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08/30/09
VR1 (WE ARE ONE) +ve NEWS-Each top unit of police will be reviewed every month, tough action will be taken against lax officers for unsatisfactory progress — C.M. C.M. reviews functioning of PAC, ATS, STF, Intelligence, Prosecution, Fire service, Transport etc. — Chief Minister-BSP to go it alone in Maharashtra-Taking API revolution forward -INTERNATIONAL JIVAKA PRESUMPTIVE HEALTH PROTECTION (IJPHP)-A tea prepared with the leaves of Tulsi is commonly used in cough,cold,mild indigestion, diminished appetite and malaise-A BLUE PRINT FOR LIFE ON MAINTAINING GOOD HEALTH THE WAY OF MEDICINE-Health is lost something is lost-ZEN AWAKENMENT IN A NUTSHELL-FREE ONLINE TRAINING ON BUDDHISM FOR CHILDREN -26-The Fawn Who Played Dead [Attendance] -The moral is: Well-learned lessons bring great rewards.
Filed under: General
Posted by: @ 6:40 am


VR1

(WE
ARE ONE)

+ve
NEWS



Press Information Bureau
(C.M. Information Campus)
Information & Public Relations Department, U.P.

Each top unit of police will be reviewed every month, tough

action will be taken against lax officers for unsatisfactory progress
— C.M.

C.M. reviews functioning of PAC, ATS, STF,
Intelligence, Prosecution, Fire service, Transport etc.
— Chief Minister

Lucknow: August 29, 2009

Reviewing the functioning of the senior officers of various top units of
police like PAC, ATS, STF, Intelligence, Prosecution, Fire service, Transport
etc. at the Yojna Bhawan here today, the Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Ms.
Mayawati said that their unit-wise works would be reviewed every month.
She warned that tough action would be taken against the officers who
could not perform as per the expectations. She directed the anti-corruption
units to take stringent action against those taking bribes and send them to
jail.

Ms. Mayawati said that during the previous review meetings, she had
warned the officers related with the law and order, that no laxity in it
would be tolerated. The district, range, zone and field officers alone were
not responsible for streamlining the law and order, but the senior police
officers of PAC, ATS, STF, Intelligence, Prosecution, Fire service, Transport
etc. were jointly responsible for law and order and their mutual
coordination was necessary and it also needed improvement, she pointed
out. She said that those leading these top units had moved up the ladder
after spending long time at the field, range and zone level. They should
lead by example and cooperate in streamlining law and order of the state,
she added. She said that today’s meeting of the heads of the various units
had been separately convened for this purpose alone.

The C.M. said that the report received by the government clearly
indicated that the senior officers heading these units needed to pull up
their socks and perform their duties with more honesty and dedication. She
said that the functioning of these officers was reviewed separately, which
indicated that these units needed to be mobilised further by their heads.
She said that U.P. was the largest state of the country population-wise.
The officers of headquarters and district should become more active to
streamline law and order because she had come to power on the issue of
law and order. Therefore, the law and order would not be compromise. She
said that the entire state had been divided into sectors and officers had
been sent to field, but they had failed.

Ms. Mayawati said that with a view to improving the working of
district police administration and streamlining the law and order, she had
decided to implement new system by abolishing the existing sector system.
A meeting with IG and DIG level police officers was held recently, where
various aspects of law and order were discussed thoroughly and they were
also given directives to streamline law and order according to the
aspirations of the people. Besides, G.O. had been issued to make local
police administration and police machinery more sensitive and helping
towards the people. She said that the senior officers of these units should
inspect the departmental works, whenever they go to districts. From now
on, the head of the each unit would be required to submit a progress
report of the same.

The C.M. said that during the two year long period of the
government, the law and order had registered a marked improvement, but
much still required to be done in this connection. She said that all the units
had been asked to submit their progress report. She said that the
performance of STF and ATS was up to the mark. She said that all other
units should also improve and give better results.

Ms. Mayawati said that if these units showed no improvement in their
functioning in the monthly review meetings, then the officers would not be
given another chance and stringent action would be taken against them
after fixing their responsibility. She warned that the officers of the units
which were lagging behind should improve their performance immediately.
She said that officers would have to perform their duties with full honesty
and dedication.

During the four and a half hour long meeting, effective pursuance of
the criminal cases was seriously discussed. Different organisations were
directed to submit their action plan for taking action against those
officers/employees who indulged in corruption within a week. The
maximum limit for the sanctioning of prosecution by the Anti Corruption,
Economic Offence Wing and Vigilance has been set up at two months, so
that such officers/employees could be brought to book. The expansion of
the works of various investigative agencies was also discussed and
directives were given to improve the quality of investigation. Orders were
given to ensure the conviction of the criminals and responsibility was also
fixed for the success of prosecution. It was also decided at the meeting
that the Principal Secretary Home would discuss the problems of various
units with their heads in the next week and ensure their solution.

The Cabinet Secretary Mr. Shashank Shekhar Singh, Chief Secretary
Mr. Atul Kumar Gupta, Additional Cabinet Secretary Mr. Vijay Shankar
Pandey, Principal Secretary Home Kunwar Fateh Bahadur, DGP Mr. Vikram
Singh, Principal Secretaries to CM, Mr. Shailesh Krishna and Mr. Ravindra
Singh and senior officers of various police units were present at the
meeting.

******
BSP to go it alone in Maharashtra

 Staff Reporter

Mumbai: Seeking to identify itself as the third alternative, the
Bahujan Samaj Party (BSP) has decided to go it alone in Maharashtra and
contest all the 288 Assembly seats.

At a recent meeting of top BSP leaders and party chief Mayawati in
Lucknow, the party decided to focus on the polls in Maharashtra and
Haryana, a press release said.

The BSP has decided to “go before the people with self-respect and not to form an alliance with anyone,” the note reads.

Maharashtra is therefore likely to see a number of rallies of the
Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister. In addition, to attract the north-Indian
vote, a team comprising Naseemuddin Siddiqui, Babu Singh Kushwaha and
Indrajit Saroj will be in Mumbai during the elections, slated for
October.

The Lucknow meeting has set an aim to bag at least 25 seats.

According to the party, this will help it grab the reins of power in the likelihood of a hung Assembly.

Conscious of the Dalit vote and the coming together of the
Republican Party of India (United) and the Left Front under the banner
of Third Front, the BSP contended that the alliance was only a grouping
of parties having a narrow reach. The BSP was therefore the sole third
alternative.

In the 2009 Lok Sabha elections, the BSP polled up to 5 per cent votes in the State.


ALMOST EVERY FRAUD
involves VICTIM

sending “CASH” money to a
Fraudster/Scammer.

ABSOLUTELY DO NOT send any money
using Western
Union
/ Moneygram. 

Always deal ONLY locally by meeting
the seller/buyer in person.

READ and UNDERSTAND the methods used
by Fraudsters in the link above.


ONLINE TRAINING ON PRECEPTS AND TRADE-67

Taking API revolution forward



A Facebook user edits his privacy settings in Ottawa, Canada.

BANGALORE: Sharing has never been this easy. Today your Internet
surfing patterns are linked to your social networking profiles, and
your social media applications are very much part of your online
avatar. So when did blogs and social networking sites make that
transition from being platforms to publish or interact to supporting a
flurry of web activities?

The growth of the Web 2.0 is inextricably linked to a trend: an
increase in the open web APIs (application programming interface).
Using the API, developers could build applications surrounding existing
services. This, in turn, enabled services such as Facebook, Google, or
Twitter to go places far beyond their imagination.

Twitter, for example, started with a simple service asking a simpler
question, “What are you doing?” to be answered in just 140 characters.
Its open API took it from being a micro-blog to a marketing tool, to a
news service, to now being a popular vehicle of information
dissemination. Because API was available, Twitter clients such as
Tweetdeck or Twhirl also sprang up around it.

Similarly Facebook (FB), which released its open stream API in
April, saw tremendous application development with 3,50,000
applications created and 15,000 websites using FB Connect.

For instance, each story/link published to FB generates 0.5 to 2
clicks back to the publishing site, points out Vishu Gupta, an engineer
at Facebook. “Connect improves user experience, and the site benefits
greatly, as it reaches out to more people and can be used to understand
user demographics,” Mr. Gupta explains.

However, services that provide APIs today walk a one-way street —
that is, while a user can publish his blog on FB, the converse is not
possible.

“This has to change to take this success story forward,” says
Kishore Bhargava, president of the Indian Linux Users Group, Delhi.
“Though API is very much part of the Open Source philosophy, today APIs
only enhance the product as envisioned by the developer. Why, for
example, can I not use the same service and share data seamlessly
across my phone, laptop and PDAs,” he asks.

The next big step is to look at open standards, so that portability
of data between hardware and websites or services is possible.

Even as more APIs are opened up — to the benefit of users,
developers, and portal owners — seamless data portability continues to
be an issue.

In the larger context of the web, these applications fragment user
data and the value they derive from it. For instance, if your social
networking site were to wind up or migrate to a different privacy
model, would you have the option of extracting your contacts, data, or
media and moving on?

Currently your postings, pictures or wall musings are all on a
one-way trip to the site that locks in your data, and denies you any
control, except for deleting it.

As more services move online, open data and interoperability across applications are the larger issues.

The debate on the openness of social networks and the need to define
or protect users’ rights to web data has been hotting up. The Data
Portability movement, and formats such as OpenID, OAuth and OpenSocial
attempt to create non-proprietary, open and interoperable blocks to
liberate the social web space, so you don’t have to reinvent yourself
every time you discover a new network.

Deconstructing ‘Internet addiction’



“There will be a big problem if people replace real world with
Internet”

 Earlier this week, the first rehabilitation centre for
‘Internet addicts’ was opened in the United States. De-addiction camps
in China were in the news recently for the death of a teenager because
of the brutal methods used there to cure ‘Internet addiction.’

‘Internet addiction’ for now is a catch-all term that not only
stands for addiction to specific activities such as gambling or gaming
but also refers to longer hours devoted to the computer network at the
expense of other activities.

Though the Internet is only a medium of communication and
information transmission like the printed book or television,
‘addiction’ is being used in this case with concern because of a
fundamental dialectic: ‘quantity becomes quality.’

“A whole new world is just a click away with the Internet. It is a
medium just like books and TV, but the amount of interaction it makes
possible with others, sometimes replacing the need for real world
interaction, makes it vastly different,” says E.S. Krishnamoorthy,
consultant neuropsychiatrist, Voluntary Health Services, Chennai.

Though chemical changes may not be induced by the broadly repetitive
action involved in gaming and general ‘Internet addiction,’ social
behavioural modifications do take place, including sleep deprivation
and aggression towards the depriver of access to the Internet, he says.

“It is somewhat between Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and
addiction due to substance abuse. Substance abuse-led addiction
focusses on gratification which this form of attachment provides,
though there is no chemical ingestion. At the same time, the
behavioural modifications are similar to those with OCD. It is almost
like the ‘rush’ gamblers get out of a purely gratification-oriented
repetitive action,” Dr. Krishnamoorthy adds.


Generational gap

Sunil Abraham, director-policy, Centre for Internet and Society,
Bangalore, says what constitutes ‘Internet addiction’ is sometimes
misunderstood because of a generational gap between those who grew up
immersed in technology and those who adopted technology later in their
lives.

Can a teenager’s extensive use of social networking be categorised
as ‘addiction’? Not necessarily. Social networking could lead to
forging new relationships which could be beneficial.

For now, such activities may not be the norm, but it could be the way our society is configured in the future, says Mr. Abraham.

The Internet itself offers solutions to balance your real and
virtual activities. For instance, ‘Freedom’ is an application that
disables networking on an Apple computer for up to eight hours at a
time. In the settings of Google mail, you can enable ‘Email addict’ (a
Google Labs feature) that disables your screen and makes you invisible
on chat for 15 minutes. There are many such timer software that let you
set a period for which a certain activity would be banned.

Dr. Krishnamoorthy advocates counselling and concerted effort to
increase real world social interactions for “treating” Internet
addiction. He warns that the problem is larger in that we are creating
an “inward-looking society.”

“There is a big problem on hand if many people replace the real
world with the Internet instead of using it as a device to enhance
interactions,” he says.

Mr. Abraham says controls should come from a more open and informed
discussion, of which even children are a part. Dubbing an activity not
fully understood an “addiction” and imposing old-fashioned controls are
not the right approach, he adds
.

Wealth
is lost nothing is lost



INTERNATIONAL JIVAKA
PRESUMPTIVE HEALTH PROTECTION (IJPHP)


Surajbala Exports Private Limited


Common Name : Tulsi
Plant Parts Used : Leaves, Seeds
and Root

Description of OCIMUM
SANCTUM
:
Tulsi plant, is a shrub reaching a height of 0.5 to 1.5 m. The leaves are 2-4
cms in length. There are several varieties of the plant. However, commonly used
one is with dark leaves.The inflorescence is a long spike with tiny purple
flowers.

Characteristics and Constituents :
The leaves contain an essential oil which has been studied with gas
chromatography. The oil contains eugenol, eugenal, carvacrol, methyl-chavicol,
limatrol and caryophylline. The seeds contain an oil composed of fatty acids
and sitosterol. The mucilage is compared of sugars - xylose and polysaccharides.

Actions and Uses of OCIMUM
SANCTUM
:
Antimicrobial activity of the essential oil has been shown against M.
tuberculosis and Staph aureus in vitro and other bacteria and fungi. Eugenol
and methyleugenol showed a positive activity. Adaptogenic (antistress) activity
has been found in mice and rats. The plant increased the physical endurance and
prevented stress-induced ulcers. In general pharmacology the aqueous extract
showed hypotensive activity and inhibited the smooth muscle contraction induced
by acetylcholine, carbachol and histamine. It also potentiated the
hexobarbitone sleeping time. Protective action against histamine-induced
bronchospasm has been shown in animals.


A tea prepared with the leaves of Tulsi is commonly used in cough,cold,mild
indigestion, diminished appetite and malaise.The solid extract of Tulsi, in a
dose of 500 mg x 3 for one week, significantly relieved the breathlessness in
20 patients with tropical eosinophilia. There was however no reduction in the
eosinophil count in peripheral blood. It is commonly used with black pepper in
bronchial asthma. An oil exlacted from Tulsi is used as drops in ear
infections. Fungal and bacterial infections of skin are treated with Tulsi juice.
The seeds are used as a general tonic.


The fresh leaves are taken as prasad by millions of Indians for many years. The
powdered leaves, 5-27 g per day were taken by 120 patients for 3 months. The
only side effect was constipation. In animals, with large dose of an extract,
antispermatogenic activity has been shown.

A tea
prepared with the leaves of Tulsi is commonly used in cough,cold,mild
indigestion, diminished appetite and malaise



A BLUE PRINT FOR LIFE


ON MAINTAINING GOOD HEALTH

THE WAY OF MEDICINE

          

To cure
illness, medicinal scince emphasizes cures

Involving food and drink, physics, chemistry, psychology,

environment, climate, and medicine. Buddhism does not only

incorporates normal medical science but also emphasizes the

elimination of   the three poisons of greed, anger, and

ignorance. Diseases of the mind require medicines for the

mind. Harmonizing the health of body and mind is the only

way to true health. This includes the above mentioned:
eating

and drinking moderately, paying homage and repenting,

chanting mantras and Buddha’s name, practicing

meditation, being mindful of breathing to achieve the state

of stoping delusion and seeing truth, making progress

optimistically, freeing the mind from cares and being at
ease

and calming oneself.


Health is lost something is lost


ZEN AWAKENMENT IN A NUTSHELL

“Late one night a female Zen adept was carrying water
in an old wooden bucket when she happened to glance across the surface of the
water and saw the reflection of the moon. As she walked the bucket began to
come apart and the bottom of the pail broke through, with the water suddenly
disappearing into the soil beneath her feet and the moon’s reflection
disappearing along with it. In that instant the young woman realized that the
moon she had been looking at was just a reflection of the real thing…just as
her whole life had been. She turned to look at the moon in all it’s silent
glory, her mind was ripe, and that was it…Awakenment.”

CHIYONONO MOON, NO WATER



FREE
ONLINE
TRAINING ON BUDDHISM FOR CHILDREN -26


The Fawn Who Played Dead
[Attendance]

Once upon a time, there was a herd of forest
deer. In this herd was a wise and respected teacher, cunning in the ways of
deer. He taught the tricks and strategies of survival to the young fawns.

One day, his younger sister brought her son to
him, to be taught what is so important for deer. She said, “Oh brother
teacher, this is my son. Please teach him the tricks and strategies of
deer.” The teacher said to the fawn, “Very well, you can come at this
time tomorrow for your first lesson.”

The young deer came to the lessons as he was
supposed to. When others cut classes to spend all day playing, he remained and
paid attention to the good teacher. He was well-liked by the other young bucks
and does, but he only played when his class work was complete. Being curious to
learn, he was always on time for the lessons. He was also patient with the
other students, knowing that some learn more quickly than others. He respected
the teacher deer for his knowledge, and was grateful for his willingness to
share it.

One day, the fawn stepped in a trap in the
forest and was captured. He cried out in great pain. This frightened the other
fawns, who ran back to the herd and told his mother. She was terrified, and ran
to her brother the teacher. Trembling with fear, crying big tears, she said to him,
“Oh my dear brother, have you heard the news that my son has been trapped
by a hunter’s snare? How can I save my little child’s life? Did he study well
in your presence?”

Her brother said, “My sister, don’t be
afraid. I have no doubt he will be safe. He studied hard and always did his
very best. He never missed a class and always paid attention. Therefore, there
is no need to have doubt or pain in your heart. He will not be hurt by any
human being. Don’t worry. I am confident he will return to you and make you
happy again. He has learned all the tricks and strategies used by deer to cheat
the hunters. So be patient. He will return!”

Meanwhile, the trapped fawn was thinking,
“All my friends were afraid and ran away. There is no one to help me get
out of this deadly trap. Now I must use the tricks and strategies I learned
from the wise teacher who taught so well.”

The deer strategy he decided to use was the
one called, “playing dead.” First, he used his hoofs to dig up the
dirt and grass, to make it look like he had tried very
hard to escape. Then he relieved his bowels and released his urine, because
this is what happens when a deer is caught in a trap and dies in very great
fear. Next, he covered his body with his own saliva.

Lying stretched out on his side, he held his
body rigidly and stiffened his legs out straight. He turned up his eyes, and
let his tongue hang out of the side of his mouth. He filled his lungs with air
and puffed out his belly. Finally, with his head leaning on one side, he
breathed through the nostril next to the ground, not through the upper one.

Lying motionless, he looked so much like a
stiff corpse that flies flew around him, attracted by the awful smells. Crows
stood nearby waiting to eat his flesh.

Before long it was early morning and the
hunter came to inspect his traps. Finding the fawn who was playing dead, he
slapped the puffed up belly and found it stiff. Seeing the flies and the mess
he thought, “Ah, it has already started to stiffen. He must have been
trapped much earlier this morning. No doubt the tender meat is already starting
to spoil. I will skin and butcher the carcass right here, and carry the meat
home.”

Since he completely believed the deer was dead, he removed and cleaned the
trap, and began spreading leaves to make a place to do the butchering.
Realizing he was free, the fawn suddenly sprang to his feet. He ran like a
little cloud blown by a swift wind, back to the comfort and safety of his
mother. The whole herd celebrated his survival, thanks to learning so well from
the wise teacher.

The moral is: Well-learned lessons bring great rewards.

comments (0)
08/28/09
VR1 (WE ARE ONE) +ve NEWS-Maya re-elected BSP president-Dharna over price rise-policy of “Sarvjan hitaya sarvjan sukhaya” was a success-The system of collecting financial assistance on my birthday will be stopped from next year-Mayawati-Creating Online Success Learn To Build and Market Your Business Effectively ONLINE TRAINING ON PRECEPTS AND TRADE-66-Wealth is lost nothing is lost-Jivaka INTERNATIONAL JIVAKA PRESUMPTIVE HEALTH PROTECTION (IJPHP) -Health is lost something is lost-The Precepts-A BLUE PRINT FOR LIFE ON LIFE & HAPPINESS THE WAY OF OWNERSHIP-Precepts (Character, morality self-discipline) is lost everything is lost- INTERNATIONAL SEMINAR ON “UNIVERSAL MESSAGE OF BUDDHISM WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO PALI LITERATURE”-COMPREHENSIVE PALI COURSE LESSON 10 Exercise 1
Filed under: General
Posted by: @ 7:34 pm


VR1

(WE
ARE ONE)

+ve
NEWS

Wealth is lost nothing is lost

Health is lost something is lost




BSP MAYAWATI’s  policy of “Sarvjan hitaya sarvjan sukhaya”
will be a total success like OBAMA’s. Its just a matter of time.

Maya re-elected BSP president

The national executive of the BSP on Wednesday unanimously


`elected’ chief minister Mayawati as its president.

The meeting was called to discuss party’s strategy for forthcoming

assembly elections in Harayana and Maharashtra. The meeting will


continue on Thursday and will also discuss the strategy for the


by-elections for 11 assembly seats and a parliamentary seat in UP. All


the party office-bearers, legislators and members of parliament have


been invited to take part in the meeting which is also likely to


finalise the names of the candidates for by-elections.

Maya was first elected party president in 2006. She had then succeeded

party’s founder president Kanshiram. However, when Kanshiram started


keeping unwell, he decided to hand over the charge to second in


command, Mayawati. After Kanshiram’s death, Maya is undisputed leader


of the BSP.


“The system of collecting financial assistance on my birthday will be stopped from next year,” Mayawati said while issuing directives to

partymen during BSP’s two-day national convention that started here


yesterday.


The BSP supremo said that now the party’s membership fee will be


increased to Rs 40 which will be collected through a special campaign


between January 1 to March 31 every year.


Dharna over price rise


Ms. Mayawati’s unanimous election was endorsed by all-India delegates

at the convention. The party decided to hold a dharna and
demonstrations against the Congress-led UPA government for the
spiralling prices and to expose the Congress’ links with
industrialists. The agitation would be held in all the States.

Ms. Mayawati assured the delegates that the BSP movement would be
taken to its logical goal.

“Policy a success”

She said the policy of “Sarvjan hitaya sarvjan sukhaya” was a success
in U.P., and it was time to extend it to the rest of the country.

Ms. Mayawati declared that she would endeavour to fulfil the
aspirations of personalities such as Jyotiba Phule, Shahuji Maharaj,
Narayana Guru, Bhim Rao Ambedkar, and Kanshi Ram, who strived for a
society based on equality.

Referring to the coming Assembly elections in Haryana and Maharashtra,
she said there was a great opportunity for the BSP to strive for
success.

She also touched upon the party’s performance in the recent Assembly
by-polls in U.P.


Maharashtra on Mayawati’s radar

Lucknow: For the next round of assembly elections, Mayawati has her

eyes set on two states — Maharashtra and Haryana. Apart from


spreading the Bahujan Samaj Party’s wings outside Uttar Pradesh, she


aims to establish the party as a major challenger to the Congress


which rules both these states.



The BSP leader unveiled her party’s strategy at a meeting at her


residence in Lucknow on Wednesday. According to a source, she called


upon leaders from both states to use this opportunity to mount a


credible challenge to the Congress.



The BSP has been making its presence felt in Maharashtra, especially


in the Vidarbha and Marathwada regions.

Today, Mayawati is banking on the 11% SC/ST population, which was traditionally with

the Congress until Sharad Pawar’s Nationalist Congress Party (NCP)


managed to woo the Republican Party of India (RPI). Now the BSP is out


to dent this vote bank.

In Haryana, the BSP made huge inroads in the last Lok Sabha election,

getting 16% of the vote, second only to the Congress. It also stood


second in two Lok Sabha constituencies.

Now, the BSP has joined hands with Haryana Janhit Congress (HJC) chief

and three-time chief minister Bhajan Lal. Under this arrangement, the


BSP will contest 40 of the 90 seats in the state.

 ALMOST EVERY FRAUD involves
VICTIM

sending “CASH” money to a
Fraudster/Scammer.

ABSOLUTELY DO NOT send any money
using Western
Union
/ Moneygram. 

Always deal ONLY locally by meeting
the seller/buyer in person.

READ and UNDERSTAND the methods used
by Fraudsters in the link above.


Creating Online Success
Learn To Build and Market Your Business Effectively

ONLINE TRAINING ON PRECEPTS AND TRADE-66

SEO
Training The Beginners Guide To Link Building

 

Over the last 8
ears our SEO training classes have changed.  That has a large part in the
fact that search engine optimization techniques change.  Google, Yahoo,
MSN and other search engines are changing the way they rank sites.  The
fact is what worked yesterday, may not work today.    It is
critical to insure consistent tracking is being completed to stay on top of the
current trends.

 

One of major aspect
that has changed is link building, and back linking.  Years ago the
research in this area took a long time, and then gathering the information to
link to took even longer.  But with modern tools and resource you can h
ave Your Net
Biz 
 website receiving quality back
links.
   

 

In our business
mentoring
 for YourNetBiz and My
Internet Business
 we are consistently testing
new software’s, and material in the link-building niche.  This is one of
the most effective ways to get your site seen in your niche.  Do this
right and you page will follow inclusion, do this wrong and you site will never
be seen on the first 5 pages.

 

Top Direct Sales Companies Focus on the below linking and back linking strategies. 
As you advance there are additional steps to master, however for those that are
seeking to get started, this is a great resource.

 

1.)  Social Book Marketing Sites – Sign up for social book marking
Sites.  Some good ones are Del.i.cous, Digg, Google Book Marks are good
sites to start with

2.) 
Yahoo Answers – Ask a Question on Yahoo
answers.  Make sure not to spam or abuse the network.   Read the
regulations

3.) 
Forums – Use forums to comment.  In
addition it’s a great place to network, but while you can’t actively promote
you signature line can contain your URL

4.) 
Press Releases – Press Releases have multiple
purposes.  One to get targeted traffic to
your
Internet Business
 site, and it is a great
resource for back links

5.) 
Articles – Write articles, and become an expert
in your niche.  While you can’t promote links in body, you can use the
resource box to promote you and or your product or niche

6.) 
Videos – Video marketing is a great way to get
more exposure.  In the description section also include your link

7.) 
Directories – Find high page rank
directories.  DMOX, Yahoo Directories, etc

8.) 
Comments On Blogs – Find Blogs in your niche and
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ON WEALTH

 

THE WAY OF FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

As long as it is clean wealth and in accordance with

right occupation  and
livelihood, then the more better.

As long as it is beneficial to the people, society, and the

economy , and as long as the occupation – such as farming,

manufacturing, business, or banking – adds to the happiness

and prosperity of life, Buddhists should participate. Having

money is not shameful, but poverty can lead to evil.

Wealth
is lost nothing is lost

http://www.zhaxizhuoma.net/IMAGES/BUDDHAS/medicineBuddha864.jpghttp://www.ancientmassage.com/images/jivaka.jpg


Jivaka

INTERNATIONAL JIVAKA
PRESUMPTIVE HEALTH PROTECTION (IJPHP)

Prince
Abhaya, the son of King Bimbisara, was riding through the city when he saw a
flock of crows circling and cawing loudly around a small bundle. Stopping his
carriage, he investigated the sound and found a newborn baby boy who had been
left to die amongst the garbage on the roadside. Upon inquiry he learned that a
courtesan had discarded her illegitimate son whom she felt was a burden, and
had left him to die
.

Prince
Abhaya was transfused with compassion for the newborn babe that still clung to
life despite its ugly surroundings. He decided to adopt the baby as his own.
The baby was named Jivaka Komara Bhacca – Jivaka, meaning ‘life’, because of
his will to live, and Komara Bhacca, which meant ‘adopted by a prince’
.

Jivaka led
a privileged life in the palace. His friends, however, often teased him as he
had no mother. Jivaka, who was embarrassed by the teasing, questioned his
father about his origin. When he heard about his origins and his will to live
he decided that he would one day grow up to be a preserver of life. He felt
that he had no real heritage or family as he was only the adopted son of the
prince. Physicians, however, were treated with great respect. Determined to
earn the respect he felt he lacked due to his birth, Jivaka decided to go to
the University of
Taxila to become a
physician.

Jivaka
approached Disapamok, a well-known scholar, for his training. At this time
Sakka, the King of the Heavens, was observing the world. He realized that it
was time for Jivaka, who had in past births aspired to be the physician of the
Buddha, to begin his training. Sakka, however, wanted to ensure that Jivaka had
more than just the best training available in India. This was the young man who
would have the privilege to be the physician of the Buddha. Sakka decided to
take a hand in the training of young Jivaka so that he would have celestial
knowledge in the art of medicine. With this in view, He entered the body of
Disapamok. Jivaka excelled in his studies. Disapamok, however, soon realized
that the training that he was providing was being influenced by celestial
beings. The knowledge that was being imparted through him far excelled his
knowledge of medicine. Jivaka quickly learned medicines and cures of which
Disapamok himself
had no knowledge. Jivaka completed in seven years the physicians
training which usually took eleven years.

Realizing
that Jivaka’s education was complete, Disapamok asked him to go forth and bring
back a plant, herb or root that could not be used for medicinal purposes for
the preservation of life. After travelling far and wide Jivaka returned to his
teacher to inform him that no such plant, herb, or root existed. All of
nature’s treasures were beneficial for the preservation of life. The joyous
teacher then praised his pupil by informing him that his education was
complete. Jivaka had surpassed his teacher in knowledge.

Jivaka
decided to go back to Rajagaha to his adoptive father. On the way he stopped to
rest in a city named Saletha. He soon heard that the young daughter of the
city’s wealthiest nobleman was sick. Despite the ministering of many well-known
physicians, she had suffered from severe headaches for seven years. Jivaka
approached the nobleman, as he was confident that he could cure the maiden. The
maiden, however, was not impressed by the very young man who claimed he could
cure her when older, well-known physicians had failed. Offering his services
for free, Jivaka continued to declare boldly that he could cure her.

Gathering
herbs and roots, Jivaka prepared the medicine which he then administered to her
through her nostrils. Before long the maiden’s headaches disappeared. The
grateful nobleman showered Jivaka with gifts and gold and provided him with a
golden chariot. Jivaka approached Prince Abhaya’s palace in great style.

Handing
over his newly earned wealth to his adoptive father, Jivaka thanked him for his
love, compassion, and caring. Prince Abhaya, however, returned all the wealth
to Jivaka and informed him that he owed him naught as he was his true son and
heir. He then told him that during his absence he had found out the full story
of his origin. His mother, Salawathi, was the sought-after courtesan of the
kings and nobility. Wanting to retain her freedom, she had discarded the baby
whom she felt would be a burden to her. Prince Abhaya had unknowingly adopted
his own child as he had loved his son dearly even prior to knowing that he was
in fact his own child. Prince Abhaya built a palace to serve as Jivaka’s
residence and provided him with many servants
.

Jivaka’s
second patient was none other than his own grandfather, King Bimbisara. The
king had a huge growth in his stomach that bled from time to time on his royal
robe. So prominent was the growth that his consorts had started to tease the
king by saying that he was with child. The king had been treated by all the
great physicians of the country to no avail. Prince Abhaya informed Jivaka of
his grandfather’s plight.

Diagnosing
the disease sight unseen, Jivaka immediately prepared the suitable medicine.
Then hiding it on his person, he visited the king. After examining the king he
administered the medicine that he had brought with him. Before long the king’s
growth shrank and his wound healed. The grateful king called his entourage of
five hundred consorts who had teased him unmercifully by asking if his
first-born was to be a boy or a girl, and commanded them to give all their
jewellery as a gift to Jivaka. Before long a mound of precious jewellery higher
than Jivaka himself was placed at his feet. However, Jivaka refused this
payment and requested permission from the king to return the ornaments back to
his consorts. Even more impressed by Jivaka’s deportment, the king showered him
with wealth, gifted him with the royal mango grove and made him the royal
physician.

Jivaka’s
reputation as a great physician grew quickly. He was the physician of kings,
noblemen and the Buddha. The text mentions that he operated and successfully
removed two tumours from the brain of a rich merchant who was a good friend of
King Bimbisara. He also operated successfully to remove a blockage in the
intestines of a nobleman. In one instance when the Buddha was afflicted with
stomach problems, Jivaka prepared the medicine, and applying it on a blue lotus
flower, offered it to the Buddha. Jivaka then asked the Buddha to inhale the
essence emanating from the flower. The medicine which Jivaka had prepared with
devotion and presented so beautifully, cured the Buddha’s stomach ailment.

Jivaka had
in one instance risked his life to attend a very cruel and vicious king named
Chanda Pradyotha. One of the King Pradyotha’s subjects had offered him a shawl
that had been dropped by a Deva in the forest. Admiring the very beautiful
shawl, the king had reflected that he should gift it to Jivaka who had risked
his life to save him. Jivaka, however, felt that there was only one person
worthy of such a shawl. He in turn offered it to the Buddha. The Buddha
accepted the celestial shawl and, as requested by Jivaka, dispensed a sermon on
the giving of robes. After listening to the discourse, Jivaka attained the
first stage of awakenment, Sotapanna. The Buddha felt that keeping such a
valuable shawl in the monastery would attract thieves, which would endanger His
monks. Addressing ananda, he requested that the shawl be cut into strips and
resewn so that it would be of little value to thieves. This custom of wearing
patched garments still remains among the Sangha. Even their new robes are made
of strips of material that are sewn together so that even the robe they wear
would help them in the practice of non-attachment.

Jivaka
built a monastery in his mango grove so that he could be close to the Buddha
when attending to His needs. It was Jivaka who attended to the Buddha’s foot
when it was cut by the sliver of rock that Devadatta rolled down the hill at
Gijjhakuta. It was also Jivaka who treated the Buddha in His last days, when He
was overcome by stomach pains.

The Buddha
said:

“Taking
life, beating, cutting, binding, stealing, lying, fraud, deceit, pretence at
knowledge, adultery; this is uncleanliness.

When
men are rough and harsh, backbiting, treacherous, without compassion, haughty,
ungenerous and do not give anything to anybody; this is uncleanliness.

Anger,
pride, obstinacy, antagonism, hypocrisy, envy, ostentation, pride of opinion,
interacting with the unrighteous; this is uncleanliness.

When
men are of bad morals, refuse to pay their debts, are slanderers, deceitful in
their dealings, pretenders, when the vilest of men commit foul deeds; this is
uncleanliness

When
men attack living beings either because of greed or hostility and are always
bent upon evil, they go to darkness after death and fall headlong into hell;
this is uncleanliness.

The
Buddha’s teaching is known as the middle path. He did not go to extremes or
command anyone to do anything. While he gave permission for His monks to be
vegetarians if they so wished.

Buddhists
should also refrain from killing, instigating others to kill or from a
livelihood that involves the breeding of animals for killing Neither should one
discourage those who have chosen to refrain from eating meat. A balanced diet
can be achieved without meat. Many Buddhists have opted to become vegetarians
as it assists them in the practice of loving-kindness.

It was also
at Jivaka’s request that the Buddha established that monks should sweep the
compound of the monastery and attend to other duties that would exercise their
bodies. Jivaka, seeing the benefit of exercise for a healthy life, requested
this and other mild duties to be performed by the monks to ensure their health.
With foresight, love and compassion the devoted Jivaka took care of the
physical health of the Buddha and His Sangha.

Blue Lotus Attar

Health is lost something is lost


Buddha Carvings

The precepts
are a condensed form of Buddhist ethical practice. They are often compared with
the ten commandments of Christianity, however, the precepts are different in
two respects: First, they are to be taken as recommendations, not commandments.
This means the individual is encouraged to use his/her own intelligence to
apply these rules in the best possible way. Second, it is the spirit of the precepts
-not the text- that counts, hence, the guidelines for ethical conduct must be
seen in the larger context of the Eightfold Path.

The first
five precepts are mandatory for every Buddhist, although the fifth precept is
often not observed, because it bans the consumption of alcohol. Precepts no.
six to ten are laid out for those in preparation for monastic life and for
devoted lay people unattached to families. The eight precepts put together
number eight and nine and omit the tenth. Lay people may observe the eight
precepts on Buddhist festival days. Ordained Theravada monks undertake no less
than 227 precepts, which are not listed here.

I undertake
to observe the precept to abstain from …

  1. …harming living beings.
  2. …taking things not freely given.
  3. …sexual misconduct.
  4. …false speech.
  5. …intoxicating drinks and drugs causing heedlessness.
  6. …taking untimely meals.
  7. …dancing, singing, music and watching grotesque mime.
  8. …use of garlands, perfumes and personal adornment.
  9. …use of high seats.
  10. …accepting gold or silver.

(adapted from The Word of the Buddha, Niyamatolika, The
Buddhist Publication Society, 1971, p xii)

The above
phrasing of the precepts is very concise and leaves much open to
interpretation. One might ask, for example, what exactly constitutes false
speech, what are untimely meals, what constitutes sexual misconduct, or whether
a glass of wine causes heedlessness. And, the grotesque mime watching of the
seventh precept sounds perhaps a bit outdated. The Buddhist master Thich Nath
Hanh has formulated The Five Mindfulness Trainings, which are an adaptation of
the first five Buddhist precepts. These are practised by Buddhists of the Lam
Te Dhyana school. By virtue of their sensible phrasing and their relevance to
modern lifestyle, these “trainings” provide a valuable foundation of
ethics for all of humanity.

The Five Mindfulness Trainings
(according to Thich Nath Hanh, www.plumvillage.org)

-First
Training-

Aware of the
suffering caused by the destruction of life, I am committed to cultivating
compassion and learning ways to protect the lives of people, animals, plants,
and minerals. I am determined not to kill, not to let others kill, and not to
condone any act of killing in the world, in my thinking, and in my way of life.

-Second Training-

Aware of the
suffering caused by exploitation, social injustice, stealing, and oppression, I
am committed to cultivate loving kindness and learn ways to work for the
well-being of people, animals, plants, and minerals. I am committed to practice
generosity by sharing my time, energy, and material resources with those who
are in real need. I am determined not to steal and not to possess anything that
should belong to others. I will respect the property of others, but I will
prevent others from profiting from human suffering or the suffering of other
species on Earth.

-Third
Training-

Aware of the
suffering caused by sexual misconduct, I am committed to cultivate
responsibility and learn ways to protect the safety and integrity of
individuals, couples, families, and society. I am determined not to engage in
sexual relations without love and a long-term commitment. To preserve the
happiness of myself and others, I am determined to respect my commitments and
the commitments of others. I will do everything in my power to protect children
from sexual abuse and to prevent couples and families from being broken by
sexual misconduct.

-Fourth
Training-

Aware of the
suffering caused by unmindful speech and the inability to listen to others, I
am committed to cultivate loving speech and deep listening in order to bring
joy and happiness to others and relieve others of their suffering. Knowing that
words can create happiness or suffering, I am committed to learn to speak
truthfully, with words that inspire self-confidence, joy, and hope. I am
determined not to spread news that I do not know to be certain and not to
criticise or condemn things of which I am not sure. I will refrain from
uttering words that can cause division or discord, or that can cause the family
or the community to break. I will make all efforts to reconcile and resolve all
conflicts, however small.

-Fifth
Training-

Aware of the
suffering caused by unmindful consumption, I am committed to cultivate good
health, both physical and mental, for myself, my family, and my society by
practising mindful eating, drinking, and consuming. I am committed to ingest
only items that preserve peace, well-being, and joy in my body, in my
consciousness, and in the collective body and consciousness of my family and society.
I am determined not to use alcohol or any other intoxicant or to ingest foods
or other items that contain toxins, such as certain TV programs, magazines,
books, films, and conversations. I am aware that to damage my body or my
consciousness with these poisons is to betray my ancestors, my parents, my
society, and future generations. I will work to transform violence, fear,
anger, and confusion in myself and in society by practising a diet for myself
and for society. I understand that a proper diet is crucial for
self-transformation and for the transformation of society.




A BLUE PRINT FOR LIFE


ON LIFE & HAPPINESS

 

THE WAY OF OWNERSHIP


In addition to managing time,
fighting for time.

and  using  time for things beneficial to society and to
extending

one’s own life span, we should be diligent in creating
lasting

beautiful language, good morals, incorruptible culture,

illustrious enterprises, firm faith, pure wisdom, eternal
virtue,

and collective life. Only in this way can we truly “have”

happiness and long life.

FIVE  MINUTES  ON  BUDDHA’S  TEACHING

 
Lesson 8
 
Lesson 7 had concluded with the diagnosis and cure for illness
with the Eightfold Path. The Buddha taught the Eightfold Path as the
Middle path, avoiding the extremes of sensual pleasures and
self-mortification. The Middle Path is a righteous way of life which
does not advocate the acceptance of decrees given by someone outside
oneself. A person practises the Middle Path, the guide for moral
conduct, not out of fear of any supernatural agency, but out of the
intrinsic value in following such an action. He chooses this
self-imposed discipline for a definite end in view: self-purification.

The Eightfold Path can be compared to a road map. Just
as a traveler will need a map to lead him to his destination, we all
need the Eightfold Path which shows us how to attain self purification.
To attain self- purification, there are three aspects of the Eightfold
path to be developed by the devotee. He has to develop Sila (Morality),
Samadhi (Mental Culture) and Panna (Wisdom). While the three must be
developed simultaneously, the intensity with which any one area is to
be practised varies according to a person’s own spiritual development.
A devotee must first develop his morality, that is, his actions should
bring good to other living beings. He does this by faithfully adhering
to the precepts of abstaining from killing, slandering, stealing,
becoming intoxicated or being lustful. As he develops his morality, his
mind will become more easily controlled, enabling him to develop his
powers of concentration. Finally, with the development of
concentration, wisdom will arise.

 The Eightfold Path consists of the following eight factors:

Sila (Morality)

Right Speech

Right Action

Right Livelihood

Samadhi (Mental Culture)

Right Effort

Right Mindfulness

Right Concentration

Panna (Wisdom)

Right Understanding

Right Thoughts

                                                                                                                             

                                                                            Dr Sri K. Dhammananda

P.P. Lakshman
August 28, ‘09 

Email: pplakshmann08@ gmail.com
Tel: 917-664-6566


FREE ONLINE TRAINING
ON BUDDHISM FOR CHILDREN-25

The
Fawn Who Played Hooky

[Truancy]

Once upon a time, there was a herd of forest deer. In this herd
was a wise and respected teacher, cunning in the ways of deer. He taught the
tricks and strategies of survival to the young fawns.

One day, his younger sister brought her son to him, to be taught
what is so important for deer. She said, “Oh brother teacher, this is my
son. Please teach him the tricks and strategies of deer.” The teacher said
to the fawn, “Very well, you can come at this time tomorrow for your first
lesson.”

At first, the young deer came to the lessons as he was supposed
to. But soon, he became more interested in playing with the other young bucks
and does. He didn’t realize how dangerous it could be for a deer who learned
nothing but deer games. So he started cutting classes. Soon he was playing
hooky all the time.

Unfortunately, one day the fawn who played hooky stepped in a
snare and was trapped. Since he was missing, his mother worried. She went to
her brother the teacher, and asked him, “My dear brother, how is my son?
Have you taught your nephew the tricks and strategies of deer?”

The teacher replied, “My dear sister, your son was
disobedient and unteachable. Out of respect for you, I tried my best to teach
him. But he did not want to learn the tricks and strategies of deer. He played
hooky! How could I possibly teach him? You are obedient and faithful, but he is
not. It is useless to try to teach him.”

Later they heard the sad news. The stubborn fawn who played
hooky had been trapped and killed by a hunter. He skinned him and took the meat
home to his family.

The moral is: Nothing can be learned from a
teacher, by one who misses the class.

Precepts (Character, morality
self-discipline) is lost everything is lost


INTERNATIONAL SEMINAR ON
“UNIVERSAL MESSAGE OF BUDDHISM
WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO
PALI LITERATURE”


International Seminar on “Universal Message of Buddhism with
special Reference to Pali Literature” will be organized by Rashtriya
Sanskrit
Sansthan, New Delhi from 22nd September, 2009 to 24th Sept., 2009 at
Vigyan Bhavan, New Delhi. The programme will include special
exhibitions, Discourses on Vipassana and presentations by eminent Scholars



A Permanent Online International Seminar on Buddhism and
Buddhist Heritage of Jambudvipa that is the Great Prabuddha Bharath


COMPREHENSIVE PALI
COURSE
 

 

LESSON 10


Exercise 1


Translate into English

  1. Buddho Dhammacārīnaṁ saccaññīna

devānañaṁ manussānañca Anuttaro Sārathi.

 

The Awakened One is the Peere Less Guide for

righteous and truth-perceiving gods and men.

 

  1. Sabbe sattā sukhino bhavantu khemino hontu,

Dhammānurakkhino hontu iti Budhassa
Bhagavato

Anuyāyino mettā-bhāvanaṁ bhāventi.

 

“May all
beings become happy ones! May

They become
secures! May they be preservers of Truth!

Thus the
followers of the Lord, the Awakened One,

practice
the meditation and Universal Love.

 

  1. Sāriputto-Moggallāno
    sama
    āna
    balino gaṇino

ahesuṁ. Te Dhammasāmino Bhagavantassa

Buddhassa Dhammānuyāyīno ahesuṁ.

 

Sariputta and Moggallana were powerful leaders of

The monks; they were devout followers of the Lord

Of Truth, The Awakened One, the Blessed One.

 

  1. kālakṇṇīnaṁ manussānaṁ puññakārī kātu

Buddhasāvakā
yeva sakkaccakārino mantino honti.

 

To make righteous of unfortunate men only the

Disciples of the Awakened one become zealous

councilors.

  1. Idha socati, pecca socati, pāpakāri ibhayattha socati;

idha modati, puññakārī sabbattha

modati.

 

He repents here, he repents hereafter, the evil-doer

Repents in both worlds; he rejoices here, he rejoices

Hereafter, the doer of good rejoices everywhere.

—-

comments (0)
08/27/09
VR1 (WE ARE ONE) +ve NEWS Wealth is lost nothing is lost-ONLINE TRAINING ON PRECEPTS AND TRADE-65-How to Become Wealthy - The Insider Secrets to Become Wealthy-Health is lost something is lost INTERNATIONAL JIVAKA PRESUMPTIVE HEALTH PROTECTION (IJPHP) - Jivaka Sutta: To Jivaka (On Being a Lay Follower) translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu- Precepts (Character, morality self-discipline) is lost everything is lost- A BLUE PRINT FOR LIFE -FREE ONLINE TRAINING ON BUDDHISM FOR CHILDREN -24 The Wind-deer and the Honey-grass [The Craving for Taste] -The moral is: “It is better to eat to live, than to live to eat.”- COMPREHENSIVE PALI COURSE LESSON 10 (continued)
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Wealth is lost nothing is lost

Health is lost something is lost

Precepts (Character, morality self-discipline) is lost
everything is lost


Wealth is lost nothing is lost

ONLINE TRAINING ON PRECEPTS AND TRADE-65


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Health is lost something is lost

INTERNATIONAL JIVAKA
PRESUMPTIVE HEALTH PROTECTION (IJPHP)
      


Jivaka Sutta: To Jivaka

(On Being a Lay Follower)

translated from the Pali by

Thanissaro Bhikkhu

© 1997–2009

I
have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying in Rajagaha, at Jivaka’s Mango Grove. Then Jivaka
Komarabhacca went to the Blessed One and, on arrival, having bowed down, sat to
one side. As he was sitting there he said to the Blessed One: “Lord, to
what extent is one a lay follower?”

“Jivaka,
when one has gone to the Buddha for refuge, has gone to the Dhamma for refuge,
and has gone to the Sangha for refuge, then to that extent is one a lay
follower.”

“And
to what extent, lord, is one a virtuous lay follower?”

“Jivaka,
when one abstains from taking life, from stealing, from sexual misconduct, from
lying, and from fermented & distilled drinks that lead to heedlessness,
then to that extent is one a virtuous lay follower.”

“And
to what extent, lord, is one a lay follower who practices for his own benefit
but not that of others?”

“Jivaka,
when a lay follower himself is consummate in conviction but does not encourage
others in the consummation of conviction; when he himself is consummate in
virtue but does not encourage others in the consummation of virtue; when he
himself is consummate in generosity but does not encourage others in the
consummation of generosity; when he himself desires to see the monks but does
not encourage others to see the monks; when he himself wants to hear the true
Dhamma but does not encourage others to hear the true Dhamma; when he himself
habitually remembers the Dhamma he has heard but does not encourage others to
remember the Dhamma they have heard; when he himself explores the meaning of
the Dhamma he has heard but does not encourage others to explore the meaning of
the Dhamma they have heard; when he himself, knowing both the Dhamma & its
meaning, practices the Dhamma in line with the Dhamma, but does not encourage
others to practice the Dhamma in line with the Dhamma: then to that extent he
is a lay follower who practices for his own benefit but not for the benefit of
others.”

“And
to what extent, lord, is one a lay follower who practices both for his own
benefit & the benefit of others?”

“Jivaka,
when a lay follower himself is consummate in conviction and encourages others
in the consummation of conviction; when he himself is consummate in virtue and
encourages others in the consummation of virtue; when he himself is consummate
in generosity and encourages others in the consummation of generosity; when he
himself desires to see the monks and encourages others to see the monks; when
he himself wants to hear the true Dhamma and encourages others to hear the true
Dhamma; when he himself habitually remembers the Dhamma he has heard and
encourages others to remember the Dhamma they have heard; when he himself
explores the meaning of the Dhamma he has heard and encourages others to
explore the meaning of the Dhamma they have heard; when he himself, knowing
both the Dhamma & its meaning, practices the Dhamma in line with the Dhamma
and encourages others to practice the Dhamma in line with the Dhamma: then to
that extent he is a lay follower who practices both for his own benefit and for
the benefit of others.”



Precepts (Character, morality
self-discipline) is lost everything is lost


Thich Nhat Hanh

1
Do not be idolatrous about or bound to any doctrine, theory, or ideology, even
Buddhist ones. Buddhist systems of thought are guiding means; they are not
absolute truth.

2
Do not think the knowledge you presently possess is changeless, absolute truth.
Avoid being narrow minded and bound to present views. Learn and practice
nonattachment from views in order to be open to receive others’ viewpoints.
Truth is found in life and not merely in conceptual knowledge. Be ready to
learn throughout your entire life and to observe reality in yourself and in the
world at all times.

3
Do not force others, including children, by any means whatsoever, to adopt your
views, whether by authority, threat, money, propaganda, or even education.
However, through compassionate dialogue, help others renounce fanaticism and
narrow-mindedness.

4
Do not avoid suffering or close your eyes before suffering. Do not lose
awareness of the existence of suffering in the life of the world. Find ways to
be with those who are suffering, including personal contact, visits, images and
sounds. By such means, awaken yourself and others to the reality of suffering
in the world.

5
Do not accumulate wealth while millions are hungry. Do not take as the aim of
your life fame, profit, wealth, or sensual pleasure. Live simply and share
time, energy, and material resources with those who are in need.

6
Do not maintain anger or hatred. Learn to penetrate and transform them when
they are still seeds in your consciousness. As soon as they arise, turn your
attention to your breath in order to see and understand the nature of your
hatred.

7
Do not lose yourself in dispersion and in your surroundings. Practice mindful
breathing to come back to what is happening in the present moment. Be in touch
with what is wondrous, refreshing, and healing both inside and around you.
Plant seeds of joy, peace, and understanding in yourself in order to facilitate
the work of transformation in the depths of your consciousness.

8
Do not utter words that can create discord and cause the community to break.
Make every effort to reconcile and resolve all conflicts, however small.

9
Do not say untruthful things for the sake of personal interest or to impress
people. Do not utter words that cause division and hatred. Do not spread news
that you do not know to be certain. Do not criticize or condemn things of which
you are not sure. Always speak truthfully and constructively. Have the courage
to speak out about situations of injustice, even when doing so may threaten
your own safety.

10
Do not use the Buddhist community for personal gain or profit, or transform
your community into a political party. A religious community, however, should
take a clear stand against oppression and injustice and should strive to change
the situation without engaging in partisan conflicts.

11
Do not live with a vocation that is harmful to humans and nature. Do not invest
in companies that deprive others of their chance to live. Select a vocation
that helps realise your ideal of compassion.

12
Do not kill. Do not let others kill. Find whatever means possible to protect
life and prevent war.

13
Possess nothing that should belong to others. Respect the property of others,
but prevent others from profiting from human suffering or the suffering of
other species on Earth.

14
Do not mistreat your body. Learn to handle it with respect. Do not look on your
body as only an instrument. Preserve vital energies (sexual, breath, spirit)
for the realisation of the Way. (For brothers and sisters who are not monks and
nuns:) Sexual expression should not take place without love and commitment. In
sexual relations, be aware of future suffering that may be caused. To preserve
the happiness of others, respect the rights and commitments of others. Be fully
aware of the responsibility of bringing new lives into the world. Meditate on
the world into which you are bringing new beings.

From the
book ‘Interbeing’: Fourteen Guidelines for Engaged Buddhism, revised edition:
Oct. l993 by Thich Nhat Hanh, published by Parallax Press, Berkeley, California

Venerable
Thich Nhat Hanh is a Buddhist monk, poet, peace activist, and the author of
Being Peace, The Miracle of Mindfulness, and many other books. He lives in a
monastic community in south-western France called Plum Village, where he
teaches, writes, gardens, and works to help refugees world-wide. He conducts
retreats throughout the world on the art of mindful living, and has conducted
special retreats for American Vietnam War veterans, psychotherapists, artists,
environmental activists and children
.



FREE
ONLINE
TRAINING ON BUDDHISM FOR CHILDREN -24

The Wind-deer and the Honey-grass
[The Craving for Taste]

Once upon a time, the King of Benares had a gardener who looked after his pleasure
garden. Animals sometimes came into the garden from the nearby forest. The
gardener complained about this to the king, who said, “If you see any
strange animal, tell me at once.”

One day, he saw a strange kind of deer at the
far end of the garden. When he saw the man, he ran like the wind. That is why
they are called ‘wind-deer’. They are a rare breed, that are extremely timid.
They are very easily frightened by human beings.

The gardener told the king about the
wind-deer. He asked the gardener if he could catch the rare animal. He replied,
“My lord, if you give me some bee’s honey, I could even bring him into the
palace!” So the king ordered that he be given as much bee’s honey as he
wanted.

This particular wind-deer loved to eat the
flowers and fruits in the king’s pleasure garden. The gardener let himself be
seen by him little by little, so he would be less frightened. Then he began to
smear honey on the grass where the wind-deer usually came to eat. Sure enough,
the deer began eating the honey-smeared grass. Soon he developed a craving for
the taste of this ‘honey-grass’. The craving made him come to the garden every
day. Before long, he would eat nothing else!

Little by little, the gardener came closer and
closer to the wind-deer. At first, he would run away. But later, he lost his
fear and came to think the man was harmless. As the gardener became more and
more friendly, eventually he got the deer to eat the honey-grass right out of
his hand. He continued doing this for some time, in order to build up his
confidence and trust.



Meanwhile, the gardener had rows of curtains
set up, making a wide pathway from the far end of the pleasure garden to the
king’s palace. From inside this pathway, the curtains would keep the wind-deer
from seeing any people that might scare him.

When all was prepared, the gardener took a bag
of grass and a container of honey with him. Again he began hand-feeding the
wind-deer when he appeared. Gradually, he led the wind-deer into the
curtained-off pathway. Slowly, he continued to lead him with the honey-grass, until
finally the deer followed him right into the palace. Once inside, the palace
guards closed the doors, and the wind-deer was trapped. Seeing the people of
the court, he suddenly became very frightened and began running around, madly
trying to escape.

The king came down to the hall and saw the
panic-stricken wind-deer. He said, “What a wind-deer! How could he have
gotten into such a state? A wind-deer is an animal who will not return to a
place where he has so much as seen a human, for seven full days. Ordinarily, if
a wind-deer is at all frightened in a particular place, he will not return for
the whole rest of his life! But look! Even such a shy wild creature can be
enslaved by his craving for the taste of something sweet. Then he can be lured
into the center of the city and even inside the palace itself.

“My friends, the teachers warn us not to
be too attached to the place we live, for all things pass away. They say that
being too attached to a small circle of friends is confining and restricts a
broad outlook. But see how much more dangerous is the simple craving for a
sweet flavour, or any other taste sensation. See how this beautiful shy animal
was trapped by my gardener, by taking advantage of his craving for taste.”

Not wishing to harm the gentle wind-deer, the
king had him released into the forest. He never returned to the royal pleasure
garden, and he never missed the taste of honey-grass.

The moral is: “It is better to eat to live, than to live to
eat.”


A BLUE PRINT FOR LIFE



THE WAY OF

ON LOYALTY AND
FILIALNESS


THE WAY OF RSTABLISHING
ONESELF


A GATHA SAYS, “ Do not look for the Buddha on faraway

Vulture Peak; Vulture
Peak is right there in
your mind. Each

of us has a Vulture
Peak within; we should
look toward our

own Vulture
Peak to practice our cultivation.”
Loyalty and

filialness are feelings that arise from our minds, intuitive

knowledge, as well as kind of love and virtue. Loyalty and

filialness are the ethical ties that bind us together in our

relationships. Only by expressing the spirit of loyalty and

filialness, by allowing loyalty and filialness as well as

compassion and love to spread throughout time and place

can society become more orderly and our families happier.


COMPREHENSIVE PALI
COURSE
 

 

LESSON 10 (continued)


Similarly
declined are the following:

Sukhī = happy one                      Pāpakāri = evil one

Khemī = state of secured one    Puññakāri = doer of good

Bhāgī
= sharer
                            Yath
āvādi = as he says

Balī = powerful one                     Thathākāri = so he does

Sāmi = Lord                                Issukī
= envious one

Bhogī = serpent, the enjoyer     Maccharī
= mean one

Kuṭṭhī =leper                              Seṭṭhi
= millionaire,

                                                     Treasurer,
banker

Sippī = artisan

Hathī = elephant                         Kāmī
= one who desires

Karī = elephant                            Upanāni = grudging,

                                                              Spiteful

Dāṭhī = tusker                             Dhammacāri = pious one

Mantī = minister, councellor      Kāyī
= one with body

Chattī = one with umbrella        Gāmī
= goer

Cārī
= one who follows
                sasī =
moon

Kārī
= doer
                                  Anus
ārī
= one who acts

                                                     In
accordance with

Dhammakārī
= righteouds one

Kālakaṇṇī
= inauspicious one

     (lit.black-eared one)     Anuyāy ī = follower

Anupassī = contemplator  Saññ ī
= perceiver

Anurakkhī = guard, preserver   Gaī
– leader

Khaḍakāī =
demolisher
          Lobhac
āi = greedy

Chiddagavesi
= fault finder

Note: Most
of these words, declined like
Sārathī, are

Adjectives.

Nouns:

Kibbisa –
wrong, fault tec.
     Gu
ṇa = quality

Khaḍa = broken piece     Inda = Lord, king

Chidda = a
hole, fault
              Masi – ink

Dukkaṭa = wrong               Idha = here

Dvaya = two
                              Pecca =
hereafter

Sasa =
hare, rabbit
                   Satt
a = beings

Sakka =
Inda, Chief of gods
  Jana = the people

Luddha,
lolupa = greedy one

Nasaka, viddhaṁsaka = demolisher

Paccakkha =
personal experience

Sakkacca =
carefully, well, etc.

Sampajāñña
= clear comprehension

Anuttaro =
incomparable, peerless

Tathāgata =
Bearer of Truth

 

Verbs:     mud = to rejoice, be happy

                  Pañā = paññāpeti = to make
known

                  Soc = to repent, suffer

                  Bhavantu (bhū) = may tey be

                  Vuccati = is called, (passive
form of  vad = to

                  say, call)

dis = ‘dis’
is changed into ‘das’ = dasseti = to

show, to
exhibit.

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VR1 (WE ARE ONE) +ve NEWS -No new practice of religious, cultural activities and other programmes at Government campuses/ properties should take place-Mayawati-Local administration to be held responsible for poor law and order situation-C.M. reviews law and order at a high-level meeting- Responsibility of concerning Principal Secretary/Secretary will be fixed, if benefit of schemes/programmes was not delivered to poor eligible persons-— C.M. Follow policy of Sarvajan Hitai, Sarvajan Sukhai in development programmes, but Dalits and backward classes should be given special priority — Chief Minister Corruption in development schemes will not be tolerated — Mayawati-Bahujan Samaj Party National President and U.P. Chief Minister Ms. Mayawati meets Nepalese Prime Minister Multi-purpose flood control, irrigation and power projects should be developed for permanent solution of flood problem —Chief Minister-C.M. requests Prime Minister to take initiative for permanent solution of flood problem from Nepal rivers C.M. writes letter to PM-Divisional Commissioners responsible for ensuring benefits of welfare schemes to eligible persons with full honesty and dedication in a corruption free manner — C.M. People should get benefits of Government schemes — Chief Minister D.M. and S.S.P./D.I.G. should remain present during 10 a.m. to 12 noon on every Monday, Thursday and Friday in their respective offices to dispose of people’s problems — Chief Minister Divisional Commissioners will be given adverse entries for lack of improvement in functioning at divisional level, their promotion will be stopped — Chief Minister-Wealth is lost nothing is lost Health is lost something is lost Precepts (Character, morality self-discipline) is lost everything is lost-ONLINE TRAINING ON PRECEPTS AND TRADE-64-INTERNATIONAL JIVAKA PRESUMPTIVE HEALTH PROTECTION (IJPHP) NATIONAL MISSION ON MEDICINAL PLANTS POLICIES AND PROGRAMMES DIRECTORATE OF HORTICULTURE AND MISSION DIRECTOR DEPT. OF HORTICULTURE-Precepts (Character, morality self-discipline) is lost everything is lost A BLUE PRINT FOR LIFE THE WAY OF ON SOCIETY THE WAY OF ONESELF AND OTHERS-FREE ONLINE TRAINING ON BUDDHISM FOR CHILDREN -23 Mountain Buck and Village Doe [Infatuation]-A Permanent Online International Seminar on Buddhism and Buddhist Heritage of Jambudvipa that is the Great Prabuddha Bharath Theravāda Buddhist Economic Ethics- COMPREHENSIVE PALI COURSE LESSON 10-Bishnoi, son of former Haryana chief minister Bhajan Lal, said the HJC’s alliance with the Bahujan Samaj Party (BSP) was sure of winning the forthcoming assembly elections expected in October
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08/26/09
VR1 (WE ARE ONE) +ve NEWS Wealth is lost nothing is lost Health is lost something is lost Precepts (Character, morality self-discipline) is lost everything is lost-Statues installation: UP Govt files answer-Gold Buddha statue recovered in Uttar Pradesh-ONLINE TRAINING ON PRECEPTS AND TRADE-63 Continuity and Change in the Economic Ethics of Buddhism ­ Evidence From the History of Buddhism in India, China and Japan-JIVAKA PRESUMPTIVE HEALTH PROTECTION CENTRE Medicinal and Aromatic Plants—Future Opportunities-A BLUE PRINT FOR LIFE ON EMOTIONS THE WAY OF LOVE AND AFFECTION-FREE ONLINE TRAINING ON BUDDHISM FOR CHILDREN -23 King Banyan Deer [ Teaching] -The moral is: Wherever it is found, compassion is a sign of greatness. A Permanent Online International Seminar on Buddhism and Buddhist Heritage of Jambudvipa that is the Great Prabuddha Bharath Let Your Aim be Nibbana-LESSON 9 Exercise 2 Translate into Pāli
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VR1

(WE
ARE ONE)

+ve
NEWS

Wealth is lost nothing is lost

Health is lost something is lost

Precepts (Character, morality self-discipline) is lost
everything is lost

Statues installation: UP Govt files answer

Lucknow: The Uttar Pradesh Government today answered to the reply
sought by the Supreme Court over the installation of BSP poll symbol
and BSP supremo Mayawati. Now the apex court has asked the petitioner
to keep his/ her stand in the matter.




The UP Government has claimed that the state assembly has approved the
decision of installing statutes in the park; hence the Supreme Court
should not intervene in the case.




The Government said that the statues are being installed according to
the will of the Kanshiram where he desired that the statues of Mayawati
should be installed where his statues are installed.




It is learnt that a petition was filed in the Supreme Court stating
that the UP Government were misusing money of the people, installing
BJP’s poll symbol and statues.



Gold Buddha statue recovered in Uttar Pradesh

Allahabad, Aug 23 (IANS) Police in Uttar Pradesh’s Allahabad city
Sunday arrested two men and recovered a stolen 3.5-kg pure gold Buddha
statue from their possession.


Vishnu Kumar and Pappu were arrested in the Trans-Yamuna area and the 8-inch statue was recovered from them.

“During interrogation, they confessed they had stolen the statue
from an ancient temple in Kushinagar and the international value of the
statue is Rs.3.5 crore (Rs.35 million),” Deputy Inspector General of
Police (Allahabad range) Chandra Prakash told IANS over phone.

The information has been sent to the Kushinagar police and the
information is expected soon about from where the statue was stolen, he
added.

ONLINE TRAINING ON PRECEPTS
AND TRADE-63



Continuity
and Change in the Economic Ethics of Buddhism ­ Evidence From the History of
Buddhism in
India, China and Japan


Introduction

Buddhist economic ethics–that is Buddhist
values with regard to wealth and economic activity, either within society or
within the sangha–are often slighted in Western scholarly studies of Buddhism
even though they play a significant role as a part of overall Buddhist
philosophy regarding social life and even enlightenment itself. This is due
perhaps partly to an implicit interpretation of Buddhism among some scholars as
being a religion focused primarily upon an individualistic pursuit of
enlightenment rather than also a set of practiced social, political, and
economic ethics. To an extent of course this characterization holds true, for
at least a part of both the Therav
ā
da and Mahāyāna
traditions. Yet it also ignores clearly developed Buddhist attitudes and values
toward economic activities, some explicitly expressed in the various Vinaya
codes for monks, others less explicitly, but still clearly enough, in various
stories and s
ū
tras which
lay out general principles of behavior for lay believers.

This paper offers an outline of the
development of Buddhist economic ethics using examples from early Therav
ā
da Buddhism in India and
the Mah
ā
yāna tradition as it evolved
in India, medieval China, and medieval and early modern Japan, in order to
illustrate the pattern of continuities and transformations these ethics have
undergone. By “economic ethics” the paper refers to four broad areas:
(1) attitudes toward wealth, i.e., its accumulation, use, and
distribution, including the issues of economic justice and equality/
inequality; (2) attitudes toward charity, i.e., how and to whom wealth
should be given; (3) attitudes toward human labor and secular
occupations
in society; and (4) actual economic activities of temples and
monasteries which reflect the lived-practice of Buddhist communities’ economic
ethics. By “Buddhist,” the paper refers to mainline Buddhist thinking
in history, as represented by the various Vinaya codes, s
ū
tras and stories, and
economic activities of major sects, monasteries, and temples.

Since I will be dealing with a range of
“Buddhisms” as they developed in various times and places, I have
relied upon previous scholarly work to help define what the general trends of
the economic ethics of these various “Buddhisms” were. This approach
assumes that there was no one Buddhist economic ethic for all of these
different times and places, just as there is no one “Buddhism.” Yet
through an examination of the economic ethics of these different
“Buddhisms,” certain continuities and differences
between them become clear. Moreover, the presence of these continuities would
seem to allow us to make a number of tentative conclusions about what the
development and nature of these various Buddhist economic ethics as a whole
might share. These can be summarized as follows:


JIVAKA PRESUMPTIVE HEALTH
PROTECTION CENTRE


Medicinal and Aromatic Plants—Future Opportunities





During the past 30 years, medicinal
and aromatic plants in the United States
have moved from essentially unknown, minor agricultural plants into crops that
many farmers consider producing as an alternative to usual plantings of food
and feed crops. The attraction of medicinal and aromatic plants as worthy farm
crops has grown due to the demand created by consumer interest in these plants
for culinary, medicinal, and other anthro­pogenic applications. As racial
diversity in the US has
expanded, immigrants from countries in which herbs and herbal medicines are
commonly used to flavor foods and treat illnesses have introduced other
Americans to a diverse range of plant materials. Indeed, market trend surveys
indicate that mainstream American consumers will purchase 75% of the ethnic
foods during the next decade (Packaged Facts 2004a).

Farmers growing medicinal and aromatic
plants, similar to farmers in other agricultural systems, begin each growing
season with hopes for success in producing a crop that brought to market will
more than repay the expense of production. Yet, in addition to traditional
cropping uncertainties of weather, pests, and other limitations, the medicinal
and aromatic plant farmer also faces changes in consumer interest,
international trade policies, and other issues that control demand. For these
reasons, an understanding of future opportunities in the medicinal and aromatic
plant industry (WHO 2003) is necessary to enable US growers to envision and
invest in medicinal and aromatic crops that will meet market demands.

HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES

The initiation of medicinal plant and
aromatic production, as a gathering or cultivation of plant materials, is lost
to history, but most likely began at or near the time of the first afflictions
and the recognition that smell­ing, chewing, and/or eating some plant materials
could provide relief from nausea, pain, and/or other infirmities. Those plants
containing the unique chemical profiles that offered pain relief, pleasant
aromas, and enhanced food flavors would soon be renowned and much valued by
early humans, leading to associations among certain aliments, plants, and
“feeling better” (Friedman and Adler 2001). Thus, these plants, now known as
medicinal and aromatic plants, and their extracts became the main source for
medicines, seasonings, colorings, preser­vatives, and other similar items used
in societies, sustained by myths and traditions developed to explain the almost
“magical” powers of selected species and to transmit the accumulation of
acquired knowledge about these species before the era of written records.

As continued experimentation with
various plant materials demonstrated the benefits of having specific plants
immediately available for use in medical treatment and food flavoring,
husbandry of these plant species undoubtedly started. Although the collection
of plants probably remained the primary source of medicinal and aromatic plant
material for a considerable period of time, cultivation and growth of plants
could be expected to have begun in small garden plots and botanical
collections. As human migration led to settlements within vari­ous ecosystems,
species having medicinal and aromatic properties specific to those regions
would be discovered, leading to a collection of plant materials with a variety
of uses and the initiation of trade among neighboring groups for unavailable
plant materials. This initial exchange of plant material could be expected to
spread and with the passage of time lead to overland and sea trade routes,
including those that brought plant materials from Asia to Europe to meet the demand for spices as seasonings
and medicines. New insights into the causal agents of poor health were acquired
during the 18
th and 19th centuries (such as the germ theory developed by Pasteur and Koch,
use of disinfectants by Lister, plus the work of many others), but medicinal
and aromatic plants remained the primary pharmaceutical agents into the early
1900s (Craker et al. 2003; Craker and Gardner 2006).

Technological innovations and
political and social forces at the beginning of the 20
th century caused
a rapid decline in the use of plants as medicine. The development of sulfa
drugs in the 1930s and the synthesis of organic chemicals in the 1940s produced
additional sources of medicines and, indeed, became the preferred method for
treatment in some countries, especially in America where the 1910 Flexner
Report (Flexner 1910) and the American Medical Association (AMA 2006) indicated
only trained physicians using allopathic medi­cines should be allowed to
practice medicine. At the same time, Western societies, modernized by the
industrial revolution, became infatuated with the social and economic changes
following World War I and identified with the new, synthesized chemical
medicines, requesting these in place of herbal medicines and resulting in a
decline in the use of plants and plant extracts until the mid-1970s (Craker et
al. 2003). By the middle of the 20
th century, medical practitioners and
consumers were demanding scientific proof of efficacy through double-blind
clinical trials in contrast to the traditional use and mythological
associations linked with medicinal plant materials.

The decline in the use of herbal
preparations as medicines can be inferred from the decline in listing of
medicinal species in the U.S. Pharmacopeia and National Formulary (USP_NF
1916-2006) beginning in the early 1900s (Fig. 1). At the start of the 20
th century, over
40 percent of the listed drugs (mostly crude extracts) originated from plants,
but by the mid-1970s, the listing of plant materials had decreased to less than
5% of the drugs in the Pharmacopeia and Formulary. In the
intervening years, the American concept of medicine had evolved from a
collection of plant materials with a mixture of constituents to a medication
containing only one chemical formula (Craker and Gardner 2005). The collection
of laws and regulations, originally developed to protect the public from
worthless health products, unsanitary manufacturing practices, and unscrupulous
sales people, limited access to phytomedicines and medical practitioners that
used phytomedicines (Masiello 1999).

With decreased demand, interest in the
cultivation of medicinal and aromatic plants in the United States
decreased. The US Department of Agriculture, which published cultivation guides
for farmers growing me­dicinal aromatic plants in the first half of the 1900s,
failed to provide such guides in the latter half of the 20
th century
(Craker et al. 2003). A sampling of horticultural and garden books published in
the early 1900s fre­quently contains cultivation information on aromatic and
medicinal herbs, but similar books published as late as the 1980s mention these
crops only briefly and focus on culinary herbs. Few research articles on
medicinal and aromatic plants were published in the scientific literature from
the 1940s to the 1990s (Fig. 2). Most current research on medicinal and aromatic
plants is focused on the medicinal uses and botany (Fig. 3).

 Plants in the US
Pharmacopeia
and Formulary. Data collected by a count of plants and
plant extracts listed in the Pharmacopeia and Formulary for
publica­tion years listed.

Scientific publications on medicinal
plants and traditional medicine in Africa.
Data from other global regions and for individual plants demonstrate the same
trend. Publication count from those listed PubMed (a service of the US National
Library of Medicine), each point represents the sum of the previous five years.

 Research
interests in medicinal plants for 2006. Data collected by a count of abstracts
published during 2006 in the Medicinal and Aromatic Plants Abstracts, National
Institute of Science Communication and Information Resources, The Council of
Scientific & Industrial Research, New Delhi, India (Doreswamy 2006).

Issues in New Crops and New Uses

The revival of US
interest in culinary herbs appears to have been initiated by a revival of
interest in natural products in the 1960s and driven by demographic changes in
the population. For example, the current popula­tion growth rate among those of
Asian and Hispanic origin, cultural groups acknowledged to enjoy more highly
spiced foods than cultures of European origin, leads all ethnic groups at 61%
(US Census 2000). In addition, an aging American population (US Census 2000)
began to use medicinal and aromatic plants to stimulate aging taste buds and,
for health reasons, as substitutes for salt. Changes to the family structure in
which both parents worked led to increased use of prepared foods that contained
more spices. As consumers became more worldly oriented and more knowledgeable
about health during the 1980s and 1990s, interest in organic and natural foods
placed new emphasis on the benefits of using medicinal and aromatic plants. The
expansion of this American interest in medicinal and aromatic plants was
promoted by observations on the use of alternative medicines in China
during President Nixon’s visit to that country in 1972.

While conventional medicine
establishments generally disapproved of the revival of herbal medicines in the
US (Fontanarosa and Lundberg 1998; Browne 2005; Winnick 2005), consumers began
to explore and use these products as evidenced by the enhanced market for
dietary supplements during the 1990s, increasing in sales from less than $1
billion annually in the early 1990s to over $4 billion annually by the end of
the 1990s (Huff 2006). With passage of the Dietary Supplement Health and
Education Act (DSHEA) in 1994 (FDA 1994), sales of supplements, many of which
are herbal products, continued to increase despite warnings about lack of
efficacy and health hazards from the conventional medicine system in the US
(Cupp 1999; Klepser and Klepser 1999) (Fig. 4). The aging population of the US, which
needed increased health care, discovered herbal medi­cines were an attractive
alternative to the comparatively high costs of conventional medicines (Powers
2006). The use of herbal medicines in the US by
regular and occasional users increased from 2% of the population in 1990 to 37%
in 2000 (WWF 2000). Yet, this development in the US is in
contrast to most other countries that had remained committed to the use of
herbal medicines as part of their health care system throughout the 20
th century. In
most areas of Africa and Asia,
the traditional healer continues to be the main source of medical care into the
21
st
century,
primarily due to the relatively high cost of conventional medicines and the lack
of trained physicians (Craker and Gardner 2006).

Globalization of trade in the late
1990s and early 2000s and concerns about the conservation of genetic diversity
affected the cultivation of medicinal plants. As demand for medicinal species
in the US grew,
domes­tic and foreign growers increased production. Quality standards for plant
material increased with processors and consumers demanding clean (no physical
nor chemical contaminating adulterants), consistent (dependable production and
bioactive levels), and certifiable (identifiable for origin and history)
products (Khan et al. 2005). Research on medicinal and aromatic plants
initiated in the 1980s and 1990s led to improvements in production of plants,
extraction of bioactive constituents, and confirmation of medicinal
applications (Khan et al. 2005).

Yet, some aspects of globalization
have been challenging for medicinal and aromatic plant growers. For example,
the production of cultivated American ginseng (Panax quinquefolium L.,
Araliaceae) shifted from the traditional center in Wisconsin to Canada (Table 1) during the 1990s and then
more recently to China.

Table 1.Production of
American ginseng.

 

American ginseng production
(t)
z

Location

1985

1992

2004

Wisconsin

471

523

227

Canada

93

303

1012

China

-?-

272

+++

Growers in each production center have
been affected by changing market places. Where possible, American growers of
ginseng have increased planting of wild-simulated versus field grown ginseng in
efforts to maintain market share. Similar production shifts, yet unidentified,
may also be occurring or occur for other medicinal and aromatic species (Harry
2001).

In the late 1990s and early 2000s, a
number of new medicinal and aromatic plant products were brought to market.
Cosmeceuticals, products formulated to improve the health and appearance of the
skin, contain a number of plant extracts, such as Aloe barbadensis, Celastrus
paniculatus
, Cyperus scariosus, Ginkgo biloba, Myrtus
caryophyllus
, and Withania somnifera, to protect and rejuvenate the
upper layers of the skin (L’amar 2006). In 2004, US
consumers, primarily aging “baby boomers” wanting to avoid visual signs of aging,
spent $12.4 bil­lion on cosmeceuticals (Barret 2005). The development,
marketing, and sales of health and wellness drinks (herbal and flavored teas
and energy, health, functional, and sports drinks that often contain herbal
extracts) exploded after 2000, with total sales of several billion dollars in
current markets (Table 2) (Lipson 2005; Mintel 2004a,b; Packaged Facts 2006).
Consumer choice spending has lead to interest in natural products for animal
care (feed and non-feed items labeled natural or organic), significantly
increasing demand during the past few years (doubling from 2002 to 2003 and
expected to reach $1 billion in the US by 2009) (Packaged Facts 2004b) for
medicinal and aromatic plants with a history of traditional veterinary use (
Pieroni et al.
2006
).

THE FUTURE

Demand for medicinal and aromatic
plants in the United States
can be expected to continue for the near future, although the rate of sale
increases for many medicinal and aromatic plant materials will probably not
match those exhibited during the 1990s. While the global market for medicinal
and aromatic plants can be estimated to be at least US$60 billion (WHO 2003),
exact market figures and market trends are difficult to ascertain due to herbal
materials in a vast array of products being sold through a large number
outlets, ranging from entrepreneurial sales over the internet to mass market
sales in supermarkets and natural product stores. In addition, favorable or
unfavorable press reports (Brody 1990, 1999; Browne 2005) about a particular
herbal product can cause an especially strong growth or a rapid decline in
interest and sales (Blumenthal et al. 2006; Craker and Gardner 2006; Google
Trends 2006). Most market surveys (Blumenthal et al. 2006; Dainells 2006;
Hartman Group 2006) suggest only a slow increase in overall demand within the US for
medicinal and aromatic plants, as compared with the 1990s. If the US
medical establishment fully accepts medicinal plants as part of the mainstream,
conventional medicine system (following the example of Asian and European
countries), sales could be expected to significantly increase.

Over the near future, continued
globalization of trade and markets along with ethnobotanical exploration can be
projected to continue to bring awareness of new plant materials for home,
medicinal, and industrial use. In addition to the demand created by population
diversi­fication and aging in the past 10 years (US Census 2000), the
relatively high cost of medical treatment in the US (Craker and Gardner 2006; Schippman
et al. 2005, 2006) and the failure of conventional medicine to have satisfac­tory
treatments for aliments, such as those associated with obesity and diabetes
(Table 3), and currently incur­able afflictions, such as HIV, cardiovascular
and degen­erative diseases, and cancer (JTF 1999), have stimulated many
healthcare consumers to test alternative medicines (AARP 2007). The search for
disease cures have led to global cooperation and extended research efforts on
the cultivation and improvement of such medicinal plants as Artemisia annua for
treatment of malaria, a disease estimated to be responsible for almost three
million deaths annually over the past 30 years, as synthesized drugs became
ineffective (IPBO 2004; WAC 2004).

Table 2. Health and
wellness market drinks.

 

Drink

Estimated market (million $)

Specialty & herbal teasz

500

Energy drinksy

1400

Sports drinksy

2721

Functional drinksx

8749

Issues in New Crops and New Uses Rising incomes
in Asia are
likely to raise the standard of living of residents, increasing demand for
additional medicinal and aromatic plants as the population suffers from the
detrimental affects of ageing, weight gain, and other medical problems that
frequently occur in relatively prosperous societies (Gross 2001).

The increase in demand for medicinal
and aromatic plants will likely continue to threaten native species in some
localities. Price differentials between wild and cultivated plants due to a
desire for the wild material or the unavailability of cultivated plant material
currently encourages unsustainable collection practices in some localities (WWF
2000), especially in economically depressed regions that lack resources for
protecting plants (ITC 2001; Schippman et al. 2002). The financial gains for
collecting and selling local plant material frequently represent a substantial
share of total income for many medicinal plant collectors in several regions
(Schippmann et al. 2005, 2006). As an example, collection of wild ginseng
(valued at $2 million in 2002) (DOF 2006) in West Virginia can be a
considerable addition to budgets of poor families (average income <$10,000)
(CBPP 1997). In many instances, a switch to cultivated species to protect
endangered species is problematic due to the difficulty of duplicating the
demanding environmental requirements of wild species in cultivated fields and
due to the socio-economic impact on native cultures and local economies when
cultivation is shifted to large scale production outside the local area (Leaky
and Izac 1997; Schippman et al. 2002, 2005; Shanley and Luz 2003). In addition,
consumer concern about protection of endangered species and prosperity of
native cultures (FAO 2003), factors that may decrease or increase medicinal plant
purchases, respectively, will most likely require labeling to demonstrate
ethical wild-crafting practices and fair-trade (a guarantee of a just financial
return to the grower/collector for work).

Continued loss of habitat in the
future due to deforestation and development can be expected to remain a threat
to many medicinal and aromatic species in both developing and industrialized
countries (Shanley and Luz 2003; Schippmann et al. 2006). In tropical areas
such as Amazonia and West Africa, changing land use from logging, ranching,
mining, and agriculture have been identified as responsible for changes in
forest com­position and structure (Uhl et al. 1991; Ekpe 2002), frequently
creating environments unfavorable to growing native medicinal and aromatic species
and posing detrimental affects on traditional healthcare (Ekpe 2002). Such
destruction in natural ecosystems and the resultant losses in medicinal and
aromatic species will surely increase pressure for preservation and cultivation
of endangered flora. Shortages of available plant material for collection in
the natural environment of medicinal and aromatic plants can be expected to
lead to increased costs for plant material until cultivation systems are in
place. Estimates suggest the number of plant species used for medicinal
purposes, most of which are collected in the wild, is more than 52,000
(Schippman et al. 2002).

In current medicinal and aromatic
plant markets, the demand is for organic products, matching the de­mand for
organic foods (Adam 2005; Hartman Group 2006) and suggesting that the current
base of customers for medicinal and aromatic plant products are the same as
those that purchase organic foods (Hartman 2007). As consumers become more
involved with health and wellness, future medicinal and aromatic plant markets
will need to respond to this demand by consumers for quality plant material,
most likely produced sustainably and uncontaminated by either synthetic
pesticides or by genetically modified organisms. As processors ex­pand to meet
the demand, global trade in medicinal and aromatic plants can be expected to
increase to make available certified organic plant material needed for the
development of new formulations and marketing concepts (Hartman Group 2006).
Sales of medicinal and aromatic plant combinations and herbal drinks have
posted market gains during the past few years (Ferrier et al. 2006) by offering
the liveliness and vigor of youth, the promise of vitality, simplicity, and
sustainability that can be expected to remain key market concepts in selling
medicinal and aromatic products in the near future (Hartman Group 2006).

Sales of organic non-food items (most
of which could be expected to contain medicinal and aromatic plants or plant
extracts) increased by one-third in 2005 (OTA 2006). The Nutrition Business
Journal
(NBJ 2007)

Table 3. Obesity and
diabetes in the US.

 

Designation z

Population(%)

Overweight (BMI ≥ 25)

64.5

Obese (BMI ≥ 30)

30.5

Severely obese (BMI ≥ 35)

4.7

Diabetes

7.0

reports that sales of dietary
supplements, many of which contain medicinal plant materials, increased by 4.5%
to $21.3 billion in 2005, with sales forecast to grow 1.5 to 2 times faster
than that of the US economy. Aromatic plants and plant extracts have become
extensively used in flower arrangements and the fragrance industry. The market
for candles and home fragrances, many of which contain aromatic plants and/or
plant extracts, reached an estimated $8.4 billion in 2004, a growth of 14.1%
from 2003 (Unity Marketing Inc. 2005) that has primar­ily been attributed to
the popularity of aromatherapy and scented candles (Elson 1999). Incense, made
from a combination of fragrant gums, resins, woods, and spices has an estimated
market value in the US
of $17 million ($12.4 million imports and $4.6 million exports) (Knight et al.
2001).

In addition to a role in traditional
and in alternative and complimentary medicinal markets, medicinal and aromatic
plants maintain a role in both over-the-counter and prescription drugs in
conventional medicine. An estimated 25% of conventional pharmaceuticals are
derived from medicinal plants (Farnsworth 1988). The estimated global market
for plant derived drugs was $18 billion in 2005, and is expected to grow to $26
billion by 2011, with the US and Canada
accounting for over 50% of the market demand (Pharmalicensing.com 2006). Of new
interest is the development of plant-made pharmaceuticals where plants are
being used to produce thera­peutic proteins that could be used for treating
diseases. Currently, common food and feed crops, such as alfalfa, barley, corn,
rice, and safflower, are being used to produce the proteins that are
subsequently isolated from the plant material. Although these products are not
yet on the market, they may offer medicinal plant growers and processors new
business opportunities in the future.

In the past few years, the
conventional American medical system seems to have done a “U-turn” and ac­cepted
the use of medicinal and aromatic by patients (Fig. 5). Yet, inconsistent
product quality, due to genotypic variation within plant species and
environmental effects that alter constituent levels and distribution, remains
an issue for use of medicinal and aromatic plants that growers and processors
can expect to continue to face in the immediate future. Quality is frequently
judged by color, aroma, taste, and effect of the plant material, although the
levels of various chemical constituents may also be analyzed in facilities
equipped or associated with testing laboratories. Additional terminology
associated with medicinal and aromatic plants and used in an effort to judge
quality aspects include organic (produced according to certification rules,
including without the use of synthetic fertilizers or pesticides) (USDA 2006),
wild-crafted (collected in the natural environment with no human contact before
harvest), woods-grown (planted in natural environment with protection and care
during growth), and commercial (produced with the possible use of synthetic
pesticides or fertilizers).

Good agricultural practices, good
collection practices, and good manufacturing practices have been de­veloped to
help growers, collectors, and processors to produce and maintain quality
medicinal and aromatic plant material (WHO 2003; FDA 2004). In the future,
these guidelines are likely to be revised and become one

The American
“U-turn” in acceptance of alternative medicines. Modified from Winnick (2005).

Issues in New Crops and New Uses of the standards
for quality determination. Such practices should help reduce adulterants and
contaminants in medicinal and aromatic plant materials brought to market. Such
adulterants (extraneous and fake plant material, counterfeit goods, synthetic
drugs, and other non-specific materials) are frequently a health hazard and
deprive the consumer of expected benefits.

CONCLUSIONS

In the US
and world markets, demand for medicinal and aromatic plant materials should
continue into the foreseeable future. Current and future changes in
demographics (age, culture, incomes, diseases, and other hu­man conditions),
public concern about healthcare (availability and expense), and familiarity
with plant products (press reports, advertising, education, and scientific
reports) can be expected to bring more people to sample and commit to using
medicinal and/or aromatic plant products. Acceptance of alternative and
complimentary medicines by conventional medical systems should reassure those
questioning the use of plant materials, enhance demand for medicinal plants,
and help establish a partnership between conventional and alternative medicines
for the benefit of the consumer. Rising consumer interest in use of natural and
organic products (Kroner 2006), in protection of endangered species (FAO 2003),
in intellectual property rights of native populations (Persley 1997), and in
the value of fair trade (Brinckmann 2004) will most likely continue, bringing a
need to validate plant sources and, in some instances, a preference for cultivation.

Consumer interest in medicinal and
aromatic plants is continuing to change in the US
marketplace as seg­ments of society become more aware of the possible
relationships between good health and healthy living. The concept of Western
medicine in which health is defined as absence of disease and all body systems
functioning is moderating and becoming more adjusted to the idea of balance
within the mind and body. As consumers become better informed about issues of
food, health, and nutrition, they also become better informed about the
controversies and concerns surrounding conventional medicine, genetically
engineered products, pesticide contaminated food, and similar issues. Such
consumers frequently choose or move towards a life-style likely to bring them
into organic and natural food stores and to try alternative medical care (SPINS
2004). Increased use of medicinal and aromatic plants will most likely be part
of this evolution.


A BLUE PRINT FOR LIFE

 

ON
EMOTIONS

THE WAY
OF LOVE AND AFFECTION

 

With love there is strength; there is hope; this is because love is
an instinct, common to human beings and all living things. Buddhism will not
deny or object to love as long as it is in accord with the law, morality, and
the laws of human ethics. Buddhism neither approves nor rejects love.But
advocates Middle Way
for life. Love must be purified with compassion and guided by wisdom. Love must
be accomplished with good and beauty; love must be supported by moral
behaviour. Life stems from love; we must add dignity and beauty to life with
pure, true, and compassionate love.




FREE
ONLINE
TRAINING ON BUDDHISM FOR CHILDREN -23


King
Banyan Deer

[ Teaching]

Out of compassion and gratitude, King Banyan Deer the
Enlightenment Being, taught the King of Benares.
He advised him to climb the five steps of training, in order to purify his
mind. He described them by saying, “It will benefit you, if you give up
the five unwholesome actions. These are:

  • destroying life, for this is not compassion;
  • taking what is not given, for this is not generosity;
  • doing wrong in sexual ways, for this is not loving-kindness;
  • speaking falsely, for this is not Truth;
  • losing your mind from alcohol, for this leads to falling down the
    first four steps.”

He further advised him to do wholesome actions, that would
bring happiness in this life and beyond. Then King Banyan Deer, and both herds,
returned to the forest.

In the fullness of time, the pregnant doe, who had stayed
with Banyan’s herd, gave birth to a fawn. He was as beautiful as a lotus
blossom given as an offering to the gods.

When the fawn had grown into a young buck deer, he began
playing with Branch Deer’s herd. Seeing this, his mother said to him,
“Better to die after a short life with the great compassionate one, than
to live a long life with an ordinary one.” Afterwards, her son lived happily
in the herd of King Banyan Deer.

The only ones left unhappy were the farmers and villagers
of the kingdom. For, given total immunity by the king, the deer began to
fearlessly eat the people’s crops. They even grazed in the vegetable gardens
inside the villages and the city of Benares
itself!

So the people complained to the king, and asked permission
to kill at least some of the deer as a warning. But the king said, “I
myself promised complete immunity to King Banyan Deer. I would give up the
kingship before I would break my word to him. No one may harm a deer!”

When King Banyan Deer heard of this, he said to all the
deer, “You should not eat the crops that belong to others.” And he
sent a message to the people. Instead of making fences, he asked them to tie up
bunches of leaves as boundaries around their fields. This began the Indian
custom of marking fields with tied up leaves, which have protected them from
deer to this very day.

Both King Banyan Deer and the King of Benares
lived out their lives in peace, died, and were reborn as they deserved.


The moral is: Wherever it is found,
compassion is a sign of greatness.



A Permanent Online
International Seminar on Buddhism and Buddhist Heritage of Jambudvipa that is
the Great Prabuddha Bharath

Let Your Aim be Nibbana

by Ajahn Chah

A
talk Ajahn Chah gave while visiting the U.S. in 1979

August 7, 2005



At this time please determine your minds to listen to the dhamma. Today is the
traditional day of dhammasavana. It is the appropriate time for us, the
host of Buddhists, to study the dhamma in order to increase our mindfulness and
wisdom. Giving and receiving the teachings is something we have been doing for
a long time. The activities we usually perform on this day, chanting homage to
the Buddha, taking moral precepts, meditating and listening to teachings,
should be understood as methods and principles for spiritual development. They
are not anything more than this.

When it comes to taking precepts, for example, a monk will proclaim the
precepts and the laypeople will vow to undertake them. Don’t misunderstand what
is going on. The truth is that morality is not something that can be given. It
can’t really be requested or received from someone. We can’t give it to someone
else. In our vernacular, we hear people say ‘The venerable monk gave the
precepts” and “We received the precepts.” We talk like this here
in the countryside, and it has become our habitual way of understanding. If we
think like that, that we come to receive precepts from the monks on the lunar
observance days, and that if the monks won’t give precepts then we don’t have
morality, that is only a tradition of delusion that we have inherited from our
ancestors. Thinking in this way means that we give up our own responsibility,
not having firm trust and conviction in ourselves. Then it gets passed down to
the next generation, and they too come to ‘receive’ precepts from the monks.
And the monks come to believe that they are the ones who ‘give’ the precepts to
the laity. In fact, morality and precepts are not like that. They are not
something to be ‘given’ or ‘received’; but on ceremonial occasions of making
merit and the like, we use this as a ritual form according to tradition and
employ the terminology.

In truth, morality resides with the intentions of people. If you have the
conscious determination to refrain from harmful activities and wrongdoing by
way of body and speech, then morality is coming about within you. You should
know it within yourself. It is OK to take the vows with another person. You can
recollect the precepts by yourself. If you don’t know what they are, then you
can request them from someone else. It is not something very complicated or
distant. So really, whenever we wish to ‘receive’ morality and dhamma, we have
them right then. It is just like the air that surrounds us everywhere. Whenever
we breathe, we take it in. All manner of good and evil are like that. If we
wish to do good, we can do it anywhere, at any time. We can do it alone, or together
with others. Evil is the same. We can do it with a large or small group, in a
hidden or open place. It is like that.

These are things that are already in existence. But as to morality, it is
something that we should consider normal for all humans to practice. A person
who has no morality is no different from an animal. If you decide to live like
an animal, then of course there is no good or evil for you, because an animal
doesn’t have any knowledge of such things. A cat catches mice, but we don’t say
it is doing evil, because it has no concepts or knowledge of good or bad, right
or wrong. These beings are outside the circle of human beings. It is the animal
realm. The Buddha pointed out that this group is just living according to the
animal kind of kamma. Those who understand right and wrong, good and evil, are
humans. The Buddha taught his Dhamma for humans. If we people don’t have
morality and knowledge of these things, then we are not much different from
animals, so it is appropriate that we study and learn about them and make
ourselves able. This is taking advantage of the precious accomplishment of
human existence and bringing it to fulfillment.

The profound dhamma is the teaching that morality is necessary. Then when there
is morality, one should pursue dhamma. Morality means the precepts as to what
is forbidden and what is permissible. Dhamma refers to nature and to humans
knowing about nature, how things exist according to nature. Nature is something
we do not compose. It exists as it is, according to its conditions. A simple
example is animals. A certain species, such as peacocks, is born with its
various patterns and colors. They were not created like that by humans or
modified by humans; they are just born that way, according to nature. This is a
little example of how it is in nature.

All things of nature are existing in the world - this is still talking about
understanding from a worldly viewpoint. The Buddha taught Dhamma for us to know
nature, to let go of it and let it exist according to its conditions. This is
talking about the external material world. As to namadhamma, meaning the
mind, it can not be left to follow its own conditions. It has to be trained. In
the end, we can say that mind is the teacher of body and speech, so it needs to
be well trained. Letting it go according to its natural urges just makes one an
animal. It has to be instructed and trained. It should come to know nature, but
should not merely be left to follow nature.

We are born into this world, and all of us will naturally have the afflictions
of desire, anger and delusion. Desire makes us crave after various things and
causes the mind to be in a state of imbalance and turmoil. Nature is like that.
It will just not do to let the mind go after these impulses of craving. It only
leads to heat and distress. It is better to train in dhamma, in truth.

When aversion occurs in us, we want to express anger towards people, and it may
get to the point of physically attacking or even killing people. But we don’t
just ‘let it go’ according to its nature. We know the nature of what is
occurring there. We see it for what it is, and teach the mind about it. This is
studying dhamma.

Delusion is the same. When it happens, we are confused about things. If we just
leave it as it is, then we remain in ignorance. So the Buddha told us to know
nature, to teach nature, to train and adjust nature, to know exactly what
nature is.

For example, people are born with physical form and mind. In the beginning
these things are born, in the middle they change, and in the end they are
extinguished. This is ordinary; this is their nature. We cannot do much to
alter these facts. We train our minds as we can, and when the time comes we
have to let go of it all. It is beyond the ability of humans to change this or
get beyond it. The dhamma that the Buddha taught is something to be applied
while we are here, for making actions, words and thoughts correct and proper.
It means he was teaching the minds of people so that they would not be deluded
in regard to nature, to conventional reality and supposition. The Teacher
instructed us to see the world. His dhamma was a teaching that is above and
beyond the world. We are in the world. We were born into this world; he taught
us to transcend the world, not being prisoner to worldy ways and habits.

It is like a diamond that falls into a muddy pit. No matter how much dirt and
filth covers it, that does not destroy the radiance, the hues, and the worth of
it. Even though the mud is stuck to it, the diamond does not lose anything, but
is just as it originally was. There are two separate things.

So the Buddha taught to be above the world, which means knowing the world
clearly. By ‘the world’ he did not mean so much the earth and sky and elements,
but rather to the mind, the wheel of samsara within the hearts of people. He
meant this wheel, this world. This is the world that the Buddha knew clearly;
when we talk about knowing the world clearly, we are talking about these
things. If it were otherwise, then the Buddha would have had to be flying
everywhere to ‘know the world clearly.’ It is not like that. It is a single
point. All dhammas come down to one single point. Like people, which means men
and women. If we observe one man and one woman, we know the nature of all people
in the universe. They are not that different.

Or learning about heat. If we just know this one point, the quality of being
hot, then it does not matter what the source or cause of the heat is, the
condition of ‘hot’ is such. Knowing this one point, then wherever there may be
hotness in the universe, it is like this. So the Buddha knew a single point,
and his knowledge encompassed the world. Knowing coldness to be a certain way,
when he encountered coldness anywhere in the world, he already knew it. He taught
a single point, for beings living in the world to know the world, to know the
nature of the world…. Just like knowing people…. Knowing men and women, knowing
the manner of existence of beings in the world. His knowledge was such. Knowing
one point, he knew all things.

The dhamma which the Teacher expounded was for going beyond suffering. What is
this ‘going beyond suffering’ all about? What should we do to ‘escape from
suffering’? It is necessary for us to do some study; we need to come and study
the thinking and feeling in our hearts. Just that. It is something we are
presently unable to change. If we can change it, we can be free of all
suffering and unsatisfactoriness in life, just by changing this one point, our
habitual world view, our way of thinking and feeling. If we come to have a new
sense of things, a new understanding, then we transcend the old perceptions and
understanding.

The authentic dhamma of the Buddha is not something pointing far away. It
teaches self. It teaches about atta, self, and that things are not
really self. That is all. All the teachings that the Buddha gave were pointing
out that ‘this is not a self, this does not belong to a self, there is no such
thing as ourselves or others.’ Here, when we contact this, we can’t really read
it, we don’t ‘translate’ the Dhamma correctly. We still think ‘this is me, this
is mine.’ We attach to things and invest them with meaning. When we do this, we
can’t yet disentangle from them; the involvement deepens and the mess gets
worse and worse. If we know that there is no self, that body and mind are
really anatta, as the Buddha taught, then when we keep on investigating,
eventually we will come to realization of the actual condition of selflessness.
We will genuinely realize that there is no self or other. Pleasure is merely
pleasure. Feeling is merely feeling. Memory is merely memory. Thinking is
merely thinking. They are all things which are ‘merely’ that. Happiness is
merely happiness; suffering is merely suffering. Good is merely good, evil is
merely evil. Everything exists ‘merely’ thus. There is no real happiness or
real suffering. There are just the merely existing conditions. Merely happy,
merely suffering, merely hot, merely cold, merely a being or a person. You
should keep looking to see that things are only so much. Only earth, only
water, only fire, only air. We should keep on ‘reading’ these things and
investigating this point. Eventually our perception will change; we will have a
different feeling about things. The tight conviction that there is self and
things belonging to self will gradually come undone. When this sense of things
is removed, then the opposite perception will keep increasing steadily.

When the realization of anatta comes to full measure, then we will be able to relate
to the things of this world, to our most cherished possessions and
involvements, to friends and relations, to wealth, accomplishments and status,
just the same as we do to our clothes. When shirts and pants are new, we wear
them; they get dirty and we wash them; after some time they are worn out and we
discard them. There is nothing out of the ordinary there; we are constantly
getting rid of the old things and starting to use new garments.

So we will have the exact same feeling about our existence in this world. We
will not cry or moan over things. We will not be tormented or burdened by them.
They remain the same things as they were before, but our feeling and
understanding of them has changed. Now our knowledge will be exalted and we
will see truth. We will have attained supreme vision and authentic knowledge of
that Dhamma which we ought to know. The Buddha taught the Dhamma that we ought
to know and to see. Where is the dhamma that we ought to know and see? It is
right here within us, this body and mind. We have it already; we should come to
know and see it.

For example, all of us have been born into this human realm. Whatever we gained
by that we are going to lose. We have seen people born and seen them die. We
just see this happening, but don’t really see clearly. When there is a birth,
we rejoice over it; when someone dies, we cry for them. There is no end. It
goes on in this way, and there is no end to our foolishness. Seeing birth, we
are foolhardy; seeing death, we are foolhardy. There is only this unending
foolishness. Let’s take a look at all this. These things are natural
occurrences. Contemplate the dhamma here, the dhamma we should know and see.
This dhamma is existing right now. Make up your minds about this. Exert
restraint and self-control. Now we are amidst the things of this life. We
shouldn’t have fears of death. We should fear the lower realms. Don’t fear
dying; rather, be afraid of falling into hell. You should be afraid of doing
wrong while you still have life. These are old things we are dealing with, not
new things. Some people are alive but don’t know themselves at all. They think,
what’s the big deal about what I do now, I can’t know what is going to happen
when I die. They don’t think about the new seeds they are creating for the
future. They only see the old fruit. They fixate on present experience, not
realizing that if there is fruit, it must have come from a seed, and that
within the fruit we have now are the seeds of future fruit. These seeds are
just waiting to be planted. Actions born of ignorance continue the chain in
this way, but when you are eating the fruit, you don’t think about all the
implications.

Wherever the mind has a lot of attachment, just there will we experience
intense suffering, intense grief, intense difficulty. The place we experience
the most problems is the place we have the most attraction, longing and
concern. Please try to resolve this. Now, while you still have life and breath,
keep on looking at it and reading it, until you are able to ‘translate’ it and
solve the problem.

Whatever we are experiencing as part of our lives now, one day we will be
parted from it. So don’t just pass the time. Practice spiritual cultivation.
Take this parting, this separation and loss, as your object of contemplation
right now, in the present, until you are clever and skilled in it, until you
can see that it is ordinary and natural. When there is anxiety and regret over
it, have the wisdom to recognize the limits of this anxiety and regret, knowing
what they are according to the truth. If you can consider things in this way,
then wisdom will arise. But people generally do not want to investigate.
Whenever suffering occurs, wisdom can arise there, if we investigate.

Wherever pleasant or unpleasant experience happens, wisdom can arise there. If
we know happiness and suffering for what they really are, then we know the
Dhamma. If we know the Dhamma, we know the world clearly; if we know the world
clearly, we know the Dhamma.

Actually, for most of us, if something is displeasing, we don’t really want to
know about it. We get caught up in the aversion to it. If we dislike someone,
we don’t want to look at their face or get anywhere near them. This is the mark
of a foolish, unskillful person; this is not the way of a good person. If we
like someone, then of course we want to be close to them, we make every effort
to be with them, taking delight in their company. This is foolishness, also.
They are actually the same, like the palm and back of the hand. When we turn
the hand up and see the palm, the back of the hand is hidden from sight. When
we turn it over, then the palm is not seen. Pleasure hides pain, and pain hides
pleasure from our sight. Wrong covers up right, right covers wrong. Just
looking at one side, our knowledge is not complete.

Let’s do things completely, while we still have life. Keep on looking at
things, separating truth from falsehood, noting how things really are, getting
to the end of it, reaching peace. When the time comes, we will be able to cut
through and let go completely. Now we have to firmly attempt to separate
things, keep trying to cut through.

The Buddha taught about hair, nails, skin and teeth. He taught us to separate
here. A person who does not know about separating only knows about holding them
to himself. Now while we have not yet parted from these things, we should be
skillful in meditating on them. We have not yet left this world, so we should
be careful. We should contemplate a lot, make copious charitable offerings,
recite the scriptures a lot, cultivate a lot: cultivate impermanence, cultivate
unsatisfactoriness, cultivate selflessness. Even if the mind does not want to
listen, we should keep on breaking things up like this and come to know in the
present. This can most definitely be done, people. One can realize knowledge
that transcends the world. We are stuck in the world. This is a way to
‘destroy’ the world, through contemplating and seeing beyond the world so that
we can transcend the world in our being. Even while we are living in this
world, our view can be above the world.

In a worldly existence, one creates both good and evil. Now we try to practice
virtue and give up evil. When good results come, then you should not be ‘under’
that good, but be able to transcend it. If you do not transcend it, then you
become a slave to virtue and to your concepts of what is good. It puts you in
difficulty, and there will not be an end to your tears. It does not matter how
much good you have practiced, if you are attached to it, then you are still not
free, and there will be no end to tears. But one who transcends good as well as
evil has no more tears to shed. They have dried up. There can be an end. We
should learn to use virtue, not to be used by virtue.

To put the teaching of the Buddha in a nutshell, the point is to transform
one’s view. It is possible to change it. It only requires looking at things,
and then it happens. Having been born, we will experience aging, illness, death
and separation. These things are right here. We don’t need to look up at the
sky or down at the earth. The dhamma that we need to see and to know can be
seen right here within us, every moment of every day. When there is a birth, we
are filled with joy. When there is a death, we grieve. That’s how we spend our
lives. These are the things we need to know about, but we still have not really
looked into them and seen the truth. We are stuck deep in this ignorance. We
ask, when will we get the chance to see the Dhamma; but it is right here to be
seen in the present..

This is the Dhamma we should learn about and see. This is what the Buddha
taught about. He did not teach about gods and demons and nagas, protective
deities, jealous demigods, nature spirits and the like. He taught the things
that one should know and see. These are truths that we really should be able to
realize. External phenomena are like this, exhibiting the three
characteristics. Internal phenomena, i.e., this body, are like this, too. The
truth can be seen in the hair, nails, skin and teeth. Previously they
flourished. Now they are diminished. The hair thins and becomes gray. It is
like this. Do you see? Or will you say it is something you can’t see? You
certainly should be able to see with a little investigation.

If we really take an interest in all of this and contemplate seriously, we can
gain genuine knowledge. If this were something that could not be done, the
Buddha would not have bothered to talk about it. How many tens and hundreds of
thousands of his followers have come to realization? If one is really keen on
looking at things, one can come to know. The Dhamma is like that.

We are living in this world. The Buddha wanted us to know the world. Living in
the world, we gain our knowledge from the world. The Buddha is said to be Lokavidu,
one who knows the world clearly. It means living in the world but not being
stuck in the ways of the world; living among attraction and aversion, but not
stuck in attraction and aversion. This can be spoken about and explained in
ordinary language. This is how the Buddha taught.

Normally we speak in terms of atta, self, talking about me and mine, you
and yours, but the mind can remain uninterruptedly in the realization of anatta,
selflessness. Think about it. When we talk to children, we speak in one way; when
dealing with adults, we speak in another way. If we use words appropriate to
children to speak with adults, or use adults’ words to speak with children, it
won’t work out. In the proper use of conventions, we have to know when we are
talking to children. It can be appropriate to talk about me and mine, you and
yours, and so forth, but inwardly the mind is Dhamma, dwelling in realization
of anatta. You should have this kind of foundation.

So the Buddha said that you should take the Dhamma as your foundation, your
basis. Living and practicing in the world, will you take yourself, your ideas,
desires and opinions, as a basis? That is not right. The Dhamma should be your
standard. If you take yourself as the standard, you become self-absorbed. If
you take someone else as your standard, you are merely infatuated with that
person. Being enthralled with ourselves or with another person is not the way
of Dhamma. The Dhamma does not incline to any person or follow personalities.
It follows the truth. It does not simply accord with the likes and dislikes of
people; such habitual reactions have nothing to do with the truth of things.

If we really consider all of this and investigate thoroughly to know the truth,
then we will enter the correct path. Our way of living will become correct.
Thinking will be correct. Our actions and speech will be correct. So we really
should look into all of this. Why is it that we have suffering? Because of lack
of knowledge, not knowing where things begin and end, not understanding the
causes; this is ignorance. When there is this ignorance, then various desires
arise, and, driven by them, we create the causes of suffering. Then the result
must be suffering. When you gather firewood and light a match to it, and then
you expect not to have any heat, what are your chances? You are creating a
fire, aren’t you? This is origination itself.

If you understand these things, then morality will be born here. Dhamma will be
born here. So prepare yourselves. The Buddha advised us to prepare ourselves.
You needn’t have too many concerns or anxieties about things. Just look here.
Look at the place without desires, the place without danger. Nibbana paccayo
hotu
- the Buddha taught, let it be a cause for Nibbana. If it will be a
cause for realization of Nibbana, then it means looking at the place where
things are empty, where things are done with, where they reach their end, where
they are exhausted. Look at the place where there are no more causes, where
there is no more self or other, me or mine. This looking becomes a cause or
condition, a condition for attaining Nibbana. Then practicing generosity
becomes a cause for realizing Nibbana. Practicing morality becomes a cause for
realizing Nibbana. Listening to the teachings becomes a cause for realizing Nibbana.
Thus we can dedicate all our Dhamma activities to become causes for Nibbana.
But we are not looking towards Nibbana. We are looking at self and other and
attachment and grasping without end. This does not become a cause for Nibbana.

When we deal with others and they talk about self, about me and mine, about
what is ours, then we immediately agree with this viewpoint. We immediately
think, “Yeah, that’s right!” But it’s not right. Even if the mind is
saying, right, right, we have to exert control over it. It’s the same as a
child who is afraid of ghosts. Maybe the parents are afraid, too. But it won’t
do for the parents to talk about it; if they do, then the child will feel he
has no protection or security. “No, of course Daddy is not afraid. Don’t worry,
Daddy is here. There are no ghosts. There’s nothing to worry about.” Well,
the father might really be afraid, too. If he starts talking about it, then
they will all get so worked up about ghosts that they’ll jump up and run away,
father, mother and child, and end up homeless.

This is not being clever. You have to look at things clearly and learn how to
deal with them. Even when you feel that deluded appearances are real, you have
to tell yourself that they are not. Go against it like this. Teach yourself
inwardly. When the mind is experiencing the world in terms of self, saying,
‘it’s true’, you have to be able to tell it, ‘it’s not true’. You should be
floating above the water, not be submerged by the floodwaters of worldy habit….
The water is flooding our hearts… if we run after things, do we ever look at
what is going on? Will there be anyone ‘watching the house’?

Nibbana paccayam hotu - one need not aim at anything or wish for
anything at all. Just aim for Nibbana. All manner of becoming and birth, merit
and virtue in the worldly way do not reach there. Making merits and skillful
kamma, hoping it will cause us to attain to some better state, we don’t need to
be wishing for a lot of things; just aim directly for Nibbana. Wanting sila,
wanting tranquility - we just end up in the same old place- it’s not necessary
to desire these things - we should just wish for the place of cessation.

It is like this. Throughout all our becoming and birth, all of us are so
terribly anxious about so many things. When there is separation, when there is
death, we cry and lament. To me, oyyy, I can only think, how utterly foolish
this is. What are we crying about? Where do you think people are going anyhow?
If they are still bound up in becoming and birth, they are not really going
away. When children grow up and move to the big city of Bangkok, they still
think of their parents. They won’t be missing someone else’s parents, just
their own. When they return, they will go to their parents’ home, not someone
else’s. And when they go away again, they will still think about their home
here in Ubon. Will they be homesick for some other place? What do you think? So
when the breath ends and we die, no matter through how many lifetimes, if the
causes for becoming and birth still exist, the consciousness is likely to try
and take birth in a place it is familiar with. I think we are just too fearful
about all of this. So please don’t go crying about it too much. Think about
this. Satte kammam vipassati - kamma drives beings into their various births -
they don’t go very far. Cycling back and forth through the round of births,
that is all, just changing appearances, appearing with a different face next
time, but we don’t know it. Just coming and going, going and returning in the
round of samsara, not really going anywhere. Just staying there. Like a mango
that is shaken off the tree/ like the snare that does not get the wasps’ nest
and falls to the ground: it is not going anywhere. It is just staying there. So
the Buddha said, Nibbana paccayam hotu; let your only aim be Nibbana. Strive
hard to accomplish this; don’t end up like the mango falling to the ground and
going nowhere.

Transform your sense of things like this. If you can change it, you will know
great peace. Change, please; come to see and know. These are things one should
indeed see and know. If you do see and know, then where else do you need to go?
Morality will come to be. Dhamma will come to be. It is nothing far away;
please investigate this.

When you transform your view, then you will realize that it is like watching
leaves fall from the trees. When they get old and dry, they fall from the tree.
And when the season comes, they begin to appear again. Would anyone cry when
leaves fall or laugh when they grow? If you did, you would be insane, wouldn’t
you? It is just this much. If we can see things in this way, we will be OK. We
will know that is just the natural order of things. It doesn’t matter how many
births we undergo, it will always be like this. When one studies dhamma, gains
clear knowledge, and undergoes a change of world-view like this, one will
realize peace and be free of bewilderment about the phenomena of this life.

But the important point, really, is that we have life now, in the present. We
are experiencing the results of past deeds right now. When beings are born into
the world, that is the results of past actions appearing. Whatever happiness or
suffering beings have in the present are the fruits of what they have done
previously. It is born of the past and experienced in the present. Then this
present experience becomes the basis for the future, as we create further
causes under its influence, and the future experience becomes the result. The
movement from one birth to the next also happens in this way. You should
understand this.

Listening to the dhamma should resolve your doubts. It should clarify your view
of things and alter your way of living. When doubts are resolved, suffering can
end. You stop creating desires and mental afflictions. Then, whatever you
experience, if something is displeasing to you, you will not suffer over it,
because you understand its changeability. If something is pleasing to you, you
will not get carried away and become intoxicated by it, because you know the
way to let go of things appropriately. You maintain a balanced perspective,
because you understand impermanence and know how to resolve things according to
Dhamma. You know that good and bad conditions are always changing. Knowing
internal phenomena, you understand external phenomena. Not attached to the
external, you are not attached to the internal. Observing things within
yourself or outside of yourself, it is all completely the same.

In this way, we can dwell in a natural state, which is peace and tranquility.
If we are criticized, we remain undisturbed. If we are praised, we are
undisturbed. Let things be in this way, not being influenced by others. This is
freedom. Knowing the two extremes for what they are, one can experience
well-being. One does not stop at either side. This is genuine happiness and
peace, transcending all things of the world. One transcends all good and evil.
Above cause and effect, beyond birth and death. Born into this world, one can
transcend the world. Beyond the world, knowing the world - this is the aim of
the Buddha’s teaching. He did not aim for people to suffer. He desired people
to attain to peace, to know the truth of things and realize wisdom. This is
dhamma, knowing the nature of things. Whatever exists in the world is nature.
There is no need to be in confusion about it. Wherever you are, the same laws
apply.

The most important point is that while we have life, we should train the mind
to be even in regard to things. We should be able to share wealth and
possessions. When the time comes, we should give a portion to those in need,
just as if we were giving things to our own children. Sharing things like this,
we will feel happy; and if we can give away all our wealth, then whenever our
breath may stop, there will be no attachment or anxiety because everything is
gone. The Buddha taught to ‘die before you die’, to be finished with things
before they are finished. Then you can be at ease. Let things break before they
are broken, let them finish before they are finished. This is the Buddha’s
intention in teaching the Dhamma. Even if you listen to teachings for a hundred
or a thousand eons, if you do not understand these points, you won’t be able to
undo your suffering and you will not find peace. You will not see the Dhamma.
But understanding these things according to the Buddha’s intention and being
able to resolve things is called seeing the Dhamma. This view of things can
make an end of suffering. It can relieve all heat and distress. Whoever strives
sincerely and is diligent in practice, who can endure, who trains and develops
themselves to the full measure, those persons will attain to peace and
cessation. Wherever they stay, they will have no suffering. Whether they are
young or old, they will be free of suffering. Whatever their situation,
whatever work they have to perform, they will have no suffering, because their
minds have reached the place where suffering is exhausted, where there is
peace. It is like this. It is a matter of nature.

The Buddha thus said to change one’s perceptions, and there will be the Dhamma.
When the mind is in harmony with Dhamma, then Dhamma enters the heart. The mind
and the Dhamma become the indistinguishable. This is something to be realized
by those who practice, the changing of one’s view and experience of things. The
entire Dhamma is paccatam. It can not be given by anyone; that is an
impossibility. If we hold it to be difficult, then it will be something
difficult. If we take it to be easy, then it is easy. Whoever contemplates it
and sees the one point does not have to know a lot of things. Seeing the one
point, seeing birth and death, the arising and passing away of phenomena
according to nature, one will know all things. This is a matter of the truth.

This is the way of the Buddha. The Buddha gave his teachings out of the wish to
benefit all beings. He wished for us to go beyond suffering and to attain
peace. It is not that we have to die first in order to transcend suffering… We
shouldn’t think that we will attain this after death… we can go beyond suffering
here and now, in the present. We transcend within our perception of things, in
this very life, through the view that arises in our minds. Then, sitting, we
are happy; lying down, we are happy; wherever we are, we are have happiness. We
become without fault, experiencing no ill results, living in a state of
freedom. The mind is clear, bright, and tranquil. There is no more darkness or
defilement. That is someone who has reached the supreme happiness of the
Buddha’s way. Please investigate this for yourselves. All of you lay followers,
please contemplate this to gain understanding and ability. If you have
suffering, then practice to alleviate your suffering. If it is great, make it
little, and if it is little, make an end of it. Everyone has to do this for
themselves, so please make an effort to consider these words. May you prosper
and develop.

Evam.




COMPREHENSIVE PALI
COURSE

 

LESSON 9

Exercise 2

 

Translate into Pāli

1.                  
Strive to conquer the evil and to gain happiness.

 

Akusalaṁ jayituṁ
ceva sukhaṁ ca labhituṁ

Yuñjatha.

 

2.                  
The meditator seels to conquer the mind.

 

Yogi cittaṁ jayituṁ pariyesati.

 

3.                  
He will tame the mind, not the body.

 

So citta
damessati, na k
āya.

 

4.                  
I will go to the monastery to worship the noblest of seers.

 

Ahaṁ isīnaṁ seṭṭhaṁ paṇāmetuṁ vihāra

gamissāmi

 

5.                  
I went to Rajagaha to worship the Blessed One, and

to associate with
monks.

 

Ahaṁ Bhagavantaṁ vandituṁ Rājagahaṁ gacchiṁ

samaṇehi ca bhajituṁ.

 

6.                  
In the three realms of existence The Awakened One,

Is the Pre-eminent. He
is the Saviour of all beings.

 

Tibhuvanamhi Buddho jeṭṭho hoti, so ca sabbessaṁ

sattānaṁ Nātho.

 

7.                  
Afterwards the boys went to the monastery to train

themselves on the
Teachings of the Awakened One.

 

Pacchā dārakā
Buddhassa Dhammesu sikkhitu

vihāraṁ gacchiṁsu.

 

8.                  
The king saluted at the feet of te Lord of

Compassion.

 

Bhūpati karuāya adhipatissa pāde vandi.

 

9.                  
I wish to ask about meditation to gain the Truth.

 

Ahaṁ saccaṁ labhituṁ
bh
ācanaārabbha

pucchituṁ icchāmi.

 

10.              
Men and women go to the monastery to seek the

Three Refuges.

 

Purisā ca itthiyo ca Tisaraṇaṁ pariyesituṁ vihāra

Gacchanti.

 

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08/23/09
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If Indira statues OK,
why not Mayawati’s?

Deccan Chronicle
August 13th, 2009

By Kancha Ilaiah

The other day I was invited for a debate on a
major national TV channel on the issue of the Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister, Ms
Mayawati, installing her statues all over the state, apart from those of
Jyotiba Phule, Periyar Ramaswamy, B.R. Ambedkar and Kanshi Ram.



The
accusation of the majority of the panelists was that installing one’s own
statues at the expense of the state was not only wrong but also unethical,
immoral and illegal.


Majority of the panelists and almost all the middle class-upper caste students
and others in the audience were clapping down any balanced argument. Anybody
who attacked Ms Mayawati was being applauded.


Much of the audience came from Noida-Uttar Pradesh and termed the installation
of the statues as politically immoral. Sadly, that there were no SC/STs or slum
dwellers who vote for Ms Mayawati to give their opinion on the issue.



We
have to debate whether the installation of statues should be seen as a legal
issue or is it more a moral and political question.


Some enthusiastic lawyers have taken the issue of Ms Mayawati installing her
own statues to the Supreme Court through a public interest litigation (PIL). But
can the courts intervene and curb the expenditure incurred by the Centre and
states in advertising their achievements and schemes with huge photographs of
the Prime Minister, Chief Ministers and Cabinet ministers?

(Many
students who get just pass marks in SSC become lawyers in this country, since
they cannot become Doctors, Engineers or scientists. One can imagine how wise
they could be and how much knowledge they would have gained with their stuper
state of mind. They are just fit for making affidavits for their livelihood and
when they take up PIL they fail miserably. Only those who get high ranks in SSC
must be allowed to become lawers so that they can be thorough with the
Constitution and also they must be thorough with Buddha Dhamma)


Publicising one’s own image while in power, through photographs or statues, has
a common objective of influencing the masses for the sake of votes in the
future, or to perpetuate one’s own image among the masses. Both forms of
publicity have a common objective and involve spending public money.


We should, here, take note of the portraits of the Prime Minister and the Chief
Ministers put up in government offices as soon as they assume office.

Undoubtedly
this is also meant to perpetuate the image of the person in power.
The question is not what the Western democracies practice and how we imitate
them. Someone might point out that the portrait of the American President is
put up in all federal offices and the portrait of the British Prime Minister is
put in major government offices. And, therefore, what we are doing is also
right. This is mere imitation and we should discard such approaches and evolve
our own democratic practices.


So let us look back and see who started the installation of statues across the
country. In my remote village of rural Telangana, Papaiah Pet of Warangal district, there
was a statue of Mahtama Gandhi. This was said to have been installed by one of
the tehsildars with state money.


Gandhi was not a person in power, hence he can be compared only with other
stalwarts, like Ambedkar. Did any government agency install an Ambedkar statue
till SC/STs started putting up his statues in the 70s and 80s in their own
mohallahs?


During the Congress regime, governmental agencies started installing statues of
Jawaharlal Nehru and Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel. After the death of Indira Gandhi
and Rajiv Gandhi, their statues were also installed across the country. They
were not leaders who emerged from social service. During the regime of the
Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP), statues and portraits of Vinayak Damodar
Savarkar, Madhav Sadashiv Golwalkar and Swami Vivekananda and Vajpayee were
installed in various places.


Ms Mayawati has showed courage and confidence in installing her own statue
along with those of Lord Buddha, Phule, Ambedkar, Periyar and Kanshi Ram.
If Indira Gandhi was the first upper caste woman leader who got power, Ms
Mayawati is the first Aboriginal Inhabitant of Jambudvipa, that is, the Great
Prabuddha Bharath (Scheduled Caste) leader who got power. She has her own
iconic image. Of course, she is an “un-Hindu” woman icon in the tradition of
Kanshi Ram. The fact is that even if she does not install her own statues, the
Bahujan people will install her statues.

(
like how a disciple of the Buddha bought Jetavana for Him by spreading gold
coins to by the Park. SC/STs are such kind of people who will give their every
thing for the leaders whom they like. They had made film stars as Chief
Ministers, just because they acted as their protectors. They would not mind
spending their entire coolie they earned to buy a ticket in black market to
worship their heroes and heroines)

She
knows that and that’s why she is undeterred. There is a counter cultural
dimension in her scheme of things. Uttar Pradesh has the most conservative
Hindu cultural base, with Ayodhya, Benares and Mathura built by the Hindu kings way back in
history. Kanshi Ram wanted to create counter Buddhist-Ambedkarit e rationalist
cultural centres that would have equal visibility.


After Bodh Gaya, Nagpur Deekshabhoomi, the Bahujan
Parks that Kanshi Ram established near
Lucknow, what Ms Mayawati is building in Noida
and other places are going to carry forward what I prefer to call the
“post-Hindu nationalist image of India”. Once these centres are
built, nobody will be able to touch them.


As a politically shrewd person, Ms Mayawati knows that once she puts herself in
that iconic lineage, nobody would be able to change it. Even after her
political career is over, she will have her own following.


Since the Hindu base is weakening in the country, the counter cultural base
will increase. This is third-generation SC/ST-Bahujan counter culturalist
campaign. It was started by Ambedkar, taken forward by Kanshi Ram and now Ms
Mayawati is expanding it further.


Ms Mayawati’s cultural parks are going to be the “un-Hindu” historical centres.
They should worry the Hindu forces and the Sangh Parivar more than the
Congress. But the Congress is talking more about them than the BJP or other
Hindutva forces. Ms Mayawati’s image will keep growing as long as the Congress,
the BJP and the Samajwadi Party keep on attacking these cultural centres.


The BJP knows that once they begin a discourse around these Buddhist-Ambedkar
cultural centres, their own Hindu cultural nationalism will get undermined and
the Bahujan-Buddhist cultural nationalism will occupy centrestage.


All the Hindu temples and Buddhist viharas in India, as well as many churches and
mosques, were built with state money and they provide the cultural base of
those religions. Then why should certain hegemonic caste-communal intellectual
forces make an issue out of the SC/ST -Bahujan cultural centres that keep
coming up with images of their own heroes in the country? The educated and
politically- aware SC/ST -Bahujan forces know what makes them raise this bogey
beyond its need. A party like the Congress would serve itself better if it
stops politicising these cultural parks and takes up other issues.

Kind Regards,

 

Jayant Ramteke


Proceeding of the first meeting of the Executive Committee of the<br /> Karnataka State Horticulture Development Agency held on 12-1-2009 under the<br /> Chairmanship of the Additional Chief Secretary and Development Commissioner at<br /> 1

 ALMOST EVERY
FRAUD involves VICTIM

sending CASH money to a Fraudster/Scammer.
ABSOLUTELY DO NOT send any money
using Western
Union
/ Moneygram. 

Always deal ONLY locally by
meeting the seller/buyer in person.

READ and UNDERSTAND the methods
used by Fraudsters in the link above.


Proceeding of the first meeting of the Executive Committee of the<br /> Karnataka State Horticulture Development Agency held on 12-1-2009 under the<br /> Chairmanship of the Additional Chief Secretary and Development Commissioner at<br /> 1


ONLINE TRAINING ON
PRECEPTS AND TRADE-62

EFFECTS OF ROOTING PRODUCTS ON MEDICINAL AND AROMATIC PLANT CUTTINGS

Aromatic plants are cultivated and commercialized from centuries;
nevertheless, little is known about cultural techniques and
productions, and few technical information is available for growers.
The production of nursery material requires studies, especially for
organic farming.
The aims of the research were to study the effects of rooting products
on lavender (
Lavandula angustifolia), pepper mint (Mentha piperita), rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis ) sage (Salvia officinalis) and thyme (Thymus vulgaris),
testing throughout the season natural rooting hormones for organic
farming and synthetic auxins with different application procedures to
increase rooting.
Cuttings were prepared every two weeks from stock plants and treated
with different rooting products.
Starting three weeks after each cutting, weekly sampling took place,
counting roots, measuring root length, and weighing fresh and dry root
and shoot mass.
Season affected rooting, due to the changes of environmental factors
(T°, light), which had a direct influence on the physiology of the
stock plants and on the rooting capacity of the cuttings themselves.
From August to October was the best period to obtain optimal rooting of
cuttings, regardless of the rooting treatments.
Overall, easier rooting was obtained for rosemary, thyme and mint.
Hormones enhanced out-of-season rooting, and the tested organic
products enhanced rooting in most of the cutting periods.


For Creating Livelihoods Enhancing Medicinal and Aromatic Plants based

Biodiversity-Rich Production Systems:
Preliminary Lessons from South Asia1

Kindly visit:

http://www2.mtnforum.org/oldocs/1332.pdf


For A COMPARISON OF CULTIVATION AND WILD

COLLECTION OF MEDICINAL AND AROMATIC

PLANTS UNDER SUSTAINABILITY ASPECTS

Kindly visit:

http://library.wur.nl/ojs/index.php/frontis/article/viewFile/1225/797


Proceeding of the first meeting of the Executive Committee of the<br /> Karnataka State Horticulture Development Agency held on 12-1-2009 under the<br /> Chairmanship of the Additional Chief Secretary and Development Commissioner at<br /> 1


Proceeding of the first meeting of the Executive Committee of the<br /> Karnataka State Horticulture Development Agency held on 12-1-2009 under the<br /> Chairmanship of the Additional Chief Secretary and Development Commissioner at<br /> 1

From J.Chandrasekharan

#668 5th A Main Road,

8th Cross

HAL 3rd Stage

Bangalore -560075

Email:tradesandprecepts@gmail.com

Mob: 9449260443

Phone: 080-25203792

To,

Respected Dr.K.Ramakrishnappa

Executive Director, KSHDA

Project Proponent Director

Department of Horticulture

Government of Karnataka

Respected Sir,

Sub: Suggestions for 25-08-09
program

Under your revolutionary step
for Horticulture Development in Karnataka, I got Certificates for participating
in the training programme on ESTABLISHING JAIVIK (ORGANIC) KITCHEN GARDEN from
21-08-09 to 22-08-09 and in the year 2005 in Medicinal and Aromatic (Terrace
Gardening ) course. Since then, I am attempting to convert my terrace into a garden
and I am planning to post all your revolutionary work in my website.

I am thankful for your kind
oral invitation for me to participate in the program to be held on 25-08-09 at
Lalbagh. I will be grateful to your goodself if you can send the details of the
program.

I would like to Express my
interest as follows:

1)       Cultivation of Healthy Seeds may be given
top priority to make every farm to function as profit centre and to convert all
farms into organic farms.

2)       Micro Loans to the farmers may be given
by the Government and Banks.

3)       All the farms produce including Healthy
Seeds may be sold at all the outlets of HOPCOMS.

4)       Cooked food items of Organic vegetables
may be arranged to sell them directly to the public through HOPCOMS or any
other agencies for their effectiveness. And also the Medicinal and Aromatic
products.

 

With kind regards

 

J.Chandrasekharan

 

Dr. K. Ramakrishnappa. Executive Director,
KSHDA Office of the Society
from Bio centre, Hulimavu to Lalbagh, Bangalore.

Invitation

Proceeding of the first meeting of the Executive Committee of the<br /> Karnataka State Horticulture Development Agency held on 12-1-2009 under the<br /> Chairmanship of the Additional Chief Secretary and Development Commissioner at<br /> 1

A BLUE PRINT FOR LIFE

 

ON
LIVELIHOOD

THE WAY
OF USING RESOURSES

 

          Life must be brought in line with the
Dhamma. This means

That in addition to
love and money, life must include ideals

Of compassion,
creating sffinites, happiness, and kindness,

As well as the Dhamma
of reason and patience. Life will be

Richer with the
Dhamma than if one only possesses money

And love.


COMPREHENSIVE PALI
COURSE

LESSON 9

Exercise 1

 

Translate into English:

 

1.                  
Munayo araññesu sukhena bhāvanāyo bhāvitu

Viharanti.

 

The sages live in the forests to happily practice

meditations.

 

2.                  
Siddhattho Bodhisatto Māra parājayitu

Bodhirukkhassa mūle nisīdi; pacchā lokuttara-

ñāāni bhāvesi ceva Bodhiṁ alabhi, māraṁ ca

damesi.

 

Siddhatha, the Bodhisatta (Would –be-Buddha) sat

Down at the foot of the Tree of Wisdom to defeat
the

Evil One; later he cultivated the supermundane

Insights and attained Awakenment and tamed the

Evil One.

 

3.                  
Isīsu uttamo bhavituṁ yagīnaṁ cakkavatti ca hotuṁ

lokasmiṁ jeṭṭho seṭṭho
bhavituṁ Buddho Jino ahosi,

Bhagavā ahost, Lokanāyako ahosi, tibhuvanassa

Nātho ahosi.

 

To be supreme among seers, to become the Emperor

Of the Yogis and to be the pre-eminent and the

Noblest in the world, the Awakened One became

the Victor, He became the Blessed One, He was the

leader of the world and became the saviour of the

three realms of existence.

 

4.                  
Sabbesu nidhisu Dhamma-nidhi uttamo iti vaditu

samaā gāmesu caranti.

 

The monks move about in the villages to declare
tha

Of all treasures, the treasure of Truth is
supreme.

 

5.                  
Sāvakanāṁ Jino Buddha evaṁ āha: “Bhikkhave

jana-hitāya lokānukampāya
Dhamma
ṁ labbhituṁ.

 

 

 

 

The victor of the
disciples, the Awakened One, said

Thus: ‘Monks, out of
compassion for the world,

wander forth to preach the
Truth for the welfare of

the people’.

 

6.                  
Bodhiṁ labhituṁ, kusalāni kammāni kātuṁ yuñjatha.

 

Strive yet to attain Awakenment, and to perform

Meritorious deeds.

 

7.                  
Girimhi dīpayo vasanti jīvituṁ, arayo ca vasanti

coretuṁ, munayo ca vasanti ñānaṁ labhituṁ.

 

In the mountain, the
leopards live to survive, the

Enemies live to plunder
and the sages live to gain

Knowledge.

 

8.                  
Mayaṁ nāvāyo passituṁ udadhiṁ gacchāma.

 

We go to the ocean to see ships.

 

9.                  
Kusalaṁ karotha nibbānaṁ pariyesituṁ.

 

You do good to seek supreme bliss.

 

10.              
Buddhassa Dhammaṁ desituṁ samaā gāmato

gāmaṁ cariṁsu, caranti,
carissanti.

 

The monks had wandered to preach the Teaching of

the Awakened One, from village to village, they

wander now and will wander in future.


FREE
ONLINE
TRAINING ON BUDDHISM FOR CHILDREN -22

King Banyan Deer
[
Compassion]

Once
upon a time, an unusual and beautiful deer was born in the forests near Benares,
in northern India. Although he was as big as a young colt, it was easy for his
mother to give birth to him. When he opened his eyes, they were as bright as sparkling
jewels. His mouth was as red as the reddest forest berries. His hoofs were as
black as polished coal. His little horns glistened like silver. And his color
was golden, like a perfect summer’s dawn. As he grew up, a herd of 500 deer gathered
around him, and he became known as King Banyan Deer.

Meanwhile,
not far away, another beautiful buck deer was born, just as splendidly golden
in color. In time, a separate herd of 500 deer came to follow him, and he was
known as Branch Deer.

The
King of Benares, at that time, was very fond of eating venison. So he regularly
hunted and killed deer. Each time he hunted, he went to a different village and
ordered the people to serve him. They had to stop what they were doing, whether
plowing or harvesting or whatever, and work in the king’s hunting party.


The people’s lives were upset by these interruptions. They grew less crops, and
other businesses also had less income. So they came together and decided to build
a large deer park for the king, at Benares. There he could hunt by himself, with
no need to command the services of the villagers.

So
the people built a deer park. They made ponds where the deer could drink, and
added trees and grasses for them to eat from. When it was ready, they opened the
gate and went out into the nearby forests. They surrounded the entire herds of
Banyan and Branch deer. Then, with sticks and weapons and noise makers, they drove
them all into the deer park trap, and locked the gate behind them.

After
the deer had settled down, the people went to the king and said, “Our crops
and income have suffered because of your hunting requirements. Now we have made
you a pleasant safe deer park, where you can hunt by yourself as you like. With
no need of our aid, you can enjoy both the hunting and the eating of deer.”

The
king went to the new deer park. There he was pleased to see the vast herds. While
watching them, his eye was caught by the two magnificent golden deer, with large
fully grown antlers. Because he admired their unusual beauty, the king granted
immunity to these two alone. He ordered that they should be completely safe. No
one could harm or kill them.

Once
a day the king would come and kill a deer for his dinner table. Sometimes, when
he was too busy, the royal cook would do this. The body would then be brought
to the chopping block to be butchered for the oven.

Whenever
the deer saw the bow and arrows, they went into a panic, trembling for their lives.
They ran around wildly, some being injured and some wounded, many suffering great
pain.

One day,
King Banyan Deer’s herd gathered around him. He called Branch Deer, and the two
herds joined for a meeting. King Banyan Deer addressed them. “Although in
the end, there is no escape from death, this needless suffering due to injuries
and wounds can be prevented. Since the king only wishes the meat of one deer per
day, let one be chosen by us each day to submit himself to the chopping block.
One day from my herd, and the next day from Branch Deer’s herd, the victim’s lot
will fall to one deer at a time.”

Branch
Deer agreed. From then on, the one whose turn it was, meekly surrendered himself
and laid his neck on the block. The cook came each day, simply killed the waiting
victim, and prepared the king’s venison.

One
day, the turn fell by chance to a pregnant doe in Branch Deer’s herd. Caring for
the others as well as herself and the unborn one, she went to Branch Deer and
said, “My lord, I am pregnant. Grant that I may live until I have delivered
my fawn. Then we will fill two turns rather than just one. This will save a turn,
and thereby a single life for one long day.”

Branch
Deer replied, “No, no, I cannot change the rules in midstream and put your
turn upon another. The pregnancy is yours, the babe is your responsibility. Now
leave me.”

Having
failed with Branch Deer, the poor mother doe went to King Banyan Deer and explained
her plight. He replied gently, “Go in peace. I will change the rules in midstream
and put your turn upon another.”

And
the deer king went to the executioner’s block, and laid down his own golden neck
upon it.

A silence
fell in the deer park. And some who tell this story even say that silence also
fell in other worlds not seen from here.

Soon
the royal cook came to kill the willing victim on the block. But when he saw it
was one of the two golden deer the king had ordered spared, he was afraid to kill
him. So he went and told the King of Benares.

The
king was surprised, so he went to the park. He said to the golden deer, still
lying on the block, “Oh king of deer, did I not promise to spare your life?
What is the reason you come here like the others?”

King
Banyan Deer replied, “Oh king of men, this time a pregnant doe was unlucky
enough to be the one to die. She pleaded for me to spare her, for the sake of
others as well as her unborn baby and herself. I could not help but feel myself
in her place, and feel her suffering. I could not help but weep, to think the
little one would never see the dawn, would never taste the dew. And yet, I could
not force the pain of death on another, relieved to think it was not his turn
today. So, mighty king, I offer my life for the sake of the doe and her unborn
fawn. Be assured there is no other reason.”

The King of Benares
was overwhelmed. Powerful as he was, a tear rolled down his cheek.
Then he said, “Oh great lord, the golden king of deer, even among
human beings, I have not seen any such as you! Such great compassion,
to share in the suffering of others! Such great generosity, to give
your life for others! Such great kindness and tender love for all
your fellow deer! Arise.”

“I
decree that you will never be killed by me or anyone else in my kingdom. And,
so too, the doe and her babe.”

Without
yet raising his head, the golden one said, “Are only we to be saved? What
of the other deer in the park, our friends and kin?” The king said, “My
lord, I cannot refuse you, I grant safety and freedom to all the deer in the park.”
“And what of the deer outside the park, will they be killed?” asked
Banyan. “No my lord, I spare all the deer in my whole kingdom.”

Still
the golden deer did not raise up his head. He pleaded, “So the deer will
be safe, but what will the other four-footed animals do?” “My lord,
from now on they too are safe in my land.” “And what of the birds? They
too want to live.” “Yes, my lord, the birds too will be safe from death
at the hands of men.” “And what of the fish, who live in the water?”
“Even the fish will be free to live, my lord.” So saying, the King of
Benares granted immunity from hunting and killing to all the animals in his land.

Having
pleaded for the lives of all creatures, the Great Being arose.


A Permanent Online
International Seminar on Buddhism and Buddhist Heritage of Jambudvipa that is
the Great Prabuddha Bharath

Let Your Aim be Nibbana

by Ajahn Chah


A talk Ajahn Chah gave while visiting the U.S. in 1979


August 7, 2005




At this time please determine your minds to listen to the dhamma. Today is
the traditional day of dhammasavana. It is the appropriate time for
us, the host of Buddhists, to study the dhamma in order to increase our
mindfulness and wisdom. Giving and receiving the teachings is something we
have been doing for a long time. The activities we usually perform on this
day, chanting homage to the Buddha, taking moral precepts, meditating and
listening to teachings, should be understood as methods and principles for
spiritual development. They are not anything more than this.

When it comes to taking precepts, for example, a monk will proclaim the
precepts and the laypeople will vow to undertake them. Don’t misunderstand
what is going on. The truth is that morality is not something that can be
given. It can’t really be requested or received from someone. We can’t give
it to someone else. In our vernacular, we hear people say ‘The venerable
monk gave the precepts” and “We received the precepts.” We talk like this
here in the countryside, and it has become our habitual way of
understanding. If we think like that, that we come to receive precepts from
the monks on the lunar observance days, and that if the monks won’t give
precepts then we don’t have morality, that is only a tradition of delusion
that we have inherited from our ancestors. Thinking in this way means that
we give up our own responsibility, not having firm trust and conviction in
ourselves. Then it gets passed down to the next generation, and they too
come to ‘receive’ precepts from the monks. And the monks come to believe
that they are the ones who ‘give’ the precepts to the laity. In fact,
morality and precepts are not like that. They are not something to be
‘given’ or ‘received’; but on ceremonial occasions of making merit and the
like, we use this as a ritual form according to tradition and employ the
terminology.

In truth, morality resides with the intentions of people. If you have the
conscious determination to refrain from harmful activities and wrongdoing by
way of body and speech, then morality is coming about within you. You should
know it within yourself. It is OK to take the vows with another person. You
can recollect the precepts by yourself. If you don’t know what they are,
then you can request them from someone else. It is not something very
complicated or distant. So really, whenever we wish to ‘receive’ morality
and dhamma, we have them right then. It is just like the air that surrounds
us everywhere. Whenever we breathe, we take it in. All manner of good and
evil are like that. If we wish to do good, we can do it anywhere, at any
time. We can do it alone, or together with others. Evil is the same. We can
do it with a large or small group, in a hidden or open place. It is like
that.

These are things that are already in existence. But as to morality, it is
something that we should consider normal for all humans to practice. A
person who has no morality is no different from an animal. If you decide to
live like an animal, then of course there is no good or evil for you,
because an animal doesn’t have any knowledge of such things. A cat catches
mice, but we don’t say it is doing evil, because it has no concepts or
knowledge of good or bad, right or wrong. These beings are outside the
circle of human beings. It is the animal realm. The Buddha pointed out that
this group is just living according to the animal kind of kamma. Those who
understand right and wrong, good and evil, are humans. The Buddha taught his
Dhamma for humans. If we people don’t have morality and knowledge of these
things, then we are not much different from animals, so it is appropriate
that we study and learn about them and make ourselves able. This is taking
advantage of the precious accomplishment of human existence and bringing it
to fulfillment.

The profound dhamma is the teaching that morality is necessary. Then when
there is morality, one should pursue dhamma. Morality means the precepts as
to what is forbidden and what is permissible. Dhamma refers to nature and to
humans knowing about nature, how things exist according to nature. Nature is
something we do not compose. It exists as it is, according to its
conditions. A simple example is animals. A certain species, such as
peacocks, is born with its various patterns and colors. They were not
created like that by humans or modified by humans; they are just born that
way, according to nature. This is a little example of how it is in nature.

All things of nature are existing in the world - this is still talking about
understanding from a worldly viewpoint. The Buddha taught Dhamma for us to
know nature, to let go of it and let it exist according to its conditions.
This is talking about the external material world. As to namadhamma,
meaning the mind, it can not be left to follow its own conditions. It has to
be trained. In the end, we can say that mind is the teacher of body and
speech, so it needs to be well trained. Letting it go according to its
natural urges just makes one an animal. It has to be instructed and trained.
It should come to know nature, but should not merely be left to follow
nature.

We are born into this world, and all of us will naturally have the
afflictions of desire, anger and delusion. Desire makes us crave after
various things and causes the mind to be in a state of imbalance and
turmoil. Nature is like that. It will just not do to let the mind go after
these impulses of craving. It only leads to heat and distress. It is better
to train in dhamma, in truth.

When aversion occurs in us, we want to express anger towards people, and it
may get to the point of physically attacking or even killing people. But we
don’t just ‘let it go’ according to its nature. We know the nature of what
is occurring there. We see it for what it is, and teach the mind about it.
This is studying dhamma.

Delusion is the same. When it happens, we are confused about things. If we
just leave it as it is, then we remain in ignorance. So the Buddha told us
to know nature, to teach nature, to train and adjust nature, to know exactly
what nature is.

For example, people are born with physical form and mind. In the beginning
these things are born, in the middle they change, and in the end they are
extinguished. This is ordinary; this is their nature. We cannot do much to
alter these facts. We train our minds as we can, and when the time comes we
have to let go of it all. It is beyond the ability of humans to change this
or get beyond it. The dhamma that the Buddha taught is something to be
applied while we are here, for making actions, words and thoughts correct
and proper. It means he was teaching the minds of people so that they would
not be deluded in regard to nature, to conventional reality and supposition.
The Teacher instructed us to see the world. His dhamma was a teaching that
is above and beyond the world. We are in the world. We were born into this
world; he taught us to transcend the world, not being prisoner to worldy
ways and habits.

It is like a diamond that falls into a muddy pit. No matter how much dirt
and filth covers it, that does not destroy the radiance, the hues, and the
worth of it. Even though the mud is stuck to it, the diamond does not lose
anything, but is just as it originally was. There are two separate things.

So the Buddha taught to be above the world, which means knowing the world
clearly. By ‘the world’ he did not mean so much the earth and sky and
elements, but rather to the mind, the wheel of samsara within the hearts of
people. He meant this wheel, this world. This is the world that the Buddha
knew clearly; when we talk about knowing the world clearly, we are talking
about these things. If it were otherwise, then the Buddha would have had to
be flying everywhere to ‘know the world clearly.’ It is not like that. It is
a single point. All dhammas come down to one single point. Like people,
which means men and women. If we observe one man and one woman, we know the
nature of all people in the universe. They are not that different.

Or learning about heat. If we just know this one point, the quality of being
hot, then it does not matter what the source or cause of the heat is, the
condition of ‘hot’ is such. Knowing this one point, then wherever there may
be hotness in the universe, it is like this. So the Buddha knew a single
point, and his knowledge encompassed the world. Knowing coldness to be a
certain way, when he encountered coldness anywhere in the world, he already
knew it. He taught a single point, for beings living in the world to know
the world, to know the nature of the world…. Just like knowing people….
Knowing men and women, knowing the manner of existence of beings in the
world. His knowledge was such. Knowing one point, he knew all things.

The dhamma which the Teacher expounded was for going beyond suffering. What
is this ‘going beyond suffering’ all about? What should we do to ‘escape
from suffering’? It is necessary for us to do some study; we need to come
and study the thinking and feeling in our hearts. Just that. It is something
we are presently unable to change. If we can change it, we can be free of
all suffering and unsatisfactoriness in life, just by changing this one
point, our habitual world view, our way of thinking and feeling. If we come
to have a new sense of things, a new understanding, then we transcend the
old perceptions and understanding.

The authentic dhamma of the Buddha is not something pointing far away. It
teaches self. It teaches about atta, self, and that things are not
really self. That is all. All the teachings that the Buddha gave were
pointing out that ‘this is not a self, this does not belong to a self, there
is no such thing as ourselves or others.’ Here, when we contact this, we
can’t really read it, we don’t ‘translate’ the Dhamma correctly. We still
think ‘this is me, this is mine.’ We attach to things and invest them with
meaning. When we do this, we can’t yet disentangle from them; the
involvement deepens and the mess gets worse and worse. If we
know that there is no self, that body and mind are really anatta, as the
Buddha taught, then when we keep on investigating, eventually we will come
to realization of the actual condition of selflessness. We will genuinely
realize that there is no self or other. Pleasure is merely pleasure. Feeling
is merely feeling. Memory is merely memory. Thinking is merely thinking.
They are all things which are ‘merely’ that. Happiness is merely happiness;
suffering is merely suffering. Good is merely good, evil is merely evil.
Everything exists ‘merely’ thus. There is no real happiness or real
suffering. There are just the merely existing conditions. Merely happy,
merely suffering, merely hot, merely cold, merely a being or a person. You
should keep looking to see that things are only so much. Only earth, only
water, only fire, only air. We should keep on ‘reading’ these things and
investigating this point. Eventually our perception will change; we will
have a different feeling about things. The tight conviction that there is
self and things belonging to self will gradually come undone. When this
sense of things is removed, then the opposite perception will keep
increasing steadily.

When the realization of anatta comes to full measure, then we will be able
to relate to the things of this world, to our most cherished possessions and
involvements, to friends and relations, to wealth, accomplishments and
status, just the same as we do to our clothes. When shirts and pants are
new, we wear them; they get dirty and we wash them; after some time they are
worn out and we discard them. There is nothing out of the ordinary there; we
are constantly getting rid of the old things and starting to use new
garments.

So we will have the exact same feeling about our existence in this world. We
will not cry or moan over things. We will not be tormented or burdened by
them. They remain the same things as they were before, but our feeling and
understanding of them has changed. Now our knowledge will be exalted and we
will see truth. We will have attained supreme vision and authentic knowledge
of that Dhamma which we ought to know. The Buddha taught the Dhamma that we
ought to know and to see. Where is the dhamma that we ought to know and see?
It is right here within us, this body and mind. We have it already; we
should come to know and see it.

For example, all of us have been born into this human realm. Whatever we
gained by that we are going to lose. We have seen people born and seen them
die. We just see this happening, but don’t really see clearly. When there is
a birth, we rejoice over it; when someone dies, we cry for them. There is no
end. It goes on in this way, and there is no end to our foolishness. Seeing
birth, we are foolhardy; seeing death, we are foolhardy. There is only this
unending foolishness. Let’s take a look at all this. These things are
natural occurrences. Contemplate the dhamma here, the dhamma we should know
and see. This dhamma is existing right now. Make up your minds about this.
Exert restraint and self-control. Now we are amidst the things of this life.
We shouldn’t have fears of death. We should fear the lower realms. Don’t
fear dying; rather, be afraid of falling into hell. You should be afraid of
doing wrong while you still have life. These are old things we are dealing
with, not new things. Some people are alive but don’t know themselves at
all. They think, what’s the big deal about what I do now, I can’t know what
is going to happen when I die. They don’t think about the new seeds they are
creating for the future. They only see the old fruit. They fixate on present
experience, not realizing that if there is fruit, it must have come from a
seed, and that within the fruit we have now are the seeds of future fruit.
These seeds are just waiting to be planted. Actions born of ignorance
continue the chain in this way, but when you are eating the fruit, you don’t
think about all the implications.

Wherever the mind has a lot of attachment, just there will we experience
intense suffering, intense grief, intense difficulty. The place we
experience the most problems is the place we have the most attraction,
longing and concern. Please try to resolve this. Now, while you still have
life and breath, keep on looking at it and reading it, until you are able to
‘translate’ it and solve the problem.

Whatever we are experiencing as part of our lives now, one day we will be
parted from it. So don’t just pass the time. Practice spiritual cultivation.
Take this parting, this separation and loss, as your object of contemplation
right now, in the present, until you are clever and skilled in it, until you
can see that it is ordinary and natural. When there is anxiety and regret
over it, have the wisdom to recognize the limits of this anxiety and regret,
knowing what they are according to the truth. If you can consider things in
this way, then wisdom will arise. But people generally do not want to
investigate. Whenever suffering occurs, wisdom can arise there, if we
investigate.

Wherever pleasant or unpleasant experience happens, wisdom can arise there.
If we know happiness and suffering for what they really are, then we know
the Dhamma. If we know the Dhamma, we know the world clearly; if we know the
world clearly, we know the Dhamma.

Actually, for most of us, if something is displeasing, we don’t really want
to know about it. We get caught up in the aversion to it. If we dislike
someone, we don’t want to look at their face or get anywhere near them.
This is the mark of a foolish, unskillful person; this is not the way of a
good person. If we like someone, then of course we want to be close to them,
we make every effort to be with them, taking delight in their company. This
is foolishness, also. They are actually the same, like the palm and back of
the hand. When we turn the hand up and see the palm, the back of the hand is
hidden from sight. When we turn it over, then the palm is not seen. Pleasure
hides pain, and pain hides pleasure from our sight. Wrong covers up right,
right covers wrong. Just looking at one side, our knowledge is not complete.

Let’s do things completely, while we still have life. Keep on looking at
things, separating truth from falsehood, noting how things really are,
getting to the end of it, reaching peace. When the time comes, we will be
able to cut through and let go completely. Now we have to firmly attempt to
separate things, keep trying to cut through.

The Buddha taught about hair, nails, skin and teeth. He taught us to
separate here. A person who does not know about separating only knows about
holding them to himself. Now while we have not yet parted from these things,
we should be skillful in meditating on them. We have not yet left this
world, so we should be careful. We should contemplate a lot, make copious
charitable offerings, recite the scriptures a lot, cultivate a lot:
cultivate impermanence, cultivate unsatisfactoriness, cultivate
selflessness. Even if the mind does not want to listen, we should keep on
breaking things up like this and come to know in the present. This can most
definitely be done, people. One can realize knowledge that transcends the
world. We are stuck in the world. This is a way to ‘destroy’ the world,
through contemplating and seeing beyond the world so that we can transcend
the world in our being. Even while we are living in this world, our view can
be above the world.

In a worldly existence, one creates both good and evil. Now we try to
practice virtue and give up evil. When good results come, then you should
not be ‘under’ that good, but be able to transcend it. If you do not
transcend it, then you become a slave to virtue and to your concepts of what
is good. It puts you in difficulty, and there will not be an end to your
tears. It does not matter how much good you have practiced, if you are
attached to it, then you are still not free, and there will be no end to
tears. But one who transcends good as well as evil has no more tears to
shed. They have dried up. There can be an end. We should learn to use
virtue, not to be used by virtue.

To put the teaching of the Buddha in a nutshell, the point is to transform
one’s view. It is possible to change it. It only requires looking at things,
and then it happens. Having been born, we will experience aging, illness,
death and separation. These things are right here. We don’t need to look up
at the sky or down at the earth. The dhamma that we need to see and to know
can be seen right here within us, every moment of every day. When there is a
birth, we are filled with joy. When there is a death, we grieve. That’s how
we spend our lives. These are the things we need to know about, but we still
have not really looked into them and seen the truth. We are stuck deep in
this ignorance. We ask, when will we get the chance to see the Dhamma; but
it is right here to be seen in the present..

This is the Dhamma we should learn about and see. This is what the Buddha
taught about. He did not teach about gods and demons and nagas, protective
deities, jealous demigods, nature spirits and the like. He taught the things
that one should know and see. These are truths that we really should be able
to realize. External phenomena are like this, exhibiting the three
characteristics. Internal phenomena, i.e., this body, are like this, too.
The truth can be seen in the hair, nails, skin and teeth. Previously they
flourished. Now they are diminished. The hair thins and becomes gray. It is
like this. Do you see? Or will you say it is something you can’t see? You
certainly should be able to see with a little investigation.

If we really take an interest in all of this and contemplate seriously, we
can gain genuine knowledge. If this were something that could not be done,
the Buddha would not have bothered to talk about it. How many tens and
hundreds of thousands of his followers have come to realization? If one is
really keen on looking at things, one can come to know. The Dhamma is like
that.

We are living in this world. The Buddha wanted us to know the world. Living
in the world, we gain our knowledge from the world. The Buddha is said to be
Lokavidu, one who knows the world clearly. It means living in the
world but not being stuck in the ways of the world; living among attraction
and aversion, but not stuck in attraction and aversion. This can be spoken
about and explained in ordinary language. This is how the Buddha taught.

Normally we speak in terms of atta, self, talking about me and mine,
you and yours, but the mind can remain uninterruptedly in the realization of
anatta, selflessness. Think about it. When we talk to children, we
speak in one way; when dealing with adults, we speak in another way. If we
use words appropriate to children to speak with adults, or use adults’ words
to speak with children, it won’t work out. In the proper use of conventions,
we have to know when we are talking to children. It can be appropriate to
talk about me and mine, you and yours, and so forth, but inwardly the mind
is Dhamma, dwelling in realization of anatta. You should have this kind of
foundation.

So the Buddha said that you should take the Dhamma as your foundation, your
basis. Living and practicing in the world, will you take yourself, your
ideas, desires and opinions, as a basis? That is not right. The Dhamma
should be your standard. If you take yourself as the standard, you become
self-absorbed. If you take someone else as your standard, you are merely
infatuated with that person. Being enthralled with ourselves or with another
person is not the way of Dhamma. The Dhamma does not incline to any person
or follow personalities. It follows the truth. It does not simply accord
with the likes and dislikes of people; such habitual reactions have nothing
to do with the truth of things.

If we really consider all of this and investigate thoroughly to know the
truth, then we will enter the correct path. Our way of living will become
correct. Thinking will be correct. Our actions and speech will be correct.
So we really should look into all of this. Why is it that we have suffering?
Because of lack of knowledge, not knowing where things begin and end, not
understanding the causes; this is ignorance. When there is this ignorance,
then various desires arise, and, driven by them, we create the causes of
suffering. Then the result must be suffering. When you gather firewood and
light a match to it, and then you expect not to have any heat, what are your
chances? You are creating a fire, aren’t you? This is origination itself.

If you understand these things, then morality will be born here. Dhamma will
be born here. So prepare yourselves. The Buddha advised us to prepare
ourselves. You needn’t have too many concerns or anxieties about things.
Just look here. Look at the place without desires, the place without danger.
Nibbana paccayo hotu - the Buddha taught, let it be a cause for
Nibbana. If it will be a cause for realization of Nibbana, then it means
looking at the place where things are empty, where things are done with,
where they reach their end, where they are exhausted. Look at the place
where there are no more causes, where there is no more self or other, me or
mine. This looking becomes a cause or condition, a condition for attaining
Nibbana. Then practicing generosity becomes a cause for realizing Nibbana.
Practicing morality becomes a cause for realizing Nibbana. Listening to the
teachings becomes a cause for realizing Nibbana. Thus we can dedicate all
our Dhamma activities to become causes for Nibbana. But we are not looking
towards Nibbana. We are looking at self and other and attachment and
grasping without end. This does not become a cause for Nibbana.

When we deal with others and they talk about self, about me and mine, about
what is ours, then we immediately agree with this viewpoint. We immediately
think, “Yeah, that’s right!” But it’s not right. Even if the mind is saying,
right, right, we have to exert control over it. It’s the same as a child who
is afraid of ghosts. Maybe the parents are afraid, too. But it won’t do for
the parents to talk about it; if they do, then the child will feel he has no
protection or security. “No, of course Daddy is not afraid. Don’t worry,
Daddy is here. There are no ghosts. There’s nothing to worry about.” Well,
the father might really be afraid, too. If he starts talking about it, then
they will all get so worked up about ghosts that they’ll jump up and run
away, father, mother and child, and end up homeless.

This is not being clever. You have to look at things clearly and learn how
to deal with them. Even when you feel that deluded appearances are real, you
have to tell yourself that they are not. Go against it like this. Teach
yourself inwardly. When the mind is experiencing the world in terms of self,
saying, ‘it’s true’, you have to be able to tell it, ‘it’s not true’. You
should be floating above the water, not be submerged by the floodwaters of
worldy habit…. The water is flooding our hearts… if we run after things, do
we ever look at what is going on? Will there be anyone ‘watching the house’?

Nibbana paccayam hotu - one need not aim at anything or wish for
anything at all. Just aim for Nibbana. All manner of becoming and birth,
merit and virtue in the worldly way do not reach there.
Making merits and skillful kamma, hoping it will cause us to attain to some
better state, we don’t need to be wishing for a lot of things; just aim
directly for Nibbana. Wanting sila, wanting tranquility - we just end up in
the same old place- it’s not necessary to desire these things - we should
just wish for the place of cessation.

It is like this. Throughout all our becoming and birth, all of us are so
terribly anxious about so many things. When there is separation, when there
is death, we cry and lament. To me, oyyy, I can only think, how utterly
foolish this is. What are we crying about? Where do you think people are
going anyhow? If they are still bound up in becoming and birth, they are not
really going away. When children grow up and move to the big city of
Bangkok, they still think of their parents. They won’t be missing someone
else’s parents, just their own. When they return, they will go to their
parents’ home, not someone else’s. And when they go away again, they will
still think about their home here in Ubon. Will they be homesick for some
other place? What do you think? So when the breath ends and we die, no
matter through how many lifetimes, if the causes for becoming and birth
still exist, the consciousness is likely to try and take birth in a place it
is familiar with. I think we are just too fearful about all of this. So
please don’t go crying about it too much. Think about this. Satte kammam
vipassati - kamma drives beings into their various births - they don’t go
very far. Cycling back and forth through the round of births, that is all,
just changing appearances, appearing with a different face next time, but we
don’t know it. Just coming and going, going and returning in the round of
samsara, not really going anywhere. Just staying there. Like a mango that is
shaken off the tree/ like the snare that does not get the wasps’ nest and
falls to the ground: it is not going anywhere. It is just staying
there. So the Buddha said, Nibbana paccayam hotu; let your only aim be
Nibbana. Strive hard to accomplish this; don’t end up like the mango falling
to the ground and going nowhere.

Transform your sense of things like this. If you can change it, you will
know great peace. Change, please; come to see and know. These are things one
should indeed see and know. If you do see and know, then where else do you
need to go? Morality will come to be. Dhamma will come to be. It is nothing
far away; please investigate this.

When you transform your view, then you will realize that it is like watching
leaves fall from the trees. When they get old and dry, they fall from the
tree. And when the season comes, they begin to appear again. Would anyone
cry when leaves fall or laugh when they grow? If you did, you would be
insane, wouldn’t you? It is just this much. If we can see things in this
way, we will be OK. We will know that is just the natural order of things.
It doesn’t matter how many births we undergo, it will always be like this.
When one studies dhamma, gains clear knowledge, and undergoes a change of
world-view like this, one will realize peace and be free of bewilderment
about the phenomena of this life.

But the important point, really, is that we have life now, in the present.
We are experiencing the results of past deeds right now. When beings are
born into the world, that is the results of past actions appearing. Whatever
happiness or suffering beings have in the present are the fruits of what
they have done previously. It is born of the past and experienced in the
present. Then this present experience becomes the basis for the future, as
we create further causes under its influence, and the future experience
becomes the result. The movement from one birth to the next also happens in
this way. You should understand this.

Listening to the dhamma should resolve your doubts. It should clarify your
view of things and alter your way of living. When doubts are resolved,
suffering can end. You stop creating desires and mental afflictions. Then,
whatever you experience, if something is displeasing to you, you will not
suffer over it, because you understand its changeability. If something is
pleasing to you, you will not get carried away and become intoxicated by it,
because you know the way to let go of things appropriately. You maintain a
balanced perspective, because you understand impermanence and know how to
resolve things according to Dhamma. You know that good and bad conditions
are always changing. Knowing internal phenomena, you understand external
phenomena. Not attached to the external, you are not attached to the
internal. Observing things within yourself or outside of yourself, it is all
completely the same.

In this way, we can dwell in a natural state, which is peace and
tranquility. If we are criticized, we remain undisturbed. If we are praised,
we are undisturbed. Let things be in this way, not being influenced by
others. This is freedom. Knowing the two extremes for what they are, one can
experience well-being. One does not stop at either side. This is genuine
happiness and peace, transcending all things of the world. One transcends
all good and evil. Above cause and effect, beyond birth and death. Born into
this world, one can transcend the world. Beyond the world, knowing the world
- this is the aim of the Buddha’s teaching. He did not aim for people to
suffer. He desired people to attain to peace, to know the truth of things
and realize wisdom. This is dhamma, knowing the nature of things. Whatever
exists in the world is nature. There is no need to be in confusion about it.
Wherever you are, the same laws apply.

The most important point is that while we have life, we should train the
mind to be even in regard to things. We should be able to share wealth and
possessions. When the time comes, we should give a portion to those in need,
just as if we were giving things to our own children. Sharing things like
this, we will feel happy; and if we can give away all our wealth, then
whenever our breath may stop, there will be no attachment or anxiety because
everything is gone. The Buddha taught to ‘die before you die’, to be
finished with things before they are finished. Then you can be at ease. Let
things break before they are broken, let them finish before they are
finished. This is the Buddha’s intention in teaching the Dhamma. Even if you
listen to teachings for a hundred or a thousand eons, if you do not
understand these points, you won’t be able to undo your suffering and you
will not find peace. You will not see the Dhamma. But understanding these
things according to the Buddha’s intention and being able to resolve things
is called seeing the Dhamma. This view of things can make an end of
suffering. It can relieve all heat and distress. Whoever strives sincerely
and is diligent in practice, who can endure, who trains and develops
themselves to the full measure, those persons will attain to peace and
cessation. Wherever they stay, they will have no suffering. Whether they are
young or old, they will be free of suffering. Whatever their situation,
whatever work they have to perform, they will have no suffering, because
their minds have reached the place where suffering is exhausted, where there
is peace. It is like this. It is a matter of nature.

The Buddha thus said to change one’s perceptions, and there will be the
Dhamma. When the mind is in harmony with Dhamma, then Dhamma enters the
heart. The mind and the Dhamma become the indistinguishable. This is
something to be realized by those who practice, the changing of one’s view
and experience of things. The entire Dhamma is paccatam. It can not
be given by anyone; that is an impossibility. If we hold it to be difficult,
then it will be something difficult. If we take it to be easy, then it is
easy. Whoever contemplates it and sees the one point does not have to know a
lot of things. Seeing the one point, seeing birth and death, the arising and
passing away of phenomena according to nature, one will know all things.
This is a matter of the truth.

This is the way of the Buddha. The Buddha gave his teachings out of the wish
to benefit all beings. He wished for us to go beyond suffering and to attain
peace. It is not that we have to die first in order to transcend suffering…
We shouldn’t think that we will attain this after death… we can go beyond
suffering here and now, in the present. We transcend within our perception
of things, in this very life, through the view that arises in our minds.
Then, sitting, we are happy; lying down, we are happy; wherever we are, we
are have happiness. We become without fault, experiencing no ill results,
living in a state of freedom. The mind is clear, bright, and tranquil.
There is no more darkness or defilement. That is someone
who has reached the supreme happiness of the Buddha’s way. Please
investigate this for yourselves. All of you lay followers, please
contemplate this to gain understanding and ability. If you have suffering,
then practice to alleviate your suffering. If it is great, make it little,
and if it is little, make an end of it. Everyone has to do this for
themselves, so please make an effort to consider these words. May you
prosper and develop.

Evam.
 

Source :

VR1 (WE ARE ONE) +ve NEWS-Statues of living persons can also be installed: Maya govt to SC-Bypolls burst Cong bubble-Officials must implement govt schemes: Mayawati-Government calls for objections from public on draft notification Ward reservation list out Bangalore: The State government on Saturday issued the draft notification on reservation in the 198 Bruhat Bangalore Mahanagara Palike (BBMP) wards. Objections and suggestions to the draft could be submitted in writing with valid reasons to the Principal Secretary, Department of Urban Development, Vikasa Soudha, Bangalore. Objections to the notification will be taken into consideration after August 31.-BSP’S PRESENCE The BSP which bagged 10,000 votes in Lok Sabha elections, fielded Subash Bharani and managed to cut into dalits and backward communities votebank, with 21,143 votes.-ONLINE TRAINING ON PRECEPTS AND TRADE-61-ESTABLISHING JAIVIK (ORGANIC) KITCHEN GARDEN training programme was conducted by GOVERNMENT OF KARNATAKA DEPARTMENT OF HORTICULTURE Biotechnology Centre, Hulimavu, Bangalore from 21-08-09 to 22-08-09-It works to be at job fair, even at 73!-A BLUE PRINT FOR LIFE ON LIVELIHOOD THE WAY OF USING RESOURSES-FREE ONLINE TRAINING ON BUDDHISM FOR CHILDREN -21 Beauty and Grey [A Wise Leader]-The moral is: A wise leader puts the safety of his followers first. A Permanent Online International Seminar on Buddhism and Buddhist Heritage of Jambudvipa that is the Great Prabuddha Bharath-Learning to Listen-All India Lay-Buddhists’ Organization(AILBO) Head office: MahaBodhi Society’s Head Quarters Kolkata
Filed under: General
Posted by: @ 2:57 am


VR1

(WE
ARE ONE)

+ve
NEWS


Statues of living persons can also be installed:
Maya govt to SC

The Uttar Pradesh government, which
had made budgetary allocation of crores of rupees for installation of
statues of Chief Minister Mayawati and her mentor Kanshi Ram in the
state, has said it is a wrong notion that only statues of dead persons
can be installed.

The state
government expressed dismay over the manner in which the hype is being
created over installation of statues of Mayawati and quoted examples of
superstar Amitabh Bachchan and former Prime Minister Atal Bihari
Vajpayee whose statues have been erected.

“It is a wrong
notion that only statues of dead persons can be installed. There is no
dearth of examples whether in the country or abroad about statues of
living persons. In the Indian context, one can easily refer to A B
Vajpayee Institute of Technology and Management, Gwalior and Amitabh
Bachchan Institute at Saifai, Etawah,” the state government said in an
affidavit.

http://timesofindia .indiatimes. com/news/ india/On- statues-Maya- tells-SC- to-stay-out- /articleshow/ 4921375.cms

On statues, Maya tells SC to stay out
Dhananjay Mahapatra , TNN 22 August 2009, 08:10am IST



NEW DELHI: The ’stupa’ being constructed near Noida flyway with a


crowd of statues will cost the exchequer Rs 203 crore and there was a


budgetary


allocation of Rs 294 crore for other parks and statues, the Mayawati


government told the Supreme Court on Friday.( Watch Video )




All this “money has been sanctioned by the state government through


budgetary allocations approved by the Assembly and every expenditure


was authorised by the state legislature, ” it said.




Before giving details of thousands of crores allocated for its


pro-poor, pro-Dalit and pro-development schemes, the government


sounded a caution. It said the SC would do well to follow its own


judgment in 2008 which said, “The judiciary must exercise


self-restraint and eschew the temptation to encroach into the domain


of the legislature or the administrative or statutory authorities. “




It expressed annoyance over the manner in which hype was being created


over installation of statues of CM Mayawati in parks and rebutted the


claim of petitioners that only a dead person’s statue could be


insta-lled by giving example of former PM AB Vajpayee and superstar


Amitabh Bachchan.




“It is a wrong notion that only statues of dead persons can be


installed, There is no dearth of examples whether in the country or


abroad about statues of living persons. In the Indian context, one can


easily refer to A B Vajpayee Institute of Technology and Management,


Gwalior, and Amitabh Bachchan Institute at Saifai, Etawah. Abroad, we


have wax statues of film stars, cricketers and other living


personalities finding place in Madame Tussauds museum,” the state


said.




Terming the PIL filed by advocates Ravi Kant and Sukumar as


“frivolous”, the state’s affidavit through additional advocate general


S K Dwivedi said Mayawati’s statues were installed “only to fulfil the


wishes of Kanshi Ram, who willed that wherever his statues were


installed, alongside the statues of Mayawati, his only heir, must also


be installed”.




Giving details of budgetary allocation for parks and statues in its


51-page affidavit, the state said, “The cultural department made


provisions of Rs 194.2 crore in the financial year 2008-09 and Rs 100


crore in the year 2009-10.”




On the Samajik Parivartan Sangrahalay at Noida near DND flyway, the


state said it would comprise two ’stupas’ with galleries which would


depict the life history of great personalities and social reformers


and their deeds and actions related to social reforms and “not to


glorify the chief minister”.




“The cost of stupa is about Rs 203 crore and not Rs 500 crore as


stated in newspaper reports,” the state said, adding that SC should


not entertain PIL as SC-appointed CEC was already seized of the


matter.

Bypolls burst Cong bubble

New Delhi, Aug. 21: 

If
the UPA managed to win nine of the 17 seats whose results were declared
today, it was largely because of the Congress’s allies, the DMK and the
Trinamul Congress.

The
Congress netted two seats in Tamil Nadu by piggybacking on the DMK. On
its own, it won Laitumthrak in Meghalaya, lost all four in Uttar
Pradesh where its performance in the Lok Sabha polls had kindled hopes
of a revival, and picked up just one of the five seats in Karnataka.

The
Congress sounded a bit more optimistic about Uttar Pradesh, where
despite its candidates losing their deposits in two constituencies
—Bidhuna and Morna — sources put the losses down to the “time-tested”
logic of ruling parties romping home in byelections.

In Uttar Pradesh, the BSP won three of the four seats.

The BSP wrested Malihabad and Bidhuna from the Samajwadi Party and Moradabad (west) from the BJP.

BSP
sources attributed the results to chief minister Mayavati’s “mid-course
corrections” after the Lok Sabha rout, a consolidation of the SC/ST
votes and an accretion in their backward caste support.

In Moradabad (west) for instance, the BSP had put up a backward caste Saini candidate, Balwan Singh.

Humayun
Qadir, a party secretary in the constituency, said that even though the
Congress got 60 per cent of the 1,50,000 Muslim votes and the
Samajwadis 20 per cent, the BSP won by nearly 18,000 votes because of
the consolidation of the backward caste and SC/ST votes.

Bypolls results prove BSP enjoys support of all sections: Mayawati



Lucknow, Aug 21 : Elated over the success of the party in the Assembly


bypoll results which were announced today, Uttar Pradesh Chief


Minister and BSP president Mayawati said it proves that the party


enjoys confidence of all the factions of society.



The ruling Bahujan Samaj Party has registered win at three out of four


seats, which had gone to the bypoll on August 18. The BSP managed to


wrest two seats from Mulayam Singh Yadav-led Samajwadi Party and one


from BJP.



In a statement, the BSP supremo said the bypoll results had vindicated


the party’s principle of ‘Sarvajan Hitay, Sarvajan Sukhaya’ (Welfare


and Prosperity of all).





Ms Mayawati said the results also punctured the much-hyped


‘misinformation’ campaign of the Congress which failed miserably in


the bypolls. ‘’I hope the support of the people will continue in the


times to come so that the party fulfills its promise to take the state


on the path of progress and development, ‘’ she said.




She was thankful to the people of the state as well as to the party


cadre, which according to her worked relentlessly to remove the


misconceptions being created by the opposition parties, specially the


Congress and SP.




Ms Mayawati said that the party candidates were on the socond spot at


50 seats in the recent Lok Sabha elections and the success in the


bypoll proved the party had got less than expected seats in the


general elections.




With regards to the loss at the Morna assembly seat in Muzaffarnagar


district, the BSP president attributed it to the fact that all three


major parties BSP, SP and the Congress had fielded Mulsim candidates


there due to which Ajit Singh-led Rashtriya Lok Dal emerged


victorious.




BSP has won the three assembly seats of Moradabad (west), Malihabad


(reserved) and Vidhuna, while has lost Morna seat to the RLD.




— UNI

http://www.dnaindia .com/india/ report_mayawati- bounces-back- after-poor- show-in-lok- sabha-polls_ 1284384

Mayawati bounces back after poor show in Lok Sabha polls

Deepak Gidwani / DNASaturday, August 22, 2009 2:21 IST




Lucknow: The elephant trumpeted victory for the BSP in the crucial


assembly byelections in UP on Tuesday. The ruling party won three of


the four seats handsomely. Byelections to nine more seats are to be


held in next 2 months.




The Congress, seen as the major challenger in these by elections, is


deriving consolation from increase in its vote count as compared to


2007. The SP lost both the seats (Malihabad and Vidhuna) it had won in


2007 to the BSP. The BJP fared the worst. Not only did it end up


fourth in three seats, it even lost the Moradabad-West seat it had won


in 2007. The saffron party’s only consolation is that it helped the


Rashtriya Lok Dal retain Morna (Muzaffarnagar) that RLD won in 2007.




UP CM Mayawati, who did not campaign in the bypoll, described the


result a victory of her government’s policies.




The results prove it is too early to write off the BSP, and that


anti-incumbency is a far cry where the Mayawati magic is concerned,


regardless of how many Dalit houses Rahul Gandhi visits. Mayawati said


that after the Lok Sabha polls people had understood that the


Congress, SP and BJP had a secret understanding to stop a “Dalit ki


Beti” from becoming PM.




The Congress is trying to explain away the BSP sweep as a result of


the “gross misuse of official machinery” by the state government. UP


Congress chief Rita Bahuguna Joshi said despite repeated pleas by her


party, the Mayawati government did not deploy central para military


forces. She also said that the results were an indicator of the


Congress’s increasing popularity.

Officials must implement govt schemes: Mayawati

STAFF WRITER 12:43 HRS IST

Lucknow, Aug 22 (PTI) Instructing all the departments to ensure proper


implementation of government schemes in the state, Uttar Pradesh Chief


Minister Mayawati today said the officials will be accountable if


their subordinates fail to execute responsibilities.




“If district level officials are failing to execute their


responsibilities with honesty and dedication, accountability of


principal secretary or secretary of the department concerned will be


fixed and action will be taken against him,” Mayawati said during a


high-level review meeting yesterday.




She asked the government officials to “improve their work culture as


per the expectations and need of the people and ensure that people get


benefit of various welfare schemes”.




Mayawati said that a report submitted by the chief secretary had


indicated that working of some department was not satisfactory.

Government calls for objections from public
on draft notification Ward reservation list out Bangalore:



The State government on Saturday issued
the draft notification on reservation in the 198 Bruhat Bangalore Mahanagara Palike (BBMP) wards.

Objections and suggestions to the draft could be submitted in writing with
valid reasons to the Principal Secretary, Department of Urban Development,
Vikasa Soudha, Bangalore.
Objections to the notification will be taken into consideration after August
31.

The ward number, ward name and the reserved category (in brackets) are as
follows:

G stands for General;

G-W for General-Women;

BC-A for Backward Class-A;

BC-A-W for Backward Class-A-Women;

BC-B for Backward Class-B;

BC-B-W for Backward Class-B-Women;

SC for Scheduled Castes;

ST for Scheduled Tribes.

List of wards

1. Kempegowda Ward (G); 2. Chowdeshwari Ward (G); 3. Atturu (BC-A); 4. Yelahanka Satellite Town
(G-W); 5. Jakkuru (G); 6. Thanisandra (BC-A); 7. Byatarayanapura (G); 8.  
Kodigehalli (G-W); 9. Vidyaranyapura (BC-A-W);
10. Dodda Bommasandra (BC-B); 11. Kuvempu Nagar (SC); 12. Shettyhalli (SC); 13.
Mallasandra (G); 14. Bagalakunte (G); 15. T Dasarahalli (BC-A); 16. Jalahalli
(SC); 17. JP Park (G-W); 18. Radhakrishna
Temple Ward
(SC); 19. Sanjay Nagar (G); 20. Ganga Nagar
(BC-A); 21. Hebbal (G); 22. Vishwanatha Nagenahalli (G-W); 23. Nagavara (BC-A-W);  24. HBR
Layout (BC-B); 25. Horamavu (G); 26. Ramamurthynagar (G); 27. Banasawadi
(BC-A); 28. Kammanahalli (G-W); 29. Kacharakanahalli (G); 30. Kadugondanahalli
(BC-A); 31. Kushalnagar (G); 32. Kavalbyrasandra (G-W); 33. Manorayanapalya (BC-A-W); 34.
Gangenahalli (BC-B-W); 35. Aramane Nagara (G); 36. Mattikere (SC); 37.
Yeshwanthapura (G); 38. HMT (ST); 39. Chokkasandra (BC-A); 40. Dodda
Bidarakallu (G-W); 41. Peenya Industrial Area (G); 42. Lakshmi Devi Nagar
(BC-A); 43. Nandini Layout (G); 44. Marappana Palya (G-W); 45. Malleswaram (BC-A-W); 46.
Jayachamarajendra Nagar (BC-B); 47. Devara Jeevanahalli (G); 48. Muneshwara
Nagar (G); 49. Lingarajapuram (BC-A); 50. Benniganahalli (G-W); 51. Vijnanapura
(SC); 52. Krishnarajapura (G); 53. Basavanapura (BC-A); 54. Hoodi (G); 55.
Devasandra (G-W); 56. A Narayanapura (BC-A-W);
57. CV Raman Nagar (BC-B); 58. New Thippasandra (G); 59. Maruthi Seva Nagar
(SC-W); 60. Sagayarapuram (SC-W); 61. SK Garden (G); 62. Ramaswamypalya (SC);
63. Jayamahal (BC-A); 64. Rajamahal Guttahalli (G-A); 65. Kadu Malleswaram (G);
66. Subramanyanagar (BC-A); 67. Nagapura (G); 68. Mahalakshmipuram (G-W); 69.
Laggere (BC-A-W);
70. Rajagopalnagar (BC-B-W); 71. Hegganahalli (G); 72. Herohalli (G); 73.
Kottigepallya (BC-A); 74. Shakthi Ganapathinagar (SC); 75. Shankar Matt (G-W);
76. Gayathri Nagar (G); 77. Dattatreya
Temple (BC-A); 78.
Pulakeshinagar (G); 79. Sarvagna Nagar (SC-A); 80. Hoysala Nagar (G-W); 81.
Vijnananagara (BC-A-W);
82. Garudachar Palya (BC-B); 83. Kadugodi (G); 84. Hagadur (G); 85.
Doddanekkundi (BC-A); 86. Marathahalli (G-W); 87. HAL Airport
(G); 88. Jeevanbhima Nagar (BC-A); 89. Jogupalya (G); 90. Ulsoor (G-W); 91.
Bharathinagar (BC-A-W);
92. Shivajinagar (BC-B); 93. Vasanthanagar (G); 94. Gandhi Nagar (G); 95.
Subhash Nagar (SC-W); 96. Okalipuram (BC-A); 97. Dayananda Nagar (SC-W); 98.
Prakash Nagar (G-W); 99. Rajaji Nagar (G); 100. Basaveshwara Nagar (BC-A); 101.
Kamakshipalya (G); 102. Vrushabhavathi Nagar (G-W); 103. Cauverypura (BC-A-W); 104. Govindaraj
Nagar (BC-B-W); 105. Agrahara Dasarahalli (G); 106. Dr. Rajkumar Ward (G); 107.
Shivanagar (BC-A); 108. Srirama Mandir Ward (G-W); 109. Chickpet (G); 110.
Sampangiram Nagar (BC-A); 111. Shanthalanagar (G); 112. Domlur (G-W); 113.
Konena Agrahara (BC-A-W);
114. Agaram (SC-W); 115. Vannarpet (BC-B); 116. Neelasandra (ST-W); 117.
Shanthinagar (G); 118. Sudamanagar (SC-W); 119. Dharmarayaswamy Temple
Ward (G); 120. Cottonpet
(BC-A); 121. Binnipet (G-W); 122. Kempapura Agrahara (G); 123. Vijayanagar
(SC-A); 124. Hosahalli (SC); 125. Marenahalli (G); 126. Maruti Mandir Ward
(G-W); 127. Mudalapalya (SC-A-W);
128. Nagarbhavi (BC-B); 129. Jnanabharathi Ward (G); 130. Ullalu (G); 131.
Nayandahalli (SC); 132. Attiguppe (BC-A); 133. Hampi Nagar (G-W); 134. Bapuji
Nagar (G); 135. Padarayanapura (BC-A); 136. Jagjivanram Nagar (G); 137.
Rayapuram (G); 138. Cheluvadipalya (SC-W); 139. KR Market (BC-A-W); 140. Chamarajpet (BC-B-W); 141.
Azad Nagar (G); 142. Sunkenahalli (G); 143. Vishveshwarapuram (BC-A); 144.
Siddapura (G-W); 145. Hombe Gowda Nagar (G); 146. Lakkasandra (BC-A); 147.
Adugodi (SC); 148. Ejipura (G); 149. Varthur (G-W); 150. Belandur (SC); 151.
Koramangala (BC-A-W);
152. Saddgu nte Palya (BC-B); 153. Jayanagar (G); 154. Basavanagudi (G); 155.
Hanumanthnagar (BC-A); 156. Srinagar
(G-W); 157. Gali Anjaneya Temple
(G); 158. Deepanjali Nagar (BC-A); 159. Kengeri (G); 160. Rajarajeshwari Nagar
(G-W); 161. Hosakerehalli (BC-A-W);
162. Girinagar (G); 163. Katthriguppe (G); 164. Vidyapeetha Ward (BC-A); 165.
Ganesh Mandir (G-A); 166. Karisandra (G); 167. Yediyur (BC-A); 168. Pattabhiram
Nagar (G); 169. Byrasandra (G-W); 170. Jayanagar East (SC); 171. Gurappanapalya BC-A-W);
172. Madiwala (G); 173. Jakkasandra (G); 174. HSR Layout BC-A);
175. Bommanahalli (G-W); 176. BTM Layout (G); 177. JP Nagar (BC-A); 178.
Sarakki (G); 179. Shakambarinagar (G-W); 180. Banashankari
Temple Ward
(BC-A-W);
181. Kumaraswamy Layout (G); 182. Padmanabhanagar (G); 183. Chikkalsandra
(BC-A); 184. Uttarahalli (SC); 185. Yelchenahalli (G-W); 186. Jaraganahalli
(G); 187. Puttenahalli (BC-A); 188. Bilekhalli (SC); 189. Hongasandra (G); 190.
Mangamma napalya (G-W); 191. Singasandra (BC-A-W); 192. Begur (G); 193. Arakere (G);
194. Gottigere (BC-A); 195. Gottigere (BC-A); 196. Anjanapura (G); 197.
Vasanthapura (G-W); 198. Hemmigepura (BC-A-W).

BSP’S PRESENCE The
BSP which bagged 10,000 votes in Lok Sabha elections, fielded Subash
Bharani and managed to cut into dalits and backward communities
votebank, with 21,143 votes.

ALMOST EVERY
FRAUD involves VICTIM

sending CASH money to a Fraudster/Scammer.
ABSOLUTELY DO NOT send any money
using Western
Union
/ Moneygram. 

Always deal ONLY locally by
meeting the seller/buyer in person.

READ and UNDERSTAND the methods
used by Fraudsters in the link above.


ONLINE TRAINING ON
PRECEPTS AND TRADE-61


ESTABLISHING
JAIVIK (ORGANIC) KITCHEN GARDEN

training
programme was conducted by

GOVERNMENT OF KARNATAKA

DEPARTMENT OF HORTICULTURE

Biotechnology
Centre, Hulimavu, Bangalore

from
21-08-09 to 22-08-09

Celebration
Program List

·                   
Dr.K.Ramakrishnappa
Director Dept. of Horticulture and Karnataka       Horticultural Development Agencies
, Lalbagh

·                   
Sri.
Nagesh Hegde, Senior Jouranalist

·                   
Dr.
Shoba Senior SCale Lecturer Smt.VHD Central Institute of Home Science

·                   
Dr.
Devkumar, Professor of Agronomy, UAS, Bangalore

·                   
Sri.N.R.Shetty.
President Sahaja

·                   
Ms.Sangeetha
Sharama, Director Annadana.

·                   
Ms.Philomena,
Aikya.

 

2)             
Prayer

3)             
Welcome speech by Sri.Chunchaiah, Sr.Asst.Director DOH

4)             
Sr.Krishnaprasad

5)             
Peresentaion of Establishing Organic vegetable Garden Ms. Sangita
Sharma

6)             
Launching of G3 by Dr. K.ramakrishnappa. Explanation on G3 by
Sri.NR Shetty

7)              
Talk and sharing of experience : Sri.Nagesh Hegde, Sr,.Journalist

8)             
Honouring Kitchen Gatrdners

9)             
Participants Experience: Appaji

10)        
Presidents Address: Dr. K. Ramakrishnappa

11)          
Vote of Thanks ; Sri.nataraj, Asst. Director DOH


	

Establishing a vegetable garden

assorted vegetables.jpg (6983 bytes) Tired of vegetables from
the supermarket that are tasteless and deteriorate within days of purchase? Remember how
the tomatoes and fresh beans and peas from Grandad’s vegie patch used to taste? Are you
wary of genetically modified food? Growing your own fresh vegetables is not difficult and
apart from the wonderful taste, you will also know exactly what has gone into and on to
your food.


  Location

The one really vital requirement for a successful vegetable garden is a sunny location.
Choose the sunniest spot you can find. If the only sunny area is paved, or on the deck or
balcony, then plant your vegetables in pots (refer to our info on sowing
into containers)
. There are quite a few varieties of vegetables developed expressly
for this purpose and container vegetable growing is becoming easier and easier.

tomatoe2.jpg (1440 bytes) The
Soil

The soil in a vegetable garden needs to be well-draining with a good structure (nice and
crumbly) that allows rapid root growth and easy access to nutrients, water and air. The
incorporation of organic material such as household compost (best because it’s weed free)
and composted animal manures helps to create suitable conditions for growth. It should be
dug over to break up clumps of soil (never dig when the soil is wet & sticky as this
will cause clumping). If, however, you find digging difficult, or are faced with a
compacted, poorly-drained site, then building up a “no-dig garden” with layers
of straw, hay and compost above ground level will allow you to grow wonderful vegetables
without the heavy work of digging over the bed. Whatever way you go the top of the soil
should be friable to allow the emerging shoots to break through.

The degree of soil acidity (i.e. the pH) can affect nutrients available to
plants. Most vegetables thrive in soil with a pH between 6 and 7. A simple pH test with a
soil testing kit (one is available from the Global Garden shop) will indicate if your soil
is too acid or too alkaline. Soils with plenty of organic matter added may need the
addition of garden lime to raise the pH. For maximum growth, natural fertilisers may need
supplementing with artificial fertilisers to ensure that the plants have all the nutrients
they need. Don’t over-fertilise. The use of a variety of organic materials will probably
produce perfectly satisfactory results. Water well before sowing.

tomatoe2.jpg (1440 bytes)Sowing
Now you are ready to open your packet and sow those miraculous little seeds!
It is usually best to sow in a straight line so that you can easily distinguish your
vegetables from any weeds which may also sprout. The job may be made easier for small
seeds by mixing them with sand & applying with a shaker to better control the sowing
rate. Sow the seed according to the directions on the packet. A general rule that works for
many seeds is that you plant them at a depth that is twice the diameter of the seed with a
minimum depth of 1 cm. Water with a fine spray initially. The seeds need moisture to
develop, so keep them moist but don’t drown them.

tomatoe2.jpg (1440 bytes)
Coping
with Pests

One of the great advantages of the home vegetable garden is the option of producing
pesticide-free produce. You may have to settle for produce that is not as visually perfect
as the shop-bought stuff and steel yourself to doing plenty of picking off and squashing
of pests. Looking at your growing crop every day not only gives satisfaction but can
enable you to quickly detect any harmful insects and physically remove them. The other
options, of course, include choosing products with low toxicity eg Pyrethrum insecticide,
trying biological control eg Dipel (for caterpillars) and using companion planting.
(Marigolds are very good). Snail bait is something that you may need to use. (Multiguard
is much safer than other baits.) A snail beer trap can be very effective - bury a
container level with the ground & fill with beer. Slugs & snails find it
irresistible & then drown happily.

tomatoe2.jpg (1440 bytes) What to
Plant

The choice of vegetables depends on the tastes of those who are going to eat them. Don’t
waste garden space producing wonderful crops of, say, chokoes, if no one in the family
will touch them with a bargepole! Like all sensible producers, cater for your market, and
sow seed successively to have an on-going supply. Tomatoes, beans, peas, broccoli,
capsicums, lettuce, carrots and zucchini are all particularly easy & rewarding. You
don’t need a huge space at all, and a vegie garden can be very attractive.

Join us as we help you along the way to grow delicious, healthy vegetables
for yourself, your family and your friends.
The Global Garden Shop
stocks a good range of excellent seeds.

It works to be at job fair, even at 73!


f you thought 60 was an age
ripe enough to retire and relax, this job fair for senior citizens in
Bangalore was destined to demolish myths. Instead of the 20-something,
fresh-out-of-college wannabe youngsters, about 700 sexagenarians and
septuagenarians queued up to meet their prospective employers.


Senior citizens filling up application forms at the jobs fair ‘Jobs60+’ in Bangalore on Saturday. DH PhotoOrganised
by a City-based NGO, Nightingales Medical Trust (NTM), the fair was
surely high on novelty. For this first-of-its-kind initiative, the
Trust had roped in 13 employers. Most jobs on offer were in the fields
of insurance, accounts and engineering.

“The objective behind
the job fair is to see that senior citizens live with dignity. Many
senior citizens become depressed because they have no means of living,
or they are financially dependent,” S Premkumar Raja, trustee and
honorary secretary, NTM, said.

With nearly 700 registered job
seekers, the fair was definitely not low on popularity. But the Trust
wanted more employers. To boost response from prospective job
providers, the Trust signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the
Federation of Karnataka Chambers of Commerce and Industry.

Sixty-one-year-old
Santhosham had read about the job fair and came fully prepared with his
resume. He was looking for an opening in technical or teaching field.

“Earlier,
the recruitment for senior citizens was easy. But due to recession, it
has become very difficult. I want to work as long as my health
permits,” said the man who had served the Indian Air Force for 20
years.

For 73-year-old Sumitra, who retired as a nursing
superintendent, a job is a must as she has no pension. “I would be
interested in doing social work, teaching or any managerial work.
Senior citizens are willing to work, but somebody should support and
motivate us. Also, if we are active, we will stay healthy,” she said.

H
K Shetty (61) agreed with Sumitra when he said he was looking for a
bank job or an administrative position. With several years in the
banking sector, he wanted to bank on his rich experience in the field.
“After retirement in January this year, this is the first time I am
venturing out to look for a job. I have my own house and stay with my
family. But if I have some work then I can kill time,” he said.

Did anyone say old age was an age-old problem?


 

A BLUE PRINT FOR LIFE

 

ON
LIVELIHOOD

THE WAY
OF USING RESOURSES

 

          In summary, a person must live, just
as apig, horse,

cow, or sheep must
live. Even insects and other creatures

must live. But the
spice of life is different for each. People

Today like to enjoy
name-brand clothes, jewelry, and popular

makeup. Being this is
in vogue, and people like to make

themselves over. But
true beauty, which is impressive, solemn,

ad composed yet
carefree, comes naturally from within. The

Sutra
on the Treasury of Truth with Parables [Dharmapadavadana

Sutra] expresses this idea, “Wisdom without anger is

uprightness”. Life
will have quality only if one strives to

cange one’s
personality, ahbits, ideas, and relationships,

mking the good better
as wella s improving, correcting, and

bautifying the
mediocre.

 



COMPREHENSIVE PALI
COURSE

 

LESSON 9

 

Infinitives:

            The
infinitive is a form of verb. It expresses the verbal

Notion without referring to a tense of a
particular subject.

In Pāli, It is formed by adding Tuṁ to verb. For example,

dātuṁ = to give
(da=tuṁ= d
ātuṁ)

 

Similarly formed are:

Pā+ tuṁ=tuṁ, pivituṁ = to drink

Pac=pacituṁ = to cook

Is=icchituṁ = to wish

Bhas=bhāsituṁ = to speak

ā+mant= Āmant= Āmantetuṁ = to address

pucch=pucchituṁ = to ask

khaṇ= khaṇituṁ = to dig

suj=sujituṁ = to cause pain

vand=vandituṁ = to bow down, to worship

paṇam=panāmituṁ = to worship

cur=coretuṁ = to steal, plunder

jay=jayituṁ = to conquer

yuj=yuñjituṁ = to yoke

dam=dametuṁ = to tame

gam=gantuṁ-gamituṁ = to go

bhuj=bhuñjituṁ = to eat

likh=likhituṁ = to write

vad=vadituṁ = to say

kath=khatetuṁ - to speak

nimant=nimantetuṁ =to invite

chind=chindituṁ = to cut

pariesa=pariyeituṁ = to seek

bhaj=bhajituṁ = to associate

parāji= parājayituṁ = to defeat

jiv=jivituṁ = to survive

 

Vocabulary:

Bodhisatta = would-be-Buddha

Bodhirukkha = Tree of Wisdom

Lokuttara = Supermundane, Transcendental

Yuñjatha = put forth, plunge yourself, Yoke
yourself

Cakkavatti = World Monarch, Emperor

Seṭṭha = Noblest

Bhagavā = Blessed One

Tibhuvana = Three realms of Existence

Āha = Said

Māra = The Evil One

Pacchā = Afterwards, Later

Yogi = Meditator, Mystic

Jeṭṭha = Pre-eminent

Jina = Victor

Lokanāyaka = Leader of the
World

Nātha = Saviour

Bhikkhavo = Monks

Anukampā = Compassion, Mercy

Hitā = Welfare

FREE
ONLINE
TRAINING ON BUDDHISM FOR CHILDREN -21

Beauty and Grey
[A Wise Leader]


Once upon a time,
there was a deer who was the leader of a herd of a thousand. He had two sons.
One was very slim and tall, with bright alert eyes, and smooth reddish fur. He
was called Beauty. The other was Grey in color, also slim and tall, and was called
Grey.

One day,
after they were fully grown, their father called Beauty and Grey to him. He said,
“I am now very old, so I cannot do all that is necessary to look after this
big herd of deer. I want you, my two grown-up children, to be the leaders, while
I retire from looking after them all the time. We will divide the herd, and each
of you will lead 500 deer.” So it was done.

In
India, when the harvest time comes, the deer are always in danger. The rice is
at its tallest, and the deer cannot help but go into the paddies and eat it. To
avoid the destruction of their crops, the human beings dig pits, set sharp stakes
in the ground, and build stone traps - all to capture and kill the deer.

Knowing
this was the season, the wise old deer called the two new leaders to him. He advised
them to take the herds up into the mountain forest, far from the dangerous farm
lands. This was how he had always saved the deer from being wounded or killed.
Then he would bring them back to the low lands after the harvest was over.

Since
he was too old and weak for the trip, he would remain behind in hiding. He warned
them to be careful and have a safe journey. Beauty set out with his herd for the
mountain forest, and so did Grey with his.

The
villagers all along the way knew that this was the time the deer moved from the
low lying farm lands to the high countryside. So they hid along the way and killed
the deer as they passed by.


Grey did not pay attention to his father’s wise advice. Instead of being careful
and traveling safely, he was in a hurry to get to the lush mountain forest. So
he moved his herd constantly, during the night, at dawn and dusk, and even in
broad daylight. This made it easy for the people to shoot the deer in Grey’s herd
with bows and arrows. Many were killed, and many were wounded, only to die in
pain later on. Grey reached the forest with only a few deer remaining alive.

The
tall sleek red-furred Beauty was wise enough to understand the danger to his moving
herd. So he was very careful. He knew it was safer to stay away from the villages,
and from all humans. He knew it was not safe in the daytime, or even at dawn or
dusk. So he led his herd wide around the villages, and moved only in the middle
of the night. Beauty’s herd arrived in the mountain forest safe and sound, with
no one killed or injured.

The
two herds found each other, and remained in the mountains until well after the
harvest season was over. Then they began the return to the farmland country.

Grey
had learned nothing from the first trip. As it was getting cold in the mountains,
he was in a hurry to get to the warmer low lands. So he was just as careless as
before. Again the people hid along the way and attacked and killed the deer. All
Grey’s herd were killed, later to be eaten or sold by the villagers. Grey himself
was the only one who survived the journey.

Beauty
led his herd in the same careful way as before. He brought back all 500 deer,
completely safe. While the deer were still in the distance, the old chief said
to his doe, “Look at the deer coming back to us. Beauty has all his followers
with him. Grey comes limping back alone, without his whole herd of 500. Those
who follow a wise leader, with good qualities, will always be safe. Those who
follow a foolish leader, who is careless and thinks only of himself, will fall
into troubles and be destroyed.”

After
some time, the old deer died and was reborn as he deserved. Beauty became chief
of the herd and lived a long life, loved and admired by all.

The
moral is: A wise leader puts the safety of his followers first.


A Permanent Online
International Seminar on Buddhism and Buddhist Heritage of Jambudvipa that is
the Great Prabuddha Bharath

Learning to Listen

by Ajahn Chah




During an informal gathering at his residence one evening, the Master
said, `When you listen to the Dhamma, you must open up your heart and
compose yourself in its centre.  Don’t try and accumulate what you hear,
or make painstaking efforts to retain it through your memory.  Just let
the Dhamma flow into your heart as it reveals itself, and keep yourself
continuously open to the flow in the present moment.  What is ready to be
retained will remain.  It will happen of its own accord, not through
forced effort on your part.


     `Similarly, when you expound the Dhamma, there must be no force
involved.  The Dhamma must flow spontaneously from the present moment
according to circumstances.  You know, it’s strange, but sometimes people
come to me and really show no apparent desire to hear the Dhamma, but
there it is — it just happens.  The Dhamma comes flowing out with no
effort whatsoever.  Then at other times, people seem to be quite keen to
listen.  They even formally ask for a discourse, and then, nothing!  It
just won’t happen.  What can you do?  I don’t know why it is, but I know
that things happen in this way.  It’s as though people have different
levels of receptivity, and when you are there at the same level, things
just happen.


     `If you must expound the Dhamma, the best way is not to think about
it at all.  Simply forget it.  The more you think and try to plan, the
worse it will be.  This is hard to do, though, isn’t it?  Sometimes, when
you’re flowing along quite smoothly, there will be a pause, and someone
may ask a question.  Then, suddenly, there’s a whole new direction.  There
seems to be an unlimited source that you can never exhaust.


     `I believe without a doubt in the Buddha’s ability to know the
temperaments and receptivity of other beings.  He used this very same
method of spontaneous teaching. It’s not that he needed to use any
superhuman power, but rather that he was sensitive to the needs of the
people around him and so taught to them accordingly.  An instance
demonstrating his own spontaneity occurred when once, after he had
expounded the Dhamma to a group of his disciples, he asked them if they
had ever heard this teaching before.  They replied that they had not.  He
then went on to say that he himself had also never heard it before.


     `Just continue your practice no matter what you are doing.  Practice
is not dependent on any one posture, such as sitting or walking.  Rather,
it is a continuous awareness of the flow of your own consciousness and
feelings.  No matter what is happening, just compose yourself and always
be mindfully aware of that flow.’


     Later, the Master went on to say, `Practice is not moving forward,
but there is forward movement.  At the same time, it is not moving back,
but there is backward movement.  And, finally, practice is not stopping
and being still, but there is stopping and being still.  So there is
moving forward and backward as well as being still, but you can’t say that
it is any one of the three.  Then practice eventually comes to a point
where there is neither forward nor backward movement, nor any being
still.  Where is that?’


     On another informal occasion, he said, `To define Buddhism without a
lot of words and phrases, we can simply say, “Don’t cling or hold on to
anything.  Harmonize with Actuality, with things just as they are.” ‘


All India
Lay-Buddhists’ Organization(AILBO)

Head office: MahaBodhi Society’s Head
Quarters

Kolkata

To,

Sub:
3rd Anniversary Conference & General Body Meeting of AILBO

Dear   Dhamma
Brother/ Sister,

After
the 3 years of formation of AILBO, various state
  units & activists of AILBO  are spreading 
the  message  of Buddha in nooks  & corners 
of our country, as well as converging 
all the Buddhistic  activities to  create a common platform for  all the 
Buddhists. Our patron Ven Bhante Dr. D. Revatha Thero’s guidance &
the efforts of members are creating awareness amongst the masses.

With
all this back-drop
  the third Anniversary conference of AILBO
is  going to be convened  at the MahaBodhi Society of India’s
Head-quarters, Kolkata on 16th & 17th of September,2009.

The
meeting will deliberate on various aspects of development of Buddhism in
different states & regions.

Ven.
Bhante Dr. D Revatha Thero will preside over & bless the function & Dr.
U. N. Biswas along-with other speakers will discuss different aspects of
Buddhism.

The
 delegates are requested to write the
paper on the state of Buddhism in their respective region &  the ways & means to propagate it in
masses.

So,
please send your delegate form (attached herewith) duly filled in &
along-with
  Rs.300/- as delegate fees,  by D.D or Money order on the address given
below. The accommodation for 16th & 17th of September
along-with the food arrangements will be provided to delegates   at
MahaBodhi Society of India’s
head-quarter.

The
delegates who want to present a paper on the subject, should send it before 30thof
  August, 2009 on the address given below. 

Pl.
feel
 free to write to me, or call on me
in case of any  query.

 

Thanking
you

 

Dr. Ashok Gaikwad ( Gen. Secretary)

All India Lay-Buddhists’ Organization(AILBO)

N-11,C-3/24/3, Hudco,

Aurangabad-431 003 (Maharashtra
state)

Mobile No: 09423 700 789,  Phone: 0240 2381 360

Email: samyak_ashok@yahoo.com  Yours’  in 
Dhamma

 


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08/21/09
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ON LIVELIHOOD 

THE WAY OF USING
RESOURCES

 

            Our lives are interwined with
material things. When

it comes to food,
clothing, shelter and transportation, in

which case can we
forsake material things? In which case

do we not form some
relationship with material things? In

life we cannot do
without material things, and for this reason

some people are
willing to become slaves to these things. But

the fact of the
matter is that there is no need in life to

exclusively pursue
pleasure and riches. Instead of being a

slave to money, a
person should seek to enhance the appeal

and flavour of life.
Beautifying one’s house-hold

surroundings, for
example, can give us employment. People

can add to the charm
of life by diligently sweeping their yards

every day, by
cleaning their houses and windows, by making

their homes cozy, and
by cultivating their gardens.

Occasionally getting
away to a scenic area with friends will

also add a little
spice to life. We can also give life more essence

by immersing
ourselves in work or nature; by experiencing

the way a flower
blooms, a mountain land scape provides

enjoyment, a bridge
joins people, a tree gives shade, or a spring

quenches thirst. We
should strive for a lifestyle that gives

value to life.

 

COMPREHENSIVE PALI
COURSE

LESSON 8

 

Exercise 2

 

Translate into Pāli

 

1.                  
Good actions bring happiness for long, bad happiness

unhappiness.

 

Kusala-kammāni dīghakālaṁ sukhaṁ
āharanti,

akusala-kammāni dukkhaṁ.

 

2.                  
Wise men perform merit, and refrain from demerit.

 

Paṇḍitā-manussā punñña
karonti ceva p
āpato
ca

Viramanti.

 

3.                  
Bhadra saw long boats at sea from the mountain.

 

Bhadro pabbbatamhā samuddasmiṁ digha-navāyo

Passi.

 

4.                  
The world is permanent, the world gives happiness,

there is a mind- thus the ignorant
say and acquiren heaps

of demerit.

 

Loko nicco, loko sukhaṁ deti,
att
ā atthi, iti bālā

Passanti, evaṁ akusalānaṁ rāsiyo labhanti.

 

5.                  
The stomach of the poet was hot.

 

Kavissa kucchi uṇhaṁ ahosi.

 

6.                  
The leopards dwell in mountains and in forests

 

                  Dīpī
girīsu ca araññesu ca vasanti.

 

7.                  
All things are impermanent, so the wise ones se

and thus become pious ones.       

 

Sabbe saṅkhārā aniccā honti’ti Paṇḍitā passanti,

evapunññavantā ca bhavanti.

 

8.                  
Body, feelings, perceptions, mental formations,

conciousness are shadows and
unsubstatial.

 

Rūpaṁ, vedanā, saññā, saṅkhārā, viññāṇaṁ, chāyā

Viya anattā ca honti.

 

9.                  
Many kings, seers, householders attain final bliss

from the Awakened One in the past,
they attain now,

and they will attain in future.

 

Bahū bhūpati, isayo, gahapatayo, atīte
Buddhato

nibbānaṁ labhiṁsu,
te id
āni pi
labhanti, anānti, anāgate

ceva labhissanti.

10.              
He destroyed the fire of evil with the cool water of

good deeds and meditation; thus you also do all good

deeds and gain happiness.

 

So akusalssa aggiṁ kusala-kammānaṁ sita

udekena ca bhāvanāya ca hānesi, eva
tumhepi

sabbāni kusala-kammāni karotha, sukhaṁ ca

Hoti.

 

11.              
The Awakened One is the Sun of Wisdom and

ocean of Compassion.

 

Buddho paññāya suriyo ceva karuāya udadhi ca

labhatha.

 

12.              
You bring paddy with your hand, we carry treasures

on the head, and fools carry
sickness in their hearts.

     

                  Tumhe
hatthena vihi
āharatha, mayaṁ sīsena

                  nidhiāharāma, bālā ca attāna
cittesu by
ādhi

                  āharanti.

 

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The
King With One Grey Hair

[Ordination]



A very very long time ago,
there were people who lived much longer than they do today. They lived many
thousand years. At that time, the Enlightenment Being was born as a baby named
Makhadeva. He lived 84,000 years as a child and crown prince. At the time of
our story, he had been a young king for 80,000 years.

One day, Makhadeva told the
royal barber, “If you see any grey hair on my head, you must tell me
immediately!” Of course, the barber promised to do so.

Another 4,000 years passed,
until Makhadeva had been a young king for 84,000 years. Then one day, while he
was cutting the king’s hair, the royal barber saw just one little grey hair on
all the king’s head. So he said, “Oh my lord, I see one grey hair on your
head.” The king said, “If this be so, pull it out and put it in my
hand.” The barber got his golden tweezers, plucked out the single little
grey hair, and put it in the king’s hand.

At that time, the king
still had at least another 84,000 years left to live as an old king! Looking at
the one grey hair in his hand, he became very afraid of dying. He felt like
death was closing in on him, as if he were trapped in a burning house. He was
so afraid, that the sweat rolled down his back, and he shuddered.

King Makhadeva thought,
“Oh foolish king, you have wasted all this long life and now you are near
death. You have made no attempt to destroy your greed and envy, to live without
hating, and to get rid of your ignorance by learning the truth and becoming
wise.”

As he thought this, his
body burned and the sweat kept rolling down. Then he decided once and for all,
“It is time to give up the kingship, be ordained as a monk, and practice
meditation!” Thinking so, he granted the income of a whole town to the
barber. It amounted to one-hundred-thousand per year.

Then the king called his
oldest son to him and said, “My son, I have seen a grey hair. I have
become old. I have enjoyed the worldly pleasures of great wealth and power.
When I die, I want to be reborn in a heaven world, to enjoy the pleasures of
the gods. So I will be ordained as a monk. You must now take the responsibility
of ruling the country. I will live the life of a monk in the forest.”

Hearing of this, the royal
ministers and the rest of the court rushed to the king and said, “Our
lord, why do you suddenly want to be ordained?”

The king held up the grey
hair in his hand and said, “My ministers and subjects, I have realized
that this grey hair shows that the three stages of life - youth, middle age and
old age - are coming to an end. This first grey hair was the messenger of death
sitting on my head. Grey hairs are like angels sent by the god of death.
Therefore, this very day is the time for me to be ordained.”

The people wept at the news
of his departure. King Makhadeva gave up his royal life, went into the forest,
and was ordained as a monk. There he practiced what holy men call the ‘Four
Heavenly States of Mind’. First is loving-kindness, tender affection for all.
Second is feeling sympathy and pity for all those who suffer. Third is feeling
happiness for all those who are joyful. And the fourth state is balance and
calm, even in the face of difficulties or troubles.

After 84,000 years of great
effort meditating and practicing these states as a humble forest monk, the
Bodhisatta died. He was reborn in a high heaven world, to live a life a million
years long!

The
moral is: Even a long life is too short to waste.

 

A Permanent Online
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the Great Prabuddha Bharath

 

 


Right Views - the first step on the
Noble 8 Fold path

The Noble 8 Fold Path is the last of
the 4 noble truths propounded by Buddhism religion. The first aspect of the
Noble 8 Fold Path is right views.

We must first recognize that
attachment to the wrong views causes suffering. These are many examples that
can be given. Consider the religious wars of history and conflicts between
religious sects - Christian or otherwise. These were caused by attachment to
the views of a certain religion. Also the holders of these views were fanatics
in that they were not willing to engage in reasoned debate but were willing to
kill, wage war and die for their beliefs. In the 20th century we have seen
conflicts between the ideologies of communism, fascism and capitalism. And all
through history nations have held views regarding their superiority to other
nations and races and were prepared to fight to prove their point.

Uniqueness of Buddhism religion or
philosophy

The unique point is
that the teachings were regarded as fingers pointing to the moon. The teachings
were pointers to the truth but not the truth itself. This being made clear
there was the happy result of there being no wars and no fanaticism in the
followers of Buddhism.

This is one of the qualities that
attracts me most to Buddhism religion or philosophy.

Further explanation about this point
can be found in Sceptical Essays written by Bertrand Russell. Russell makes the
point that when 2 men of science hold opposing views about a subject they make
an appeal to evidence to win their argument. Also the scientists recognize that
they are fallible and can make mistakes. When fresh evidence suggests that they
are mistaken the scientist is prepared to change his views. Russell praises
this reasonableness and intellectual honesty and says that if this habit became
common to humanity it would lead to lessening of fanaticism and an end to
almost all the preventable wars and misery that we have seen throughout
history.

A scientist generally has good
reasons for his view; he appeals to evidence and is prepared to change his
mind. The fanatic on the other hand – someone like Hitler - generally has no
good reasons for his views, he appeals to force and is not prepared to change
his mind.

The goal of Buddhism - Nibbana

Why do we wish to
follow the eightfold path. Buddhism prescribes this path as a cure for the
suffering that all of us experience. So if you wish to be happy and not suffer
follow the teachings of Buddhism. Eightfold path will take us to the state
beyond suffering.

Regarding wrong views - the element
of the Noble 8 Fold path - in our individual lives they are caused generally by
traumas or wrong upbringing suffered in childhood. We may suffer from an
inferiority complex which is nothing but a point of view and a wrong view at
that. We are subject to the opinions of our parents when we are young –
regarding religion, sex and many other subjects. This forms our beliefs in
adult life. In my own community in India
I have observed the habit in many members of my community of blaming the
Muslims of India
for most of our social ills. A child subjected to this sort of brainwashing
will never be able to form a good relationship with a Muslim person even when
he matures. In this way, attachment to wrong views causes pain and suffering
both in our lives and others.

From the point of Buddhism religion
or philosophy we may say that all views are wrong views. We are obviously
dealing with the nature of God or Ultimate reality about which no opinions can
be held or expressed - you can only have the experience but you will find it
impossible to communicate your experience.

As stated earlier this experience is
the goal of Buddhism - Nibbana.

Buddhism may be described not as a
collection of views but as a path or method of dropping wrong views and gaining
insight. But how do we change deeply held beliefs and views which do not serve
us? It is through meditation, mindfulness, awareness and insight. Once we have
an insight about the nature of ourselves or of the world it will be possible
for us to drop our wrong views about the subject.

Insight about the nature of the
Universe and our relationship to it is the goal of Buddhism. Eightfold path can
lead us to that happy state.

I am afraid there is no substitute
for meditation as a tool to enable us to gain insight about ourselves and drop
wrong views and achieve lasting transformation and spiritual growth. You will
necessarily have to meditate daily for months and even years before you see
changes. I recommend Vipassana
as taught by S.N Goenka. It is a powerful and effective meditation for
transformation although it is quite demanding.

From the point of view of the Noble 8
Fold Path right views are one of the 8 elements which make up the path leading
to the end of suffering. For more on the Noble 8 Fold Path please refer The
Heart of Buddha’s Teaching
by Thich Nhat Hanh which explain this and other
aspects of Buddhism clearly.

For more on Buddhism and facts -
about it being a dialogue, a skillful means, about a powerful meditation that
leads to peace please visit this page on Buddhism
religion facts
You will find that Buddhism and facts are in close
agreement.

For more on the Noble eightfold path
please this page on Right
Thinking as per the Eightfold path of Buddhism

comments (0)
08/19/09
VR1 Media-Promotion of Buddhist Circuit in Uttar Pradesh and Bihar -ONLINE TRAINING ON PRECEPTS AND TRADE-58-Nepal promises steps to improve business climate We will create ‘feel-at-home’ environment for Indian entrepreneurs Security plan will address the issue of strikes, disruptions There is potential to further increase Indian investment- ON LIVELIHOOD THE WAY OF USING RESOURCES COMPREHENSIVE PALI COURSE LESSON 8 Exercise 1 Translate into English- FREE ONLINE TRAINING ON BUDDHISM FOR CHILDREN -18-Over 55 percent polling in Uttar Pradesh by-polls-A Permanent Online International Seminar on Buddhism and Buddhist Heritage of Jambudvipa, that is, the Great Prabuddha Bharath -11 Buddhist Meditation - the royal road to emancipation-Buddhism in South India?-
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MEDIA


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To reach Ultimate Bliss!

Promotion of Buddhist Circuit in Uttar Pradesh and Bihar


14:22 IST

The Union Tourism
Minister Kumari Selja has said that her Ministry will take along Uttar
Pradesh and Bihar while promoting Buddhist Circuit for tourists. She
said that Buddhist Circuit is popular both among foreign and domestic
tourists and all efforts will be made to make it star attraction. The
issue came up during the meeting of Uttar Pradesh tourism minister with
Kumari Selja here today when the former called on her. During the
meeting, Uttar Pradesh submitted a project on the Buddhist Circuit to
the Union Ministry for consideration.


Both the leaders discussed tourism related issues and Kumari
Selja stressed the need to provide cleanliness and hygienic atmosphere
at tourist spots in the state as the feel good factor among tourists
will provide the state a chance to have more repeat visitors. She said
Public Awareness Campaign about cleanliness must be started in places
like Agra where tourists come in large numbers. She suggested that the
help of corporate sector may also be taken in creating such awareness.
Kumari Selja also suggested to provide skill upgradation training to
waiters, cooks, taxi drivers and other stakeholders to provide better
experiences for tourists during their stay in the state. She said her
Ministry is willing to provide training to instructors of the state in
this regard, if such a request is put forward. She also urged the state
to work towards Seamless travel for the comfort of the tourists as
Uttar Pradesh is one of the key state in the Golden Triangle
(Delhi-Agra-Jaipur), which attracts most of the foreign tourists
visiting India.


The Uttar Pradesh tourism minister Shri Vinod Singh enlisted
the efforts of the state government in providing training to waiters,
cooks etc. and requested the Union Ministry to sanction a scheme of the
state government under which stipend for such training will be given to
the beneficiaries. He also sought help to have international airports
at Agra and Kushinagar.

Please visit:
http://books.google.co.in/books?id=cLXwU9e6D4sC&pg=PA512&lpg=PA512&dq=Buddhist+pilgrimage+in+UP+with+pictures&source=bl&ots=A63IIFHHDL&sig=xDwKJFtM2EcjmO_YRlVj22XhnEY&hl=en&ei=GeCMSo66DdWBkQWPi-G-DA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=4#v=onepage&q=&f=false
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kuVBUNV4D1c
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qLMeW6PPjUc
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tmr5X5vZZBU&NR=1
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yD9WDlwVYgw&feature=related

India Pilgrimage Tours

India Pilgrimage Tour

Circuit : Delhi - Patna - Nalanda - Bodhgaya - Varanasi - Gorakhpur
- Balrampur - Lucknow
Duration : 11 Nights / 12 Days

Cultural Discoveries :

Delhi : The capital of the
country and a historical place .
Patna : Capital of Bihar state and a Buddhiest tourist place.
Nalanda : An ancient historical place related to Budhism.Nalanda  Rajgir

Nalanda , an ancient city of
Mauryan period and resides most popular University of its
time. The Nalanda University was world famous Buddhist centre
of Learning. Pupils from far places used to come here to
receive the quality education. It was established by the great
scholar and diplomat Chankya. We will have to drive around 55
miles south east of Patna. Reaching there we would see the
complex of Nalanda University. You would find yourself in the
middle of history. You can take photographs and here and have
a video shoot. Our guide would show you the entire region.
After lunch we would drive towards Rajgir 15 Kms onwards.
Rajgir is an ancient town once the capital of powerful
Maghadha Kingdom.See the remains of its glorious past in its
ruins. Rajgir is developed as a health and winter resort due
to its warm water ponds. The water in this pond is said to
have medicinal qualities. You too can have a bath here. After
bath we would take a rope way to reach the Shanti Stupa
uphills and other monasteries built by Japanese devotees up
there. A continued journey towards outskirts of Rajgir would
take us to Gridhkuta Parvat ( hill) where Buddha preached his
best teachings. This is the very place where the first
Buddhist council was held after the lords Mahaparinirvana.

We would take our evening tea here at a local tea stall and
continue our drive towards Bodhgaya a very important place of
Pilgrimage in the Buddhist religion. We would Bodhgaya in
night. There would be no problem as we have already booked the
hotel for your convenience. After check in formalities over,
rest in your room. Dinner would be sent in your room. Go to
sleep after a nice hot dinner. It was a hectic day, so sleep
early and take complete rest. Tomorrow we would visit all the
important places in Bodhgaya.

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» Day 05 : Bodhgaya - Varanasi

Bodhgaya

Bodhgaya
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Wake up and have your bed tea
in your room. You can have breakfast of your choice in the
hotel restaurant . today we would see famous Buddhist
monasteries and temples in Bodhgaya. After breakfast we would
drive towards Mahabodi Temple which has diamond throne and
holy tree. Mahabodhi is the place where lord Buddha attained
enlightenment. Emperor Ashoka is considered to be the original
founder of the Mahabodhi temple. After visiting the temple
and Mahabodhi tree we would move further to visit other
monasteries and temples built by people from other countries
where Buddhism is the presiding religion like Bhutan , Tibet ,
China , Thai land and many others. We would take lunch in a
local restaurant which offers variety of cuisine. You can
order for Indian , Chinese , Continental and any other cuisine
of your choice.


Bodhgaya : The holy place where Lord Buddha attained Awakenment.
Varanasi : The most sacred and important religious sight in Hindu
religion.
Gorakhpur : An important historical and cultural place in Eastern
part of Uttar Pradesh.
Balrampur : The city has many ancient sights of Budhist religion.
Lucknow : Capital city of Uttar Pradesh and popular as a ciltural
hub of state with many famous Mughal monuments.
Kushinagar

Kushinagar
Kushinagar, the important place of Budhiest piligriamge where
Lord Buddha attained Mahapariniravana. Have your breakfast and
get in to the car. Kushinagar is 53 kms west and approx 3 hrs.
of drive from Gorakhpur. Reaching thter we would encounter
with the remains of ancient city “Kushinara” of
Malla dynasty.Visit the Today, Kushinagar is rediscovering its
roots, as a centre for international Buddhism, and home to
many viharas, including a Tibetan gompa devoted to Sakyamuni,
a Burmese vihara, and temples from China and Japan.

See the magnificient sulpture of Lord Buddha in the Stupa.
Have lunch in the peaceful environment of the Kushinagar and
visit all the temples built by many other Buddhist countries.

Introduction

Buddhism in South India?
 

The soaring towers of the great temples dedicated to the Hindu gods Śiva and Visnu
today dominate the religious landscape in the Tamil-speaking corner of southeastern
India. Impressive shrines built by a succession of powerful medieval dynasties cover the
region, from Kañcipuram in the north to Sriralkam, Citamparam, Tañcavur, and
Maturai. The temples of Śiva’s son, Murukan, mark the boundaries of the Tamil coun­
try; in 1971, the most prominent Tamil political party (the Tiravita Munnerrak Kalakam,
or DMK) declared Murukan to be its official patron deity. 1 Tamil-speaking Hindus today
enjoy the reputation throughout India of being the most traditional and the most ortho­
dox, with their practices and institutions
representing a seemingly unbroken chain of

religious development that stretches back nearly two millennia. Although minority popu­
lations of Muslims, Christians, and Jains do exist, the overwhelming majority of the
Tamil-speaking population in modern India practices some form of devotion to Śiva,
Visnu, or the goddess.

Yet the literary and historical record of religions in this region of southernmost India
tells a far more complex story. Although the monarchs of the medieval Pallava, Paotiya,
and Co;a dynasties constructed large edifices in honor of the Hindu pantheon, they
patronized other sectarian communities as well, including Jains, Ajivikas, 2 and Bud­
dhists. Indeed, non-Hindu communities played such an important role in South Indian
literary and religious culture and in the administration of the state between the fourth
and seventh centuries that later Śaiva tradition labeled this period the Kalabhra Interreg­
num,
the interruption of the “wicked ones” (kalappalar). 3 The earliest written records in
Tamil, the Brahmi inscriptions, are Jain. 4 Between the composition of the classical, or
“Calkam, ” literature (roughly, the second through fourth centuries) 5 and the emergence
of the Hindu devotional (bhakti) poet-saints in the seventh through ninth centuries, the
majority of the poetic works produced in Tamil were written by either Buddhists or
Jains.

Despite the presence of Buddhists, Jains, and Ajivikas in the Tamil inscriptional,
archaeological, and literary record, the significance of non-Hindu contributions to the
 history of religions in Tamil-speaking South India has only recently become the topic of
serious academic study. In what Richard Davis calls the “standard historical narrative
concerning South Indian Jainism and Saivism, ” for example, scholarship has long tended
to pit Hindu against non-Hindu, telling “a story of heterodox challenge and Hindu revival
and triumph. ” 6 In this historical narrative, which has dominated the study of religion
in South India for more than a century, Buddhists and Jains appear only intermittently
as the “other, ” as
foreigners to be spurned, ridiculed, and ultimately dismissed as “anti­
Tamil, ” unable to corrupt or suppress with their emphasis on ascetic practice the natu­
ral joie de vivre of the Tamils. 7

Several recent and important studies have begun to reverse this scholarly trend,
however, particularly in regard to the long presence of Tamil-speaking Jains in South
India. Leslie C. Orr’s work, for example, examines the lives of both Hindu and Jain
“religious women” in the inscriptional record of the eighth through thirteenth centu­
ries, noting that Jain women were both significant temple donors and religious teachers. 8
James Ryan’s study of the ninth-century poetic narrative, the Civakacintamaoi, demon­
strates the power of literary parody in this sophisticated work by a Jain monk that over­
turns the classical conventions of literary love to prove “the poisonousness of lust in
epic fashion. ” 9 Paula Richman’s study of the sixth-century Buddhist narrative, the
Manimekalai, loosely follows a similar approach, demonstrating the ways in which the
author inverts classical literary ideals with great rhetorical finesse to inculcate Buddhist
values in his audience. 10 Examining the anti-Jain invective in the earliest devotional poetry
to Śiva, Indira Peterson asserts that “we cannot assume that the Jains suddenly stopped
participating in Tamil culture even as the Śaiva bhakti cult began to assert itself. It is
much more likely that the Nayanars [the Śaiva
saints, literally “leaders”] found it advan­
tageous to exclude their most powerful rivals from their reformulation of Tamil cul­
ture. ” 11 In a thought-provoking essay that ponders the origins of the seeming similari­
ties between Jain thought and the medieval Śaiva philosophy in Tamil known as Śaiva
Siddhanta, Richard Davis suggests a model of “productive encounter” among sectarian
communities, a flow of ideas back and forth despite the Śaiva rhetoric of challenge and
defeat. 12 Indeed, each of the essays in the edited volume, suggestively titled Open
Bound­
aries: Jain Communities and Cultures in Indian History,
in which the Orr, Ryan, Peterson,
and Davis articles cited previously appear, fruitfully attempts to understand the Jain
tradition, from models of kingship to Jain contributions to Sanskrit literary theory, in
the broader context of South Asian history and religiosity, taking into account the “chal­
lenging, borrowing, contradicting, polemicizing, appropriating, and modifying that goes
on across religious boundaries. ” 13

Among the many religious communities that once wielded influence in various realms
of cultural life in the Tamil-speaking South, relatively little study has been made of the
Buddhists. With the Buddhist strongholds of Amaravati and Nagarjunakooda immedi­
ately to the north and the great monastic establishments of Sri Lanka to the east, it is
certainly not surprising to find traces of a Buddhist presence in the kingdoms of the
Pallavas, the Paotiyas, and the Co;as in the fourth through twelfth centuries. Yet while
the scattered artifacts of Buddhism in the region have been examined individually over
the past century or so, the significance of any one is often far from clear; the character
of the Tamil-speaking Buddhist community or communities has remained largely obscure.
Who were the Tamil-speaking Buddhists of southern India? What did being “Buddhist” 

mean in the complex religious world of the medieval South, a diverse landscape of
competing sectarian communities in which Buddhists were perhaps always a minority?
What can the disparate remnants of Buddhism in this region reveal to the historian of
religions?

 

http://www.questia. com/PM.qst? a=o&d=104967642

 

Imagining a Place for Buddhism
Literary Culture and Religious Community in
Tamil-Speaking South India

ANNE E. MONIUS

OXFORD
UNIVERSITY PRESS
2001

 
 
May all beings be happy!
(Sakya, The Humanity)

ONLINE TRAINING ON PRECEPTS AND TRADE-58

Nepal promises steps to improve business climate

We
will create ‘feel-at-home’ environment for Indian entrepreneurs

Security plan will address the issue of strikes, disruptions

There is potential to further increase Indian investment


NEW DELHI: Nepal on Wednesday promised a “feel-at-home” environment
for Indian entrepreneurs, with Prime Minister Madhav Kumar Nepal
assuring India that his office would take the initiative to remove all
obstacles.

Last year, his predecessor Pushpa Kamal Dahal alias Prachanda had
given a similar commitment, but his tenure was too short to create a
conducive atmosphere for Indian businessmen, who complained of
extortion threats and plant closures.

Mr. Nepal promised to put in place a security plan after consulting
all political parties to protect investment and ensure uninterrupted
manufacturing operations. The plan would address the issue of strikes
and disruptions so as to keep the industrial production steady and
protect investor interest.

“The Prime Minister’s office will make sure that you feel at home
and obstacles are removed. You will get a high level of attention from
the government. I will personally make sure that foreign investment is
given due priority,” Mr. Nepal said, speaking at a luncheon organised
by the industrial chambers.

Mr. Prachanda had also said his government would adopt every
possible measure to create the necessary conditions, including
repatriation of capital and profit earned by investors.

New Delhi considers Indian investment in Nepal a fulcrum for
correcting the imbalance in trade, now tilted heavily in favour of
India. This approach has been tried out with success in boosting trade
with Sri Lanka without skewing the balance further in India’s favour.
India has been adopting a similar approach to Bangladesh, but with
little success.

“My government will be responsive to all your suggestions,” Mr.
Nepal told Indian businessmen, while identifying hydropower, roads,
bridges, infrastructure, construction, tourism, agro-processing and
financial services as the areas where Indian investment would be
especially welcome. He conceded that though the bulk of the foreign
investment (43 per cent) received by Nepal was from India, there was
potential to increase it further.

Peace and stability in Nepal through all-round economic growth and
inclusive development would be the key factors in lifting the economic
face of the nation. “I believe we can sustain peace and stability in
the country only with rapid and inclusive development. We will do our
best to ensure security and peaceful environment in the country,” he
said
.




ON LIVELIHOOD
THE WAY OF USING
RESOURCES


Although Buddhism
admonishes us against material

Desire, in this
society and opposed to excessive indulgence in material

culture is in accord
with moral living. But practicing ascetics

who hope to subdue
their wills by tempering their material

desires are also to
be commended.   In the monastic life, for

example, when the
master dies, his or her belongings are given

to his or her
disciples. One garment can be handed down for

generations; over the
years of my own monastic life I have ]

experienced this. If
we can distance ourselves from material

things, then we are
not slaves to them. That is why the

Diamond Sutra [Vajracchedika Prajna Paramita Sutra] tells us

Not to dwell in the
six dusts – form, sound, smell, taste, touch

And objects. The five
desires and six dusts are filled with

Defects and afflictions;
The Collection of Great Treasures
asserts,

“Riches, lust, and
position are impermanent and last but a

Short time. The wise
do not pursue momentary pleasure

But diligently seek
the most wonderful Buddha wisdom”. The

Flower Ornament Sutra [Avatamsaka Sutra] also notes, “The

Dhamma of eternal
happiness, gentleness, and patience is to

Be found amid
loving-kindness, compassion, joy, and

Equanimity”.  We can find our path in life only by taming

Our material desires
and taking delight in seeking the Dhamma;

And by being happy,
compassion, joy and equanimity.



COMPREHENSIVE PALI COURSE LESSON 8 (Contd)-

LESSON 8

 

Exercise 1

 

Translate into English

 

1.                  
Manussā kusalāni ca akusalāni ca kammāni karonti.

 

Men do good and eveil deeds.

 

2.                  
Munayao puññāni karonti, evapuññavantā honti.

 

The sages perform meritorious deeds. Thus become

Pious ones.

 

3.                  
Pāpa-puggalā pāpa-kammāni harissanti.

 

Evil men will commit eveil deeds.

 

4.                 
Evaṁ te dīghakālaṁ dukkhaṁ labhissanti.

 

Thus they will get suffering for long.

 

5.                 
Ekasmiṁ gahapatimhi pāpa-icchāyo uppajjiṁsu.

 

Evil desire arose in one householder.

 

6.                  
So maīnaṁ rāsiyo karissāmi iti abhāsi.

 

I shall make heaps of gems, so he
said.

 

7.                  
Kāyo anicco, vedanā aniccā, saññā aniccā, saṅkhārā

Aniccā, viññāṇaṁ iti Bodhi Rukkhassa mūle

Sākyamunino ñāṇaṁ upapajji.

 

The body is impermanent, feelings are impermanent

Perceptions are impermenant, mental formations are

Impermanent, conciousness is impermenant, thus

The knowledge arose to the sage of the sahyas at

The foot of the Tree of Awakenment.

 

8.                  
Dhammassa Adhipatino, Karuāya Udadhissa,

Saddhā-cittena devamanussā atite
vandi
ṁsu,idāni

Vandanti, ānāgate vandissanti.

 

Gods and men worshipped the Lord of
Truth, the

Ocean of Compassion, with a heart of
devotion, in

The past, they worship now and will
worship in the

Future.

 

9.                  
Paṇḍitā sabbe saṁkhārā aniccā, dukkhā, anattā iti

Passanti, evaṁ saṁyojanāni hanenti akusala-

Byādhīhi attānaṁ mocenti, kusalaṁ karonti ceva

paññaṁ bhāventi.

 

All things are impermanent, unsatisfactory and

Impersonal, so the wise ones understand and thus

Destroy the fetters and free themselves from the

Diseases of evil, and perform meritorious deeds and

Develop wisdom.

 

10.              
Bālā gambhīraṁ Buddha-Dhammaṁ jānanti

evaṁ Dhamma-nidhiṁ na labhanti, dighakāla

dukkhena viharanti ca.

 

The tools do not know the profound Teachings of the

Awakened One,thus they don’t acquire the

Treasure of Truth and for long dwell with

Unhappiness.



FREE ONLINE
TRAINING ON BUDDHISM FOR CHILDREN -18

The One-hundredth Prince
[Obedience
to a Wise Teacher]

Once
upon a time, there was a king who had one- hundred sons. The youngest, the one-hundredth,
was Prince Gamani. He was very energetic, patient and kind.

All
the princes were sent to be taught by teachers. Prince Gamani, even though he
was the one-hundredth in line to the throne, was lucky enough to have the best
teacher. He had the most learning and was the wisest of them of all. He was like
a father to Prince Gamani, who liked, respected and obeyed him.

In
those days, it was the custom to send each educated prince to a different province.
There he was to develop the country and help the people. When Prince Gamani was
old enough for this assignment, he went to his teacher and asked which province
he should request. He said, “Do not select any province. Instead, tell your
father the king that if he sends you, his one-hundredth son, out to a province,
there will be no son remaining to serve him in his home city.” Prince Gamani
obeyed his teacher, and pleased his father with his kindness and loyalty.


Then the prince went again to his teacher and asked, “How best can I serve
my father and the people, here in the capital city?” The wise teacher replied,
“Ask the king to let you be the one to collect fees and taxes, and distribute
benefits to the people. If he agrees, then carry out your duties honestly and
fairly, with energy and kindness.”

Again
the prince followed his teacher’s advice. Trusting his one-hundredth son, the
king was glad to assign these functions to him. When he went out to perform the
difficult task of collecting fees and taxes, the young prince was always gentle,
fair and lawful. When he distributed food to the hungry, and other necessary things
to the needy, he was always generous, kind and sympathetic. Before long, the one-hundredth
prince gained the respect and affection of all.

Eventually,
the king came to be on his deathbed. His ministers asked him who should be the
next king. He said that all his one-hundred sons had a right to succeed him. It
should be left up to the citizens.

After
he died, all the citizens agreed to make the one-hundredth prince their next ruler.
Because of his goodness, they crowned him King Gamani the Righteous.

When
the ninety-nine older brothers heard what had happened, they thought they had
been insulted. Filled with envy and rage, they prepared for war. They sent a message
to King Gamani, which said, “We are all your elders. Neighbour countries
will laugh at us if we are ruled by the one-hundredth prince. Either you give
up the kingdom or we will take it by war!”

After
he received this message, King Gamani took it with him to his wise old teacher,
and asked his advice.

It
just so happened that this honorable gentle teacher was the reborn Awakened
Being. He said, “Tell them you refuse to wage war against your brothers.
Tell them you will not help them kill innocent people you have come to know and
love. Tell them that, instead, you are dividing the king’s wealth among all one-hundred
princes. Then send each one his portion.” Again the king obeyed his teacher.

Meanwhile
the ninety-nine older princes had brought their ninety-nine small armies to surround
the royal capital. When they received the king’s message and their small portions
of the royal treasure, they held a meeting. They decided that each portion was
so small it was almost meaningless. Therefore, they would not accept them.

But then they
realized that, in the same way, if they fought with King Gamani and
then with each other, the kingdom itself would be divided into small
worthless portions. Each small piece of the once-great kingdom would
be weak in the face of any unfriendly country. So they sent back their
portions of the royal treasure as offerings of peace, and accepted
the rule of King Gamani.

The
king was pleased, and invited his brothers to the palace to celebrate the peace
and unity of the kingdom. He entertained them in the most perfect ways - with
generosity, pleasant conversation, providing instruction for their benefit, and
treating all with even-handed courtesy.

In
this way the king and the ninety-nine princes became closer as friends than they
had been as brothers. They were strong in their support of each other. This was
known in all the surrounding countries, so no one threatened the kingdom or its
people. After a few months, the ninety-nine brothers returned to their provinces.

King
Gamani the Righteous invited his wise old teacher to live in the palace. He honored
him with great wealth and many gifts. He held a celebration for his respected
teacher, saying to the full court, “I, who was the one-hundredth prince,
among one-hundred worthy princes, owe all my success to the wise advice of my
generous and understanding teacher. Likewise, all who follow their wise teachers’
advice will earn prosperity and happiness. Even the unity and strength of the
kingdom, we owe to my beloved teacher.”


The kingdom prospered under the remainder of the generous and just rule of King
Gamani the Righteous
.

The moral is:
One is rewarded a hundred-fold for following the advice of a wise
teacher.

A Permanent Online International Seminar on Buddhism and Buddhist
Heritage of Jambudvipa, that is, the Great Prabuddha Bharath -11

Buddhist Meditation - the royal
road to emancipation

This article describes and explains partly the Buddhist
Meditation technique expounded in the Anapanasati Sutra.

This Sutra describes a practice that has come down to us
from the founder of Buddhism, the Buddha himself. It is one of
the main practices of Theravada Buddhism.

Anapana means breathing and the word sati means awareness.
Anapanasati is therefore the practice of awareness of the
breath.

This is a particularly good Buddhist Meditation as you can
practice it at any and all times during the day and not just in
those hours when you are meditating.

It is an easy meditation method but it requires effort.

The paradox in learning
meditation

The first thing we come to know in learning
meditation is that many techniques are simplicity itself. But
practicing them involves moment to moment awareness and that is
an extraordinarily difficult habit to form. In learning
meditation, in practicing this easy meditation technique we are
reversing the accumulated habits of a lifetime..


So that is what makes it difficult. But persevere. The
benefits and results are more than worth it.

This sutra has been described as the incomparable path
leading to emancipation. For our purposes however, it would
suffice if we gained some peace and happiness and some freedom
from our fretful, anxious selves.

The sutra consists of 16 verses or methods of Buddist
Meditation. In this article I will describe and explain the
first 2 verses only which will be enough to calm us down, get
ourselves started and give us the experience decide whether we
wish to continue, stop or progress further.

The sutra reads as follows: -

Following the breath in daily life – eliminating
forgetfulness and unnecessary thinking.

“Breathing in, he knows that he is breathing in; and
breathing out he knows that he is breathing out. Breathing in a
long breath he knows, “I am breathing in a long breath.”
Breathing out a long breath he knows, “I am breathing out a
long breath.” Breathing in a short breath he knows “I am
breathing in a short breath”. Breathing out a short breath he
knows, “I am breathing out a short breath”’

These sutras sound very simple; you may think what is so
earth-shakingly important about knowing whether I am breathing
in or breathing out. Do not be fooled. By doing this exercise
you will force yourself to be free of your thoughts and
desires. You will be free of your joys, sorrows, anger and
unease and gain some peace.

As stated earlier

The above method is one of the
main practices of Theravada Buddhism

You can practice this
exercise during your hours of meditation with profit. You can
also – if you choose – integrate this method in your daily life
and practice it as you go about your day-to-day chores.


Most of our day-to-day chores can be done and made
meaningful by practice of this method of Buddhist Meditation.
While sitting, walking, standing you combine awareness of
breathing with all the movements of the body. While sitting –
“I am breathing in and I am sitting down”. While standing – “I
am breathing out and I am standing”. While doing something
which involves attention such as chopping onions – “I am
breathing in and I am aware that my right hand is chopping
onions” This is the way we can practice.

You may find that the time taken for an in breath or out
breath is too short to say the complete sentence to yourself.
In that case say “Breathing in – sitting” or “Breathing in –
standing” or “Breathing out – chopping onions” and so on.

By following your breath and combining conscious breathing
with your daily activities you will cut across the stream of
disturbing thoughts and become peaceful. This is also an
exercise that leads to stopping of our thoughts so that we can
observe them. It also leads to an increase in our powers of
concentration.

You may find it difficult to sustain your practice over the
weeks, months and years if you are practicing alone. It will be
of immense help to you if you can form a group or community of
likeminded friends who are interested in Buddhist Meditation.
The group can then support and encourage each other.

Some more easy meditation
techniques

So these are two of the practices described in
the Anapanasati sutra of Buddhism. Theravada and also Mahayana
Buddhism has many such powerful and easy meditation techniques
we can practice.


As I mentioned earlier the Anapanasati sutra describes 16
forms of Buddhist Meditation. I have explained in brief the
first 2 methods, which are quite enough for you to dis-identify
with your mind and your grasping, anxious ego and gain peace.
To make further progress please pick up a copy of the book

Breathe! You are alive by Thich Nhat Hanh available at
Amazon.

To learn more about the benefits of this practice please
visit this page on Buddhism
religion

To learn more about its history visit this page on
Buddhism religion
history

I hope you enjoyed this article and that it will be useful
to you.


Over 55 percent polling in Uttar Pradesh by-polls

Lucknow, Aug 18 (IANS) Over 55 percent turnout was recorded in
by-elections to four assembly seats in Uttar Pradesh Tuesday, officials
said.


Polling was peaceful with no untoward incidents reported.

The highest turnout, 66 percent, was recorded in the Morna
constituency in Muzaffarnagar district and the lowest, 45 percent, in
the Moradabad Central constituency.

Malihabad in Lucknow district and Viduna in Kanpur Dehat recorded 55 percent polling.



Bahujan Samaj Party

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08/18/09
VR1 MEDIA -Byelections:-Byelection in Chitapur -Councillor finds she is a man -62 per cent turnout in Kollegal -Somanna’s ‘warning’ to voters -BBMP website -www.bbmp.gov.in-BBMP polls: Govt struggles with ward reservation
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VR1

MEDIA

Byelections: polling largely peaceful in five constituencies

Karnataka Bureau


Average voting percentage 61.5

A few voters in Ramanagara constituency boycotted the polls

Two stray incidents of clashes reported in two villages in Channapatna




— Photo: V. Sreenivasa Murthy





Incentive: Supporters of political parties
distributing food packets near a polling station in Govindarajanagar
constituency in Bangalore on Tuesday.

Bangalore: The byelections in five Assembly constituencies in the
State — Govindarajanagar (Bangalore Urban district), Ramanagara and
Channapatna (Ramanagara district), Kollegal (Chamarajanagar district)
and Chitapur (Gulbarga district) passed off peacefully with large
police presence in select pockets
.

The election authorities here indicated that the polling percentage
in the five constituencies was around 61.5 and that there could be a
small addition since voters were standing in queue at some polling
stations even at the closing time of 5 p.m. The byelections were marked
by brisk polling through the day.

Byelections in the State were largely owing to some legislators
choosing to contest the recent Lok Sabha elections or resigning from
the Assembly to cross over to the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party.
Following the defection of legislators from the Congress and the Janata
Dal (Secular) to the BJP in mid-2008. 

State Chief Electoral Officer C.S. Suranjana said 61.6 per cent of the 10.10 lakh electorate voted in the byelections.

The percentage of polling in these five constituencies was 58.3
during the 2009 Lok Sabha elections and 62.13 in the 2008 Assembly
elections. With no cognisable violations having been reported,
re-polling is out of question in any of the polling stations in the
five constituencies.

According to information received from the Returning Officers,
Channapatna recorded the highest percentage of polling of 73 while
Govindarajanagar, which witnessed a fierce battle between Minister for
Muzrai and four-time MLA, V. Somanna of the BJP, and a new entrant to
electoral politics, Priya Krishna of the Congress, recorded a low
turnout of 48 per cent.

Even in the Lok Sabha elections all the Bangalore-based
constituencies recorded a low turnout of around 45 per cent and voter
apathy was cited as the reason then. The percentage of polling was 71
at Ramanagara, 64 at Kollegal and 59 at Chitapur. The latter two are
reserved constituencies.

Mr. Suranjana said that polling officials replaced EVMs in six
places on complaints of malfunctioning at Channapatna ,
Govindarajangar, Kollegal and Chitapur. A few voters of
Chikkadevarahalli (booth No. 180) and Siddayanadoddi (booth No. 117) in
Ramanagara constituency boycotted the polls demanding separate polling
booths and alleging that successive governments had not taken up
development projects for their benefit.

At Channapatna despite the tension that had built up in the last
two days, polling was largely peaceful except for two stray incidents
of clashes in two villages which left four persons injured. At the end
of polling, a large number of Janata Dal (S) supporters staged a
protest when the police tried to take a son of the Janata Dal (S)
candidate into custody in connection with the assault on two Ministers
on Sunday.

After campaigning ended on Sunday, Minister for Information
Technology Katta Subramanya Naidu was heckled and assaulted by Janata
Dal (S) activists when they reportedly found him distributing money to
garner votes for the BJP candidate. This had resulted in complaints and
counter-complaints.

In Gulbarga, following a complaint, officials stopped a bus
proceeding from Mumbai towards Chitapur, at Wadi in Gulbarga district.
It was alleged that the bus was carrying voters from Mumbai to
Chitapur
.

Byelection in Chitapur


GULBARGA: An estimated 56 to 58 per cent of the electorate voted in
the Chitapur Assembly byelection in Gulbarga district on Tuesday. The
byelection was necessitated by the resignation of M. Mallikarjun Kharge
after he was elected to the Lok Sabha.

Minor clash between Congress and BJP workers and
complaints that political parties were carting bogus voters from
outside the State.

Polling was disrupted for about 30 minutes at a polling booth in
Chitapur town and at another in Ravoor because of malfunctioning
electronic voting machines (EVMs).

 A complaint was  filed with the Election Commission against the
BJP for indulging in unfair electoral practice, following the police
seizing vehicles suspected of carting bogus voters.

The polling, which began on a dull note in the morning, picked up in
the afternoon. After three hours of polling only 12 per cent of the
voters had cast their votes, but by 4 p.m. over 51 per cent of the
voters had exercised their franchise.

Councillor finds she is a man

Special Correspondent

CHANNAPATNA: A woman member of Channapatna city municipal council
could not vote in the bypolls on Tuesday as the voters’ list had the
picture of a man in her place. An anguished Ms. Khamma Nijami,
councillor from Ward 23, told The Hindu
that she had
not been allowed to vote though she had a valid Photo Identity Card
(XDH2312163). Another person, Syed Nur, alleged that he could not vote
as the voters’ list had the photo of his wife in his place.

A large number of people coming under the jurisdiction of polling
stations 86 and 87 in Petta area of Channapatna had to return without
casting their votes as their names had been deleted from the voters’
list. Councillor Sakamma alleged that 285 names had been deleted from
polling station No. 86.

62 per cent turnout in Kollegal

Correspondent

Chamarajanagar: The voter turnout for the byelection in the Kollegal
(SC) Assembly constituency in Chamarajanagar district on Tuesday was 62
per cent, according to the election authorities.

People whose names were missing
in the electoral rolls were disappointed and they expressed anger at
the authorities concerned.

Polling, which was slow in the morning, picked up around noon. A
large number of people were found standing in queues at polling
stations in the afternoon.

Polling was delayed by about 30 minutes in Santhemaralli and Bheema
Nagar polling stations in Kollegal town owing to technical snags in the
electronic voting machines (EVM).

Somanna’s ‘warning’ to voters

Bangalore Bureau



— Photo: V. Sreenivasa Murthy





queuing up: Voters at one of the election centres
during the byelections in Govindarajanagar Assembly Constituency in
Bangalore on Tuesday.

Bangalore: “I will win whatever you do. But if you don’t join my
side in the next two years, I will see that your own people will beat
you up.”
Unaware of the presence of a group of journalists nearby, V.
Somanna, Muzrai and Housing Minister and a candidate in the bypolls at
Govindarajanagar, issued this threat to a gathering of people a little
away from the polling booth in Gangondanahalli even as polling was in
progress. The area, a Muslim pocket, saw some confusion over missing
names, with contrary claims on the number of names that were not in the
electoral list.

He had said, and added that he would “reveal
all” about his Congress rival Priya Krishna’s assets once the elections
were over.

Voting in Govindarajanagar constituency was brisk in the lower
middle class and revenue pockets in the morning and remained sluggish
in middle-class layouts, with no disruptions or violence. Polling in
many centres started only after a “mock” election was done before the
representatives of the 27 candidates to check the working of the
Electronic Voting Machines.
There were some complaints about
names gone missing from the electoral rolls — especially in
Pattegarapalya, Gangondanahalli, Moodalapalya and Muneshwara Nagar.

Rehmatulla and Chand Pasha, near booth numbers 191 and 192 in
Gangondanahalli, claimed that their names had disappeared from the list
though they had voted in Lok Sabha elections. Niyamat Ullah Sharief,
president of the local mosque, said that some names had been wrongly
entered, though the accompanying photographs were correct. The name
Shamsheer, for instance, was printed as Shivaji Rao.

Voters in Raghavendra School in Anubhava Nagar said that the two
voting machines were kept in the wrong order till 10 a.m. The machine
from names one to 16 was kept after the second machine. 


Swine flu effect

The effect of the swine flu was visible. Some polling officers wore
masks, an item evidently in short supply. An election officer at
Muneshwaranagar, said: “Our colleagues fought with each other to get
the mask. The masks allotted for six of us were taken away by others.”



BBMP website

The website address of the Bruhat Bangalore Mahanagara Palike (BBMP) has been changed to www.bbmp.gov.in from www.bmponline.org, according to a press release.(Site under Construction)

http://timesofindia
.indiatimes. com/news/ city/bangalore/ BBMP-polls- Govt-struggles-
with-ward- reservation/ articleshow/ 4904062.cms

BBMP polls: Govt struggles with ward reservation



S Kushala, TNN 18 August 2009, 04:13am IST




BANGALORE: For the state government which is rushing through the


preparations for civic elections, finalizing ward-wise reservation has


become a


tricky task. After issuing the notification for the guidelines and


reservation roster, the urban development department officials are


coping with pressure from BJP MLAs and ministers.




According to government guidelines, 91 wards of the BBMP have been


reserved for SC/ST, backward classes along with one-third


representation for women. The remaining 107 wards are general, along


with women. The reservation is based on the 2001 census figures which


pegs Bangalore’s population at 58,40,155, SCs at 6,81,521 and STs at


70,071.




Though there is no scientific formula to fix the reservation, normally


the `one-third’ basis is followed — on an average fixing every third


ward as general and in between wards for SC/ST and backward classes.


For instance, if ward 1 Kempegowda is General, ward 4 Yelahanka Town


could be General or General Woman. Wards will have SC/ST backward


classes reservations based on their caste composition.




Surprisingly, several lists containing wards and reservations are


being floated. So much so that a list allegedly released by the urban


development department is also doing the rounds in political circles.


The government, of course, maintains that the reservation list is yet


to be finalized.




Normally, ruling party members have a say in making the reservation


list. The city BJP MLAs and ministers submitted their priority lists


to the chief minister who holds the Bangalore portfolio. The list is


typically drawn up after identifying potential winners and matching


their caste to the appropriate ward.




The candidate could be a former corporator who is popular in the area,


a social activist, a party loyalist and worker, businessman or a


real-estate player close to the MLA who has both money and muscle


power.




“Interested candidates have already started tapping the doors of


partymen in power. There is a lot of money involved in the exercise.


This civic election may see a lot of people from real estate


contesting from new wards in the periphery,'’ sources explained.




Once the urban development department finalizes the list, the draft


will be put up for notification. At this point, the list typically is


challenged in the courts.

comments (0)
08/17/09
Four assembly by-polls in UP tomorrow-Kindly Vote for all the 5 BSP Candidates contesting in the Karnataka State By - Election on 18-08-2009 Dr. Subash Bharani (Kollegal)-Ayappa (Chittapura) Nahidha Salma (Govindarajanagara) Mallikarjunaiah (Ramanagara) Sujeevan Kumar (Channapatna)-Minister Somanna locked inside garment unit? -Yeddyurappa censured for poll code violation -
Filed under: General
Posted by: @ 6:46 pm

Kindly Vote for all the 5 BSP Candidates

contesting in the UP, Karnataka and all other States going for  By - Election on 18-08-2009

Four assembly by-polls in UP tomorrow

Lucknow, Aug 17 (PTI) Amidst tight security, the stage
is set for tomorrow’s by-elections to four assembly seats in
Uttar Pradesh, the first test of popularity for political
parties in the state after the Lok Sabha polls.


An estimated 11 lakh voters are likely to exercise their
franchise to decide the political fate of 58 aspirants vying
for Moradabad West, Malihabad, Bidhuna and Morena assembly
seats.

The
ruling BSP,  has
put up candidates for the four seats.


The by-polls are seen as the first test popularity for
BSP which is going to spring a surprise by winning all the 4 seats.

http://www.kalachuvadu.com/issue-83/images/kanshi_ram.jpg

http://www.lifeinlegacy.com/2006/1014/RamKanshi.jpghttp://www.outlookindia.com/images/kanshi_ram_thumb_061009.jpg

Monday, August 17, 2009

KUMARI MAYAWATI
BIO DATA
DATE OF BIRTH & PLACE —– January 15, 1956, Delhi
FATHER ——– Mr. Prabhu Das
MOTHER ———— Mrs. Ram Rati
EDUCATION ———– B.A., B.Ed., LL.B., education at Kalindi College,

University of Delhi (Delhi) and University of Meerut (Uttar Pradesh)

PROFESSION ————— Political, Social Worker and Lawyer.
OTHER INFORMATION —- Teacher, Delhi Administration, 1977-1984.
SPECIAL INTERESTS - Social service for the downtrodden and the Scheduled
Castes and Scheduled Tribes to organise weaker sections

of the society. Reading, gardening, urban development,
planning and labour welfare.


POSITION HELD 1 Elected to Lok Sabha for first time in 1989.
2 Re- elected to Lok Sabha for second time in 1998.
3 Re- elected to Lok Sabha for third time in 1999 &

Leader of B.S.P. Parliamentary Party in Lok Sabha.
4 Re- elected to Lok Sabha for fourth time in 2004
(Resigned on 26th June, 2004)
5 Elected to Rajya Sabha for first time in April 1994
(Resigned on 25th October 1996).
6 Re-elected to Rajya Sabha for second time in July 2004
& leader B.S.P. Parliamentary Party Rajya Sabha.
(Resigned on 5th July, 2007)
7 Chief Minister of Uttar Pradesh for the first time from 03
June, 1995 to 18 October, 1995, 2nd time
from 21 March, 1997 to 21 September, 1997, 3rd time
from 03 May, 2002 to 29 August, 2003 and 4th time
from 13 May, 2007 to till date. Elected to Uttar Pradesh
Legislative Assembly for first time in 1996. Elected to
Uttar Pradesh Legislative Assembly for second time in
2002. (Resigned on 28th August, 2003) Elected to Uttar
Pradesh Legislative Council for first time on 29th June,
2007.
President of Bahujan Samaj Party.



COUNTRIES VISITED
Canada
(Toronto), Denmark, France, Japan, South Korea, Switzerland (Zurich),
Taiwan, U.K. (London and Wolver Hampton), U.S.A. (Orlando, Washington
and New York).


PUBLICATION
“Bahujan Samaj Aur Uski Rajniti”, October, 2000 (in Hindi)
“Bahujan Samaj Aur Uski Rajniti”, October, 2001 (in English)
“Mere Sangharshmai Jivan Evam Bahujan Movement Ka Safarnama”. January, 2006 (in Hindi)


PERMANENT ADDRESS
C- 57, Indrapuri, New Delhi- 110012.


PRESENT ADDRESS
5, Kalidas Marg, Lucknow.

Dr. Subash Bharani (Kollegal)

The
entry of former IPS officer Subhash Bharani, to BSP  has made the parties sit up. The BSP has a fairly good presence in
Chamarajanagar and Kollegal. If Bharani notches up an impressive number of
votes, it is an indicator of SC/ST unity and a boost to BSP.

BSP candidate Subash Bharani, the former IPS
officer, accused the opposition of indulging in malpractices including use of
money power. But there is wave for the party and people will vote for change, he
stated. The segment has rejected the politicians it elected once and will
continue the tradition since Congress nominee Jayanna is not active, JD(S)
candidate N Balaraj merely indulged in film activities when he was an MLA and
BJP candidate G N Nanjundaswamy was never close to the people.



He
said he is fighting to help the party open
its account in the state assembly. This should pave for the growth of BSP here,
he stated.


Online edition of India’s National Newspaper
Tuesday, Aug 18, 2009
ePaper | Mobile/PDA Version

Yeddyurappa censured for poll code violation
Special Correspondent


Election Commission takes serious note of promises made by the Chief
Minister

Chief Minister told ‘to be careful in the future’

He had promised to give loans to purchase cattle


BANGALORE: A day before the byelections to five Legislative Assembly
constituencies in the State, the Election Commission of India on Monday
censured Chief Minister B.S. Yeddyurappa for violating the model code
of conduct during the campaign in Kollegal (reserved) constituency on
August 10.

In its order, the Commission took serious note of promises made by
the Chief Minister and censured him under sub-section (VI) A and (VI) C
of the Clause VII of the model code of conduct.

Sources in the office of the Karnataka Chief Electoral Officer (CEO) told The Hindu that the commission had issued the order and censured the Chief Minister.

In its order dated August 14, the commission said it watched videos of
speeches made by the Chief Minister and it was found that he has made
promises of giving loans to farmers and tribal people for purchase of
cows and buffaloes and intention of declaring the district as
drought-hit.

The Chief Minister during the poll campaign on August 10 at
Santhemarahalli in Yellandur in Kollegal constituency promised the
voters that the Government would give loans to farmers, particularly
tribal people, to purchase cows and buffaloes if they voted for BJP
candidate in the byelection to be held on Tuesday.
Mr. Yeddyurappa also promised to declare Charamarajangara district as a
“drought-hit” if voters blessed the party candidate.

The commission served a show-cause notice on Mr. Yeddyurappa on
August 14 for violating the model code of conduct. On August 15.

Ayappa (Chittapura)

Nahidha Salma (Govindarajanagara)

Mallikarjunaiah (Ramanagara)

Sujeevan Kumar (Channapatna)

BSP 
Karnataka State  Coordinator  Ashok Siddharth, President Marasandra
Muniappa, Vice President N.Mahesh, general Secretaries Bulla Subbha
Rao, Kamalanabhan, State Executive Committee member Gopinath, and
leaders R.Muniappa, Chengappa, Tulasi das, campaigned in all the 5
Assembly constituencies explaining the following points to all the
voters in their Door-to-door campaign.


Online edition of India’s National Newspaper
Tuesday, Aug 18, 2009
ePaper | Mobile/PDA Version
Minister Somanna locked inside garment unit?

Special Correspondent


He distributed money to workers of the factory, alleges Congress


Smt. Nahidha Salma contesting for the Govindarajanagara Assembly
constituency goes around constituency along with BSP leaders and
supporters
Chikkana,Shana
Agha, Nazharath,, Ramesh, J.Chandrasekharan, Ethiraj, T.S. Thimmappa,
Ganesh, B.A.Nagaraj, Manjunath, K.T. Praveen, M. Manju,
H.hanumantharaya, Prakash and hundreds of women and men supporters
belonging to SC/STs Muslims, Christians, backward communities and
poorer among the upper castes, door-to-door in all the wards and
important localities of Govindarajnagara, such as:


BANGALORE: Karnataka Pradesh Congress Committee working president on Monday alleged that Housing and Muzrai Minister V.
Somanna distributed money to workers at Unitek Apparels at Bhuvaneswari
Nagar in Govindaraja Nagar Assembly constituency, and that the Congress
workers and some residents locked him there for some time
.

The two alleged that a TV channel was reporting the alleged grabbing
of prime land belonging to a private textile company in the
constituency by Mr. Somanna and his wife, Shailaja, but the Minister
got power supply cut in the area with a view to preventing the channel
from covering the news report.

Expressing shock over the inaction of the election observers for
Govindaraja Nagar constituency to the distribution of money and the
alleged highhandedness of the government agencies,  the Election Commission was
urged
to keep a watch on the activities of the
Minister tomorrow. The TV channel concerned should be allowed to
continue its coverage
.

The Voters condemned the alleged land grabbing
incident and alleged that the residents had to suffer due to power
disconnection.

 Election Commission censured Chief Minister B.S.
Yeddyurappa for “intimidating voters” at Santemarahalli in Kollegal
Assembly constituency during an election campaign a couple of days ago, commission is urged to be tough with Mr. Somanna too
and extend all protection to the Opposition candidates.


He told presspersons that the Nagarabhavi Block Congress Committee
president and his supporters went to Unitek Apparels and
locked it, protesting against the alleged move by Mr. Somanna to
influence voters in the by-elections to be held on Tuesday.

He distributed money to workers of the factory, as alleged by the Congress


Why Minister Somanna locked inside garment unit?


103 BBMP Ward
Kaveripura (OLD
Ward :103- Pattigarpalya) consisting,

Kamakshipalya Industrial Estate, Pete Chennappa Industrial Estate, Kaveripura Priyadarshini Layout,Ranganathpura, HVR Layout, Syndicate Bank Colony, Prashanth Nagar Colony, Sampige Layout, Rajiv Nagar,Srishaila Nagar, Muneswara Nagar, Pattigara Palya, Saraswathi Nagar


104 BBMP Ward
Govindaraja Nagar
consisting    

Prashanth Nagar, Corporation Colony,BMP Colony, Govindaraja Nagar, Magadi Chord road Layout, Thimmenahalli, CHBS Layout,Binni Layout, Vijaya Nagar 1st Stage


105 BBMP Ward
Agrahara
  consisting        

Dasarahalli,Indira Colony, West of Chord road 4th Stage,Agrahara Dasarahalli, Oddarapalya (P)


106 BBMP Ward Dr Raj Kumar Ward (OLD Ward :106- Rajajinagar Industrial Town)consisting

Rajaji Nagar Industrial town, Oddarapalya (P), Rajaji Nagar 6th block, Police Colony


125 BBMP Ward
Marenahalli consisting

Amarjyothi Nagar, Saraswathi Nagar, Kanaka Nagar, Marenahalli

126 BBMP Ward
Maruth Mandir ward
   (OLD
Ward :126- GKW Layout) consisting

Madhura Nagar, Vinayaka Layout, GKW Layout, Vijayanagar (P), Canara Bank Colony


27 BBMP Ward
Mudalapalya consisting

Panchasheela Nagar, Lakkappa Garden,Kurilingappa Garden, Annapurneshwari Nagar, Mudalapalya, Shantha Kaveri Gopala Nagar, Adarsha Nagar, Shakthi Nagar,Kalyana Nagar, Bairaveshwar Nagar


128
BBMP Ward Nagarabhavi
    (OLD
Ward :128- Chandra
Layout
) consisting

 Chalukya Nagar, Hoysala Nagar,Nagarabhavi, Manasa Nagar, Madhura Nagar,Anand Jyothi Nagar, BDA Layout, Chandra Layout, Ahamad Nagar (P), Teachers colony,Gangodanahalli


131 BBMP Ward
Nayandahalli consisting

Nayandahalli, Chandra Layout Extension,Chandra Layout II Stage, Metro Layout, Dr. Ambedkar Nagar.


and explains to following:


Rice is sold at Rs. 40 Dal at Rs. 100,
Vegetable prices are sky rocketing, Petrol price has been increased by more
than Rs. 4 per litre.Then why vote for the ruling parties? Kindly Cast your
valuable Vote in Favour of BSP Candidates
by  PRESSing 
BUTTON FACING ELEPHANT SYMBOL !



Since you
were not alert, your invaluable votes were, either bought or looted or remained
unused and selfish persons are misusing your votes by ensnaring you in the name
of caste and creed, money, temple, church and mosque or all kinds of emotional
blackmail. You got carried away by alluring promises made in the election
manifesto of the ruling party.

BSP is the
only party that is for the welfare of all sections of the society, irrespective
of caste and creed, language and religion. It does not give money to buy votes.
So vote for BSP elephant to rise in your lives to the defense of Democracy.

In UP Sister
Mayawati’s Government made
Effective
arrangements to check stockpiling and black marketing
. To pressurize
the Karnataka Government caste your vote for BSP elephant.


Sister Mayawati’s U.P. Government demands Rs. 7789.14 crore relief package
from Centre for drought affected districts of State
. To pressurize the
Karnataka Government to do the same, cast your vote for BSP elephant.

to the defence of democracy !

Honourable
Chief Minister of UP sister Mayawati Ensured basic facilities for backwards, weaker and poor sections of
society—
To pressurize the Karnataka Government to do the same, cast
your vote for BSP elephant.


Providing basic
amenities to urban poor is top priority of UP State Government ruled by
Honourable Chief Minister
Sister Mayawati -
To
pressurize the Karnataka Government to do the same, cast your vote for BSP
elephant.


Mahamaya Garib
Balika Ashirvad Yojna and Savitri Bai Phule Balika Shiksha Madad Yojna is being
implemented effectively for empowerment of poor girls and to make them
self-reliant by the UP Government ruled by Honourable Chief Minister

Sister Mayawati -
To pressurize the Karnataka Government to do the same,
cast your vote for BSP elephant.


 There is a good response from the voters and Subash Bharani from Kollegal , Nahidha Salam from Govindarajanagara,Ayappa from Chittapura, Mallikarjunaiah from Ramanagara and, Sujeevan Kumar,are likely to spring surprise despite of all odds such as money power, removal of Bahujan samaj votes from the voters list and the doubtful EVMs.

Price rise, Draught condition, water and power shortage and bad road conditions issues are all not favourable for the ruling party and as the Caders of BSP have taken these issue to the door steps of the voters it will work in favour of BSO to spring a surprise.

comments (0)
Kindly Vote for all the 5 BSP Candidates contesting in the Karnataka State By - Election on 18-08-2009 Dr. Subash Bharani (Kollegal) Ayappa (Chittapura) Nahidha Salma (Govindarajanagara) Mallikarjunaiah (Ramanagara) Sujeevan Kumar (Channapatna)-VRI MEDIA FREE ONLINE TRAINING ON PRECEPTS AND TRADE-57 ON LIVELIHOOD THE WAY OF USING RESOURCES-COMPREHENSIVE PALI COURSE LESSON 8 (Contd)-FREE ONLINE TRAINING ON BUDDHISM FOR CHILDREN -17 Little Prince No-father [The Power of Truth]-The moral is: The truth is always stronger than a lie.-A Permanent Online International Seminar on Buddhism and Buddhist Heritage of Jambudvipa, that is, the Great Prabuddha Bharath -10-The Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister, Ms. Mayawati has extended her heartiest felicitations and good wishes to the people of the State on the occasion of 62nd anniversary of the Independence Day.The Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister, Ms. Mayawati has extended heartiest felicitations and good wishes to the people of the State on the occasion of Sri Krishna Janmashtami.-The Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Ms. Mayawati has expressed her profound grief over the death of Mrs. Sitara Devi, mother of Mr. K.K. Srivastava, group chairman, “Swatantra Bharat” news paper.-C.M. orders suspension of 16 senior officers including three IAS officers with immediate effect for their involvement in corruption in land allotment for hotels in Noida in year 2006 and causing Rs. 4721.14 crore loss to state exchequer-Mayawati criticises central government on I-Day-C.M. directs for effective implementation of Nivesh Mitra Yojna 211 investment proposals received under Nivesh Mitra Yojna C.M. reviews works of Industrial Development Department
Filed under: General
Posted by: @ 4:32 am

Kindly Vote for all the 5 BSP Candidates

contesting in the Karnataka State By - Election on 18-08-2009

Dr. Subash Bharani (Kollegal)

The
entry of former IPS officer Subhash Bharani, to BSP  has made the parties sit up. The BSP has a fairly good presence in
Chamarajanagar and Kollegal. If Bharani notches up an impressive number of
votes, it is an indicator of SC/ST unity and a boost to BSP.

BSP candidate Subash Bharani, the former IPS
officer, accused the opposition of indulging in malpractices including use of
money power. But there is wave for the party and people will vote for change, he
stated. The segment has rejected the politicians it elected once and will
continue the tradition since Congress nominee Jayanna is not active, JD(S)
candidate N Balaraj merely indulged in film activities when he was an MLA and
BJP candidate G N Nanjundaswamy was never close to the people.



He
said he is fighting to help the party open
its account in the state assembly. This should pave for the growth of BSP here,
he stated.

Ayappa (Chittapura)

Nahidha Salma (Govindarajanagara)

Mallikarjunaiah (Ramanagara)

Sujeevan Kumar (Channapatna)

BSP 
Karnataka State  Coordinator  Ashok Siddharth, President Marasandra
Muniappa, Vice President N.Mahesh, general Secretaries Bulla Subbha
Rao, Kamalanabhan, State Executive Committee member Gopinath, and
leaders R.Muniappa, Chengappa, Tulasi das, campaigned in all the 5
Assembly constituencies explaining the following points to all the
voters in their Door-to-door campaign.


Smt. Nahidha Salma contesting for the Govindarajanagara Assembly
constituency goes around constituency along with BSP leaders and
supporters
Chikkana,Shana
Agha, Nazharath,, Ramesh, J.Chandrasekharan, Ethiraj, T.S. Thimmappa,
Ganesh, B.A.Nagaraj, Manjunath, K.T. Praveen, M. Manju,
H.hanumantharaya, Prakash and hundreds of women and men supporters
belonging to SC/STs Muslims, Christians, backward communities and
poorer among the upper castes, door-to-door in all the wards and
important localities of Govindarajnagara, such as


103 BBMP Ward
Kaveripura (OLD
Ward :103- Pattigarpalya) consisting,

Kamakshipalya Industrial Estate, Pete Chennappa Industrial Estate, Kaveripura Priyadarshini Layout,Ranganathpura, HVR Layout, Syndicate Bank Colony, Prashanth Nagar Colony, Sampige Layout, Rajiv Nagar,Srishaila Nagar, Muneswara Nagar, Pattigara Palya, Saraswathi Nagar


104 BBMP Ward
Govindaraja Nagar
consisting    

Prashanth Nagar, Corporation Colony,BMP Colony, Govindaraja Nagar, Magadi Chord road Layout, Thimmenahalli, CHBS Layout,Binni Layout, Vijaya Nagar 1st Stage


105 BBMP Ward
Agrahara
  consisting        

Dasarahalli,Indira Colony, West of Chord road 4th Stage,Agrahara Dasarahalli, Oddarapalya (P)


106 BBMP Ward Dr Raj Kumar Ward (OLD Ward :106- Rajajinagar Industrial Town)consisting

Rajaji Nagar Industrial town, Oddarapalya (P), Rajaji Nagar 6th block, Police Colony


125 BBMP Ward
Marenahalli consisting

Amarjyothi Nagar, Saraswathi Nagar, Kanaka Nagar, Marenahalli

126 BBMP Ward
Maruth Mandir ward
   (OLD
Ward :126- GKW Layout) consisting

Madhura Nagar, Vinayaka Layout, GKW Layout, Vijayanagar (P), Canara Bank Colony


27 BBMP Ward
Mudalapalya consisting

Panchasheela Nagar, Lakkappa Garden,Kurilingappa Garden, Annapurneshwari Nagar, Mudalapalya, Shantha Kaveri Gopala Nagar, Adarsha Nagar, Shakthi Nagar,Kalyana Nagar, Bairaveshwar Nagar


128
BBMP Ward Nagarabhavi
    (OLD
Ward :128- Chandra
Layout
) consisting

 Chalukya Nagar, Hoysala Nagar,Nagarabhavi, Manasa Nagar, Madhura Nagar,Anand Jyothi Nagar, BDA Layout, Chandra Layout, Ahamad Nagar (P), Teachers colony,Gangodanahalli


131 BBMP Ward
Nayandahalli consisting

Nayandahalli, Chandra Layout Extension,Chandra Layout II Stage, Metro Layout, Dr. Ambedkar Nagar.


and explains to following:


Rice is sold at Rs. 40 Dal at Rs. 100,
Vegetable prices are sky rocketing, Petrol price has been increased by more
than Rs. 4 per litre.Then why vote for the ruling parties? Kindly Cast your
valuable Vote in Favour of BSP Candidates
by  PRESSing 
BUTTON FACING ELEPHANT SYMBOL !


Since you
were not alert, your invaluable votes were, either bought or looted or remained
unused and selfish persons are misusing your votes by ensnaring you in the name
of caste and creed, money, temple, church and mosque or all kinds of emotional
blackmail. You got carried away by alluring promises made in the election
manifesto of the ruling party.

BSP is the
only party that is for the welfare of all sections of the society, irrespective
of caste and creed, language and religion. It does not give money to buy votes.
So vote for BSP elephant to rise in your lives to the defense of Democracy.

In UP Sister
Mayawati’s Government made
Effective
arrangements to check stockpiling and black marketing
. To pressurize
the Karnataka Government caste your vote for BSP elephant.

Sister Mayawati’s U.P. Government demands Rs. 7789.14 crore relief package
from Centre for drought affected districts of State
. To pressurize the
Karnataka Government to do the same, cast your vote for BSP elephant.

Honourable
Chief Minister of UP sister Mayawati Ensured basic facilities for backwards, weaker and poor sections of
society—
To pressurize the Karnataka Government to do the same, cast
your vote for BSP elephant.

Providing basic
amenities to urban poor is top priority of UP State Government ruled by
Honourable Chief Minister
Si