Analytic Insight Net - FREE Online Tipiṭaka Research & Practice Universitu 
in
 112 CLASSICAL LANGUAGES
Paṭisambhidā Jāla-Abaddha Paripanti Tipiṭaka Anvesanā ca Paricaya Nikhilavijjālaya ca ñātibhūta Pavatti Nissāya 
http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org anto 105 Seṭṭhaganthāyatta Bhāsā
Categories:

Archives:
Meta:
December 2018
M T W T F S S
« Nov    
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31  
08/27/09
VR1 (WE ARE ONE) +ve NEWS Wealth is lost nothing is lost-ONLINE TRAINING ON PRECEPTS AND TRADE-65-How to Become Wealthy - The Insider Secrets to Become Wealthy-Health is lost something is lost INTERNATIONAL JIVAKA PRESUMPTIVE HEALTH PROTECTION (IJPHP) - Jivaka Sutta: To Jivaka (On Being a Lay Follower) translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu- Precepts (Character, morality self-discipline) is lost everything is lost- A BLUE PRINT FOR LIFE -FREE ONLINE TRAINING ON BUDDHISM FOR CHILDREN -24 The Wind-deer and the Honey-grass [The Craving for Taste] -The moral is: “It is better to eat to live, than to live to eat.”- COMPREHENSIVE PALI COURSE LESSON 10 (continued)
Filed under: General
Posted by: site admin @ 7:51 pm

VR1

(WE
ARE ONE)

+ve
NEWS

Wealth is lost nothing is lost

Health is lost something is lost

Precepts (Character, morality self-discipline) is lost
everything is lost


Wealth is lost nothing is lost

ONLINE TRAINING ON PRECEPTS AND TRADE-65


http://ezinearticles.com/?How-to-Become-Wealthy—The-Insider-Secrets-to-Become-Wealthy&id=2229347


How
to Become Wealthy - The Insider Secrets to Become Wealthy

By
Megan
Vaillancourt

How Can I
become wealthy? Many people daydream and even organize their plan of
action to obtain wealth. What do the wealthy know, and how can you use
that to help you to become wealthy?   The fact is majority of people
did not create their wealth by buying a lottery ticket, or stumbling across a
long lost relative that left them a fortune. Those that created their
riches, created it by having the right mindset, and finding the right
opportunity to create that life style.  

You want to
become wealthy; it all starts with evaluating your values, and up
bringing. Most of us were geared from a young age to believe you go to
school, get a degree and find a job.   What is wrong with this
philosophy, it is the rule of thumb we all use, but ever wonder why a small
population is wealthy.   Education is critical in all markets of
life, but most will not teach you how to create a rich life
style.  They will not give you the critical elements and teach
you how to build a business to create your own wealth. You don’t hear of a
Wealth Building Class, on the high school class
list, your core values start as young as pre-school. You can see the challenge
with many to start thinking and creating that millionaire mindset.

Become Wealthy - Your Action Game Plan

You have to
work on your core values. The rich did not become rich without stepping
out of the ordinary.   They stepped out of their safety zone, and got
rid of the nine to five rule. Majority of the high income brackets are not
working for someone else rather they are creating their own businesses, their
own products and services to prosper.

 Your Action Guide To Become Wealthy

1.) Wealth Building
Mindset Change - It all starts with you, and your thought process may have to
change a little. This is not often an easy task; as for many they have the
work ethic of a nine to five job. What the rich know is that majority of
the time that job is not going to make you rich. Start saying today, that
I want to stop working for someone else and want to make a change to improving
mine. Understand as of this moment the only one in charge of your financial
situation is you.

2.) Where Do
The Wealthy Start From - Some were born with a silver spoon in their mouth, but
there is not since crying over the fact that the silver spoon was not in your
cards. Think of some of the top millionaires, usually Donald Trump, trumps
the list. What does he do, how did he create his millions?  If
you examine the trends you will notice the majority of the wealthy, are
entrepreneurs.

3.) Where You
Are And Where You Want To Be - Okay nine chances out of ten what you are doing
now is not working. Where are you now, is their open possibilities in your
position that you are not exploring. What do you have to change in order
to become wealthy? Now most are going to fire their job, until they are
showing real profits and change. But maybe it is time to look in different
directions.

4.) Internet
Wealth - Becoming an entrepreneur and starting a successful business was more
difficult years ago. In modern times there are more platforms and avenues
to create your wealth. The worldwide web, and Internet Business start-ups
are changing people’s financial services. Compared to starting a bricks and
motor business, there are lower start up with higher returns. For
thousands each the Internet Business, or home based business industry is giving
many a road map to success, without large overhead, and large set up fees.

5.) Online
Mentoring and Coaching - Anybody who is wealthy did not  achieve those
results without finding a mentor and training platform. This is not the
type of training you can get in school, rather life methods and business
building methods needed to create wealthy. In order to obtain your wealthy
you need to align yourself with successful people. Seeking out a mentoring
or coaching team to teach you how to build a successful business, and how to
get that business to start creating your wealth is critical.

6.) Take
Action - The wealthy did not just sit on there hands and wait for the day there
life changed. They started to take action steps to become
wealthy. Start researching different avenues. Start researching
Internet Business, look for a mentoring team that can teach you how to build a
successful business. 

If you want
to become wealthy it has got to start with you.   The formula to
changing your lifestyle goes beyond wishing and wanting for a better life, it
goes toward changing your thought process, and then aligning yourself with
successful people and getting the right training towards reaching your
goals. The first step to become wealthy is to step out of your safety
zone, and reach for those goals. Are you meant to become wealthy, I do not know
and neither will you unless you start changing your mindset and breaking out of
your safety bubble to seek your own wealth.

Author: Megan
Vaillancourt has helped gives hundreds of affiliates the training and mentoring
to reach online wealth. Her Mentors 4 U
Business
Mentoring
team, has been responsible for training
new entrepreneurs on how to find their wealth online.

For More
Information on Megan and her training that has received such high recognition
for their success trainings visit her link below

Internet
Business

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Megan_Vaillancourt


Megan Vaillancourt - EzineArticles Expert Author


Health is lost something is lost

INTERNATIONAL JIVAKA
PRESUMPTIVE HEALTH PROTECTION (IJPHP)
      


Jivaka Sutta: To Jivaka

(On Being a Lay Follower)

translated from the Pali by

Thanissaro Bhikkhu

© 1997–2009

I
have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying in Rajagaha, at Jivaka’s Mango Grove. Then Jivaka
Komarabhacca went to the Blessed One and, on arrival, having bowed down, sat to
one side. As he was sitting there he said to the Blessed One: “Lord, to
what extent is one a lay follower?”

“Jivaka,
when one has gone to the Buddha for refuge, has gone to the Dhamma for refuge,
and has gone to the Sangha for refuge, then to that extent is one a lay
follower.”

“And
to what extent, lord, is one a virtuous lay follower?”

“Jivaka,
when one abstains from taking life, from stealing, from sexual misconduct, from
lying, and from fermented & distilled drinks that lead to heedlessness,
then to that extent is one a virtuous lay follower.”

“And
to what extent, lord, is one a lay follower who practices for his own benefit
but not that of others?”

“Jivaka,
when a lay follower himself is consummate in conviction but does not encourage
others in the consummation of conviction; when he himself is consummate in
virtue but does not encourage others in the consummation of virtue; when he
himself is consummate in generosity but does not encourage others in the
consummation of generosity; when he himself desires to see the monks but does
not encourage others to see the monks; when he himself wants to hear the true
Dhamma but does not encourage others to hear the true Dhamma; when he himself
habitually remembers the Dhamma he has heard but does not encourage others to
remember the Dhamma they have heard; when he himself explores the meaning of
the Dhamma he has heard but does not encourage others to explore the meaning of
the Dhamma they have heard; when he himself, knowing both the Dhamma & its
meaning, practices the Dhamma in line with the Dhamma, but does not encourage
others to practice the Dhamma in line with the Dhamma: then to that extent he
is a lay follower who practices for his own benefit but not for the benefit of
others.”

“And
to what extent, lord, is one a lay follower who practices both for his own
benefit & the benefit of others?”

“Jivaka,
when a lay follower himself is consummate in conviction and encourages others
in the consummation of conviction; when he himself is consummate in virtue and
encourages others in the consummation of virtue; when he himself is consummate
in generosity and encourages others in the consummation of generosity; when he
himself desires to see the monks and encourages others to see the monks; when
he himself wants to hear the true Dhamma and encourages others to hear the true
Dhamma; when he himself habitually remembers the Dhamma he has heard and
encourages others to remember the Dhamma they have heard; when he himself
explores the meaning of the Dhamma he has heard and encourages others to
explore the meaning of the Dhamma they have heard; when he himself, knowing
both the Dhamma & its meaning, practices the Dhamma in line with the Dhamma
and encourages others to practice the Dhamma in line with the Dhamma: then to
that extent he is a lay follower who practices both for his own benefit and for
the benefit of others.”



Precepts (Character, morality
self-discipline) is lost everything is lost


Thich Nhat Hanh

1
Do not be idolatrous about or bound to any doctrine, theory, or ideology, even
Buddhist ones. Buddhist systems of thought are guiding means; they are not
absolute truth.

2
Do not think the knowledge you presently possess is changeless, absolute truth.
Avoid being narrow minded and bound to present views. Learn and practice
nonattachment from views in order to be open to receive others’ viewpoints.
Truth is found in life and not merely in conceptual knowledge. Be ready to
learn throughout your entire life and to observe reality in yourself and in the
world at all times.

3
Do not force others, including children, by any means whatsoever, to adopt your
views, whether by authority, threat, money, propaganda, or even education.
However, through compassionate dialogue, help others renounce fanaticism and
narrow-mindedness.

4
Do not avoid suffering or close your eyes before suffering. Do not lose
awareness of the existence of suffering in the life of the world. Find ways to
be with those who are suffering, including personal contact, visits, images and
sounds. By such means, awaken yourself and others to the reality of suffering
in the world.

5
Do not accumulate wealth while millions are hungry. Do not take as the aim of
your life fame, profit, wealth, or sensual pleasure. Live simply and share
time, energy, and material resources with those who are in need.

6
Do not maintain anger or hatred. Learn to penetrate and transform them when
they are still seeds in your consciousness. As soon as they arise, turn your
attention to your breath in order to see and understand the nature of your
hatred.

7
Do not lose yourself in dispersion and in your surroundings. Practice mindful
breathing to come back to what is happening in the present moment. Be in touch
with what is wondrous, refreshing, and healing both inside and around you.
Plant seeds of joy, peace, and understanding in yourself in order to facilitate
the work of transformation in the depths of your consciousness.

8
Do not utter words that can create discord and cause the community to break.
Make every effort to reconcile and resolve all conflicts, however small.

9
Do not say untruthful things for the sake of personal interest or to impress
people. Do not utter words that cause division and hatred. Do not spread news
that you do not know to be certain. Do not criticize or condemn things of which
you are not sure. Always speak truthfully and constructively. Have the courage
to speak out about situations of injustice, even when doing so may threaten
your own safety.

10
Do not use the Buddhist community for personal gain or profit, or transform
your community into a political party. A religious community, however, should
take a clear stand against oppression and injustice and should strive to change
the situation without engaging in partisan conflicts.

11
Do not live with a vocation that is harmful to humans and nature. Do not invest
in companies that deprive others of their chance to live. Select a vocation
that helps realise your ideal of compassion.

12
Do not kill. Do not let others kill. Find whatever means possible to protect
life and prevent war.

13
Possess nothing that should belong to others. Respect the property of others,
but prevent others from profiting from human suffering or the suffering of
other species on Earth.

14
Do not mistreat your body. Learn to handle it with respect. Do not look on your
body as only an instrument. Preserve vital energies (sexual, breath, spirit)
for the realisation of the Way. (For brothers and sisters who are not monks and
nuns:) Sexual expression should not take place without love and commitment. In
sexual relations, be aware of future suffering that may be caused. To preserve
the happiness of others, respect the rights and commitments of others. Be fully
aware of the responsibility of bringing new lives into the world. Meditate on
the world into which you are bringing new beings.

From the
book ‘Interbeing’: Fourteen Guidelines for Engaged Buddhism, revised edition:
Oct. l993 by Thich Nhat Hanh, published by Parallax Press, Berkeley, California

Venerable
Thich Nhat Hanh is a Buddhist monk, poet, peace activist, and the author of
Being Peace, The Miracle of Mindfulness, and many other books. He lives in a
monastic community in south-western France called Plum Village, where he
teaches, writes, gardens, and works to help refugees world-wide. He conducts
retreats throughout the world on the art of mindful living, and has conducted
special retreats for American Vietnam War veterans, psychotherapists, artists,
environmental activists and children
.



FREE
ONLINE
TRAINING ON BUDDHISM FOR CHILDREN -24

The Wind-deer and the Honey-grass
[The Craving for Taste]

Once upon a time, the King of Benares had a gardener who looked after his pleasure
garden. Animals sometimes came into the garden from the nearby forest. The
gardener complained about this to the king, who said, “If you see any
strange animal, tell me at once.”

One day, he saw a strange kind of deer at the
far end of the garden. When he saw the man, he ran like the wind. That is why
they are called ‘wind-deer’. They are a rare breed, that are extremely timid.
They are very easily frightened by human beings.

The gardener told the king about the
wind-deer. He asked the gardener if he could catch the rare animal. He replied,
“My lord, if you give me some bee’s honey, I could even bring him into the
palace!” So the king ordered that he be given as much bee’s honey as he
wanted.

This particular wind-deer loved to eat the
flowers and fruits in the king’s pleasure garden. The gardener let himself be
seen by him little by little, so he would be less frightened. Then he began to
smear honey on the grass where the wind-deer usually came to eat. Sure enough,
the deer began eating the honey-smeared grass. Soon he developed a craving for
the taste of this ‘honey-grass’. The craving made him come to the garden every
day. Before long, he would eat nothing else!

Little by little, the gardener came closer and
closer to the wind-deer. At first, he would run away. But later, he lost his
fear and came to think the man was harmless. As the gardener became more and
more friendly, eventually he got the deer to eat the honey-grass right out of
his hand. He continued doing this for some time, in order to build up his
confidence and trust.



Meanwhile, the gardener had rows of curtains
set up, making a wide pathway from the far end of the pleasure garden to the
king’s palace. From inside this pathway, the curtains would keep the wind-deer
from seeing any people that might scare him.

When all was prepared, the gardener took a bag
of grass and a container of honey with him. Again he began hand-feeding the
wind-deer when he appeared. Gradually, he led the wind-deer into the
curtained-off pathway. Slowly, he continued to lead him with the honey-grass, until
finally the deer followed him right into the palace. Once inside, the palace
guards closed the doors, and the wind-deer was trapped. Seeing the people of
the court, he suddenly became very frightened and began running around, madly
trying to escape.

The king came down to the hall and saw the
panic-stricken wind-deer. He said, “What a wind-deer! How could he have
gotten into such a state? A wind-deer is an animal who will not return to a
place where he has so much as seen a human, for seven full days. Ordinarily, if
a wind-deer is at all frightened in a particular place, he will not return for
the whole rest of his life! But look! Even such a shy wild creature can be
enslaved by his craving for the taste of something sweet. Then he can be lured
into the center of the city and even inside the palace itself.

“My friends, the teachers warn us not to
be too attached to the place we live, for all things pass away. They say that
being too attached to a small circle of friends is confining and restricts a
broad outlook. But see how much more dangerous is the simple craving for a
sweet flavour, or any other taste sensation. See how this beautiful shy animal
was trapped by my gardener, by taking advantage of his craving for taste.”

Not wishing to harm the gentle wind-deer, the
king had him released into the forest. He never returned to the royal pleasure
garden, and he never missed the taste of honey-grass.

The moral is: “It is better to eat to live, than to live to
eat.”


A BLUE PRINT FOR LIFE



THE WAY OF

ON LOYALTY AND
FILIALNESS


THE WAY OF RSTABLISHING
ONESELF


A GATHA SAYS, “ Do not look for the Buddha on faraway

Vulture Peak; Vulture
Peak is right there in
your mind. Each

of us has a Vulture
Peak within; we should
look toward our

own Vulture
Peak to practice our cultivation.”
Loyalty and

filialness are feelings that arise from our minds, intuitive

knowledge, as well as kind of love and virtue. Loyalty and

filialness are the ethical ties that bind us together in our

relationships. Only by expressing the spirit of loyalty and

filialness, by allowing loyalty and filialness as well as

compassion and love to spread throughout time and place

can society become more orderly and our families happier.


COMPREHENSIVE PALI
COURSE
 

 

LESSON 10 (continued)


Similarly
declined are the following:

Sukhī = happy one                      Pāpakāri = evil one

Khemī = state of secured one    Puññakāri = doer of good

Bhāgī
= sharer
                            Yath
āvādi = as he says

Balī = powerful one                     Thathākāri = so he does

Sāmi = Lord                                Issukī
= envious one

Bhogī = serpent, the enjoyer     Maccharī
= mean one

Kuṭṭhī =leper                              Seṭṭhi
= millionaire,

                                                     Treasurer,
banker

Sippī = artisan

Hathī = elephant                         Kāmī
= one who desires

Karī = elephant                            Upanāni = grudging,

                                                              Spiteful

Dāṭhī = tusker                             Dhammacāri = pious one

Mantī = minister, councellor      Kāyī
= one with body

Chattī = one with umbrella        Gāmī
= goer

Cārī
= one who follows
                sasī =
moon

Kārī
= doer
                                  Anus
ārī
= one who acts

                                                     In
accordance with

Dhammakārī
= righteouds one

Kālakaṇṇī
= inauspicious one

     (lit.black-eared one)     Anuyāy ī = follower

Anupassī = contemplator  Saññ ī
= perceiver

Anurakkhī = guard, preserver   Gaī
– leader

Khaḍakāī =
demolisher
          Lobhac
āi = greedy

Chiddagavesi
= fault finder

Note: Most
of these words, declined like
Sārathī, are

Adjectives.

Nouns:

Kibbisa –
wrong, fault tec.
     Gu
ṇa = quality

Khaḍa = broken piece     Inda = Lord, king

Chidda = a
hole, fault
              Masi – ink

Dukkaṭa = wrong               Idha = here

Dvaya = two
                              Pecca =
hereafter

Sasa =
hare, rabbit
                   Satt
a = beings

Sakka =
Inda, Chief of gods
  Jana = the people

Luddha,
lolupa = greedy one

Nasaka, viddhaṁsaka = demolisher

Paccakkha =
personal experience

Sakkacca =
carefully, well, etc.

Sampajāñña
= clear comprehension

Anuttaro =
incomparable, peerless

Tathāgata =
Bearer of Truth

 

Verbs:     mud = to rejoice, be happy

                  Pañā = paññāpeti = to make
known

                  Soc = to repent, suffer

                  Bhavantu (bhū) = may tey be

                  Vuccati = is called, (passive
form of  vad = to

                  say, call)

dis = ‘dis’
is changed into ‘das’ = dasseti = to

show, to
exhibit.

Leave a Reply