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09/30/09
BT, nanotechnology research centre at your doorstep -Omega Ploprof launched -Unique ID will provide access to various state benefits: Nilekani -Voter list
Filed under: General
Posted by: @ 10:29 pm


BT, nanotechnology research centre at your doorstep


Staff Reporter


Deakin University signs MoU with Bangalore University

To be funded by State Government

Infrastructure, faculty in hand: BU


BANGALORE: Soon, Bangalore University’s sprawling Jnana Bharathi
campus will house a “world class” research centre specialising in the
field of biotechnology and nanotechnology.

A Memorandum of Understanding for this ambitious project has been
signed between Deakin University, Australia, and Bangalore University.

According to the MoU, the purpose is to create a Deakin India
Research Institute (DIRI), that will benefit Indian communities and
industry. It also aims to create a collaborative and rewarding
university-industry research model in India, BU Vice-Chancellor N.
Prabhu Deva announced here on Tuesday. The funds for the project will
be allocated by the Government of Karnataka. The MoU is for a duration
of five years.

This India-owned institute would meet the growing demand for
research in India, Bangalore University officials said at a press
conference here on Tuesday. DIRI proposes to produce at least 500 PHD
students over the first five years, the university said.

The university claims that it already has the infrastructure and necessary faculty for the two disciplines.

The two institutes will cooperate in the area of academic staff
cooperation on collaborative research, lectures and conferences, staff
exchange, development of student exchange programmes and identifying
special short-term academic programmes and projects of mutual benefit
for both institutions.

Omega Ploprof launched

 Watch brand Omega was
launched in an exclusive boutique of the company at UB City and also the
Omega Ploprof (the first few letters of plongeurs professionnels — the
French words for “professional divers”).

The watch is water-resistant up to 1,200 metres and is available
either with a mesh shark-proof bracelet or a rubber strap, and is
priced at Rs. 3,17,100.

Omega’s vice-president Raynald Aeschlimann introduced the
watch’s features and a diver, described
its myriad features.

Voter list

The voter list prepared for the Bruhat Bangalore Mahanagara Palike
elections will be displayed on Thursday at the offices of the revenue
officers concerned and the voting centres coming under the 198 wards in
the 28 Assembly constituencies. The BBMP, in a release, appealed to the
public to file their objections, if any, relating to the list, with the
Electoral Registration Officer or Deputy Electoral Registration Officer
on or before 5.30 p.m. on October 6.

Work in full swing for BBMP polls

Special Correspondent


Preparations will be completed by September 15: Chikkamath

EVMs procured for all the 198 wards

Assembly poll voters’ list to be followed


BANGALORE: The State Election Commission will complete its
preparations for holding the Bruhat Bangalore Mahanagara Palike (BBMP)
polls by September 15.

State Election Commissioner C.R. Chikkamath said at a meeting of
officials, representatives of political parties and non-governmental
organisations on Wednesday that the voters’ lists for all the 198 wards
were ready and the Electronic Voting Machines (EVMs) required for the
BBMP polls had reached them.

Except for preparing the final booth-level voters’ list, all the preparations for holding the BBMP elections were complete.

“We will complete all the preparations by September 15, which is the
time given to us”, Mr. Chikkamath said responding to a reporters’ query.

The State Election Commission (SEC) announced the launch of a new
portal for the BBMP polls that can be accessed at
http://www.bbmpelections. info

The portal seeks to help voters locate their name with respect to
new electoral parts and the corresponding polling station in the newly
delimited ward.

For conducting the BBMP elections, the voters’ list for each
delimited ward had been prepared by adopting the existing voters list
of Assembly constituencies, Mr. Chikkamath said.

He called upon the voters to make use of the portal.

Deputy Commissioner of Bangalore Urban district G.N. Naik said there
were 65 lakh voters in Bangalore. But he regretted the poor response
from the voters for the enumeration drive that began on July 1. “There
was poor response to the drive at the Voter Facilitation Centres (VFC)
that were set up in each of the 28 Assembly constituencies in the
city,” he said.

Mr. Chikkamath said the Electoral Photo Identity Card (EPIC)
coverage in Bangalore was a dismal 64-65 per cent. “It does not go well
with the Bangalore’s image as an IT destination,” he said.

“In contrast, there are certain villages in Rajasthan, where the EPIC coverage is almost 98 per cent,” he said.

Responding to a question from a representative of a political party,
Mr. Naik said additions, deletions and modifications to the voters’
list would continue till at least 10 days before the last date for
filing of nominations for the elections.


Deletion

Mr. Naik sought to reassure the meeting that names would be deleted
from the voters list only after the due process of law was completed.

“Our enumerators will go to the address during the door-to-door
survey. If they are not found at the address, a seven-day notice will
be given in the house or to the neighbours, ” Mr. Naik said.



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ಮರುಹಂಚಿಕೆಯಾದ ವಾರ್ಡುಗಳ ಮತದಾರರ ಪಟ್ಟಿ (ಕರಡು)
ಕರ್ನಾಟಕ ಸರ್ಕಾರವು ಹಿಂದಿನ ಬೆಂಗಳೂರು ಮಹಾನಗರ ಪಾಲಿಕೆಯೊಂದಿಗೆ ಸುತ್ತಲಿನ ನಗರ/ಪುರ
ಸಭೆಗಳು ಮತ್ತು ಹೊಂದಿಕೊಂಡಂತಹ ನಗರೀಕೃತ ಗ್ರಾಮಗಳನ್ನು ಸೇರಿಸಿ ಬೃಹತ್ ಬೆಂಗಳೂರು
ಮಹಾನಗರ ಪಾಲಿಕೆಯನ್ನು ರಚಿಸಿದೆ. ತದನಂತರ ಬೃಹತ್ ಬೆಂಗಳೂರು ಮಹಾನಗರ ಪಾಲಿಕೆಯ
ಪ್ರದೇಶವನ್ನು ೧೯೮ ವಾರ್ಡುಗಳಾಗಿ ವಿಂಗಡಿಸಿದೆ. ಬೃಹತ್ ಬೆಂಗಳೂರು ಮಹಾನಗರ ಪಾಲಿಕೆಗೆ
ಜನಪ್ರತಿನಿಧಿಗಳನ್ನು ಆಯ್ಕೆಗೊಳಿಸುವುದಕ್ಕಾಗಿ ಹಾಲಿ ಇರುವ ವಿಧಾನಸಭಾ ಕ್ಷೇತ್ರಗಳ
ಮತದಾರರ ಪಟ್ಟಿಯನ್ನು ಅಳವಡಿಸಿಕೊಂಡು ೧೯೮ ವಾರ್ಡುಗಳ ಮತದಾರರ ಪಟ್ಟಿಯನ್ನು
ತಯಾರಿಸಲಾಗಿದೆ. ಸದರೀ ಮತದಾರರ ಪಟ್ಟಿಯ ಅವಗಾಹನೆಗಾಗಿ ಈ ಅಂತರ್ಜಾಲ ವ್ಯವಸ್ಥೆಯನ್ನು
ಸಾರ್ವಜನಿಕರಿಗಾಗಿ/ರಾಜಕೀಯ ಪಕ್ಷಗಳಿಗಾಗಿ ಕಲ್ಪಿಸಲಾಗಿದೆ. ಮತದಾರರು ತಮ್ಮ ತಮ್ಮ
ಹೆಸರುಗಳು ಯಾವ ವಾರ್ಡಿನ ಯಾವ ಭಾಗದಲ್ಲಿ ನಮೂದಿಸಿದೆ ಮತ್ತು ಯಾವ ಮತಗಟ್ಟೆಗೆ ಸೇರಿದೆ
ಎಂದು ಖಾತ್ರಿಪಡಿಸಿಕೊಳ್ಳುತ್ತ, ಯಾವುದೇ ಸಮಸ್ಯೆಗಳಿದ್ದಲ್ಲಿ ಸಂಬಂಧಪಟ್ಟ
ಅಧಿಕಾರಿಗಳನ್ನು ಸಂಪರ್ಕಿಸಬೇಕೆಂದು ಸೂಚಿಸಲಾಗಿದೆ.

ಆಯುಕ್ತರು,
ರಾಜ್ಯ ಚುನಾವಣಾ ಆಯೋಗ, ಕರ್ನಾಟಕ


ಬೃಹತ್ ಬೆಂಗಳೂರು ಮಹಾನಗರ ಪಾಲಿಕೆಯ ಚುನಾವಣೆಗಾಗಿ ಮತದಾರರ ಪಟ್ಟಿಯನ್ನು ಸದ್ಯಕ್ಕೆ
ಚಾಲ್ತಿಯಲ್ಲಿರುವ ವಿಧಾನಸಭಾ ಮತದಾರರ ಯಾದಿಯನ್ನು ಆಧಾರವಾಗಿಟ್ಟುಕೊಳ್ಳಲಾಗಿದೆ.
ಇದರಲ್ಲಿ ಮೂಲ ಪಟ್ಟಿ, ಒಂದು ಮತ್ತು ಎರಡನೇ ಪುರವಣಿ ಹಾಗೂ ಮೂರನೆ (ಗೋವಿಂದರಾಜನಗರ
ವಿಧಾನಸಭಾ ಕ್ಷೇತ್ರ) ಪುರವಣಿಗಳು ಸೇರಿವೆ. ಈ ಮೂಲ ಮತದಾರರ ಪಟ್ಟಿಯಲ್ಲಿ
ನಮೂದಿಸಲ್ಪಟ್ಟ ಮತದಾರರ ಹೆಸರುಗಳು ಮಾತ್ರ ಹೊಸದಾಗಿ ನಿರ್ಮಿತವಾದ ವಾರ್ಡುಗಳ ಮತದಾರರ
ಪಟ್ಟಿಯಲ್ಲಿ ಸೇರ್ಪಡೆಯಾಗಿರುತ್ತವೆ
Government
of Karnataka has formed Bruhat Bangalore Mahanagara Palike (BBMP) by
amalgamating the erstwhile Bangalore Mahanagara Palike, Ctiy/Town
Municipal Councils surrounding Bangalore city and 110 intervening
villages. Subsequently, Government of Karnataka has delimited BBMP in
to 198 wards. For conducting elections for the council of Bruhat
Bangalore Mahanagara Palike, voters’ list for each delimited ward has
been prepared by adopting the existing voters list of Assembly
Constituencies. This portal is developed with an intention of helping
voters locating their name with respect to the new electoral parts and
the corresponding polling station in the newly delimited ward. It is
hoped that public make use of this facility and approach concerned
authorities for clarification, if any; in the voters’ list.

Commissioner,
State Election Commission, Karnataka


http://www.bbmpelections.info/bbmpele/ksecUIPDFSearch.aspx

Unique ID will provide access to various state benefits: Nilekani

Narayan Lakshman and Shyam Ranganathan

It
will take around 18 months to issue the first UID, says UIDAI chief



— Photo: M. Vedhan





FIRM ON MISSION: Unique Identification Authority of
India chairman Nandan Nilekani at an interactive session at The Hindu
in Chennai on Wednesday. He said the project will be rolled out in 18
months and 600 million people covered in four years.

CHENNAI: While the Unique
Identification project will not
solve all the problems of the
poor it will open “a ramp of
access” to various benefits
from the state, said Nandan
Nilekani, chairman, Unique
Identification Authority of
India (UIDAI).

“The whole idea is to unlock
access to people who are
outside the system.” Citing
the example of people from
Bihar in Bangalore who, for
the last 10 years, have had
“zero contact with the formal
system,” he said, “In our cities
there are millions of people
who are non-persons.”

He clarified that the UID
would not confer any citizenship
rights or other privileges
but would only be used as a
means of uniquely identifying
the residents in the country.

At an interaction at The
Hindu here on Wednesday,
Mr. Nilekani said he had received
a few hundred mails
from Indian professionals
round the world expressing
interest in participating in
this “complex, high-risk
project.”

“The largest database [in
the United States] of this kind
is of 120 million people. We
are talking about 1.2 billion
people. It is the only country
where we are talking about
online authentication,” Mr.
Nilekani said.

But the target was achievable:
“If anyone can do it,
India can,” he said. It would
take around 18 months to issue
the first UID and 600
million people would be covered
in four years.

In response to questions
on the ease of enrolment, especially
for the poor, Mr. Nilekani
said the barriers to
getting a UID number would
be reduced because, “we will
have a large number of registrars
and because we will
have a proactive strategy
working with civil society
NGO groups for outreach.”

Project costs

On the project costs, Mr.
Nilekani clarified, “Remember
that in a country where
spending maybe 100-200
thousand crore rupees on all
kinds of subsidies and direct
benefits, this is a one-time
expenditure that will lead to
a perpetual improvement in
the quality of benefits.” The
return on investment would
be “well worth it from an
economic perspective.”

Addressing concerns about

the UID database being misused
by an “Orwellian State,”
Mr. Nilekani said, having one
large centralised database
would necessitate being
“careful in terms of checks
and balances, in terms of the
legality, in terms of privacy,
and making sure that this database
is not misused in some
way.”

But he added that “. the
social benefits of giving UIDs
to the people who are left out
today are so massive that we
should do it and come up
with a way to mitigate the
risks on the privacy issue.”

Even government agencies
such as the police would only
have access to the database
“under the appropriate laws,”
Mr. Nilekani explained. “As
long as the legal system was
followed, on the principle of
security, the database could
be “opened up for a suspect,”
he said.

Biometrics

He conceded that there
could be errors in authenticating
people based on biometrics.
“Biometrics is not
an exact science,” he said.
While fingerprinting was
the most straightforward
biometric available, iris scans
were more reliable, he said.
But the equipment for iris
scans was expensive and the
process was cumbersome.
Many people could object to
it as being invasive and there
were also very few suppliers
of iris scan technology, he
said.

A Biometrics Committee
with stakeholders from different
Ministries would
come up with the final biometric
set and take a decision
on whether iris scans were
required or not in the next
few months, Mr. Nilekani
said.


Voter list

The voter list prepared for the Bruhat Bangalore Mahanagara Palike
elections will be displayed on Thursday at the offices of the revenue
officers concerned and the voting centres coming under the 198 wards in
the 28 Assembly constituencies. The BBMP, in a release, appealed to the
public to file their objections, if any, relating to the list, with the
Electoral Registration Officer or Deputy Electoral Registration Officer
on or before 5.30 p.m. on October 6.

Work continues at U.P. memorial sites: petitioner

NEW DELHI: The Mayawati government is continuing with construction
activities at the memorial sites in Lucknow.

Affidavit filed by Uttar Pradesh Chief Secretary
that the order was not violated. Dr. Bhimrao Ambedkar Sthal is different projects and coined new names for them to show they were
not covered by the restraint order.

Hence construction activities were being carried out.

The State’s contention was that it was only maintaining and cleaning
the sites, removing garbage and unused building materials.

In a fresh affidavit filed on Tuesday, the State government denied
any fresh construction activity on the sites in question. “Whatever
construction was being carried out was only with regard to certain
structures, which are not the subject matter of dispute,” it said.

comments (0)
09/29/09
VR1 (WE ARE ONE ) +VE NEWS-Mayawati is wise in making a monument to her greatness. -ONLINE TRAINING ON PRECEPTS AND TRADE-82 UP rolls out red carpet for private investors-Wealth is lost nothing is lost INTERNATIONAL JIVAKA PRESUMPTIVE HEALTH PROTECTION (IJPHP) -
Filed under: General
Posted by: @ 7:04 am




Mayawati is wise in
making a monument to her greatness.


The demonstration of her greatness will be the monument itself: In India
no other evidence is needed.

 

We love the Taj Mahal.
The Taj sent Bengali Tagore into rapture (“a teardrop on the cheek of time”). Gujarati
Gandhi, less sentimental, saw it immediately for what it was: a monument to
cruelty. He thought of the peasants taxed to pay for its marble, the villagers
who lost their land to its gardens.

 

What was Mumtaz
Mahal’s achievement? She bred. She produced 14
children, including Aurangzeb, in 19 years of marriage. What were Shah
Jahan’s other achievements? Difficult to say. But he’s famous for his
building.

 

Indians don’t need to
actually read Buddha, Jothiba Phule, Sahu Maharaj, Ambedkar, Kanshiram or
Mayawati to know what they stood for or against.



We revere them
because they are great. And they definitely need monuments.

 

This is the culture
on which Mayawati must mark her legacy. We can
hardly blame her for concluding that a monument will be better legacy.



But newspapers and
news channels and political parties persist in
attacking her construction.

 

She understands that
our emotion will soon fade. And she knows that in India only the symbol will remain:
The person and his ideas will vanish.

 

The monument appears
from photographs to be almost complete now. It’s
difficult to understand why it should not be allowed to be finished.

On 10 July, the Supreme Court said: “If a democratically elected
government decides to do something without misappropriating public
money, there is little courts can do.” This seemed like a sensible
thing to say.

 

Building monuments is
economic activity, unlike corruption. The money will go to quarries, sculptors,
labourers, cement plants, dealers and transporters.

The argument is that a monument isn’t particularly functional.
But then neither is Mumbai’s Rs1,600 crore Rajiv Gandhi Setu, whose
design forces rush hour drivers to detour 1.2km in the opposite direction.



Mayawati will go down
as a revered figure in history for Indians.

 

She is guaranteed to
become great because Indians will be awed by her
grand monument.


 

 ALMOST EVERY FRAUD involves
VICTIM

sending “CASH” money to a
Fraudster/Scammer.

ABSOLUTELY DO NOT send any money
using Western
Union
/ Moneygram. 

Always deal ONLY locally by meeting
the seller/buyer in person.

READ and UNDERSTAND the methods used
by Fraudsters in the link above.


ONLINE TRAINING ON PRECEPTS AND TRADE-82


UP rolls out red carpet for private
investors

 

The Uttar
Pradesh government today clarified that it would no longer invest in
manufacturing activity across all sectors but would, instead, roll out red
carpet to the private investors.

Participating
in Business Standard Roundtable on Industrial Development in Lucknow,
Principal Secretary (Industrial Development) V N Garg
said the government had decided to disinvest in all those sectors where private
investors wanted to participate.

He listed
power, tourism, transport, education, expressways and sugar as the priority
sectors, where the government was vigorously pursuing the public-private
partnership (PPP) model of development.

“We will
primarily focus on framing policies and creating an amicable environment for
business,” he said.

“However, the
perception about Uttar Pradesh largely remains of an agrarian, under-developed
state, where majority of the people live below poverty line,” he said.

Conceding
that investment in the state was much below its potential, he said ‘Brand UP’
needed to be presented to prospective investors and industry in a much better
way.

He said the
government had taken several policy decisions to project Uttar Pradesh as the
ideal investment destination and attract investors. “We also have to appreciate
that infrastructure can not be created in a day, but over a span of time with
the active participation of all the stake holders, including the government,
industry and citizenry,” he said.

“There is
tremendous investment opportunity available in the state given its large
geographical size, population and demand and the investors must seize the
opportunity,” he added.

He especially
referred to the Yamuna Expressway and Ganga
Expressway Projects in the state to buttress his point.

“Expressways
are not merely roads, but a corridor of development. These projects will lead
to a silent revolution and create several smaller townships along their
course,” he said.

Besides Garg,
the panelists of the ‘Round Table’, included Mirza International Chairman
Irshad Mirza, Giri Institute of Development Studies Director A K Sing, CII UP
Council Vice-Chairperson Jayant Krishna and World Bank consultant and Lucknow
University professor Arvind Mohan.

The other
participants comprised leading industrialists, economists, bankers etc.

The industry
demanded an efficient single-window clearance system, representation on
policy-making bodies, roadmap for development with tangible targets and special
focus on MSME sector, which formed the bulk of the UP industrial base.


Wealth
is lost nothing is lost

 

INTERNATIONAL JIVAKA
PRESUMPTIVE HEALTH PROTECTION (IJPHP)
      


Uses of Plants in Alphabetical Order

abscess: fig tree, sage, wild clary

ADHD

aging: asparagus, olive tree

AIDS: hemp

alkalization: aloe

anaemia: buckwheat, nettle

antiseptic: lavender

aphrodisiac: hemp, rocket

appetite: prickly juniper

appetite, lack of: hemp, lemon

apetite reduction: fleawort

arteriosclerosis: garlic

ascorbic acid

asthma

astringent: sage, salad burnet, wild clary

atopic dermitis: hemp

atopic eczema: hemp

attention deficit and
hyperactivity disorder

attention deficit disorder

beriberi: hemp

bile: everlasting, field marigold, pot marigold

blood: physalis

blood pressure, high: aloe, garlic

blood pressure, low: sage, wild clary

blood sugar: aloe

bronchias: fennel, hemp

burns: aeonium, field marigold, plantain, pot marigold, Saint John’s-wort

calcium: white goosefoot

cancer

catarrh: greater plantain, ribwort

cereals

cheerfulness: hemp

cheese

chemotherapy

cholera: nettle

cholesterol: aloe, buckwheat, olive, poppy

cigarette

circulation: almond, hemp

coeliac disease

cold: hemp, lemon, pine, rocket, sage, wild clary

constipation

cough: pine, poppy, prickly pear, Thymbra, thyme

cramp: field marigold, lemon verbena, pot marigold

curdling

depression: hemp, Saint John’s-wort

dermitis, atopic: hemp

diabetes: aloe

diarrhea: arbutus, carob, plantain, prickly pear, nettle

digestion

disinfection: garlic

diuretic: hemp, maize, physalis

dummies: opium poppy

eczema: asparagus, field marigold, buckwheat, pot marigold

eczema, atopic: hemp

erysipelas: sea onion

eyelid: plantain

eyes: fennel, physalis

fleas: pulicaria

freckles

fruits

furuncle: fig tree

gastric acid: everlasting

gastritis: salad burnet

gingivitis: sage, wild clary

glaucoma: hemp

gluten intolerance

gout: hemp

gums: mastic, sage, wild clary

haemoglobin: nettle

haemorrhoids: buckwheat

hallucinations

hallucinogen

head ache: peppermint

heart: almond, hemp, oleander, olive, sea onion

hepatitis: hemp, peppermint

high blood pressure: aloe, garlic, olive tree

hoarseness: poppy

IBS: aloe

immunodefence: aloe, headed thyme, thyme

incense

inflammation of the urinary system: arbutus

influenza: lemon, orange, rocket

insect bites: sage, wild clary

insomnia: lemon tree, orange tree

intestines: hemp

intraocular pressure: hemp

invigorative

iron

irritable bowel syndrome: aloe

joint: stingnettle

juice: orange

kidneys: laurel

kidney stones: aloelemon

lack of appetite: hemp, lemon

laxative

leucocytes: headed thyme, thyme

loss of weight: hemp

low blood pressure: sage, wild clary

malaria: hemp

menstrual pain: orange tree

menstruation: hemp, sage, wild clary

metabolism: bladder campion

migrane: hemp, lavender, lemon tree, orange tree, peppermint

milk: curdle

molar ache: lavender

mother’s milk: fennel, nettle

mouth: mastic, peppermint, salad burnet

mucous membrane: pine

multiple sclerosis

musical instruments: oleander, prickly juniper

nausea: hemp

nervousness

nervous system: Saint John’s-wort

nicotine addiction: tobacco

optic nerve: physalis

pipe

plague: salad burnet

potassium: white goosefoot

prostate: lemon verbena, physalis

provitamin A: physalis

pseudocereals

psychosomatic deseases: lavender

rennet

restlessness

rheuma: hemp, Phoenician juniper, prickly juniper, stingnettle

rutin: buckwheat

schizophrenia

sclerosis,
multiple

scurvy

sedative

skin: aloe, asparagus

sleep: sage, wild clary

smoke

soap: olive

spasm: field marigold, jimsonweed, lemon tree, pot marigold

spices

spleen: hemp

stimulation

stomach: hemp

stomach ache: headed thyme, laurel, lemon verbena, prickly pear cactus, spearmint

sunburnt skin: salad burnet

talkativeness: hemp

throat: salad burnet, headed thyme, thyme

tooth ache: lavender

tooth gums: mastic, sage, wild clary

toothpaste: aloe, sage, wild clary

tranquilizer

tumor: aloe

udder: hemp

urinary system: arbutus, headed germander

urine: everlasting

varicose veins: buckwheat

vegetables

vitalization

vitamin A: white goosefoot

vitamin B: physalis

vitamin C

vomiting: hemp

wart: fig tree

weight, loss of: hemp

wounds: aeonium, aloe, field marigold, greater plantainpot marigold, ribwort, rosemary, Saint John’s-wort, salad burnet


Health is lost something is lost

comments (0)
09/23/09
VR1 (WE ARE ONE ) +VE NE-WS-The word Adi is one of the names of The Buddha-ONLINE TRAINING ON PRECEPTS AND TRADE-81-Attention All Solopreneurs and Business “Newbies”-INTERNATIONAL JIVAKA PRESUMPTIVE HEALTH PROTECTION (IJPHP) The Medicine Buddha Or The Buddha’s Medicine?-
Filed under: General
Posted by: @ 5:54 am




VR1

(WE  ARE  ONE )

+VE  NEWS

MAY YOU BE EVER HAPPY, WELL AND SECURE!

MAY YOU LIVE LONG!

MAY ALL BEINGS BE EVRER HAPPY, WELL AND SECURE!

MAY YOU ALWAYS HAVE CALM, QUIET, ALERT, ATTENTIVE AND

EQUANIMINTY MIND!

WITH A CLEAR UNDESRSATNDING THAT

NOTHING IS PERMANENT!




The word Adi is one of the names of
The Buddha


It is really a conspiracy of caste hindus.
How dare still these caste hindus spread such unethical stories that SC/STs are
Adi-sudras!  Dr. Ambedkar has written separate volumes on sudras
and Untouchables. He did never have written anything that Untochables as
Adi-sudras. Whatever he said about mulnivasi is in different perspective
to locate the impoverished people in a caste-ridden society. More over, your
interpretation on Adi-Dravida cannot be denied. If the term Adi means ‘pre’
or ‘ancient’, it does mean that the present SC/STs belongs to the community
which belonged to pre-historic period. It also means to me the people who
founded the Harappan Civilization which had seen the Proto-Buddha who might be
Adi-Buddha.

The word Adi is one of the names of
The Buddha (Historical Buddha) who was the Kulaguru (Master) of Sakyas who were
invariably the Avarnas non-caste communities. Pandit Iyotheedas refers Adi
as The Buddha  and he gives a plenty of sources one of which is Bodhisatta
Thiruvalluvar’ s Tirikkural (not Thirukkural) . In the first
Chapter titled “Kadavul Vazhthu Enum Buddharathu Paayiram”, Thiruvalluvar
writes in praise of The Buddha as follows:

Agara mudala vezhutthellaam Adi

Bagavan Mudatre yulagu

He places Adi Bagavan as the first of the
world as that of Tamil alphabet ‘Aa’. Thus the Adi-Dravidas, Adi-Vasis,
Adi-Andhras are from the lineage of The Adi Buddha. Pandit Iyotheedas throws a
flood of light on the history of Adi. Please read his writings. We have enough
sources to prove this history and disprove the derogatory defining of
“Adi-sudras”.


 ALMOST EVERY FRAUD involves
VICTIM

sending “CASH” money to a
Fraudster/Scammer.

ABSOLUTELY DO NOT send any money
using Western
Union
/ Moneygram. 

Always deal ONLY locally by meeting
the seller/buyer in person.

READ and UNDERSTAND the methods used
by Fraudsters in the link above.


ONLINE TRAINING ON PRECEPTS AND TRADE-81

http://www.thebusinessbuddha.com/

Attention All Solopreneurs and Business “Newbies”

I Know You’re Ready to Evolve Your Business!
How do I know that? Because you’re here.

Chances are, you’re either a “newbie” entrepreneur who’s figuring it all
out or you’ve been in business awhile but you’ve hit the proverbial wall (think
Nascar race crash!) and you need to grow your business faster and smarter
starting yesterday.

Well, I can help you do that. I work with business owners just like you to give
them the shortcuts to business evolution. As a business strategist, I know how
to look for the long-range, bigger picture and translate that into the most
focused, prioritized action for the fastest results. And it’s exactly that
which most entrepreneurs don’t have the time to do, but it’s what determines
their business success. Now that I have your attention….

“If Darwin
were on the Internet, he would come to me
for solutions…” ~ Viki

So, you need to know that I already know you.
You woke up one day knowing that there was something better for you, so you
gathered your resources and set out in your own business only to get so far and
1) run out of steam, 2) have it blow up in your face, and/or 3) have it run
over your life. But the “pilot light” of whatever woke up is still burning, so
you’re looking for answers.

And you’ve probably tried a lot of answers on your own as you’ve walked this
entrepreneurial path – worked it through on your own, listened to your beloved
advisors (who really don’t have the expertise to help you, as you’ve discovered
by now), bought the courses, attended the events, tapped every resource you
have to do it, and you NEED something to happen. That’s EXACTLY why I want to
work with you…

You have the heart, the courage, the
persistence and the fortitude to keep going, despite the pressure cooker you’re
living in from running your business and living your life. You are someone who
I admire, and who the world needs to experience through your business, whatever
stage of development you’re in and regardless of what it is, because if you
choose it from your authentic “pilot light”, it’s what you’re meant to do.

“You can view [running a business] as not
just a job but as an honorable livelihood where you can, by using your
imagination, develop the human spirit.” ~ Anita Roddick

Here’s the deal… while I specialize in innovating unique business
strategies for your business, there are four critical areas in which I focus on
making sure you have the basics that can make or break your business.

  • Time Management
  • Prioritized Game Plan
  • Personal Productivity
  • Appropriate Resources

I’m all about making sure you have the nuts and bolts to running your
business in a way that optimizes your results. My goal is for you to
proactively evolve your business, which means that I meet you where you are
right now, understand where you want to go, and support you in getting there.

“If they don’t
fail outright, most businesses fail to fully achieve their potential. That’s
because the person who owns the business doesn’t truly know how to build a
company that works without him or her…

which is the key.” ~ Michael Gerber

“By quieting
ourselves down…removing ourselves from the noise around us, the fear inside us,
and the well-intentioned voices of others that would tell us what to do…we
receive the insight of our personal truth, which only we can truly know. And
that deep, quiet voice always is life supporting and always wealth
awakening.”
~ Dr.
Michael Norwood

Remember, the same energy that created a situation cannot
solve it. I would be honored to bring everything that the Business Buddha® has
to bear on your business situation – my goal is to help you evolve your
business proactively, quickly and easily!

“We are not
business people who have spirituality. We are spiritual people who do
business.” ~ Chris Widener





If you’re still reading, chances are that we are going to be working
together. Thanks for reading this all the way through… even more, congratulate
yourself on giving your business the opportunity to have resources that work,
access to easy concepts to implement for big results, and for inviting a change
to QUICKLY make ENORMOUS positive progress towards what happens in your
business!


Wealth
is lost nothing is lost


INTERNATIONAL JIVAKA
PRESUMPTIVE HEALTH PROTECTION (IJPHP)
      


The Medicine Buddha Or The Buddha’s Medicine?

 

As far as medicine is concerned the Buddha’s teaching as
preserved in the Pali Tipitaka is distinctly different that which proceeded it
and to a large extent even different from what came later. The medicines and
healing procedures in pre-Buddhist Indian literature is what can be called
religio-magical, i.e. prayers, mantra, spells and rituals. Likewise, many
sicknesses were believed to be caused by evil spirits. The Pali Tipitaka is the
earliest evidence of a departure from such notions, none of which are found in
it. Instead, we find the beginning of empirico-rational medicine. In the
Bhesajjakkhandaka of the Vinaya is a list of herbs, resins, salts and oils
which can be used as medicines. I will give some of these below. Now whether or
not such substances really did have healing properties, their mention without
any magical additions suggests a new type of thinking. Caraka Samhita
and Susruta Samhita, (dates uncertain but defiantly post-Buddha,
probably between 200 BCE and 300 CE) also contain a strong empirical and
experimental outlook but one can also see the either the inability to shake off
or perhaps the reintroduction of, magic. My favorite prescription in Caraka
starts, ‘Take the left ear of a donkey, boil it and…’ By the time the great
Mahayana sutras were composed religio-magical healing was well on the way to
completely replaced rational medicine. A good example of this would be the Bh
aisajyarajan
Sutra
(Medicine Buddha Scripture) which says, ‘May every being be cured of
deformity by hearing my name. May every ailing being too poor to afford
medicine be cured of their sickness by hearing my name. May all female beings
get rid of their femininity by hearing my name, etc.’ Worshiping the Medicine
Buddha, reciting his name and doing Medicine Buddha pujas had almost
completely superseded rational healing. Later Tantric text contains huge
amounts of healing dharanis, mantras and spells.

[52976500_a4ebc622a0_m.jpg]

Picture above shows monks making a Medicine
Buddha mandala

I give here some of the medicinal plants mentioned by the Buddha and include
their application according to S. K. Jain and Robert A. DeFillipps’
authoritative Medical Plants of India, Algonac, 1991.

Amalaka, Emblica
officinalis
. Bark: Applied to sores, pimples, with t
he
bark of Dillenia pentagyna for tubercular fistula; for cholera,
dysentery, diarrhea. Leaf: For gravel, diarrhea and sores. Fruit:
: Refrigerant,
diuretic, laxative, for indigestion, with Swertia and fnugreek for gonorrhea.
Raw fruit: Aperient, dried and used in haemorrhagia, diarrhea, as a liver
tonic, for scurvy, the juice as an eye drop. Seeds: For asthma and stomach disorders.

Ativisa, Hiptage mabadlota. Astringent, tonic, for
fevers, cough, diarrhea and dysentery.

Bhanga, Cannabis sativa. Leaves boiled and steam
inhaled and/or rubbed on the skin. Whole plant: Stomachic, antispasmodic,
analgesic and sedative, for epilepsy, with root of Bryonopsis laciniosa,
Melothria heterophylla and opium for convulsions; on sores, for cough
and cold. Leaf: for dyspepsia, gonorrhea, bowel complaints, narcotic nerve
stimulant and for skin diseases.
Bhaddamuttaka, Cyperus rotundus. Whole plant: For
heat stroke. Root: For stomach disorders.





Candana, Santalum album. Bark; With root bark of Solanum
torvum
and Achyranthes aspera for malaria. Oil: For enlarged
spleen, with Lepidium, Nerium oleander, Nymphaea, root of Michelia and
almonds for dysentery; in a paste and applied for headaches, skin complaints,
burns and fever inflammation. Oil from heart wood: As diuretic, diaphoretic,
refrigerant, expectorant and for dysuria. Oil from seeds: For skin diseases.

Halidda, Curcuma domestitca. Root; For hazy vision,
inflammation of eyes, with tobacco for night blindness; subnormal temperature,
body pains, rheumatism, with green gram for scabies, sores, with Dolichos
biflous
for infantile fistula ani; with mustard and Solanum surattense
for coughs; with leaves of sweet potato, Negella indica and Buettneria
herbacea
root to stimulate lactation. Flowers: For sores in the throat,
with Shorea robusta and bark of Ventilago calyulata for syphilis.

Haritaka, Terminalia chebula. Bark: As diuretic,
cardiotonic, for eczema, mouth sores. Fruit: For dysentery, enlarged spleen,
externally for measles, applied to inflammation of the eyes, constipation,
coughs, bronchitis, as

Hingu, Balanites aejyptiaca. Bark: For colds and
cough. Fruit: For pneumonia and skin diseases.





Kalanusari, Nardostachys jatamansi. Root. As an
aromatic, bitter tonic, stimulant, antiseptic, for convulsions, inhaled (with
other plants) for ulcers of nose and palate, dysentery, constipation,
bronchitis (with other plants), as a laxative and to improve urination.

Kutaja, Holarrhaena antidysenterica. Root: Spleen
complaints, diarrhea, discharge in urine and excreta, haematuria, blood
dysentery, the bites of dogs or poisonous animals. Bark: For bronchitis, cold,
menorrhagia,, dysentery and other stomach disorders. Flowers: For worms,
leucoderma and as an appetite stimulant. Seeds: For epilepsy, postnatal
complaints, leprosy and other skin diseases, constipation and indigestion,
colic and dysentery.

Lasuna, Allium sativum. Bulb: For fever, pulmonary
phthisis, gangrene of lung, whooping cough, rheumatism, duodenal ulcer,
hyperlipidemia, certain typhoides, flatulence, atonic dyspepsia, juice on skin
diseases and as an ear drop.

Padma, Nelumbo necifera. Tuber: To relieve
strangulation of the intestine. Rhizome: Yields nutritious arrowroot useful for
diarrhea and dysentery in children. Carpel: Demulcent. Flower: As astringent
and cooling agent for cholera.

Talisa, Flacourtia cataphracta. Bark: Given together
(with the roots of other plants) to women as prenatal and post natal treatment
to purify the blood; for biliousness. Fruit: For biliousness and liver
complaints.

Usira, Andropogon muricatum. Root: Chewed for coughs
and colds, promotes
bronchial secretion, asthma, diarrhea and dysentery, the oil is used as a nerve
stimulant, sedative, analgesic, epilepsy, constipation. Stem: Cough and colds.
Root: Vermifuge, in intermittent fever. Whole plant: Sedative, analgesic,
depressant for blood pressure, rubbed on aching body parts.

[usirar.jpg]



Tagara, Tabernaemontana coronaria. Root:
Bitter-tasting and applied locally as an anodyne, chewed to relieve toothaches.
Stem: The bark as a refrigerant. Leaf: Latex used for eye diseases.


Health is lost something is lost



A BLUE PRINT FOR LIFE


ON  THE FUTURE

THE WAY OF DEVELOPMENT


            People
willingly pay taxes with the hope that the nation

will improve in the future. Bridges and roads are repaired
in

the hope that transportation will become more convenient.

Welfare is provided to relieve poverty with the hope that
the

social welfare system will mnot be lacking. The capable and

wise are elected with the hope that government will become

increasingly more democratic . Punishing corrupt officials
is

done with the hope that government will become impartial.

Everybody today hopes that there will be good weather for

Crops the country will be prosperous, people will live in
peace,

And  the world will
soon know peace.


Precepts (Character, morality
self-discipline) is lost everything is lost


 

 

FREE
ONLINE TRAINING ON BUDDHISM FOR CHILDREN-37


Big Red, Little Red and No-squeal
[Envy]


Once upon a time, there were two calves who
were part of a country household. At the same home there also lived a girl and
a baby pig. Since he hardly ever made a sound, the pig was called ‘No-squeal’.

The masters of the house treated No-squeal
very very well. They fed him large amounts of the very best rice, and even rice
porridge with rich brown sugar.

The two calves noticed this. They worked hard
pulling ploughs in the fields and bullock carts on the roads. Little Red said
to Big Red, “My big brother, in this household you and I do all the hard
work. We bring prosperity to the family. But they feed us only grass and hay.
The baby pig No-squeal does nothing to support the family. And yet they feed
him the finest and fanciest of foods. Why should he get such special
treatment?”

The wise elder brother said, “Oh young
one, it is dangerous to envy anybody. Therefore, do not envy the baby pig for
being fed such rich food. What he eats is really “the food of death”.

“There will soon be a marriage ceremony
for the daughter of the house, and little No-squeal will be the wedding feast!
That’s why he is being pampered and fed in such rich fashion.

“In a few days the guests will arrive.
Then this piglet will be dragged away by the legs, killed, and made into curry for
the feast.”

Sure enough, in a few days the wedding guests
arrived. The baby pig No-squeal was dragged away and killed. And just as Big
Red had said, he was cooked in various types of curries and devoured by the
guests.

Then Big Red said, “My dear young
brother, did you see what happened to baby No-squeal?” “Yes
brother,” replied Little Red, “now I understand.”

Big Red continued, “This is the result of
being fed such rich food. Our poor grass and hay are a hundred times better
than his rich porridge and sweet brown sugar. For our food brings no harm to
us, but instead promises long life!”

The moral is: Don’t envy the well-off, until you know the price
they pay.


comments (0)
09/21/09
An idea that is developed and put into action is more important than an idea that exists only as an idea. Buddha-Activists & motivators-ONLINE TRAINING ON PRECEPTS AND TRADE-80-Ambedkar the patriot revealed at lecture-The Congress Cat has come out of the bag.
Filed under: General
Posted by: @ 8:24 am



VR1

(WE  ARE  ONE )

+VE  NEWS

MAY YOU BE EVER HAPPY, WELL AND SECURE!

MAY YOU LIVE LONG!

MAY ALL BEINGS BE EVRER HAPPY, WELL AND SECURE!

MAY YOU ALWAYS HAVE CALM, QUIET, ALERT, ATTENTIVE AND

EQUANIMINTY MIND!

WITH A CLEAR UNDESRSATNDING THAT

NOTHING IS PERMANENT!






An
idea that is developed and put into action is more important than an idea that
exists only as an idea.

Buddha

ONLINE TRAINING ON PRECEPTS AND TRADE-80


Activists & motivators

Chandrabhan Prasad

In November 2007, I was visiting Indiana
University as a guest
speaker. I was staying with my host Dr Kelvin Brown, a law Professor at the
university. He took me to a function organised on the theme “Leadership amongst
Blacks.”

Most speakers talked about their
successes, and explained how to succeed in the US society. Not one speaker talked
about slavery and the oppressions the White society committed on them. Speakers
and the audience alike, all were seen in cheerful mood and all explored ways to
succeed.

American Blacks have a new set of people
called “Motivational Speakers”. If you search the Internet for ‘Motivational
Speakers’, you will find countless names who are engaged in the business of
motivating the Black youth. American Blacks have entered a new phase of their
movement. All people fighting for their emancipation will, apart from organised
political tools, witness three other sets of tools and leaders — Reformers,
Activists, and Motivators.

Reformers enter first when the system of
oppression is too rigid, and the oppressed too depressed. The reformer will not
look at the oppressor; instead, will ask his people to do away with certain
practices that prevent their growth. The reformer can sound blaming his own
people for their sufferings. The reformer, in the process, creates a jerk in
the psychology of his people. The people start moving.

The activist enters when there is some
amount of openness in the society. Cracks appear in the ranks of the oppressors
as few from his side stand with the oppressed. The activists will invoke
history and paint the oppressor into a demon. All societies undergo this phase.
The American Blacks underwent this phase in ’60s and ’70s.

But, if stretched too far and too long,
activism can turn counterproductive. Excessive chaste beating and demon hunting
creates few dangerous situations. The oppressed develop hatred toward the oppressor,
and disrespect against the system. With this socio-psychological drive, the
oppressed find little reasons to become part of the system. They lose hope
because they have been constantly fed with the idea that the system is bad.
They start thinking of alternative ways that never come.

The Motivator, on the other hand,
injects optimism. He no more demonises the demon. He shows space available in
the mainstream, and asks his people to move fast and occupy that space. He
explains how to do it. Most Black motivational speakers are achievers in their
respective fields. They cite their own experiences — of how they made it. He
inspires the generation next. Barack Obama’s Presidential campaign was modeled
along this line — “Yes, We Can Do It”.

SC/STs are still in their activism
phase. I am making a database of SC/ST Entrepreneurs whose annual turnover is
worth Rs 1 Crore or more annually. I have multiple purposes in mind. First, I
want to study whether SC/STs are succeeding in the domain of enterprise or not.
If not, what are the main obstacles. If there are few hundred SC/ST
entrepreneurs with Rs 1 crore turnover, I want to profile them and tell the
SC/ST generation next that if so many SC/STs can succeed in businesses, you too
can.

This is a great learning experience. A
Scheduled Caste asked me: “If you will show so many SC/STs with Rs 1 crore
business turnover, the Government might withdraw all facilities including
reservations. Another very distinguished SC told me that if the Government
comes to know of the list, the income tax department will be asked to raid
their business premises and all will be put behind bars. “Why,” I asked. “Will
any Government tolerate some SC/STs doing so well,” he replied.

Now, I am going from city to city in
search of SC/ST entrepreneurs. All the SC/ST entrepreneurs I have met so far
tell me that everybody, including income tax, sales tax departments, district
officers, local MP and MLAs, and people around know that they are SC/STs. I am
yet to meet a SC/ST entrepreneur who said he is not known that he is a SC/ST.

This is one of the biggest challenge the
SC/ST movement faces. If we keep telling the community that none of us can
succeed in businesses because society is so bad, what impact will it have on
prospective SC/ST entrepreneurs? Do we tell our children that you will never
pass your high school examination because the entire system is so Brahminical,
so Hinduised? SC/STs ought to immediately come out of the activism phase, and
start producing motivators.

 

Jagatheesan Chandrasekharan adds:


The main object of www.buddhismandbusiness.webs.com
is meant for the above purpose and http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org is trying to take up
online training on precepts and trade.

 

First of all fear of all sorts has to be overcome by
practicing Sila and Bhavana, by following the path shown by the Buddha and Baba
Saheb Dr.B.R.Ambedkar, Manyavar Kanshiran ji and Bahen Mayawati ji. As Baba
Saheb said that the SC/STs have to get the Master Key, all SC/STs must also
like Obama say and practice “Yes, We Can Do It”.


Ambedkar the patriot revealed at lecture




HYDERABAD: Ambedkar’s political philosophy existed
before his being,
was the statement from Former Chief Judge at the High Court of
Himachal Pradesh, Justice M N Rao at a lecture held at the
Administrative Staff College
(ASCI) campus at Bella Vista on Friday
evening. Rao spoke on the occasion of the B R Ambedkar Memorial
Lecture, examining his influence in making of the Constitution. Former
Karnataka Governor and political heavyweight V S Rama Devi was present
to introduce the speaker, along with the Director General, ASCI, S K
Rao, who addressed the gathering.



The audience,
comprising of a significant portion of both former and
present legal professionals in the High Court of Andhra Pradesh
listened in rapt attention as Rama Devi argued for Ambedkar as a
“non-radical reformer,” who used moderation in revealing the evils of
the caste system in India.
In her introduction, the former Governor of
Karnataka also said that Ambedkar was a staunch patriot, who used
reforms as a means of achieving freedom.



“Ambedkar’s patriotic
zeal is often overlooked by critics, who view
him simply as a torch bearer for the oppressed classes. More than
being simply a social reformer, Ambedkar was a seeker of social
justice,” she said.



Proposing that the
leader was more than simply a reformer, a la Raja
Ram Mohan Roy of Bengal, Rama Devi said that
Ambedkar was an able
statesman, a politician and a lawyer with a keen sense of finance and
economics. Justice M N Rao, in his speech observed that Ambedkarism,
as a concept had its roots prior to Ambdekar’s times.



“The socio-political
philosophy founded on the basis of equal
opportunities in the social reformatory moves by reformers in Bengal,”
he said. Revealing that while the reformers shied away from taking
radical steps for fear of stigma, Ambedkar was, “in the true sense, a
Radical.” Rao cited Ambedkar’s bur ning of the Manusmriti text as a
sign of protest against the rigidity of the Hindu caste system to
support his case. “He too wanted Independence
like his contemporaries,
but he wanted the emancipation of the downtrodden as well, which has
caused his image to be contorted as a relatively ‘unpatriotic’ public
figure, which is erroneous,” he said.

The Congress Cat has come out of the bag.


Mishra gave vent to
the anguish of the Mayawati government and said memorials for other leaders
seldom raised an eyebrow, except when they were meant for a SC/ST icons such as:

 

Mayawati and Kanshi
Ram in various parks of Lucknow

Dr Bhim Rao Ambedkar
Samajik Parivartan Sthal,

Manyawar Kanshi Ram
Memorial at Alambag,

Kanshi Ram
Bahujan Nayak
Park
,

Ramabai Ambedkar
Rally Maidan,

Kanshiram Sanskritik
Sthal,

Dr Ambedkar Samajik
Parivartan Prateek Sthal,

Manywar Kanshiram
Yaadgar Vishram Sthal,

Buddha Sthal, Eco Park,

Samata Mulak Churaha
and Dr Ambedkar Chauraha,

Buddha Shanti Upwan
and

Prerna Sthal.

 

He sought to buttress
his argument by citing the example of the sprawling Teen Murti Bhawan in Delhi,
which is a memorial for the first Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru
.

“We would like the court also to
focus on larger issues like Teen Murti Bhawan which at present would be worth
more than Rs 3,000 crore. It hurts when no one questions such memorials. But,
if a memorial for Dr Ambedkar is built, then objections are raised,” he
said
after the court issued notices.

 

Earlier, senior
advocate U U Lalit said the PIL petitioners had no connection with UP and that
all the expenditure on the statues and renovation of parks had been duly
sanctioned by the assembly and that nothing was being done without proper
sanction.

 

When the court said it has not issued any interim
order but was merely seeking response of the state government, Mishra said:
“We will bring all the larger issues before the court and it should deal
with them.”


Given the tone and tenor of the arguments, the Mayawati government is sure to
list out the number of memorials for upper caste leaders and draw a contrast
with the smaller numbers dedicated to SC/ST leaders.

Mishra also told TOI that huge amounts
were being spent by the Mayawati government for the upliftment of the poor,
building schools and hospitals besides social upliftment schemes for oppressed class.
“The media highlights only the memorials built to honour Dalit leaders and
ignores the developmental work of the Mayawati government,” he said
.

 

Congress accused of
triggering civil war

While stepping up its tirade against
Uttar Pradesh chief minister
Mayawati, Congress Cat has come out of the bag and is being 

accused of triggering
a civil war and paving the way for anarchy.

The Bulldozer Singh’s Samajawadi party’s threat of unctrollable

bulldozing of statues
and memorials of
Mayawati and Kanshi
Ram in various parks of Lucknow

Dr Bhim Rao Ambedkar
Samajik Parivartan Sthal,

Manyawar Kanshi Ram
Memorial at Alambag,

Kanshi Ram
Bahujan Nayak
Park
,

Ramabai Ambedkar
Rally Maidan,

Kanshiram Sanskritik
Sthal,

Dr Ambedkar Samajik
Parivartan Prateek Sthal,

Manywar Kanshiram
Yaadgar Vishram Sthal,

Buddha Sthal, Eco Park,

Samata Mulak Churaha
and Dr Ambedkar Chauraha,

Buddha Shanti Upwan
and

Prerna Sthal and to
create unrest in the event of the statues being installed

by her government
were removed, the Congress Cat has come out of the bag

to support the
Bulldozing of the above memorials to trigger a civil war.

“It’s not just unfortunate but
violative of the Constitution and sends
out a message that the congress cat and the bulldozer singh does not

have confidence in
the law of the land.”

Despite an apology to the Supreme Court,
Congress Cat spokesman

Manish Tiwari along
with UP Congress leader Rita
Bahuguna Joshi by supporting bulldozing singh are triggering a

civil war and paving
the way for anarchy

“We unequivocally condemn the
bulldozing singh and congress cat’s
attitude of unctrollable bulldozing of statues and memorials for
unleashing a civil war as it proves that they do not believe in the
rule of law.”

comments (0)
09/20/09
“Bahujan Jan Jagran Rally” from Kanpur to Lucknow on 11 Oct. 2009. Rally will start at 9.30 AM.-The Bahujan Samaj Party (BSP) won the Nautan assembly constituency-Mayawati slams Congress party’s austerity drive-UP to set up multi-purpose farmers service centres-ONLINE TRAINING ON PRECEPTS AND TRADE-79 INTERNATIONAL JIVAKA PRESUMPTIVE HEALTH PROTECTION (IJPHP)
Filed under: General
Posted by: @ 11:05 am






“Health is
the greatest gift, contentment the greatest wealth, faithfulness the best
relationship.”

 

ONLINE TRAINING ON PRECEPTS AND TRADE-79


INTERNATIONAL JIVAKA
PRESUMPTIVE HEALTH PROTECTION (IJPHP)
   

  

Without health life is not life; it is only a state of langour and
suffering - an image of death.

Buddha

Health is lost something is lost

Dear Brothers/Sisters
 
Jai Bhim
 

We wish to inform you that Lakshay has decided to organise a
“Bahujan Jan Jagran Rally” from Kanpur to Lucknow on 11 Oct. 2009.
Rally will start at 9.30 AM.

An Emotional Support will be given to Iron Lady Behan Maya Wati Chief Minister of UP through a Memorandum.
 
A pamphlet in this regards is attached.
 
We look forward to all  support from you all.
 
Regards
 
Suryakant Aditya
National Executive Member
Bhartiya Samanvaya Sangthan (Lakshay)


The Bahujan Samaj Party emerged victorious on one
seat

 

The Bahujan Samaj
Party (BSP) won the Nautan assembly constituency.

Mayawati slams Congress
party’s austerity drive

LUCKNOW - Uttar Pradesh Chief
Minister Mayawati has ridiculed Congress party’s austerity drive, terming it as
a ploy to steer attention away from the steep price rise.

Addressing a mass rally here on
Thursday, Mayawati hit out at the Congress party, calling its austerity drive
“a drama.”

“Because of the wrong doings by the
Congress government at the centre, the prices are rising due to which poor
people across the country are suffering. And now to cover up its weaknesses,
they have cut down on its travelling expenses by flying economy class and
travelling by train. All this is just a drama,” Mayawati said.

“With a drought looming and elections
in some states approaching, the Congress-led government has embarked on a
much-publicised austerity drive,” she added.

UP to
set up multi-purpose farmers service centres

STAFF WRITER 12:7 HRS IST
Lucknow, Sep 17 (PTI) Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Mayawati has
ordered setting up of farmers service centres in rural areas to
provide all necessary assistance under one roof.

“Farmers service centres should be set up in rural areas on public
private partnership (PPP) model where all facilities should be
provided under one roof,” she said during a review meeting with the
principal secretaries held last evening.

She also directed that advance arrangements should be made to provide
various agricultural inputs, including fertilisers and seeds, for the
Rabi season.

“It had been observed that due to lack of proper arrangements problems
are being faced by the farmers and they are forced to purchase
fertiliser and seeds from private sector on higher prices,” the Chief
Minister said.

Besides, effective measures should be taken to check smuggling of
fertilisers and seeds specially on the Indo-Nepal border.

UP not
mulling new IT policy

The Uttar Pradesh government said
there was no need for a new IT policy in the state and the need of the hour was
to ensure proper implementation of the 2004 IT Policy.

“The existing IT policy is
well-equipped to cater to the needs of the industry but renewed efforts would
be made for proper implementation of its guidelines,” state IT and Electronics
Principal Secretary Chandra Prakash told Business Standard on sidelines of a
seminar on ‘IT Industries in UP — The Road Ahead’ here last evening.

The seminar was organised by MSME
chamber Indian Industries Association (IIA) and Association of Knowledge
Workers Lucknow
(AKWL). It was attended by representatives of leading IT/ITES companies.

Asked if government would consider
setting up government-promoted IT/ITES-centric Special Economic Zones (SEZ) in
the state, he replied in the negative saying that separate measures were not
needed since provisions contained in the IT policy were sufficient.

Earlier, in his keynote address he
had said, “Creation of SEZs was important for UP” and that with the new
initiatives of the state government, the perception about Uttar Pradesh would
change positively in next the 2-3 years.

“e-governance is coming up in a big
way in Uttar Pradesh.

Prakash said the government was
setting up 17,000 common service centres christened as ‘Jan Suvidha Kendra’ in
the rural areas to offer host of services online at one place.

“e-governance is the priority of the
government and these centres of electronic delivery services in public domain
would be rolled out on public-private partnership (PPP) model,” he said.

The government is setting up a state
meta data centre, which will contain data of all the departments and the
different
places would be connected to it through district data centres
with private investment.

comments (0)
09/18/09
VR1 (WE ARE ONE ) +VE NEWS-ONLINE TRAINING ON PRECEPTS AND TRADE-78-Wealth is lost nothing is lost
Filed under: General
Posted by: @ 8:48 pm







CONTENTS

 


Preface

Buddhists often tend to disregard economics completely, because
the monastic way of life idealized by Buddhism is economically very
minimalist. Such neglect of comment concerning economic values is not
warranted, however, because the Buddhist scriptures are in fact rich with
advice from the Buddha regarding sound economic values — and they are applicable
to monastic and lay lifestyles alike. 

The availability of teachings, is not, however, the only reason
Buddhists should take an interest in economics. Of all the reasons for
compiling a treatise in Buddhist economics, the most pressing reason
Buddhists have to sit up and take notice of economic issues is because if we
don’t, abuse of economic principles will continue to escalate conflict in the
world. The whole history of our planet from ancient times until now has been
punctuated by wars — whether they be world wars or more localized ones –
and as Buddhists see it, the outbreak of war can usually be traced back to
financial strife, or else problems of the abuse of economic knowledge.
However, once war breaks out, the nature of the problem is often distorted to
make it look as if it is a problem of religious or ethnic conflict.

In the West we are accustomed to feeling a sense of relief when we
hear that the economy is booming — however, we sometimes fail to realize
what those economic figures actually reflect in terms of quality of life.
Ironically, all it takes for a country to be considered economically strong
is for its economic figures to look good. If every household in a certain
country or society were wealthy, of course that country or society would have
good economic figures to show for itself. In Thailand, however, the majority
of the population are economically poor. It is only a small minority of
population who are wealthy — thus, how can Thailand possibly be considered
economically strong? If you want to have an accurate picture of the economy
of any country, you have to take a long hard look at the wealth of the
majority — not just at the collective figures. It is the economic status of
the majority which most accurately reflects the true economic state of that
country or society.

Economic values in Buddhism are concerned with quality of life.
But in Buddhism we define quality of life not only in terms of material
comfort, but also in terms of mental wellbeing and ultimately liberation of the
mind from negative latent tendencies. Thus, value is put on sometimes quite
abstract qualities. As in the words of the Buddhist nun, Kuhn Yay Ratana
Upasika Chandra Khonnokyoong who founded Wat Phra Dhammakaya in Thailand:

“with a well-trained group of
people in front of me ready to work for good in society, I fell that I am
already a multimillionnaire — because even if I were to have ten million, I
could still not guarantee being able to train up such a group.”

Contrary to popular opinion, the
Buddha never prohibited wealth — but he did prohibit poverty. Happiness
appropriate to a householder (A.ii.69) includes ownership [atthisukha],
enjoyment [bhogasukha], freedom from debt [ananasukha] and
blamelessness [anavajjasukha]. Buddhism praises contentment [santu.t.thi]
and limited desires [appicchata] but not poverty. What is important as
a Buddhist, however, in the economic process, whether one is earning, saving
or using money, is that one should never compromise one’s principles. Once
wealthy, as a Buddhist one should use one’s wealth in a way that supports a
wholesome aim in life — not to fritter away money away aimlessly or in a way
that leads to further proliferation of defilements of greed, hatred or
delusion in the mind. It is not to say that riches cannot buy happiness –
but riches used aimlessly may create more damage than good. Riches, if they
are to bring happiness, must be applied to support the emergence of higher
spiritual values — especially virtues and virtuous people — which according
Buddhist economics have more value than anyone can put a price on.

Originally this book was intended to deal solely with Buddhist
Economics, however after the warlike events of 11 September 2001, the present
author would like to extend the scope of this book to show how the build-up
of economic tensions can be blamed for these sort of incidents.

 

1

The Economic Hidden Agenda behind
every war

 


“When one nation’s army turns its guns on another, far from
starting a war, they are the products of a war started long ago through
economic exploitation.”


 

The abuse of economic knowledge has
beset our interactions with the economy all the way from earning, to saving
and expenditure — every step of the economic process being vulnerable to
those who respect no ethical guidelines. In spite of this, western economics
seems to turn a blind eye to ethical issues surrounding the economic process.
Ethical issues are often intentionally overlooked under the pretext of being
‘objective’ — but alas, this leaves the door open to all sorts of economic
exploitation — and even though opponants might never be threatened with
knives or guns, the positioning that goes on behind the scenes of the world
economy is no less cruel than out-and-out aggression. Economic exploitation
in the present day has proliferated to the point that entire populations of
countries are forced into compromises that leaves them strait-jacketed with
regard to the appropriation of their own finances. This is the reality of
economic ‘colonization’ in many countries of the world even at this very
moment — and Thailand is just one of many countries that seems to have
become an economic plaything to more dominant superpowers.

In response to obvious injustice, it is hard to deny that
understanding of economics attuned to ethical values must start by addressing
two issues: 

  • the scrupulousness of how
    wealth is accrued  
  • the scrupulousness of those
    who accrue it
      

The seriousness of economic
exploitation, of course depends on how far people are prepared to go to
achieve their economic ends. Are they to kill each other or does their
conscience cause them to stop short of this merely at indirect (political or
diplomatic) pressure? In brief, it can be said that when resources are
acquired, hoarded or used unscrupulously, it soon leads to conflict and chaos
throughout the world. Insignificant incidences of exploitation gradually
exacerbate the burden of bitterness which eventually stops short at nothing
less than armed conflict.

The Economics of
Exploitation

Having recognized the implications of economic exploitation (even without
knowing who is taking advantage of whom) we can start to appreciate that the
web of economic exploitation has become so complex that it is difficult to
know a beginning or an end of it. When one nation’s army turns its guns on
another, far from starting a war, they are the products of a war started long
ago through economic exploitation. In the absence of any ethical guidelines,
when any means seems justified by economic ends, it is no surprise that the
conflicts continue to escalate — violence has indeed proliferated to a point
where it is difficult to see how we personally can do anything to
ameliorate the situation, without remedies of a similarly large scale.

Condoning unethical economic practices is to kindle the flames of
war on our planet. Wars like the Crusades, lasted for longer than a century
— and upon first sight they might seem to have been nothing more than a
religious war between Christians and Moslems, however, if examined in more
depth, they turn out to have been the result of badly organized economic
policy admixed with incompatability of beliefs. If you look beneath the
surface of any other religious war which has broken out in history, you will
always find a hidden agenda of economic advantage behind the conflict. It is
only with the admixture of other elements that turns the conflict into a war.
If it wasn’t for economic difficulties, in spite of differences of belief,
why should different groups want to interrupt ‘business as usual’? However,
any day economic progress becomes obstructed and a political tinder box
doesn’t emerge spontaneously, it is not usually long before ethnic and
religious differences will provide the necessary spark. To the uninitiated,
of course it looks like a war motivated by ethnic or religious conflict . . .

Even the battle for
Ayutthaya had economic roots

Even the most famous invasion of Thailand in 1564 when the (then) capital of
Ayutthaya was sacked by the Burmese is popularly believed to have been a
fight over ‘royal white elephants’. The first invasion took place in the
reign of King Maha Chakrap’at. At that time the region of Ayutthaya, extended
as far south as Rangsit and the present site of Wat Phra Dhammakaya. The
populace were renowned for elephant husbandry — especially elephants for use
in royal service — and several of these included the legendary ‘white
elephants’. According to eye-witness accounts, even as recently as fifty
years ago, there was still a large shallow pond in front of Wat Phra
Dhammakaya, which previously was used as a watering hole for the elephants of
the vicinity. At that time, although the whole area was densely forested, the
presence of herds of elephants made the area of strategic importance, because
as well as being the royal ‘chargers’, trained elephants were the most
indefatiguable ‘machines of war’ (equivalent to the modern-day tanks).

The news of the abundance of elephants reached the ears of King
Bayinnaung of Burma, who sent an emissary to ask for a pair of ‘white
elephants’ for himself in 1563.

 


BOX 1: THE LEGENDARY ROYAL WHITE ELEPHANTS

In Southeast Asia, white elephants are held in very high regard because
they are believed to be the bodhisatva (a future Buddha in the making)
–however, because of residual bad karma from previous lives, instead of
taking human birth, the bodhisatva takes birth in one of the most elevated
forms of animal life, indicated by the rare ‘whiteness’ of an elephant. The
people of old had the belief that any country possessing such an elephant
would prosper, as the charm of the the beast would call the rain to fall
according to season.

 

Of course Thailand would never agree to part with any white
elephants — and that was known full well in advance by King Bayinnaung. He
knew that when the refusal came, he would have an excuse to go to war with
Thailand. When a battle ensued in 1564, it turned out that it was the Thais
who lost on their home ground as a result of their lack of strategy and
unity. That is the popular history of the outbreak of war. However, in
reality it would be crazy for any king to risk the life and limb of large
numbers of his subjects just out of the whim of acquiring an elephant. There
ought to be more substantial reasons for the war breaking out in those times.

Much later the present author came across the description of a
historical document found in about 1987 by Professors Prasert na Nakorn and
Sukit Nimmanmain. It was a letter describing how the Lanna Kingdom had used
to trade with Burma in silver, gold, herbs (especially alloe, cinnamon and
spices), lac and honey. According to the document Lanna changed its policy on
trade and started trading with Ayutthaya instead of Burma. Originally Burma
had no interest in the spice trade, but when Europe started trading in spices
through India, it saw its chance to dominate the market. Burma had become a
wealthy middle man for spices traded between Lanna and the Europeans in
India.

Ayutthaya, however, was also a spice trading centre — but its
prices were lower than those of Burma. It was no real difficulty for the
trading ships from Europe to round the peninsular at Singapore to trade with
Thailand instead of Burma. Within a relatively short period of time, all the
Lanna traders decided to supply Ayutthaya instead of Burma. In addition, to
take their merchandise to Ayutthaya was easier than taking it to Burma
because it was all downstream. Thus Ayutthaya could be a cheaper middleman
than Burma and this was the real reason for the conflict that grew up between
Burma and Thailand. This is why King Bayinnaung (and King Tabinshwehti before
him) wanted to sack Ayutthaya — and the white elephant was only an excuse –
but he got lucky in the ensuing war and conquered Siam. Thus the reason for
the first invasion of Ayutthaya was for economic reasons.

The second fall of Ayutthaya in 1569 was partly revenge for the
rebel Sett’at’irat’s subsequent counterattack against Burma in 1566 but
analysed more deeply, Burma could only sack Ayutthaya a second time because
the Thais were competing amongst themselves for economic power and at that
time, towards the end of the Ayutthaya dynasty, vice had become very
widespread in the old capital. Even the king was up to his neck in ‘roads to
ruin’. Wherever there is economic prosperity to excess, as we shall discover
later in this book, there will be an upsurge various sorts of vice and
addiction.

In conclusion, we can say that Buddhist economics and western
economics diverge whenever economic advantage is used as a reason to justify
conflict. In Buddhism economics, economic advantage is not seen as adequate
means to justify ignoble ends.

Having identified the real roots of world conflict, it is no
longer useful to look for who to blame. To look for scapegoats is
really only an admission of our own inadequecies or laziness to recognize our
own part in the problem. It would be more appropriate that we start to study
the ethical issues surrounding economics as outlined in the remainder of this
book while doing our personal best to be most scrupulous in all respects.

Scrupulous macroeconomics on the level of national policy has to
be built on the foundation of scrupulous on the individual (microeconomic)
level. Economics on both levels are dealt with in the remainder of this book.

 

2

The Distinguishing features of
Buddhist Economics

 

“Don’t eat just because you feel like it 
– eat when you feel hungry . . .”


 

There are many points of similarity
and difference between Western Economics and Buddhist Economics. What the two
have in common is in their recognition of three stages in the economic
process. However, in the detail of each of the three stages, we find
significant divergence: 

  • acquisition of wealth:
    While Western Economics recognizes acquisition as important, it gives virtually
    no guidelines for the ethical limits of scrupulous acquisition –
    especially concerning livelihood. Anything that doesn’t break the Law is
    seen as fair play. Unfortunately, the Law is a very rough and ready
    indicator of ethical behaviour. In the olden days where morality was a
    part of common sense, the Law might have been seen to offer sufficient
    guidelines, however, in the present day, that can no longer be said to
    be true. When the way people acquire their wealth is no more ethical
    than the way animals hunt their prey, that is the point where humans
    become prepared to kill each other for their wealth — even if people
    still have sufficient conscience not to kill each other overtly for
    wealth, it doesn’t mean they won’t attempt to do so covertly by economic
    exploitation — where direct killing means setting about each other with
    weapons and indirect killing means pressurizing, cheating and exploiting
    others by various means.
      
  • conservation of wealth:
    Having acquired wealth surplus to one’s needs, the remainder needs to be
    stored or shared. Animals will tend to hoard as much as they can without
    any consideration of ethical fairness. If you watch any African wildlife
    documentary you will see how in the dry season the big cats don’t have
    to go out hunting, but sculk by the watering hole, dominating that
    scarce resource, so that they can prey on anything that comes to drink
    there. The big cat will get both water to drink and easy meat just by
    staying close to the watering hole. This is the way animals hoard their
    requisites — without any consideration of ethicality. How do people
    measure up to these animal ways? As we all know, some acquire wealth
    scrupulously — while others disregard ethicality completely or
    partially. Hoarding wealth in a way that disregards ethicality includes
    limiting the supply of resources to the point that others risk death
    because of the lack of these things in the marketplace. In the present
    day, this often happens — for example when oil-producing countries
    limit the supply of their produce to force the prices up — to the
    degree that their potential customers must suffer. In such a case
    Buddhists would no longer agree with Western economics that such
    hoarding is ethically justified and would favour the sale of such
    products at a moderate price. It is frightening to consider what would
    happen if the food producing countries were to start hoarding their
    products — there would be dire consequences for the rest of the world.
      
  • employment of weath for benefit or to
    satisfy desires:
    When spending, Buddhist economics again
    diverges from Western Economics, because it advocates spending one’s
    resources:
     
  • in moderation: ‘Moderation’
    is the keyword when it comes to the beneficial deployment of wealth.
    Moderation in spending depends largely on a person’s ability to
    distinguish between need and want. Necessary wealth can be broken down
    into the Four Requisites of clothing, food, shelter and medicine.
    Buddhists define ‘need’ as clothing enough to protect oneself from heat
    and cold, food to stave off hunger, shelter to protect us from the
    elements and medical care to treat us when we are ill (as mentioned in
    the verses of the Buddhist monk’s recollection [M.i.10, Nd.496]). If
    one is clear in one’s mind what constitutes a ‘need’, one will see consumption
    for what it really is — that is, merely a means to an end. If we
    confuse ‘wants’ with ‘needs’, however, as encouraged by modern
    marketing forces, we will err into regarding consumption as an end in
    itself. However because people have the tendency never to know enough
    of a good thing, ‘need’ has given way to ‘want’. When people want
    anything they can get their hands on, their ethical considerations tend
    to be forgotten. The Buddha would see moderation as an antidote for
    consumption to excess and would say that moderation in fact contributes
    to economic wellbeing. Most people are most interested in how high
    their income is. However, more important still is how much you are left
    with at the end of the month. In the olden days, they used to say “Don’t
    just eat because you feel like it — eat when you are hungry
    . . .” — because we can feel like eating twenty-four hours
    a day! If there was nothing more to moderation than appetite, then we
    would need to be no more intelligent than a cow which chews cud at one
    end and drops cowpats from the other. It is not the income which counts
    but how much is left after the expenses. The secret of having something
    left is to expend only in case of need (not want). However, because
    people know no moderation in their consumption, resources become scarce
    and there is not much remaining difference between how such people make
    their living and how scavenging birds fight over their carrion.
    However, moderate consumption is hardly something supported by Western
    economics.
     
  • only in order to give
    the greatest possible amount of true happiness for all:

    Consider how much the world could be improved if all the money
    squandered worldwide on gambling, drugs and prostitution were
    redirected into feeding the hungry, giving basic education or
    instilling virtue in the hearts of our planet’s citizens? Even if not
    all the money were to be redirected — maybe just 5-10%, our world
    would be a much more attractive place to live in! Unfortunately,
    because such a large amount of money has been sunk into businesses
    involved with vice, our whole world has become inundated with the
    contingent social problems — and consequently, the opportunity to
    encourage virtue in society diminishes with every passing year.
     


BOX 2: Diighajaa.nu Sutta

Origin of Principles for Buddhist
Economic Practice

Principles of Buddhist Economic practice are derived from a scriptural
source called the Diighajaanu Sutta (A.iv.281ff.) — and are repeated in
the Ujjaya Sutta (A.iv.285-9). The former Sutta was given in response to
the questions of a householder called Diighajaa.nu who was not short on
wealth but failed to apply what he had to achieve any satisfaction in his
life. Diighajaa.nu was a man who inhabited Kakkarapatta in Ko.liya — and
the people of that town referred to themselves as Byagghapajjans. He asked
Buddha two questions: 

  • How to find happiness in
    the present lifetime  
  • How to find happiness in
    the next lifetime.  

His questions are
particularly pertinent to the subject of this book because Diighajaa.nu requested
principles of practice applicable to economics for the household life
(rather than the monastic one). The answers the Buddha gave were formulated
as the ‘four principles of finding happiness in the present lifetime’ [di.t.t.hadhammikattha-sa.mvattanika
dhamma
] (enlarged upon in Chapter 3) and the ‘four principles of
finding happiness in the lifetime to come’ [samparaayikattha
sa.mvattanika dhamma
] (enlarged upon in Chapter 4).

 

3

Buddhist Micro-economics for the
here-and-now


“It’s not what you earn that counts — but how much you have left
over at the end of the month . . .”

 

The Buddha gave a total of four principles of economic practice
for finding happiness in the present lifetime [di.t.t.hadhammikattha-sa.mvattanika
dhamma
] (A.iv.281): 

  1. Diligent acquisition
    [u.t.thaanasampadaa]: Diligent acquisition means skilfulness in
    the acquisition of wealth. Diligent acquisition refers to the habits of
    a person who works hard for their living — in contrast to those who are
    too lazy to make the effort. It also refers to the patience needed for
    people to work together as a team and the wisdom to recognize the work
    left undone — being able to perform, organize and administer the work
    as required. The most important feature of this first stage of the economic
    process can be summarized as acquiring wealth in an ethical way. As
    Buddhists we would say that taking advantage of others economically, in
    whatever form, is unethical acquisition of wealth. Particular
    forms of livelihood which the Buddha advised us to avoid in this respect
    are the five sorts of Unwholesome Livelihood [micchaa va.nijjaa]
    (A.iii.207) mentioned below:
      
  1. trading in weapons:
    The weapon trade is a major source of income for every superpower of
    the world. It is only normal that those who supply weapons will be on
    the receiving end of hatred from the victims of the destruction caused
    by the weapons they have sold. Selling weapons is the starting point of
    a long chain of negative karmic consequences. Weapons have had a part
    in every violent catastrophe occurring worldwide over the years — and
    it is not our place here to say who is right or wrong — but no-one can
    deny the magnitude of the death toll coming from armed conflict. Not
    selling weapons means refraining from any sort of trade in instruments
    for destroying life, whether it be guns, knives or even hunting
    equipment like traps or bait. Anything used for killing people or
    animals are considered weapons for the purposes of Unwholesome
    Livelihood. Even without physically harming a person, maltreatment can
    cause resentment which lasts across lifetimes — thus, it is up to all
    of us to check our own aggression without waiting for prodding from
    others . . .
     
  2. trading in people:
    Trading in people is also making profit out of the suffering of others.
    It formerly meant trading in slaves, but nowadays has come to include
    child labour, wage-slaves and prostitution;
     
  3. selling live animals to the
    slaughterhouse:
    Selling live animals to the
    slaughterhouse is taking a profit from the suffering of animals in a
    way that leads inevitably to their death;
     
  4. trading in alcohol or intoxicants: Trading
    in alcohol and intoxicants including non-medicinal drugs such as
    marijuana;
     
  5. trading in poison: Trading
    in poison means selling poison such as insecticide or rat-poison. The
    Buddha advised us not to sell such agents because otherwise their
    retribution will find its way back to us. Even though when we sell the
    poison it has not yet caused any harm, but as soon as it is used it has
    the same potency as already mentioned for weapons. If only we were to
    follow the Buddha’s advice more widely we wouldn’t have to waste our
    time in the present day for so much campaigning for biologically grown
    vegetables.
      

It is not to say that
there are no more than these five ways of unwholesomely earning a living –
but these are the main ones. Thus if you would like to know where to start
looking for ways to reduce the amount of conflict in the world, the present
author’s advice would be to start by minimizing your involvement with Unwholesome
Livelihood. The Buddha taught that any person who lapses into Unwholesome
Livelihood will eventually attract a heavy burden of negative karma for
themselves. Other ways of making money which involve economic exploitation in
various ways can also be included as unwholesome livelihood, such as criminal
activities, or for example:
 

    • Making one’s living out of interest:
      The present author’s still remembers when he was a child, his mother
      always maintained, “In our household and our family we have never
      liked living off the interest earned from the money we lend to
      others.” She explained, “It is making a living out of the
      suffering of people who are incompetent in managing their own finances.
      If they were really competent in their financial management, they
      wouldn’t have to come borrowing money from the likes of us! Those who
      are financially careless would rather borrow at a high interest rate
      than go without — which would indicate that they don’t have much idea
      about the effective way to earn, save and use their finances. If you
      get too involved with these sort of people, it will just lead you to
      unnecessary frustration. If you really want to help such people, then
      just give the money to them without strings attached. It is not
      worthwhile to extend the mutual agony of having to be paid back for the
      interest on a loan.”
       
  1. Careful conservation
    [aarakkhasampadaa]: Careful conservation means skilfulness in the
    saving of wealth. Having earned wealth by the sweat of one’s brow in a
    scrupulous way, a person should take good care of their wealth, not
    allowing it to be eroded away by unjust taxation, theft, natural
    disaster or unintended inheritants. As for unwholesome conservation of
    wealth — this refers to excessive hoarding or stockpiling as mentioned
    above. Furthermore, when saving up one’s wealth — one should not allow
    doing so to bring us into conflict with those around us. Good reasons to
    put money on the side, according to Buddhist principles (A.iii.45) are
    in case of emergency such as repairing the consequences of fire, flood,
    excess taxation, theft or exhortion by malevolent relatives! You have to
    consider carefully, however what form you ought to save your money in.
    Of course the best way to conserve your wealth is as transcendental
    wealth or merit (see self-sacrifice of Chapter 4) — because in such a
    form it is beyond the touch of interest rates and it will appreciate
    with the passing of the years — thus saving in the form of
    transcendental wealth is really the most skilful way of conserving one’s
    wealth.
     
  2. Having virtuous friends
    [kalyaa.namittata]: Having virtuous friends means surrounding
    yourself with a network of virtuous friends in all areas of your life.
    The sort of friends one should cultivate are those endowed with faith [saddha],
    self-discipline [siila], self-sacrifice [caaga] and wisdom
    [pa~n~naa]. Apart from facilitating our cultivation of wisdom, it
    will also strengthen the network of good friends of which we are a part.
    Such networking is particularly relevant to teamwork because when one
    earns one’s living, one does not usually do so alone — whether it be
    working in the same office as one’s colleagues or cooperating in an
    international network. The most important attribute of teamwork is that
    the team members must have a similarly high level of scrupulousness in
    their work dealings and a similarly high level of faith in spiritual
    teachings. Furthermore, everyone in the team should have a similarly
    high level of self-sacrifice, dedicated to the collective good –
    thereby avoiding the dangers of networking with those who are overcome
    by their own selfishness. The Buddha taught that worldly wealth is
    exhausted in a moment — but the value of training other people to be
    virtuous never knows an end. The importance of this virtue is emphasized
    over and over again by the Buddha — who especially in the context of
    economics, taught that simply acquiring, storing and using wealth is not
    good enough. We have to build up a network of good people to work with
    too, before we get round to using our wealth — the way we use our
    wealth should be in cooperation with such good friends, if we really
    want happiness and prosperity in life.The Buddha emphasized that when
    one is earning one’s living, one should try to avoid associating
    with those who break the Precepts — no matter whether they be young or
    old. If not only the Precepts, but also their faith in Buddhism is
    lacking, then that is all the more reason to avoid associating with
    them. It is as if we are selective about channelling our resources –
    devoting our resources to encourage the proliferation of virtuous people
    in our society. Those who encourage virtue in their co-workers at the
    same time they earn their living will never have to complain at a later
    date of being ’stabbed in the back’ by their colleagues. You have no-one
    else but yourself to blame if your employees are left incompetent,
    unable to work as a team or unable to delegate — you cannot just expect
    competent people to rain down on you from the sky! You have to build on
    your employees competency by training them yourself. At the same time
    you need to continue to train yourself — seeing what virtues you can
    pick up from those more experienced than yourself — in this way, you
    will soon produce a network of good co-workers for yourself.
     
  3. Living within your means
    [samajiivitaa]: Living within your means means skilfulness in
    spending. Those who realize the ease with which wealth can come and go,
    should lead their life in a way that is appropriate to their means –
    not being extravagent but at the same time, not too spendthrift either!
    When we talk of generosity [daana] in this context we mean giving
    those things which are surplus to our needs. Some people might doubt as
    to how much they really need or might be unable to distinguish between
    ‘need’ and ‘want’ and hence the Buddha gave guidance about how
    householders should budget their earnings so that their generosity is
    neither reluctant nor a burden on the family expenditure. The Buddha
    taught (Aadiya Sutta A.iii.45 [36/93]) that the family budget should be
    divided into five. He did not say that each part should be 20% of your
    earnings, but he taught that you should budget for each of these sorts
    of expenditure. As for the “working capital” which you have
    built up for yourself, the Buddha taught in the Si”ngalovaada Sutta
    (D.iii.180ff.) that you should apply one-quarter of your earnings for
    your immediate needs, one-half should be reinvested in your business and
    the remaining quarter should be saved in case of emergency. It is up to
    each individual to decide how much of their income to use as
    “working capital” and how much to use for generosity. If you
    budget in this way, you will be able to practise generosity, giving
    neither too much nor too little. The fivefold division of one’s funds
    mentioned above should be as follows:
      
    1. one part to support the
      immediate needs of yourself, your parents, your children, spouse,
      servants
        
    2. one part to extend
      generosity towards your friends
        
    3. one part to be saved in
      case of emergency (as already mentioned above)
        
    4. one part which should be
      used for five sorts of dedication  
    1. for
      one’s extended family  
    2. for
      hospitality  
    3. for
      dedicating merit for the departed  
    4. for
      taxes  
    5. for
      dedicating merit to the things that you believe in according to your
      local custom (e.g.ascetics, animals, physical forces and elements,
      lower deities or higher deities depending on your culture)
        
  1. one part to extend support
    to well-practising monks and ascetics 

  2. In the old days they used to compare an extravagent person with a low income
    to the owner of a fig-tree who shakes the tree so that all the figs fall off,
    but who picks up only a few of them to eat. At the other extreme, a person
    with a good income who is not generous with their wealth will die in
    hardship out of keeping with their social status. Steering the middle way
    between stinginess and extravagence in a way appropriate to your level of
    income is said to be living within your means. Aside of the main five forms
    of Unwholesome Livelihood (mentioned above) which cause deterioration
    of wealth, there are another four sorts of behaviour, known as the ‘Four
    Roads to Ruin’ which if we can avoid them, will also help to protect our
    hard-earned income:
     

      1. womanizing;  
      2. drinking
        alcohol;  
      3. gambling;  
      4. associating with bad
        company 

      In conclusion, for anyone to remain
      scrupulous after wholesomely acquiring and saving their wealth, it is
      necessary to build up a network of good people [kalyaa.namitta] around
      themselves first, before they come to spending their hard-earned wealth.
      Habitually associating with good friends will cause one to expend with
      reflection as to true benefit, and thereby use one’s wealth solely for things
      which help in cultivating faith, keeping one’s precepts purely, practising
      self-sacrifice and cultivating wisdom in keeping with the guidance of the
      Buddha for happiness in lives to come (see next chapter).

      Thus, throughout one’s life one should earn one’s living
      carefully according to the four principles of happiness in the present
      lifetime — never compromising one’s Buddhist scrupulousness — and the same
      goes for saving one’s wealth. At the same time one needs to develop
      those around one as a protective fence or network of good friends. Surrounded
      by virtuous people, the tendency for our mind to be tempted by unethical
      compromises will be significantly reduced — and the interactions we have
      with our fellow workers will be for mutual encouragement of further good
      deeds.

      Metaphor of the reservoir

      The four economic principles for happiness in the present lifetime can be
      compared to four channels of water which supply a pool. The Four Roads to
      Ruin can be compared to four outlets from the pool. If we close the inlets
      and open the outlets, in the absence of rain, the pool will soon become
      completely dry. There will certainly be no increase in the water level. On
      the contrary, if one opens all four of the inlets by conducting oneself in
      keeping with the Buddhist economic principles, while closing the outlets by
      avoiding all four roads to ruin, before long the pool will be full or even
      overflowing. Thus, whether we are speaking economically on a personal level
      or on national level, it is vital to seal up the four possible outlets from
      our economic prosperity — by not womanizing, drinking alcohol or gambling –
      and by associating with good friends. These are the basics of Buddhist
      microeconomics for the present lifetime — economics that you won’t find
      described anywhere else in the world. If you heed the Buddha’s words on
      economics and put them in to practice you will have prosperity in your
      future, never falling upon hard times.

       

      4

      Buddhist Microeconomics for the
      Hereafter


      “If beings knew . . . the result of giving and sharing, they would
      not eat without having given nor would they allow the stain of meanness to
      obsess them and take root in their minds. Even if it were their last
      morsel, their last mouthful, they would not enjoy eating without having
      shared it . . .”

      It. 26


       

      In the Buddhist microeconomics of the
      previous chapter, in fact we have spoken about only the profane category of
      happiness due to us from following the Buddha’s economic principles — i.e.
      the happiness we can expect in the present lifetime. Our Buddhist ancestors
      saw each person’s life as a sort of business which could run at a profit or
      at a loss. For those interested only in worldly wealth, but who ignored
      spiritual values, their business was seen to trade only in worldly wealth.
      However those who consecrated time for spiritual practice saw their profit
      and loss in terms of merit and demerit — which were the way to
      transcendental wealth. If you are not born human it is going to be difficult
      to deal in merit. An angel, even though considered fortunate in birth, in
      fact still has difficulty in accruing merit. If one is born in the nether
      realms such as hell, the animal realm, as hungry ghosts or as Titans, then it
      is all the more difficult to ‘deal in merit’. It is only in the human realm
      that we have the possibility to accumulate merit for ourselves. This is why
      the wise were wont to ask the Buddha two questions whenever they had the
      opportunity to meet with Him, in the same way as Diighajaa.nu Byagghapajja
      who wanted to know what he should do for his happiness and benefit both
      in this lifetime and the next. The four practices [byagghapajjadhamma]
      enumerated by the Buddha in response to Diighajaa.nu’s second question, which
      are for happiness in the hereafter are as follows [samparaayikattha
      sa.mvattanika dhamma
      ] (A.iv.284): 

      1. faithfulness
        [saddhasampadaa]: Faithfulness is something that arises in a person
        when they have confidence (rather than blind-belief) in the wisdom and
        enlightenment of the Buddha. The benefit of having such faith in the
        Lord Buddha is that one is prepared to practise in his footsteps. Faith
        is thus no insignificant virtue for a person to have, because it will
        literally illuminate the mind from within. In general, any person who
        isn’t overly bent on wickedness has a little brightness in their heart
        — but it tends to be fleeting like distant lightning over the horizon
        or the glimmer of a firefly. Sometimes we have a flash of inspiration in
        our mind and we’d like to follow the thought further to its conclusion,
        but because of lack of continuity we are unable to follow the train of
        thought to completion. If only we had a little faith in mind to give a
        continuous level of brightnessin the mind, we would be able to follow
        our inspiration through to its logical conclusion — e.g. to realize
        that the Law of Karma is reasonable, that those who do good actions
        receive good returns on their action, that those who do evil actions
        will get evil retribution — allowing one to find the proper pathway in
        life for oneself. No-one should ever underestimate faith because it
        means that the mind is sufficiently illuminated to understand about the
        enlightenment of the Lord Buddha — to a degree that the causes and
        effects of any issue begin to become clear to one — that merit and
        demerit are no longer a myth or a mystery to one — and one gains the
        precursory discretion or ‘benefit of the doubt’ to discern the
        difference between appropriate and inappropriate, heaven and hell. When
        one’s mind is sufficiently illuminated to understand these issues, one
        will trust in the truth of the wisdom of the Buddha’s enlightenment –
        banishing the doubt and suspicion from one’s mind, and making one ready
        to practise in the Buddha’s footsteps. Even if one possesses faith
        alone, already one has a chance to protect oneself from falling
        into the nether realms — but the trouble with having faith alone is
        that it may not be very steadfast. For the cultivation of faith, one
        needs invest enough time, money and effort in one’s spiritual activities
        so that one’s faith can be developed into wisdom. Economically speaking,
        this justifies the expense of going to listen to Dhamma teachings in
        order to consolidate one’s level of faith in the Triple Gem.
         
      2. self-discipline
        [siilasampadaa]: By self-discipline, we mean at least the ability
        to keep all five of the Precepts — all the way from restraining oneself
        from taking the life of living beings, to restraining oneself from
        drinking alcohol. Apart from restraining ourselves from the behaviours
        prohibited by the Five Precepts, we must work on our mind too to uproot
        even the latent tendencies that make us want to break the Precepts in the
        first place. The reason we have to be so strict with ourselves is that
        one’s mind is filled with faith and has sufficient inner brightness to
        see the connections between causes and effects, we will start to be
        self-motivated to be more strict with ourselves. From an economic point
        of view, in cultivating self-discipline you need to find the time to go
        to the temple to keep the Precepts purely — rather than labouring under
        the misapprehension that extra salary will bring happiness both in this
        lifetime and the next;
          
      3. self-sacrifice
        [caagasampada]: A person is endowed with self-sacrifice when they
        are free of any further stinginess in their mind — someone who takes
        pleasure in giving. Such people, apart from having self-discipline and
        faith, can also be said to be skilled in saving up their wealth
        — but they choose not to save it up in this this world as material
        wealth, but as transcendental wealth for the next. They know that
        if they try to hoard what they have in this world, before long it will
        be nibbled away by unjust taxation, by thieves, fire, flood or uninvited
        inheritants. Some grandchildren who cannot wait for death of a wealthy
        grandparent might even conspire to murder them in order to receive a
        legacy before its due! Buying shares is no real security, because even
        the value of shares can sometimes collapse. Buying dollars or gold
        offers no real security either, because the market might slump at any
        time. However, if you transform material wealth into merit by giving it
        away, it will be wealth that will stay with you from one lifetime to the
        next — and without fear that the value of your assets will deteriorate
        — they will know only increase! Wherever there are those who practice
        self-sacrifice, there will never be a danger of economic exploitation –
        on the contrary, when self-sacrifice is abundant, everyone’s financial
        status will improve, both giver and recipient alike. This is why
        self-sacrifice is so important in laying the foundation of happiness for
        lifetimes to come. For self-sacrifice, you need do divide up an
        appropriate proportion of your wealth (as mentioned already in the
        section on skilful deployment of wealth
        ) for giving in charity to
        save as transcendental wealth for next lifetime. If we share
        wholeheartedly with others, in turn they will want to share with us –
        and this will save one from finding oneself on the breadline, or living
        from hand to mouth, with a job that destroys our health.
          
      4. wisdom [pa~n~naasampadaa]:
        Sometimes the word ‘wisdom’ is bandied about without real consideration
        of its true meaning. In Buddhism, the word means ‘penetrative insight
        into the vicissitudes of the psycho-physical constituents [khanda]
        and into the arising and decay of all things’. Knowledge of other
        things, for example engineering or computing, could hardly be considered
        wisdom according to the Buddhist definition. True wisdom means knowing
        every facet of the constant change taking place in our bodily make-up –
        knowing that there is birth, old-age, sickness and death, decay and
        destruction as in the words ‘arising, continuity and decay’. Even though
        a person might have several doctorates under their belt, if their
        knowledge cannot keep up with the working of the bodily make-up, it is
        still incomplete knowledge — and knowledge which is not completely pure
        because it still potentially harmful. Wisdom allows you to uproot the
        last of the defilements in your mind. True wisdom is not only reflection
        on a matter, but reflection in a way that you can see the arising and
        the decay of that thing. This sort of wisdom is indeed noble
        wisdom because it helps us to uproot the last of the defilements in the
        mind and can thus bring us, by the proper means, to an end of suffering.
        The importance of wisdom is that it shines forth like light which drives
        away the darkness that prevents us from seeing the reality of the world.
        Wisdom also functions like a spade which one can use to dig up the
        deepest roots of a poisonous weed — in this case the poisonous
        defilements which pollute the mind. Thus, economically speaking, we have
        to be self-disciplined in the use of our wealth to give ourselves
        sufficient freedom to use one’s time for meditation practice and Dhamma
        study to give rise to a constantly higher level of wisdom within
        oneself.  

      Of the four practices, the most
      important precursor of transcendental wealth is faith. Faith is
      something we have often heard about, but often misunderstood — so in our
      studies of the practices for happiness in the hereafter, we should start on
      the right foot by making sure we understand the concept of faith. With a
      correct understanding of faith, it will start to become clear how the the
      Buddha could teach that ‘each time faith arises for someone, in the end it
      will lead to wisdom.’ 

      Anyone who works diligently and is
      not reckless with their earnings, who knows how to earn their living in an
      appropriate way, while at the same time having faith, self-discipline, who is
      helpful to those in need (giving an amount to them which is appropriate),
      whose mind is free of stinginess, who cultivates continuously the path to
      happiness in the hereafter (rather than doing virtuous deeds sporadically or
      according to whim) — making such good deeds habitual. Thus, faith,
      self-discipline, self-sacrifice and wisdom are the microeconomic practices
      recommended by the Buddha for happiness in lives to come.

       

      5

      Buddhist Microeconomics at the
      Ultimate Level 

       

      “The problem is not with the irresistable things of the
      world, but the desires in the human mind. In the absence of a desiring
      observer, the beautiful things of the world never caused harm to anyone.
      Thus recognizing the real root of the problem, the wise should make
      immediate efforts to avoid all elation with the beautiful things of the
      world”


       

      When looking for Buddhist economic principles to take us beyond
      the material comfort and economic security of Chapter 3 and the mental
      wellbeing of Chapter 4, to attain inner freedom (especially from the
      defilement of grasping in the mind). What becomes important is economic
      values and practices which lead to the uprooting of sense-pleasure from the
      mind. Before looking at microeconomics at the ultimate level, it is first
      necessary to examine the meaning of the word ’sensuality’.

      Sense pleasure means indulgence of the things that are attractive
      to the senses and it can be broken down into two components:

      1. Sense-side sensuality [kilesakama]: the
        emotion of desiring something which is a defilement existing in the mind
        and which forces the mind to grasp after things and desire for things
        without end with the defilements of grasping [raaga] and greed [lobha]
        as two examples of its products;
          
      2. Object-side sensuality
        [kamavatthu]
        :
        this
        means physical objects that are attractive to us — images, sounds,
        textures, smells and tastes which are attractive to the corresponding
        sense. An attractive image might mean a beautiful flower or a sparkling
        diamond. An attractive sound might be that of pleasant music, a pleasant
        voice, birdsong or the sound of a waterfall and nature. A pleasant smell
        might be the scent of perfume or the aroma of food. A pleasant taste
        might mean anything one finds tasty, whether it be sweet or sour, salty
        or oily which one prefers. Something pleasant to the touch [photabba]
        might be anything that which when it comes into physical contact with
        one’s body is soft or pleasant. 

      Sense objects have sometimes been
      compared to an unignited match head. The mental components of desire are like
      the striker on a matchbox. Only when sensual objects and their mental
      components come into contact with one another do we run the risk of becoming
      slave to our desires. In any case, it should be understood that the sensually
      tempting things of the world are not the reason for greed — they are only
      part of the story. The sensual grasping comes from the minds of men. Without
      the grasping in the human mind the attractive things of the world never
      caused any harm to anyone. Once knowing the danger that lies with the sensual
      grasping in the mind, the wise do their best to eradicate all trace of
      sensual grasping from the mind.

      Practically speaking, to eradicate grasping from the mind, one
      must follow the advice the Buddha gave to Bahiya Daaruciiriya
      (DhA.ii.209ff.):

      “When you see an object, be
      conscious of just the visible object (without being entranced thereby); when
      you hear a sound, be conscious of just the sound; when you smell or taste or
      touch something, be conscious of just the smell, the taste or the touch; and
      when you think of anything, be conscious of just that mind-object.”

      By doing this, one’s mind will always
      be without object-side sensuality [kaamavatthu]. By not being
      entranced by a perception, the sense-side sensuality has no chance to flare
      up. The opposite would be the case if one becomes elated by the pleasing
      things one senses, becoming entranced thereby and allowing the emotion of
      grasping to hijack the ethical discretion of your mind.

      The Harm of Sensuality

      It follows that those whose mind is heavily under the influence of sensual
      grasping and craving for sensual pleasures will soon have reasons to take advantage
      of themselves or others or both.

      For those whose mind is overrun with grasping, killing, stealing,
      sexually molesting others and lying is not very far away. However, if our
      mind is free of sensual grasping, there will be no harmful thoughts to generate
      harmful speech or actions for us. This is the reason why the Buddha taught
      monks and laypeople alike:

      “You should cut down the forest
      of sensuality in the mind — whether it be a large forest or a small forest
      you should make sure none remains. Verily, I do say that sense-side
      sensuality is as a forest and object-side sensuality is like the trees.”

      When everyone is overrun with the
      defilements of greed the whole of the time, it causes people to seek
      endlessly for happiness from sensual objects — this is why such people are
      referred to as ‘consumers of sense pleasure’ [kaamabhogii]. In such a
      search there is a never-ending work to do — whether it be acquisition,
      conservation or spending of wealth throughout one’s life.


       


      BOX 3: Kaamabhogii Sutta
      (A.v.176, S.iv.331)
       

      The Kaamabhogii Sutta tells us about the ten varieties of ’supposedly’
      wealthy people [kaamabhogii] — in so far as they deserve praise or blame.

       

      1. Consumers
        of sense-pleasure who acquire money by unscrupulous means (i.e.
        acquire wealth by wrong livelihood) and having acquired it derive no
        enjoyment from it, not do they disburse it for the benefit of others
        nor donate it for a meritorious cause. Such an attitude to wealth
        cannot be said to be smart — and on the contrary burdens them with
        worse demerit.
          
      2. Consumers
        of sense pleasure who acquire money by unscrupulous means, but who
        derive enjoyment from it, but who don’t disburse it for the benefit of
        others or donate it for meritorious causes. Such an attitude to wealth
        is not smart in the acquisition and not particularly smart in the
        spending — especially in the conservation of wealth, it is definitely
        not smart;
          
      3. Consumers
        of sense-pleasure who acquire money by unscrupulous means, but who
        derive enjoyment from their wealth, disburse their wealth for others,
        donating it for meritorious causes too;
          
      4. Consumers
        of sense-pleasure who acquire wealth by a mixture of scrupulous and
        unscrupulous means (wealth in this case might be acquired partly
        honestly by a salary, but the rest might come from bribes — i.e. both
        right and wrong livelihood) — but who derive no enjoyment from their
        wealth, don’t disburse their wealth for others and don’t donate it for
        meritorious causes. Such an attitude to wealth may or may not be smart
        in the acquisition and is definitely not smart in the spending and
        saving;
          
      5. Consumers
        of sense-pleasure who acquire wealth by a mixture of scrupulous and
        unscrupulous means, who derive enjoyment from it, but fail to disburse
        it for the benefit of others or to donate it for meritorious causes.
        Such an attitude to wealth may or may not be smart in the acquisition,
        is reasonably smart in the spending, but not in the saving;
          
      6. Consumers
        of sense-pleasure who acquire wealth by a mixture of scrupulous and
        unscrupulous means, who derive enjoyment from it and disburse it for
        the benefit of others and also donate it for meritorious causes. Such
        an attitude to wealth may or may not be smart in the acquisition, but
        which is smart in the usage and the saving;
          
      7. Consumers
        of sense-pleasure who acquire money solely by scrupulous means (solely
        by right livelihood) but who derive no enjoyment from their wealth and
        neither disburse their wealth for the benefit of others nor donate it
        for meritorious causes. Such an attitude to wealth can be considered
        smart in the acquisition but not smart in the usage or the saving;
          
      8. Consumers
        of sense-pleasure who acquire money solely by scrupulous means, who
        derive enjoyment from their wealth and but do not disburse their
        wealth for the benefit of others nor donate it for meritorious causes.
        Such an attitude to wealth can be considered smart in the acquisition
        and usage but not smart in the saving;
          
      9. Consumers
        of sense-pleasure who acquire money solely by scrupulous means, who
        derive enjoyment from their wealth and also do disburse their wealth
        for the benefit of others and donate it for meritorious causes.
        However in spite of all their good actions, the people of these
        categories remain blind to the harmfulness of sense-pleasure — they
        lack the wisdom to be motivated to renounce sense-pleasure. Such an
        attitude to wealth can be considered smart in the acquisition, the
        usage and the saving, but because such people lack insight into the
        harmfulness of sense pleasure, they lack the power to liberate
        themselves from the clutches of the defilements of sense-pleasure –
        because they haven’t had the chance to associate sufficiently with the
        wise;
          
      10. Consumers
        of sense-pleasure who acquire money solely by scrupulous means, who
        derive pleasure from their wealth, who disburse their wealth for
        others and donate it for meritorious causes. In addition, those of
        this category are no longer blind to the harmfulness of sense-pleasure
        — thus they have the wisdom to want to escape from the cycle of
        existence [sa.msara] and this wisdom will allow them to
        renounce attachment to the use of the wealth. Such an attitude to
        wealth can be considered smart in the acquisition, the usage and the
        saving and furthermore allows one to overcome oneís defilements,
        ultimately to enter upon Nirvana.  

      This classification
      offers a very complete model of how development of the mind can fit in with
      economic progress. The Buddha taught the Kaamabhogii Sutta to
      Anaathapi.n.dika. Anaathapi.n.dika was the Savatthii-based banker who was
      the sponsor for the building of Buddhism’s first temple at the Jetavana
      Grove — but he was moreover renowned for his wisdom. By teaching the
      Kaamabhogii Sutta to Anaathapi.n.dika, it was as if the Buddha intended to
      appreciate Anaathapi.n.dika for his belonging to the tenth category.

       

      From the Kaamabhogii Sutta, it can thus be concluded that the
      Buddha enumerated ten different sorts of attitude subscribed to by people as
      shown in the following table:

       

      Ten Attitudes to Wealth [kaamabhogii]

       

      Acquisition

      spending

      insight into harm of sense pleasure

      for self

      for others

      for meritorious work

      1.

      wholly unscrupulous

      derives no pleasure from wealth

      doesn’t share with others

      doesn’t donate

      blind to harm of sense pleasure

      2.

      wholly unscrupulous

      derives pleasure from wealth

      doesn’t share with others

      doesn’t donate

      blind to harm of sense pleasure

      3.

      wholly unscrupulous

      derives pleasure from wealth

      shares with others

      does donate

      blind to harm of sense pleasure

      4.

      parially unscrupulous, partially
      scrupulous

      derives no pleasure from wealth

      doesn’t share with others

      doesn’t donate

      blind to harm of sense pleasure

      5.

      parially unscrupulous, partially
      scrupulous

      derives pleasure from wealth

      doesn’t share with others

      doesn’t donate

      blind to harm of sense pleasure

      6.

      parially unscrupulous, partially
      scrupulous

      derives pleasure from wealth

      shares with others

      does donate

      blind to harm of sense pleasure

      7.

      wholly scrupulous

      derives no pleasure from wealth

      doesn’t share with others

      doesn’t donate

      blind to harm of sense pleasure

      8.

      wholly scrupulous

      derives pleasure from wealth

      doesn’t share with others

      doesn’t donate

      blind to harm of sense pleasure

      9.

      wholly scrupulous

      derives pleasure from wealth

      shares with others

      does donate

      blind to harm of sense pleasure

      10.

      wholly scrupulous

      derives pleasure from wealth

      shares with others

      does donate

      has insight into the harm of sense pleasure

      If a person can acquire their wealth solely by scrupulous means, and if they
      can manage to derive pleasure from that wealth, while at the same time
      disbursing their wealth for others and donating it for meritorious work, and
      also having the insight to see the harm of sense-desire and the importance of
      extricating oneself from it, this is the crème-de-la-crème of the ten
      attitudes.

       

      6

      Ideals and Goals in Buddhist
      Microeconomics


      “Anyone with faith, leading to truthfulness, training without end,
      patience and self-sacrifice, will gain supreme wealth for themselves
      because they avoid sorrow in lives to come”

       

      Threefold Goals in
      Buddhist Economics

      Having studied the economic practices applicable to happiness in this
      lifetime and the next, in this chapter we shall look at the goals of
      such practice — because without such goals clearly in mind, it is unlikely
      that anyone will have the patience to put the forgoing principles into
      practice. 

      Buddhist microeconomics are designed to work on three levels
      (these determine the true value of any economic activity): 

      1. the purely materialist level
        (material comfort & economic security)  
      2. the material/spiritual level
        (mental wellbeing)  
      3. the purely spiritual level
        (inner freedom)  

      To deal with each level in turn:

      The Purely Materialist level

      Practice on the purely materialist level corresponds to the first question
      from the Diighajaa.nu Sutta (see Box 2) concerning happiness in the present
      lifetime. When one’s only aim in life is to find immediate material
      convenience for oneself, so that we can avoid hardship, the Buddha’s teaching
      can be summarized by the acronym ‘U-A-Ka-Sa’, namely:

      U

      meaning

      u.t.thaanasampadaa or diligent acquisition

      A

      meaning

      aarakkhasampadaa or conservation

      Ka

      meaning

      kalyaa.namittata or having good friends

      Sa

      meaning

      samajiivita or living within one’s means

       

      The aim on this level, which we must
      not lose sight of is standing on our own two feet instead of being a burden
      on society — achieving by scrupulous means a moderate degree of material
      comfort and economic security for oneself and one’s family. The most
      important guiding principle in accumulating wealth for oneself is to avoid
      the bad karma of taking advantage of others.

      The Material/Spiritual level

      Practice on the material/spiritual level corresponds to the second question
      from the Diighajaa.nu Sutta (see Box 2) concerning happiness in lifetimes to
      come. The Buddha’s teaching on this level can be summarized by the acronym
      ‘Sa-Sii-Caa-Pa’, namely:

      Sa

      meaning

      saddhaa or faith

      Sii

      meaning

      siila or self-discipline

      Caa

      meaning

      caaga or self-sacrifice

      Pa

      meaning

      pa~n~naa or wisdom

       

      The aim on this level, which we must not lose sight of are:

      • making faith and the four Gharavasadhamma
        habitual:
        The Buddha taught that if one is to avoid
        sorrow in the worlds to comeone must have the character habits of
        truthfulness [sacca], training oneself without end [dama],
        patience [di.thi] and self-sacrifice [caaga] — all these
        with ‘faith’ [saddha] as their precursor. Indeed it is this group of
        four virtues which is another key factor in the understanding of
        Buddhist economics. Anyone who has these qualities will amass supreme
        wealth for themselves because they will avoid sorrow in lives to come –
        also gaining the possibility to enter upon heaven. Any householder with
        faith, who avails themselves of these four virtues has found for
        themselves the most supreme and effective path in life. Any person who
        develops U-A-Ka-Sa and Sa-Si-Ca-Pa will avail themselves of the habits
        expounded in the Gharavasadhamma — i.e. they will have the habits of
        truthfulness, develops the mselves without end, is patient and knows
        self-sacrifice, will attain success both in this lifetime and the next.
        The identifying feature which tells us that a person is endowed with the
        Four Virtues of a householder is that they lead their lives according to
        the principles of happiness in this lifetime (U-A-Ka-Sa) and happiness
        in the next lifetime (Sa-Si-Ca-Pa) too.
         
      • expanding the mind: One’s
        ability to give is a very important economic value for Buddhists
        — because it has a direct influence on our quality of mind. Buddhist
        economics advocates giving limitlessly because apart from expanding the
        mind, transcendental wealth accrued will be limitless. This is in
        contrast to some people or even animals for whom generosity is limited
        in its scope. No matter how many offspring animals have, they will bring
        all of them up without qualms — but if anyone else’s offspring should
        stray into their territory, they will be attacked or hunted down. Thus
        the loving kindness of an animal would seem to extend no further than
        that animal’s own progeny — its generosity has its boundaries — and
        the same seems to be the case whether its cats, dogs, chickens or crows.
        It is like some teachers who hold back from teaching certain things they
        know — or from teaching those who don’t pay. Some don’t ask for a fee
        for their teaching — their students don’t have to pay anything — but
        they will accept students, but they will accept students only from their
        own tribe or clan. Even if potential students have money to spend, if
        they belong to another tribe or language, such teachers will refuse to
        teach them. All these instances of those who don’t help as much as they
        could are examples of compassion with limits. Even the compassion of
        temple-goers can have its limits. Some find they are able to spread
        loving kindness to their own family, or to those who have done them
        favours in the past — but outside these groups they feel at a loss to
        spread their compassion. More compassionate people spread their loving
        kindness to the whole world without exception and the karmic fruits of
        such compassion are so much broader. In everyday life, many people we
        meet with are honest, but narrow-minded. Their virtues might extend only
        within their own household. Their tenderness and mercy is reserved only
        for their own family. However, they may be ready to cheat those external
        to their own family — feeling that strangers are ‘fair game’. As
        described in the Kaamabhogii Sutta (see Box 3), their motives are a
        mixture of scrupulous and unscrupulous, and the unscrupulous part
        applies solely to those other than their nearest and dearest. Such
        people make good leaders for a household, but such an attitude will
        create problems if they ever become a village councillor or mayor –
        because they are unable to share happiness with others outside their own
        family. Some people manage to expand the scope of their mind to
        encompass their whole village — such people deserve to make a good
        mayor but will create problems whenever they manage to work their way up
        to the provincial council. They will work only for the prosperity of
        their own village and leave the problems of the rest of the province
        unsolved. Some people make good provincial governors but if they ever
        work their way up to the ministry, they may start to create problems if
        they cannot expand their mind accordingly. If they fail to be aware of
        the needs of the whole country and curry favour only with those of their
        own province, their staff or their canvassers, they will fail to fulfil
        the position of responsibility they have attained. In the case that
        compassion is limited, miraculous powers one accrues will also be
        territory-limited. Thus the scope of awareness and compassion differs
        from one person to the next — but according to Buddhist economics it is
        important that we practice compassion limitlessly with the aim of
        expanding the mind thereby.
          


      BOX 4: Aa.lavaka Sutta
      (S.i.213-215)

      The aims in Buddhist economics are derived from the Aa.lavaka Sutta.
      This Sutta consists of the answers given by the Buddha to thirteen
      questions of asked by a man-eating ogre [yakkha] called Aa.lavaka.

      1. What possession is the supreme pride of
        all men?
        : The Buddha replied that faith [saddha]
        is the possession which brings men supreme pride. The Buddha started
        with faith because (as mentioned earlier in the context of
        happiness in lives to come
        ) it is the initial brightness in the
        mind which will give us sufficient continuous illumination on a
        subject of Dhamma to allow us to practice it until we can understand
        it through our reasoning.
         
      2. What practice brings man supreme
        happiness?
        : The
        Buddha replied that the practice of virtue [???] can bring us
        real happiness. Our modern neglect of virtue and good character are
        relatively recent, being traceable back to the work of Kant who was
        the first to ‘invent’ happiness as distinct from virtue.
          
      3. Which is the taste supreme amongst all
        other tastes?
        : The Buddha answered that sincerety [sacca]
        is king amongst the flavours — and this will be all too apparent to
        anyone who has been deceived or who has been victim to back-stabbing
        or ingratitude.
          
      4. What do the wise praise as making one’s
        life supreme? :
        The Buddha answered that it is ‘wise
        living’ that is praised by the wise as supreme (the value of wisdom
        being as mentioned earlier in the context of happiness in lives to
        come).
         
      5. How can a person get to the other side
        (literally ‘to cross the pool’)? : The Buddha answered that people can
        get to the other side through faith. In the Buddha’s meaning the pool
        or ‘the ocean’ means the ‘cycle of existence’ [samsara]. He
        answered that faith [saddha] will be the quality to get one
        there, because faith in the authenticity of the Buddha’s enlightenment
        gives the perseverence to struggle against the defilements in order to
        enter upon Nirvana in the same way that the Buddha did.
         
      6. How can a person cross the ocean?
        : The Buddha replied that it is non-recklessness that will help us
        cross the ocean.
         
      7. How can one go beyond suffering?
        : The Buddha replied that suffering should be overcome by striving.
          
      8. How can one become pure?
        : The Buddha replied that one can become pure by one’s wisdom.
         
      9. How can one avail oneself of wealth?
        The Buddha answered that those who choose a suitable job, are skilled
        at what they do and who are diligent rather than lazy, will manage to
        amass wealth for themselves.
         
      10. How can one avail oneself of honour?
        The Buddha said that honour accrues to those who are honest. Even
        politicians who want to make their way to the top should never take
        the ‘easy way out’ of going back on their electoral promises. All it
        takes is for politicians to do as they promise and every one of their
        words will take on a built-in power to accomplish. By this simple
        policy, within a very short time, any such politician will soon be
        able to become the praise of the nation.
         
      11. How can one avail oneself of friends?
        The Buddha answered that the bonds of friendship can be secured by
        one’s generosity. If all we can think about is getting the most for
        ourselves, without sharing anything with others, no-one will want to
        be our friend . However, if you are the sort of person who rushes to
        make a present of whatever you receive, you will soon be surrounded by
        friends.
         
      12. How can one develop wisdom?
        The Buddha replied that one can attain wisdom by having faith in the
        virtues that led the arahants to attain Nirvana, by avoiding
        recklessness, being thorough and listening carefully to teachings. In
        brief, if you want to attain wisdom, you need to start by listening
        carefully to teachings — however, even before you listen to a
        teaching, you need to start having a heart of faith. Any person who
        thus accepts the teaching of the arahants (i.e. is endowed with faith)
        with the intention of entering upon Nirvana, cannot be considered
        reckless. If such a person listens thoroughly to those teachings, they
        will avail themselves of wisdom. The whole process must start with
        faith. Without faith, one doesn’t even take the first step in the
        right direction. There is no wisdom without faith as its precursor.
        However, once one has faith, the other virtues like non-recklessness,
        thoroughness and good listening will bring forth wisdom.
         
      13. How can one avoid sorrow when leaving
        this world for the next?
        Apparently the ogre was
        also afraid of falling into hell because the next question he was to
        ask the Buddha was how one can avoid sorrow when leaving this world
        for the next. The ogre would like to earn a place in heaven for
        himself, but had not yet found the right path. The Buddha taught that
        if one is to avoid sorrow in the worlds to comeone must
        have:  
        • truthfulness
          [sacca]  
        • training
          oneself without end [dama]  
        • patience
          [di.thi]  
        • self-sacrifice
          [caaga]  

      For our purposes in
      the analysis of Buddhist economics, the most important answers are those to
      questions 1, 5 and 13.

       


      BOX 5: Some background on ogres

      In Buddhist cosmology, ogres [yakkha] come in several
      categories. 

      • Half-angelic ogres:
        the first category of ogres are half-man, half-angel and therefore
        belong to the lowest rung of the fortunate realms [sugati-bhuumi].
        Some can float in the air and keep the Precepts, meditating in
        earnest. Some are possessed of mental powers, but only partially –
        sometimes being visible to the human eye, sometimes invisible. They
        are half-material, half-ethereal, but are still considered part of the
        ‘fortunate realms’.
          
      • Fallen-angel ogres:
        second category of ogres are a little malevolent — liking to eat live
        human or animal flesh — therefore their precepts are not intact, but
        they may nonetheless have mental powers.
          
      • Physical-bodied ogres:
        the third category of ogres are not even able to float in the air.
        They have a material body like a human, but are able to change their
        appearance. They eat the same sort of food as humans, but some are
        ferocious while others keep the Precepts.  

      Aa.lavaka belonged to
      the category of ‘fallen-angel’ ogres. He could float in the air because at
      the time when he was still a human, he had performed a mixture of
      meritorious and demeritorious deeds. Through the power of the merit, he
      gained the ability ot float in the air at will, along with various other
      miraculous powers — however the powers would work only within the
      boundaries of his own territory.

       


      The Purely Spiritual level

      The purely spiritual level is not dealt with in the Diighajaa.nu Sutta. His
      questions covered only the lower two levels. The question remains of what
      sort of economics one needs if one wants to reach beyond the heaven realms to
      Nirvana and a complete end of all defilements. In the answers of the Buddha,
      He has already used the word ‘ariya‘ or ‘transcendental’ several times
      — especially in the last virtue of the second set of practices for happiness
      in lives to come — where wisdom. The aim on this level, which we must not
      lose sight of is to bring oneself to an end of defilements.

      INTEGRATION OF
      MICROECONOMIC PRACTICE ON THREE LEVELS:

      The Economical Mandala of
      Phrabhavanaviriyakhun

      In the present day, educationalists and theoreticians alike need to produce
      graphics to help them to plan the economy for the years ahead. However,
      charts and graphics are not something that are an innovation for our
      generation — because ever since ancient times, Thai Buddhists have had a way
      of modelling economics as follows:

      They would summarized the practices on the level of a purely
      material goal in the form of a mandala to make it look a little more
      sacred. In the old days, when monks went to give a house an inaugural
      blessing, they used to mark such a diagram above the door. Sometimes the monk
      would not write the abbreviations in Thai, but in the Khom language of the
      old scriptures. In the beginning everyone would know the meaning of the
      abbreviations on the door lintel. Later generations changed the Khom
      characters to Thai characters for ease of comprehension. 

      They added a second layer of economic abbreviations around the
      original in order to denote practice on the level of a material/spiritual
      goal as follows:

      Usually the invited monk would write the mandala in flour
      mixed with water — but unfortunately in most cases, the monk would just
      write the mandala and return to the temple without explaining its
      meaning. Thus the owner of the house in later generations had no idea of the
      Buddhist economic principles encapsulated therein. They didn’t know the
      meaning and assumed that the mandala was sacred in itself — so once
      the monk had returned, they felt relieved that they had already done their
      duty as a good Buddhist and went back to playing poker in the assumption that
      they would soon be rich.

      This mandala so far gives only practices for economic aims
      on the material and material/spiritual levels. If you want to go all the way
      and have an economic aim that will take you to Nirvana, you need to add the
      Noble Eightfold Path to each of the eight corners of the mandala as
      illustrated in the diagram below:

      . . . where the abbreviations have
      the following meanings:

      Di

      meaning

      Sammaa Di.t.thii or Right View

      Sa.n

      meaning

      Sammaa Sa.nkappa or Right Intention

      Vac

      meaning

      Sammaa Vaacaa or Right Speech

      Ka

      meaning

      Sammaa Kammanta or Right Action

      Aj

      meaning

      Sammaa Aajiiva or Right Livelihood

      Vay

      meaning

      Sammaa Vayaamaa or Right Effort

      Sat

      meaning

      Sammaa Sati or Right Mindfulness

      Sam

      meaning

      Sammaa Samaadhi or Right Concentration

       

      Because the people of old found the mandala
      so important, but feared that it would be lost, they made mandalas of
      it on cloth — making the famous ‘yantra‘ cloths found throughout
      Thailand. Later finding that even the ‘yantra‘ cloths were not very
      long-lasting, they engraved the pattern on plates of gold, silver or other
      metals. Later, with the wish to be able to take the teaching around with
      them, they made miniatures in on small metal rolls and made necklaces out of
      them.

      These were skilful means of ancient Thai Buddhists who tried to
      integrate Buddhist teachings into everyday life on every level — especially
      so as not to get carried away with madness for material wealth, and in order
      to focus instead on cultivating spiritual values. Practising one’s
      livelihood, according to the principles of Buddhism would immediately grasp
      that, one’s duty as a Buddhist was to avoid one’s livelihood being the reason
      for accumulating demerit in one’s life. With such principles in mind, even
      though it might be a great temptation to make a quick profit from
      unscrupulous practices, if one knew that it involved the Wrong Livelihood
      prohibited by the Buddha, one would rather sacrifice one’s life than to do
      it.

      In conclusion, you can say that Buddhist economics teaches us to
      interact economically in life without abandoning one’s Dhamma principles.

       

      7

      Principles of Buddhist Macroeconomics


       

       

      “As for those at the top — even if they have a hundred
      million or a thousand billion, they are still in poverty — but their
      poverty differs from that of the grassroots poor because instead of being
      poor from a lack of resources, they are poor because they never know
      enough.”


       

      All of what we have spoken about up
      until now has concerned our personal economic habits — otherwise known as
      Buddhist Microeconomics. However, the Buddha also gave economic guidelines
      applicable on the national or global level — something we can perhaps call
      ‘Buddhist Macroeconomics’. We find such guidelines in the Kuu.tada.n.ta Sutta
      (see Box 6) for economics on this level. The Buddha distinguished two level
      of socio-economic groups in society: 

      Both the groups above and below have one thing in common — in
      that they feel poor. For the group below it is not just a feeling
      of poverty — they are poor because they live from hand to mouth, on
      the breadline often, struggling to make ends meet — no matter whether they
      are farmers, labourers or clerical workers. Shop-keepers and traders have to
      put themselves in debt to get the stock they need to open shop. Clerks tend
      to be treated unjustly and have a pitiable wage. All these groups are poor
      because of a real lack of wealth.


       


      BOX 6: Kuu.tadanta Sutta

      In the Kuu.tadanta Sutta (D.i.127ff.) the Buddha is asked what sort of
      sacrifice should be performed in order that it should be efficacious. In
      those days in India, sacrifices would usually entail the ritual killing of
      large numbers of live animals and the destruction of much plant life. In
      answer to this enquiry, the Buddha spoke of the ‘perfect sacrifice’
      performed in the days of yore by King Mahaa Vijitaavii, which caused no
      regrets to animal or human life at any stage. Part of the ’sacrifice’
      involved the co-operation of the upper crust of the king’s subjects but the
      sacrifice was in fact help given to those on the lower rungs. The Buddha
      thus distinguished two levels of socioeconomic groups in society:

      • those
        at the top 
      • politicians 
      • senior
        civil servants 
      • academics 
      • major
        businessmen and bankers
         
    1. those
      at the grassroots 
      • farmers
        and labourers 
      • shop-keepers
        and traders 
      • clerks
        and low-ranking civil-servants 

      He taught that any
      government or benefactor wishing to make the perfect sacrifice of benefit
      both to themselves and to society at large needed to take heed of the four
      upper groups and give to the three lower levels.

       

      As for those at the top — even if they have a hundred million or
      a thousand million, they still feel poor — but their poverty is different
      from those of the grassroots because the reason they feel poor is that their
      desires are insatiable.

      The majority of people in any country belong to the grassroots –
      usually 80-90% — that is usually the figure for people in any country who
      lack adequate wealth. As for those on top, although they are not very
      numerous, their every move has some impact on the government and might even
      cause a change of government in some cases. Those at the top are few but
      wield a lot of power.

      Government Investment

      In the olden days, economic problems on a national scale would be solved by
      making concessions to those at the top. However, no matter how many
      concessions the government may make to such figures, it is never enough for
      them. Unfortunately, when such giants make a fuss, their voice is loud. Even
      though those below are more numerous, their ability to protest is reduced
      because they are struggling even to keep their head above water — and can
      afford to set aside no time to protest. Thus the government tends to protect
      its skin by giving concessions to those at the top. However, even if you were
      to give them a hundred million, it would hardly be enough (It is hardly
      enough for a good night out in Las Vegas). Thus helping at the top just keeps
      the giants quiet without satisfying them — and meanwhile the grassroots
      continue to die an undignified death.

      If we turn to look at what advice the Buddha gave for government
      investment, we find that He supported allocation of funds to those at the
      grassroots — but with one important condition — that the recipients should
      be carefully selected. If handouts are given indiscriminately, you may find
      that the more impatient would rather kill the golden goose than wait for its
      eggs!

      Thus when giving concessions or help to those at the grassroots,
      you should look to see which people are virtuous (i.e. manage to keep the
      Five Precepts and are established in Right Livelihood) but who lack the
      capital or technology. They should be those who are diligent and have
      attained success at a certain level — such people should be selected to
      receive concessions. Helping such people will also be an example for others
      to follow — by helping in such a way you will find that your investment
      doesn’t immediately disappear as it would if helping the people at the top.

      These are principles which it was easier to follow in the olden
      days. A king would set out a ‘talent scout’ who would look for people of real
      virtue deserving to be helped by the king. By helping such people, exemplars
      of virtue would shine forth in the kingdom. Sometimes it might be traders of
      exceptional virtue who lacked capital or honest civil servants who had been
      mistreated or had received insufficient salary. However, the most important
      was always to select those who were virtuous. Having helped such people,
      there should be follow-up — to see how such people had responded to the
      help. Before long there would be could get down to work, before long the
      products of their work would start to become apparent. At that point, it
      would be appropriate to involve some of the giants in order to help in the
      marketing and other high level strategies.

      However, in the present day it is difficult for anyone to accept
      that one person might be more worthy than another of help merely on the
      observations of a ‘talent scout’. The talent scout might be partial. Thus in
      the present day it is usually more convenient for people to work as a
      committee to look after allocation of local budgets. Even this arrangement
      might not be failsafe, however, because some local councils are less honest
      than others. This is why our society has developed the system of democracy [lokaadhipateyya]
      (with all its faults) in place of the Buddha’s ideal system of government [dhammaadhipateyya]
      (D.iii.220, A.i.147) where virtue alone and not the majority vote is the
      deciding factor in government.

      There is still the risk, however, that the money might easily
      disappear when invested at the grassroots — but if the government afraid to
      invest, they might never have the chance to train the ‘new blood’ in
      responsibility. If they take the money and still fail you, maybe you should
      just consider the lost capital as a the cost of ‘tuition’ in responsibility.

      In the case the government cannot afford to risk losing money by
      helping at the grassroots, they should bring in some of those at the top,
      such as the local M.P. or the local head of the civil service or academics to
      help set up systems and procedures for those who are less knowledgeable. The
      trouble with many working at the grassroots level is that they don’t have the
      knowledge of administration or any idea of how to set up systems in order to
      work efficiently when starting out. If those at the top ‘put their man in’ to
      help at the start-up of new enterprises and help by following up progress in
      the initial months — concerning the accounts, legal matters, and
      accountability they can help to create a feeling of collective ownership of a
      project (because if it is a success it will benefit everybody in the locality).
      Accountants should help to teach the recipients of the investment how to
      regulate their finances — because otherwise, if the money invested should
      disappear because good accounts have not been kept, who can be blamed?

      When encouraging businessmen at the top to get involved with
      investments in the grassroots, sometimes there will be something in it too
      for the big businesses, sometimes not — but irrespective, as fellow
      countrymen, they ought to feel proud that they are doing something for
      the nation — even if it is only considered part of the company’s budget for
      ‘good works’. As for the government, there is always a risk that the
      investment will be lost — but in any case it is better than investing at the
      top because in that way it would be lost for sure.

      This is a problem of how investment in the lower sector can help
      society to develop. Of course, no-one can expect 100% return with such
      investments — but at the very least will upgrade the ability of the bottom
      rungs of society to take responsibility for their own future. Success depends
      on the follow-up and the degree of co-operation between all involved –
      co-operating to develop members of society with truthfulness, the inspiration
      to develop themselves without end, patience and self-sacrifice — the Virtues
      of the Householder mentioned in the previous section — struggling against
      all the things that prevent our society from having a fair economy.

      Cleaning Up Society

      Even on a national level, it is the ‘roads to ruin’ which do most damage to a
      fair economy. If roads to ruin must continue to exist in society, then they
      should be zone-restricted and with clear opening hours so as not to encourage
      them to spread throughout society indiscriminately. Better than that, however
      is to try to eradicate the ‘roads to ruin’ completely from our society –
      something which can only ever happen if there is co-operation on all levels.

       

      8

      Conclusion


      Riches ruin only the foolish, 
      not those in quest of the Beyond.
      By craving for riches the witless man,
      ruins himself as well as other

      Dh.355


       

      This book has dealt with the problems of the world through the
      eyes of Buddhist Economics. Usually such matters are not the domain of
      expertise of a monk such as the present author — but when economics become
      such an implicit part of everyone’s life, even monks cannot afford not to
      have a standpoint — however, where monks do become involved in such matters,
      it should be in a way suitable for a monk . . . that is, to try to gain
      insight into the reality of economics and waking people up to that reality,
      helping to train-up virtuous people and encouraging Buddhists truly to pursue
      Perfections in the footsteps of the Buddha — spreading the wisdom of
      Buddhism far and wide, while helping to forge an amenable homeground [pa.tiruupadesa]
      for Buddhism. It is the hope of the present author that by clarifying
      Buddhist principles relating to economics on the three levels of aim in life,
      it will be easier for Buddhist in conscience to know where compromises can be
      made and where compromises would be unscrupulous. What sort of wealth is
      worthwhile and what sorts undermine the fabric of society. It is also the
      present author’s hope that readers will start to grasp that from the point of
      view of Buddhism it is not just money or economic figures per se that matters
      in economics — but happiness on three levels of aim in life. Often things
      other than money can better bring happiness and from the Buddhist economic
      viewpoint we would say that the virtues mentioned in this book that bring
      mental wellbeing or inner freedom are more valuable than money can buy — and
      so economically priceless.

      Wealth
      is lost nothing is lost


      comments (0)
      VR1 (WE ARE ONE ) +VE NEWS-Mayawati warns against demolition of memorials-Uttar Pradesh Government Determined to usher in Green Gardens and Healthy Environment in the State -Transgressions unintended if any: U.P. -ONLINE TRAINING ON PRECEPTS AND TRADE-77-Principles of Buddhist Macroeconomics-Wealth is lost nothing is lost INTERNATIONAL JIVAKA PRESUMPTIVE HEALTH PROTECTION (IJPHP) -Health is lost something is lost A BLUE PRINT FOR LIFE ON THE FUTURE THE WAY OF DEVELOPMENT-Precepts (Character, morality self-discipline) is lost everything is lost FREE ONLINE TRAINING ON BUDDHISM FOR CHILDREN-36 Grandma’s Blackie [Loving-kindness] -The moral is: Loving-kindness makes the poorest house into the richest home
      Filed under: General
      Posted by: @ 2:47 am

      VR1

      (WE  ARE  ONE )

      +VE  NEWS

      MAY YOU BE EVER HAPPY, WELL AND SECURE!

      MAY YOU LIVE LONG!

      MAY ALL BEINGS BE EVRER HAPPY, WELL AND SECURE!

      MAY YOU ALWAYS HAVE CALM, QUIET, ALERT, ATTENTIVE AND

      EQUANIMINTY MIND!

      WITH A CLEAR UNDESRSATNDING THAT

      NOTHING IS PERMANENT!


      MERITS makes us HAPPY

      MORALITY makes us HAPPIER

      MEDITATION makes us HAPPIEST.



      Mayawati warns against demolition of memorials

      Atiq Khan


      Accuses SP, Congress of mischievous propaganda



      — PHOTO: SUBIR ROY




      Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Mayawati, with Assembly Speaker
      Sukhdev Rajbhar (third from left), her Cabinet colleagues Lalji Verma
      and Naseemudin Siddiqui and BSP general secretary S.C. Mishra ( at
      right), at the foundation-laying ceremony for the Manyavar Kanshi Ram
      Green Garden in Lucknow on Thursday.

      LUCKNOW: Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Mayawati on Thursday warned
      that if the monuments and memorial sites dedicated to the Bahujan Samaj
      Party icons here were demolished, a serious law and order situation
      would arise in the country.

      President’s Rule would have to be imposed. “The Congress and the Samajwadi Party would be responsible for this,” she said.

      She was addressing a gathering after laying the foundation stone for the Manyavar Shri Kanshi Ramji Green (Eco) Garden here.

      Denying that her government violated the Supreme Court’s orders on
      suspending construction work at the memorial sites, Ms. Mayawati
      accused the Samajwadi Party and the Congress of indulging in a
      “malicious and mischievous propaganda.”


      “Wrong facts”

      She also accused a section of the media of presenting “wrong facts”
      pertaining to work at the memorial sites and cautioned the media
      against becoming a tool in the Opposition game plan.

      The Chief Secretary had submitted an affidavit in the court.

      She said work was going on only at those sites against which no writ petition had been filed and no stay granted by the court.

      The Chief Minister dubbed the Congress ‘anti-SC/STs’ and said
      thousands of crores of rupees were spent on building memorials, parks,
      statues and museums in the name of members of the Gandhi and Nehru
      families.

      “It seems eminent persons belong only to these two families and when
      crores have been spent on building memorials for them the Congress does
      not say that money has been misused.”

      The Green Eco Garden is being developed on 160 acres on which the old Lucknow jail once stood.



      Uttar
      Pradesh Government Determined

      to usher
      in

      Green Gardens and Healthy Environment

      in the
      State

      Foundation Stone

      Of

      Manyavar Shri Kanshiram ji

      Green (Eco) Garden

      Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh

      Laid by

      Ms Mayawati

      Hon’ble
      Chief Minister, Uttar Pradesh

      On 17
      September, 2009

      At 4:00
      p.m.

      Place:
      Manyavar Shri Kanshiram ji Smarak Sthal

      Near V.I.P. Road, Lucknow

       

      http://www.upgov.nic.in/upinfo/images/mayawati.jpg

      Ms
      Mayawati

      Chief Minister, Uttar Pradesh

                      Population wise, Uttar Pradesh is the largest
      state in the country. Naturally, therefore, our government has been very
      conscious about ameliorating its environment from the very beginning. In view
      of this, the government launched a special drive, last year, to plant 100
      million saplings in the Bundelkhand region, which is pretty backward in terms
      of greenery. In the next phase, a mega tree-plantation effort would be mounted
      for other areas in Uttar Pradesh to better the environment with priority on
      planting fruit-bearing and shady trees. Likewise, priority is being accorded to
      enhance environment in other major towns of the state. Though there are quite a
      number of small parks in the city, the absence of a large and majestic park in
      Lucknow city-centre was being felt very seriously and, this is why the state
      government has decided to set up, right in the centre of the city, Manyavar
      Shri Kanshiram ji Green (Eco) Garden> Side by side, a green belt of 600 acres
      is being developed on the outer periphery of the city of Lucknow. Similar
      action is contemplated in respect of other big cities in a phased manner to
      improve environment in time to come.


      Transgressions unintended if any: U.P.

      J. Venkatesan

      NEW DELHI: The Mayawati government has refuted media reports that it
      continued with construction at memorial sites in Lucknow even after
      giving an undertaking in the Supreme Court on September 8 to stop all
      activities forthwith.

      Chief Secretary Atul Kumar Gupta, in his affidavit filed on
      Thursday, said what was done after the September 8 order related to
      repairs to the road, footpath, drain and toilet; finishing of stone
      works/pedestals, grass turfing, and plantation of trees; removal of
      stagnant water, and of unused and scrap material from various places;
      and dismantling of steel pipes (scaffolding) along with repairs to and
      touching up stone works.

      The affidavit, filed in response to the court direction, said: “Not
      only has the State government the highest regard for the orders passed
      by the Supreme Court, but [it] has also issued appropriate instructions
      and directions to ensure that the undertaking given to the court is
      complied with in letter and in spirit. Notwithstanding this, if any
      transgression has occurred, I tender the most profuse apology for the
      same, and humbly submit that [if any transgression has happened] the
      same was entirely unintended.”

      Regarding the news item published in The Hindu on
      September 11, the Chief Secretary said chiselling and finishing work
      was being carried out by the Public Works Department on the wall
      running along Jail Road. The wall was constructed on the footpath of
      Jail Road and was not part of the Kanshiram Smarak Sthal.

      As for the work being carried out at Smriti Upvan, referred to in
      the report, the affidavit said this site was not covered by the
      undertaking given to the court. Therefore, the premise of the report
      that the court order was violated was factually erroneous and
      misleading.

      The affidavit also denied the news reports of The Times of India and the visuals telecast by NDTV.
      “The undertaking given on September 8 is being fully honoured and the
      question of the same being flouted does not arise at all,” the Chief
      Secretary said.


      Ravi files affidavit

      Meanwhile, the Editor of The Hindu, N. Ravi, filed
      an affidavit along with the materials and photographs based on which
      the news report was published on September 11.



       









      ONLINE TRAINING ON PRECEPTS AND TRADE-77



      An idea that is developed and put into action is more
      important than an idea that exists only as an idea.

      Buddha


      7

      Principles of Buddhist Macroeconomics


       

       

      “As for those at the top — even if they have a hundred
      million or a thousand billion, they are still in poverty — but their poverty
      differs from that of the grassroots poor because instead of being poor from a
      lack of resources, they are poor because they never know enough.”


       

      All of what we have spoken about up
      until now has concerned our personal economic habits — otherwise known as
      Buddhist Microeconomics. However, the Buddha also gave economic guidelines
      applicable on the national or global level — something we can perhaps call
      ‘Buddhist Macroeconomics’. We find such guidelines in the Kuu.tada.n.ta Sutta
      (see Box 6)
      for economics on this level. The Buddha distinguished two level of
      socio-economic groups in society: 

      Both the groups above and below have one thing in common — in that
      they feel poor. For the group below it is not just a feeling of
      poverty — they are poor because they live from hand to mouth, on the
      breadline often, struggling to make ends meet — no matter whether they are
      farmers, labourers or clerical workers. Shop-keepers and traders have to put
      themselves in debt to get the stock they need to open shop. Clerks tend to be
      treated unjustly and have a pitiable wage. All these groups are poor because of
      a real lack of wealth.


       


      BOX 6: Kuu.tadanta
      Sutta

      In the Kuu.tadanta Sutta (D.i.127ff.) the Buddha is asked what sort of
      sacrifice should be performed in order that it should be efficacious. In
      those days in India,
      sacrifices would usually entail the ritual killing of large numbers of live
      animals and the destruction of much plant life. In answer to this enquiry,
      the Buddha spoke of the ‘perfect sacrifice’ performed in the days of yore by
      King Mahaa Vijitaavii, which caused no regrets to animal or human life at any
      stage. Part of the ’sacrifice’ involved the co-operation of the upper crust
      of the king’s subjects but the sacrifice was in fact help given to those on
      the lower rungs. The Buddha thus distinguished two levels of socioeconomic
      groups in society:

      • those at the top 
      • politicians 
      • senior civil servants 
      • academics 
      • major businessmen and
        bankers
         
    2. those at the
      grassroots 
      • farmers and labourers 
      • shop-keepers and
        traders 
      • clerks and low-ranking
        civil-servants 

      He taught that any
      government or benefactor wishing to make the perfect sacrifice of benefit
      both to themselves and to society at large needed to take heed of the four
      upper groups and give to the three lower levels.

       

      As for those at the top — even if they have a hundred million or a
      thousand million, they still feel poor — but their poverty is different from
      those of the grassroots because the reason they feel poor is that their desires
      are insatiable.

      The majority of people in any country belong to the grassroots –
      usually 80-90% — that is usually the figure for people in any country who lack
      adequate wealth. As for those on top, although they are not very numerous,
      their every move has some impact on the government and might even cause a
      change of government in some cases. Those at the top are few but wield a lot of
      power.

      Government Investment

      In the olden days, economic problems on a national scale would be solved by
      making concessions to those at the top. However, no matter how many concessions
      the government may make to such figures, it is never enough for them. Unfortunately,
      when such giants make a fuss, their voice is loud. Even though those below are
      more numerous, their ability to protest is reduced because they are struggling
      even to keep their head above water — and can afford to set aside no time to
      protest. Thus the government tends to protect its skin by giving concessions to
      those at the top. However, even if you were to give them a hundred million, it
      would hardly be enough (It is hardly enough for a good night out in Las Vegas). Thus helping
      at the top just keeps the giants quiet without satisfying them — and meanwhile
      the grassroots continue to die an undignified death.

      If we turn to look at what advice the Buddha gave for government
      investment, we find that He supported allocation of funds to those at the
      grassroots — but with one important condition — that the recipients should be
      carefully selected. If handouts are given indiscriminately, you may find that
      the more impatient would rather kill the golden goose than wait for its eggs!

      Thus when giving concessions or help to those at the grassroots, you
      should look to see which people are virtuous (i.e. manage to keep the Five
      Precepts and are established in Right Livelihood) but who lack the capital or
      technology. They should be those who are diligent and have attained success at
      a certain level — such people should be selected to receive concessions.
      Helping such people will also be an example for others to follow — by helping
      in such a way you will find that your investment doesn’t immediately disappear
      as it would if helping the people at the top.

      These are principles which it was easier to follow in the olden
      days. A king would set out a ‘talent scout’ who would look for people of real
      virtue deserving to be helped by the king. By helping such people, exemplars of
      virtue would shine forth in the kingdom. Sometimes it might be traders of
      exceptional virtue who lacked capital or honest civil servants who had been
      mistreated or had received insufficient salary. However, the most important was
      always to select those who were virtuous. Having helped such people, there
      should be follow-up — to see how such people had responded to the help. Before
      long there would be could get down to work, before long the products of their
      work would start to become apparent. At that point, it would be appropriate to
      involve some of the giants in order to help in the marketing and other high
      level strategies.

      However, in the present day it is difficult for anyone to accept
      that one person might be more worthy than another of help merely on the
      observations of a ‘talent scout’. The talent scout might be partial. Thus in
      the present day it is usually more convenient for people to work as a committee
      to look after allocation of local budgets. Even this arrangement might not be
      failsafe, however, because some local councils are less honest than others.
      This is why our society has developed the system of democracy [lokaadhipateyya]
      (with all its faults) in place of the Buddha’s ideal system of government [dhammaadhipateyya]
      (D.iii.220, A.i.147) where virtue alone and not the majority vote is the
      deciding factor in government.

      There is still the risk, however, that the money might easily
      disappear when invested at the grassroots — but if the government afraid to
      invest, they might never have the chance to train the ‘new blood’ in
      responsibility. If they take the money and still fail you, maybe you should
      just consider the lost capital as a the cost of ‘tuition’ in responsibility.

      In the case the government cannot afford to risk losing money by
      helping at the grassroots, they should bring in some of those at the top, such
      as the local M.P. or the local head of the civil service or academics to help
      set up systems and procedures for those who are less knowledgeable. The trouble
      with many working at the grassroots level is that they don’t have the knowledge
      of administration or any idea of how to set up systems in order to work
      efficiently when starting out. If those at the top ‘put their man in’ to help
      at the start-up of new enterprises and help by following up progress in the
      initial months — concerning the accounts, legal matters, and accountability
      they can help to create a feeling of collective ownership of a project (because
      if it is a success it will benefit everybody in the locality). Accountants
      should help to teach the recipients of the investment how to regulate their
      finances — because otherwise, if the money invested should disappear because
      good accounts have not been kept, who can be blamed?

      When encouraging businessmen at the top to get involved with
      investments in the grassroots, sometimes there will be something in it too for
      the big businesses, sometimes not — but irrespective, as fellow countrymen,
      they ought to feel proud that they are doing something for the nation –
      even if it is only considered part of the company’s budget for ‘good works’. As
      for the government, there is always a risk that the investment will be lost –
      but in any case it is better than investing at the top because in that way it
      would be lost for sure.

      This is a problem of how investment in the lower sector can help
      society to develop. Of course, no-one can expect 100% return with such
      investments — but at the very least will upgrade the ability of the bottom
      rungs of society to take responsibility for their own future. Success depends
      on the follow-up and the degree of co-operation between all involved –
      co-operating to develop members of society with truthfulness, the inspiration
      to develop themselves without end, patience and self-sacrifice — the Virtues
      of the Householder mentioned in the previous section — struggling against all
      the things that prevent our society from having a fair economy.

      Cleaning Up Society

      Even on a national level, it is the ‘roads to ruin’ which do most damage to a
      fair economy. If roads to ruin must continue to exist in society, then they
      should be zone-restricted and with clear opening hours so as not to encourage
      them to spread throughout society indiscriminately. Better than that, however
      is to try to eradicate the ‘roads to ruin’ completely from our society –
      something which can only ever happen if there is co-operation on all levels.

      Wealth
      is lost nothing is lost

      INTERNATIONAL JIVAKA
      PRESUMPTIVE HEALTH PROTECTION (IJPHP)
            


      Every human being is the author of his own
      health or disease.

      Buddha

      Health is lost something is lost



      A BLUE PRINT FOR LIFE


      ON  THE FUTURE

      THE WAY OF 
      DEVELOPMENT

                  People
      willingly pay taxes with the hope that the nation

      Will improve in the future. Bridges and roads are repaired
      in

      The hope that transportation will become more convenient.

      Welfare is provided to relieve poverty with the hope that
      the

      social welfare system will not be lacking. The capable and

      wise are elected with the hope that government will become

      increasingly more democratic. Punishing corrupt officials is

      done with the hope that the government will become impartial.

      Everybody today hopes that there will be good weather for

      crops the country will be prosperous, people will live in
      peace,

      and that the world will soon know peace

      Precepts (Character, morality
      self-discipline) is lost everything is lost

       

      FREE
      ONLINE TRAINING ON BUDDHISM FOR CHILDREN-36


      Grandma’s Blackie
      [Loving-kindness]

      Once upon a time, when King Brahmadatta was
      ruling in Benares, there was an old woman who
      had a calf. This calf was of a noble dark color. In fact, he was jet black
      without a spot of white. He was the Bodhisatta - the Enlightenment Being.

      The old woman raised the little calf just as
      though he were her own child. She fed him only the very best rice and rice
      porridge. She petted his head and neck, and he licked her hand. Since they were
      so friendly, the people began calling the calf, “Grandma’s Blackie’.

      Even after he grew up into a big strong bull,
      Grandma’s Blackie remained very tame and gentle. The village children played
      with him, holding onto his neck and ears and horns. They would even grab his
      tail and swing up onto his back for a ride. He liked children, so he never complained.

      The friendly bull thought, “The loving
      old woman, who brought me up, is like a kind mother to me. She raised me as if
      I were her own child. She is poor and in need, but too humble to ask for my
      help. She is too gentle to force me to work. Because I also love her, I wish to
      release her from the suffering of poverty.” So he began looking for work.

      One day a caravan of 500 carts came by the
      village. It stopped at a difficult place to cross the river. The bullocks were
      not able to pull the carts across. The caravan leader hooked up all 500 pairs
      of bullocks to the first cart. But the river was so rough that they could not
      pull across even that one cart.

      Faced with this problem, the leader began
      looking for more bulls. He was known to be an expert judge of the qualities of
      bulls. While examining the wandering village herd, he noticed Grandma’s
      Blackie. At once he thought, “This noble bullock looks like he has the
      strength and the will to pull my carts across the river.”

      He said to the villagers standing nearby,
      “To whom does this big black bull belong? I would like to use him to pull
      my caravan across the river, and I am willing to pay his owner for his
      services.” The people said, “By all means, take him. His master is
      not here.”

      So he put a rope through Grandma’s Blackie’s
      nose. But when he pulled, he could not budge him! The bull was thinking,
      “Until this man says what he will pay for my work, I will not move.”

      Being such a good judge of bulls, the caravan
      leader understood his reasoning. So he said, “My dear bull, after you have
      pulled my 500 carts across the river, I will pay you two gold coins for each
      cart - not just one, but two!” Hearing this, Grandma’s Blackie went with
      him at once.


      Then the man harnessed the strong black bull to the first cart. He proceeded to
      pull it across the river. This was what all one thousand bulls could not do
      before. Likewise, he pulled across each of the other 499 carts, one at a time,
      without slowing down a bit!

      When all was done, the caravan leader made a
      package containing only one gold coin per cart, that is, 500 coins. He hung
      this around the mighty bullock’s neck. The bull thought, “This man
      promised two gold coins per cart, but that is not what he has hung around my
      neck. So I will not let him leave!” He went to the front of the caravan
      and blocked the path.

      The leader tried to push him out of the way,
      but he would not move. He tried to drive the carts around him. But all the
      bulls had seen how strong he was, so they would not move either!

      The man thought, “There is no doubt that
      this is a very intelligent bull, who knows I have given him only
      half-pay.” So he made a new package containing the full one-thousand gold
      coins, and hung it instead around the bull’s neck.

      Then Grandma’s Blackie re-crossed the river
      and walked directly towards the old woman, his ‘mother’. Along the way, the
      children tried to grab the money package, thinking it was a game. But he
      escaped them.

      When the woman saw the heavy package, she was
      surprised. The children told her all about what happened down at the river. She
      opened the package and discovered the one thousand gold coins.

      The old woman also saw the tired look in the
      eyes of her ‘child’. She said, “Oh my son, do you think I wish to live off
      the money you earn? Why did you wish to work so hard and suffer so? No matter
      how difficult it may be, I will always care for and look after you.”

      Then the kind woman washed the lovely bull and
      massaged his tired muscles with oil. She fed him good food and cared for him,
      until the end of their happy lives together.

      The moral is:
      Loving-kindness makes the poorest house into the richest home.


      comments (0)
      09/17/09
      VR1 (WE ARE ONE ) +VE NEWS U.S. establishes ‘virtual consulate’ in Bangalore-Babasaheb’s Dhamma Deeksha speech on 15th October 1956-ONLINE TRAINING ON PRECEPTS AND TRADE-76-Ideals and Goals in Buddhist Microeconomics-Wealth is lost nothing is lost INTERNATIONAL JIVAKA PRESUMPTIVE HEALTH PROTECTION (IJPHP) -Bacopa monnieri-Health is lost something is lost-A BLUE PRINT FOR LIFE ON THE FUTURE THE WAY OF DEVELOPMENT-Precepts (Character, morality self-discipline) is lost everything is lost-FREE ONLINE TRAINING ON BUDDHISM FOR CHILDREN-35 The Bull Called Delightful [All Deserve Respect] -The moral is: Harsh words bring no reward. Respectful words bring honor to all.
      Filed under: General
      Posted by: @ 2:54 am


      U.S. establishes ‘virtual consulate’ in Bangalore

       Staff Reporter

      It
      is an attempt to reach out beyond the Consulate General

      It will give news about forthcoming events and services available

      The website also hopes to promote trade links with India


      Bangalore: The United States may have ruled out setting up a
      consulate in Bangalore but hopes that a new website, designed
      specifically for Bangalore’s residents, will establish a “virtual
      presence” here.

      The U.S. Consulate General (Chennai) and American Corner, Bharatiya
      Vidya Bhavan, on Wednesday launched a website,
      http://bangalore.usvpp.gov, which will act as a “virtual consulate” for
      Bangaloreans.

      The launch coincided with the fifth anniversary of the American
      Corner which was set up to “serve as a window to life and culture in
      the U.S.” and offers up-to-date information about cultural,
      educational, political, economic and social trends in the U.S.

      The Bangalore “virtual consulate” is the first its kind in India and
      will give news about forthcoming events and services available at
      Bangalore.


      Services

      For those looking for US citizen services, are applying for visas,
      planning on doing business in the US, or want to explore education
      options, the website points you in the right direction, said Michael
      Pelletier, Consul for Public Affairs, US Consulate General, Chennai.

      The choice of Bangalore as the first Indian city to launch the
      virtual consulate was an “obvious” one, he said. The virtual consulate
      is an attempt to reach out beyond the Consulate General and make
      American programmes widely available, added Mr. Pelletier.

      The website also hopes to promote trade links with India and specifically with Bangalore.

      The trade relations are already robust and the private sector
      partnerships between the two countries “have outpaced what the
      governments have achieved” in this regard, he said.



      Babasaheb’s Dhamma
      Deeksha speech on 15th October 1956

       

      My all Buddhist fellows
      and invitees present:

       

      Perhaps it
      is difficult for the thinkers to understand the significance of the place of
      conversion (Deeksha) ceremony which was performed yesterday and today
      morning. In their and in my opinion as well the ceremony which was held
      yesterday should have been held today and today’s yesterday. It is essential to
      know, why we have shouldered this responsibility, what was its necessity and
      what will be the result of it. By understanding this, the foundation of our
      mission will become strong. This process of understanding should have occurred
      earlier. But few
      things remain so uncertain
      that, those happen
      automatically. About this ceremony the things to be
      happend, happened.    But in spite of exchange of days, nothing
      is harmed.

      Many people
      asked a question, why had you chosen Nagpur
      the place for this ceremony? Why this ceremony was not per­formed at some other
      place? A few people say that since the large platoon of R.S.S. (Rashtriya
      Swayamsevak Sangh) is in Nagpur
      and just to embarass them this ceremony is being held in this city. This is not
      true at all. For this reason this ceremony is not being held at Nagpur. Our mission is so
      stupendous that every minute of life is inadequate. I do not have time to
      ill-omen others by scratching my nose.

      The reason
      for choosing this place is different.
      Those
      who have studied the Buddhist history will come to know that the people who
      propagated Buddhism in India
      were the Nag people. Nag people were the fierce enemy of the Aryans. Many
      Fierceful battles took place between the Aryans and the Non-Aryans. Many
      examples are available in the Puranas about where the Aryans burnt
      the Nagas. The sage Agasti could save only one Naga. We are the descendants of
      him. The Naga people who tolerated the oppression needed some great man to
      uplift them and they found that great man in Lord Gautam Buddha. The Nagas
      propagated the teachings of Lord Buddha throughout India. Such are we Nagas. The major
      habitation of the Naga people was in and around Nagpur. Therefore this city is called ‘
      Nag-pur ‘ means the city of Nagas.
      There is a Nagarjun Hill about 27 miles from this place. The river flowing
      nearby is Nag river. Obviously this river got this name because of the people
      living here. The river which flows through the habitation of the Naga people is
      the Nag river. This is the main reason to select this place-Nagpur. There is no
      question of irritating anybody nor the intention. The reason of the R. S. S.
      even did not touch my mind. Nobody should interpret in that way.

      Opposition,
      could perhaps be for other reasons. I have already explained that this place
      has not been choosen for antagonism. I have been criticised by many people and
      newspapers for the initiation of this mission. The criticisms of some is harsh.
      In their opinion I am misleading my poor Untouchables. They are misguiding some
      of our people by telling that those who are Untouchables today will remain
      Untouchables and the rights they have got, they will lose it. They advise
      illiterate people among us to follow the traditional path. This might be
      influencing some of the young and elder among us. If, by that the doubts have
      been arisen in the minds of people, it is our duty to clear those doubts and
      the clearing of those doubts will strenghthen the foundation of our movement.

      In the past
      we had a movement for not to eat meat.. The touchables thought it as if a
      thunderbolt of lightening for them. Isn’t this a strange practice that they
      should drink the milk of living buffalo and we should carry its carcass on our
      shoulder after its death. We ask them why don’t you allow us to carry your dead
      mother ? They should give us their dead mother as they give us their dead
      buffalo. Some-one some-time wrote in the ‘ Kesari ‘ through correspondence that
      in certain villages 50 cattle died every year, Rs. 500 could be earned from
      their hides, horns, hoovers, meat, bones and tails; and leaving aside the matter
      of meat of dead animals, these people would be deprived of that profit, such
      propaganda was made through ‘Kesari ‘. Really speaking what was the necessity
      of replying to such propaganda. Our people felt that what our Saheb (leader) is
      doing if he is not replying such propaganda?

      Once I had
      been to Sangamner for meeting. The arrangement for the dinner was made. That
      time a reporter from ‘ Kesari ‘ sent me a chit and asked, “You are
      advising your people not to carry dead animals. How poor they are ! Their women
      do not have sari and blouse to wear, they do not have food, they do not have
      fields, when their conditions are so miserable, you tell them to give up an
      income of Rs. 500 per year from hides, hooves, meat, is it not a loss of your
      people? “

      I asked,
      “where shall I reply you? Shall I reply here in corridor or in meeting? It
      is better to answer before the people. “I asked the person,” Is it
      the only thing or you want to ask anymore? “He said, “This much to
      say and answer this only “. I asked that person, “How many children
      you have and how many people you are? “He said, “I have five children
      and my brother has five to seven children “. I said, “It means your
      family is large. Hence, you and your relatives should carry all the dead
      animals of that village and earn an income of Rs. 500. You must take this
      benefit. In addition to this I make an arrange­ment to give you Rs. 500
      annually. What will happen to my people, whether they will get food, clothes or
      not, I will see it myself. Then, why are you giving up this benefit? Why don’t
      you do this? If we do it, it is beneficial, and if you do it, isn’t beneficial
      to you?   Carry the dead animals. “

      A
      Brahmin-boy came to me yesterday and said, “you have been given reserved
      seats in the Parliament and the Assemblies, why are you giving them up? “I
      said, “You become Mahar and fill up those seats in the Parliament and the
      Assemblies. The vacancies in the services are filled up. So many Brahmins and
      others apply for the posts. Why don’t you Brahmin people fill up these reserved
      seats by becoming Mahar as you do in services?”

      My question
      to them is why do you weep for our loss? In reality self-respect is dearer to
      human being and not material gain. A woman with virtues and character knows how
      much beneficial is immoral behaviour. In our Bombay there is a locality of prostitutes.
      Those women wake up at 8 O’clock and place an order for the breakfast in nearby
      hotel, (Dr. Ambedkar imitated this in changed voice) “O Suleman, get a
      plate of mince (Kheema) and bread.” Suleman brings alongwith tea, cake
      etc. But, my Downtrodden sisters do not get even simple Chutni-Bhakar (mixture
      of chilli and salt and bread), but they live with dignity and character.

      We are
      fighting for honour and self-respect. We are getting ready to take the human
      being towards the perfection, for that we are ready for any sacrifice. These
      newspaper people (indicating them) got on my nerves for the past forty years.
      How severely they have maligned me till date! I ask them to ponder over at
      least now, leave this childishness and be prudent.

      Even after
      conversion to the Buddhism, I am confident, I will get the political rights.
      (Shouts in the name of Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar with thunderous claps). I cannot
      tell what will hap­pen after my death. For this movement we have to struggle
      more. What will happen on having embraced the Buddhism if at all there are
      difficulties, how could those be avoided. For that, what arguments and efforts
      are to be made, I have thoroughly thought over this. My bag[1] is with full of solutions. What are
      those I know fully well. These rights I have obtained for my people. One who
      obtained these rights, will surely regain them. It I who have obtained these
      rights and facilities, and I am confident that I will again obtain them.
      Therefore, now at least you should continue to have faith in me. That there is
      no truth in the adverse propaganda.

      I am
      surprised at one thing. Everywhere there is debate on large scale. But no one
      has asked me a question as to why I embraced the Buddhism. Why I embraced only
      this religion and not any other. This is the basic and important question in
      the any movement of a conversion. While converting it should be put to the test
      :Which religion and why it should be embraced. Through a resolution at Yeole in
      1935, we started the movement of renouncing the Hindu religion. Long back I had
      vowed, ” Though I am born as a Hindu I will not die as a Hindu ” and
      I proved it yesterday. I am overjoyed, I am exalted. I feel I have been
      liberated from the hell. I do not want blind followers. Those who wish to
      embrace Buddhism, they should accept it with comprehension. Their conscious
      should accept that religion.

      Religion is
      absolutely essential for the development of mankind. I know that one sect came
      into existence after reading Karl Marx. According to them religion is futile.
      They do not have importance of religion. In the morning they get breakfast
      containing bread, cream, butter, chicken leg etc. full meal, sound sleep, to
      see movies; and that is all. That is their philosophy. I am not of that
      opinion. My father was poor; I could not get such kind of luxuries. Nobody has
      ever lived a life as hard as mine. Therefore, I have a realisation that how
      hard a man’s life can be in the absence of luxuries. I know that economic eleva­
      tion movement is necessary. I am not against that movement.
      Man must progress financially.

      But I make
      an important distinction in this matter. There is a difference between buffalo,
      bull and man. Buffalo
      and bull need fodder every day. Man also needs food. But the difference in
      between the two is that buffalo and bull have no mind; man has body and mind
      too. Therefore, both should be pondered over. The mind should be developed. The
      mind should be cultured. It should be made cultured. I do not want to have any
      sort of relationship with such country or people who say that there is no
      relation between man and cultured mind except the food. As to keep relationship
      with people man should have sound body in the same way while making the body
      healthy, the mind should also be cultured. Otherwise, it cannot be said that
      mankind has been progressed.

      Why man’s
      body or mind is
      ill? The reasons
      are, either his body is diseased or his mind has no enthusiasm. If there is no
      enthusiasm in mind there is no progress. Why is not this enthusiasm there? The
      first reason is that man has been kept in such a way that he does not get any
      opportunity or he has no hope to rise. That time, how will he remain
      enthusiastic? He re­mains diseased. The man who gets the fruit of his deeds can
      get enthusiasm. Otherwise a teacher in a school started saying, ” Hey, who
      is this ? He is a Mahar. And will this wretched Mahar get through in first
      class? For what he wants first class ? Be in third class only—to get in first
      class is Brahmin’s claim. Under these circumstances, what enthusiasm the boy
      will get? How can he progress? The root of creating enthusiasm is in mind,
      whose body and mind also are healthy, who is courageous, who has confidence in
      surmounting all adversities, in him only enthusiasm is generated and he only
      excels. Such a strange philosophy has been incorporated in the Hindu religion
      which can never promote enthusiasm. Circumstances making man unenthusiastic
      have been maintained for thousands of years, then at the most such people will
      be produced who would fill their stomach by clerical jobs. What else will
      happen? To protect these clerks, a big clerk is needed.

      The reason
      behind man’s enthusiasm is mind. You know the owners of mills. They appoint
      managers for their mills and get the works done in the mills through their
      managers. Mill own­ers are involved in some or the other bad habits, their
      minds have not been developed culturally. We started a movement to infuse
      enthusiasm in our minds, then the education would be started. I began my
      education by wearing a loin-cloth. I could not get even water to drink in the
      school. I spent many days without water in the school. The same situation was
      maintained even in the Elphinston College in Bombay.
      If such is the situation, what else conditions will be
      created.    Only clerks will be produced.

      Lord
      Linlithgow was the Viceroy when I was in the Executive Council of Delhi. I said to him,
      ” In addition to the normal expenditure, you spend Rs. Three lac on the Aligarh University for the education of the
      Muslims. In the same way you give Rs. Three lac to the Banaras Hindu
      University. But we are
      neither Hindus nor Muslims. If you think of doing something for us, then
      thousand times more than them should be done. Do at least as much for us as
      Muslims. ” Then Lord Linlithgow said, ” Whatever you have to say give
      me in writing. ” Accordingly I prepared a memorandum. That manuscript is
      still with me. Europeans were very sympathetic. They accepted my proposal. The
      problem was on which item the money had to spend. They thought that, our girls
      are not educated, they should be provided with education. Boarding be started
      for them, and the money should be spent on that. If our girls are provided
      education and made educated, where, at home, is the material to cook various
      types of dishes? What is the end result of their education ? The Government
      spent the money on other heads and withheld the amount for education.
      Therefore, one day I went to Lord Linlithgow and regarding the expenditure on
      education I said, ” If you do not get angry, I would like to ask 
      you  a question.  I am alone equal to fifty graduates, Aren’t I? He
      had to accept it. Again I asked him, ” What is the reason of it?” He
      said, “We do not know the reason.” I said, “My learning is so
      great that I could sit on the pinnacle of the palace. I want such men. Because,
      from there, one can make overall surveillance. If our people are to be
      protected, then such sharp eyed men should be created. What can a mere clerk
      do? At the very moment Lord Linlithgow was convinced by my words and sixteen
      men were sent to England
      for higher education. Just as some earthen pots are half-baked and some are
      baked, of those sixteen some are half-baked and some are baked-this is
      different matter! Later on C. Rajgopalachari can­celled this scheme of higher
      education.

      In this
      country, such situation prevails that will make us unenthusiastic for thousands
      of years to come. Till this situation exists, there cannot be enthusiasm for
      our progress. In this regard we cannot do anything by remaining in this
      religion. There is Chaturvrana in Manusmruti. Chaturvrana system
      is very harmful for the progress of mankind. It has been mentioned in the Manusmruti
      that Shudras should do only menial service. Why do they need
      education? The Brahmin should take education, Kshatriya should
      take up arms, Vaishya should do business and Shudra should serve.
      Who will unfold this system? Brahmin, Kshatriya and Vaishya have
      some gain, but what about Shudras? Will there be any enthusiasm in other
      castes except these three varnas? This Chaturvarna System is not
      haphazardly; this is not a custom; this is the religion.

      There is no
      equality in the Hindu religion. Once I had been to Mr. Gandhi, he said, “I
      believe in Chaturvarna” ! I said, “Mahatmas like you believe
      in Chaturvarna! But what is this Chaturvarna and how is this?
      (Dr. Ambedkar expressed this by showing his hand fingers one upon another as
      well as keeping palm in flat position.) This Chaturvarna is whether up
      or flat? from where the Chaturvarna begins and where does it end ?
      Gandhiji did not answer this question and what answer can he give? Those who
      ruined us, also be perished by
      this
      religion. I do not accuse this Hindu religion
      unnecessarily. Nobody will
      prosper by the Hindu religion. That religion itself is a ruinous religion.

      Why did our
      country go under the rule of foreigners? Till 1945 Europe
      witnessed the wars. In whatever number soldiers were killed that number was
      filled by new recruitment. That time nobody could say that we had won the war.
      Everything is altogether different of our country. If Kshatriyas are
      killed, we are doomed. Had we right to possess the arms, this country would not
      have gone in servitude. No one could have been able to conquer this country.

      By
      remaining in the Hindu religion nobody can prosper in any way. Because of the
      stratification in Hindu religion, it is fact that higher varnas and
      castes are benefitted. But, what about the others? The moment Brahmin woman
      delivers a child, her eyes are focussed towards a post of High Court Judge
      where it is lying vacant. On the contrary, when our sweeper woman delivers a
      child, her eyes are focussed on a post of sweeper where it is lying vacant. The
      Vama-System of Hindu religion is responsible for such a strange social
      structure. What improvement can take place from this? Prosperity can be
      achieved only in the Buddhist religion.

      In the
      Buddhist religion 75% Bhikkhus were Brahmins. 25% were the Shudras and
      others. But the Lord Buddha said, “O, Bhikkhus, you have come from
      different countries and castes. Rivers flow separately when they flow in their
      provinces, but they lose their identity when they meet the sea. They become one
      and the same. The Buddhist Sangh is like an ocean. In this Sangh all
      are equal. “After they merge into the ocean, it is not possible to
      identify the water of Ganga or Mahanadi.
      Similarly when we join Buddha Sangh, we lose our caste and become equal.
      There is only one Great Man who preached such equality, and that Great Man is
      Lord Buddha. (Thunderous applause).

      Some people
      say, “Why did you take so much time to get converted ? What were you doing
      all these days? This is the question of importance. Convincing a religion is
      not an easy task. That is not the mission of a single person. Any person
      thinking of religion will come to know this. No man in the world shoulder as
      much responsibility as do I. If I get a Song life, I will fulfill my planned
      work. (Shouts of ‘ long live Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar’) “.

      Some people
      will say what will happen if Mahar becomes Buddhist. I tell them they should
      not say so. It will be dangerous for them. Higher and wealthy class will not
      feel the necessity of religion. The officers among them have bungalows to live
      in, servants to serve them, they have money, wealth and respect, the men of
      such sort need not think of religion or to be worried about it.

      Religion is
      necessary for the poor. Religion is necessary for the Depressed people. The
      poor man survives on hope. The root of life lies in hope. What will happen to
      the life if the hope is lost? Religion makes hopeful, and gives a message to
      the depressed and the poor – do not be afraid, life will be hopeful, it will
      be! Therefore, the poor and the depressed mankind clings to the religion.

      When the
      Christian religion entered Europe, the condition of Rome and neighbouring countries was very
      distressful. People could not get enough food. That time hotchpotch (Khichadi)
      was distributed among the poor people. Who become the followers of the Christ?
      Poor and Depressed people. The poor and lower class people of the Europe become Christian.  Gibbon had said that
      Christianity is the religion of the beggars. Gibbon is not alive to give the
      answer to how Christian religion became the religion of all in Europe,
      otherwise he would have had to answer this.

      Some people
      will say that this Buddhism is the religion of Maharas and Mangas. The Brahmin
      people used to call Lord Guatam as ‘Bho Guatam’ means ‘Are Gautam’. In this way
      the Brahmins used to tease the Lord Buddha. They have to see how many idols of
      Rama, Krishna and Shankara will be sold out in
      the foreign countries. if they are put to sell. On the contrary, if the idols
      of Lord Buddha are kept for sale, not a single idol will be left out (Loud
      clapping). That is too much in India,
      go and show something outside, the name known to the world is of the Lord
      Buddha. Then how the propagation of this religion will be prevented!

      We will
      follow our path, you follow yours. We have found a new path. This is the day of
      hope. This is the path of elevation and progress. This is not the new path.
      This path has not been borrowed from any where. This path is from here, it is
      purely Indian. The Buddhist religion servived here for 2000 years in India. Truly
      speaking, we feel regretted why we did not embrace the Buddhism earlier. The
      principles preached by the Lord Buddha are immortal. But the Lord Buddha did
      not make such claim. There is a provision for change with the change of
      time.    Such generosity is not found in any religion.

      The main
      reason of destruction of the Buddhist religion is the invasions of Muslims.
      Muslims destroyed the idols of the Lord Buddha in their invasions. This was the
      first attack on the Buddhist religion. Because of the fear of their invasions,
      the Buddhist Bhikkhus fled. Some went to Tibet,
      some went to China
      and some went elsewhere. To defend the religion laity is essential. There was a
      Greek King in the North-West Frontier. His name was Milinda. This King always
      used to debate. He delighted in debates. He used to tell the Hindus, one who is
      a debator should come forward and debate. He had made many unanswerable.

      Once, he thought to debate with the
      Buddhist people and he asked to fetch any Buddhist debator. So the Buddhist
      people requested Nagsena that he should represent the Buddhists in that debate.
      Nagsena was learned. Earlier he was Brahmin. What debate took place between
      Nagsena and Milinda is known to the world through a book. The name of that book
      is ‘Milinda Panha’. Milinda asked a question, ‘Why does the religion decline?’
      Nagsena answered and gave three reasons for it.

      The first reason is that a
      particular religion itself is immature. The basic principles of that religion
      have no depth. It becomes a temporal religion and such religion survives only
      for short period.

      The second reason is that, if there
      are no learned preachers in that religion, then the religion declines. Learned
      persons should preach the philosophy of the religion. If the preachers of the
      religion are not prepared to hold debate with the opponents, then the religion
      declines.

      And the third reason is that, the
      religion and the religious principles are only for learned persons. For common
      people there are temples and shrines. They go there and worship super­natural
      power
      .

      While embracing
      Buddhism we should keep in mind these reasons. No one can say that the
      principles of Buddhism are temporal. Today, the whole world respects all the
      Principles of Buddhism even after 2500 years. There are 2000 Buddhist Institu­tions
      in America.
      At the expense of 3 Lac rupees, a Buddhist temple has been built in England. In Germany also,
      there are 3 to 4 thousand Buddhist Institutions. Buddha’s principles are
      immortal. Nevertheless the Buddha has not claimed that this is the religion of
      God. The Buddha said that his father was a common man; his mother was a common
      woman. If you feel, accept this religion. If this religion appeals to your
      reason, then accept it. Such generosity has not been allowed in any other
      religion.

      What is the
      original foundation of Buddhism? There is tre­mendous difference between the
      Buddha’s religion and other religions. It is not possible to have changes in
      other religions because those religions relate man with God. Other religions
      preach that God has created the Nature. God has created all-sky, air, moon, sun
      etc. God has left nothing for us to do, so we must worship God. According to
      the Christian religion, after death, there is a Day of Judgement, and all
      depends on that Judgement. There is no place for God and Soul in the Buddha
      religion. Lord Buddha said there is sorrow

      all over the world, 90% people are suffering from sorrow. To emancipate those depressed and poor
      people from sorrow is the
      principal task of the Buddha’s religion. What else did Karl Marx tell different
      from Lord Buddha’s saying? Lord Buddha did not tell anything in a zigzag way.

      Brothers, I
      have told you whatever, I wanted to say. In all respects this religion is
      perfect. It has no stigma at all. The principles of Hinduism are such from
      which enthusiasm cannot be created. From thousands of years till the other day
      not a single graduate or a learned man was produced from our society. I do not
      hesitate to say, there was a woman who used to sweep my school; she was
      Maratha. She did not touch me. My mother used to tell me to call elder person
      as Mama (uncle). I used to call the postman as Mama (Loud
      laughter). In my childhood I felt thirsty in the school. I told so to my
      teacher. The teacher called the peon for my protection and told him to take me
      to the tap. We went to the tap. The peon opened the tap and I drank the water.
      Usually at school I did not get water to drink. Later I was offered some
      service as District Judge. But I did not get stick with that sort of job. I had
      a problem - who would carry out the mission of my brothers, so I did not get
      stick in that bondage.

      As an
      individual, nothing in this country is impossible for me (clapping).
      How the arranged declivity of Vaishya,
      Kshatriya
      and Brahmin on your head will be tumbled down and
      destroyed, is the real question.
      Hence, it is my duty to give you in all
      respects the knowledge of this religion. By writing books, I will remove all
      your doubts and suspicions and will try to lead you to a stage of full
      knowledge. At least at present, you should have faith in me.

      However, your responsibility is
      great too. Your behaviour should be such that other people will honour and
      respect you. Do not think that this religion means we have got stuck with a
      corpse around our neck. As far as the Buddhism is concerned, the land of India is of no account. We must resolve
      to follow Buddhist religion in the finest way. It should not happen that the
      Mahar people brought the Buddhism to disgrace, so we must have firm determination.
      If we accomplish this, then we will thrive ourselves, our nation, and not only
      that but the whole world also. Because the Buddhist religion only will be the
      saviour of the world. Unless there is justice, there will be no peace in the
      world.

      This new
      path is full of responsibilities. The young should keep in mind that we had
      made some resolutions and expressed some desires. They should not become
      selfish idlers. We should decide that, at least, we should give 20th part of
      our income for this purpose. I want to take all of you with me. Initially
      Tathagat gave Deeksha to few individuals and directed them: “Spread this
      religion”. After that Yasha and his forty friends embraced the Buddhism. Yasha
      belonged to rich family. Lord Buddha said to them, what is this religion like?
      The religion is “Bahujan hitay bahujan sukhay, Lokanucampay, Dhamma adi
      Kalyanam, Madhya Kalyanama,
      Paryavasan Kalayanam.” Tathagata decided
      the path of preaching His religion according to the conditions of that time.
      Now we must have to make the mechanism. After this ceremony each one should
      give deeksha to each one.
      I
      proclaim that every Buddhist person has the right to give Deeksha.

      [2]

      Thus, Dr.
      Babasaheb Ambedkar concluded his speech under thunderous applause from the
      Buddhists and. invitees.


      ONLINE TRAINING ON PRECEPTS AND TRADE-76


      6

      Ideals and Goals in Buddhist
      Microeconomics


      “Anyone with faith, leading to truthfulness, training without end,
      patience and self-sacrifice, will gain supreme wealth for themselves because
      they avoid sorrow in lives to come”

       

      Threefold Goals in Buddhist Economics

      Having studied the economic practices applicable to happiness in this
      lifetime and the next, in this chapter we shall look at the goals of
      such practice — because without such goals clearly in mind, it is unlikely
      that anyone will have the patience to put the forgoing principles into
      practice. 

      Buddhist microeconomics are
      designed to work on three levels (these determine the true value of any
      economic activity): 

      1. the
        purely materialist level (material comfort & economic
        security)  
      2. the
        material/spiritual level (mental wellbeing)  
      3. the
        purely spiritual level (inner freedom)  

      To
      deal with each level in turn:

      The Purely Materialist level

      Practice on the purely materialist level corresponds to the first question from
      the Diighajaa.nu Sutta (see Box
      2) concerning happiness in the present lifetime. When one’s only
      aim in life is to find immediate material convenience for oneself, so that we
      can avoid hardship, the Buddha’s teaching can be summarized by the acronym
      ‘U-A-Ka-Sa’, namely:

      U

      meaning

      u.t.thaanasampadaa or diligent acquisition

      A

      meaning

      aarakkhasampadaa or conservation

      Ka

      meaning

      kalyaa.namittata or having good friends

      Sa

      meaning

      samajiivita or living within one’s means

       

      The
      aim on this level, which we must not lose sight of is standing on our own two
      feet instead of being a burden on society — achieving by scrupulous means a
      moderate degree of material comfort and economic security for oneself and one’s
      family. The most important guiding principle in accumulating wealth for oneself
      is to avoid the bad karma of taking advantage of others.

      The Material/Spiritual level

      Practice on the material/spiritual level corresponds to the second question
      from the Diighajaa.nu Sutta (see Box
      2) concerning happiness in lifetimes to come. The Buddha’s
      teaching on this level can be summarized by the acronym ‘Sa-Sii-Caa-Pa’,
      namely:

      Sa

      meaning

      saddhaa or faith

      Sii

      meaning

      siila or self-discipline

      Caa

      meaning

      caaga or self-sacrifice

      Pa

      meaning

      pa~n~naa or wisdom

       

      The aim on this level, which
      we must not lose sight of are:


      BOX 4: Aa.lavaka Sutta
      (S.i.213-215)

      The aims in Buddhist economics are derived from the Aa.lavaka Sutta.
      This Sutta consists of the answers given by the Buddha to thirteen questions
      of asked by a man-eating ogre [yakkha] called Aa.lavaka.

      1. What
        possession is the supreme pride of all men?
        : The Buddha replied that faith
        [saddha] is the possession which brings men supreme pride. The
        Buddha started with faith because (as mentioned earlier in the context
        of happiness in lives to come
        ) it is the initial brightness in the
        mind which will give us sufficient continuous illumination on a subject
        of Dhamma to allow us to practice it until we can understand it through
        our reasoning.
         
      2. What
        practice brings man supreme happiness?
        : The Buddha replied that the
        practice of virtue [???] can bring us real happiness. Our modern
        neglect of virtue and good character are relatively recent, being
        traceable back to the work of Kant who was the first to ‘invent’ happiness
        as distinct from virtue.
          
      3. Which
        is the taste supreme amongst all other tastes?
        : The Buddha answered that
        sincerety [sacca] is king amongst the flavours — and this will
        be all too apparent to anyone who has been deceived or who has been
        victim to back-stabbing or ingratitude.
          
      4. What
        do the wise praise as making one’s life supreme? :
        The Buddha answered that it is
        ‘wise living’ that is praised by the wise as supreme (the value of
        wisdom being as mentioned earlier in the context of happiness in lives to
        come).
         
      5. How
        can a person get to the other side

        (literally ‘to cross the pool’)? : The Buddha answered that people can
        get to the other side through faith. In the Buddha’s meaning the pool or
        ‘the ocean’ means the ‘cycle of existence’ [samsara]. He answered
        that faith [saddha] will be the quality to get one there, because
        faith in the authenticity of the Buddha’s enlightenment gives the
        perseverence to struggle against the defilements in order to enter upon
        Nirvana in the same way that the Buddha did.
         
      6. How
        can a person cross the ocean?

        : The Buddha replied that it is non-recklessness that will help us cross
        the ocean.
         
      7. How
        can one go beyond suffering?

        : The Buddha replied that suffering should be overcome by striving.
          
      8. How
        can one become pure?
        :
        The Buddha replied that one can become pure by one’s wisdom.
         
      9. How
        can one avail oneself of wealth?

        The Buddha answered that those who choose a suitable job, are skilled at
        what they do and who are diligent rather than lazy, will manage to amass
        wealth for themselves.
         
      10. How
        can one avail oneself of honour?

        The Buddha said that honour accrues to those who are honest. Even
        politicians who want to make their way to the top should never take the
        ‘easy way out’ of going back on their electoral promises. All it takes is
        for politicians to do as they promise and every one of their words will
        take on a built-in power to accomplish. By this simple policy, within a
        very short time, any such politician will soon be able to become the
        praise of the nation.
         
      11. How
        can one avail oneself of friends?

        The Buddha answered that the bonds of friendship can be secured by one’s
        generosity. If all we can think about is getting the most for ourselves,
        without sharing anything with others, no-one will want to be our friend
        . However, if you are the sort of person who rushes to make a present of
        whatever you receive, you will soon be surrounded by friends.
         
      12. How
        can one develop wisdom?

        The Buddha replied that one can attain wisdom by having faith in the
        virtues that led the arahants to attain Nirvana, by avoiding
        recklessness, being thorough and listening carefully to teachings. In
        brief, if you want to attain wisdom, you need to start by listening
        carefully to teachings — however, even before you listen to a teaching,
        you need to start having a heart of faith. Any person who thus accepts
        the teaching of the arahants (i.e. is endowed with faith) with the
        intention of entering upon Nirvana, cannot be considered reckless. If
        such a person listens thoroughly to those teachings, they will avail themselves
        of wisdom. The whole process must start with faith. Without faith, one
        doesn’t even take the first step in the right direction. There is no
        wisdom without faith as its precursor. However, once one has faith, the
        other virtues like non-recklessness, thoroughness and good listening
        will bring forth wisdom.
         
      13. How
        can one avoid sorrow when leaving this world for the next?
        Apparently the ogre was also
        afraid of falling into hell because the next question he was to ask the
        Buddha was how one can avoid sorrow when leaving this world for the
        next. The ogre would like to earn a place in heaven for himself, but had
        not yet found the right path. The Buddha taught that if one is to avoid
        sorrow in the worlds to comeone must have:  
        • truthfulness
          [sacca]  
        • training
          oneself without end [dama]  
        • patience
          [di.thi]  
        • self-sacrifice
          [caaga]  

      For our purposes in the analysis of Buddhist economics, the most
      important answers are those to questions 1, 5 and 13.

       


      BOX 5: Some background on ogres

      In Buddhist cosmology, ogres [yakkha] come in several
      categories. 

      • Half-angelic
        ogres:

        the first category of ogres are half-man, half-angel and therefore
        belong to the lowest rung of the fortunate realms [sugati-bhuumi].
        Some can float in the air and keep the Precepts, meditating in earnest.
        Some are possessed of mental powers, but only partially — sometimes
        being visible to the human eye, sometimes invisible. They are
        half-material, half-ethereal, but are still considered part of the
        ‘fortunate realms’.
          
      • Fallen-angel
        ogres:
        second
        category of ogres are a little malevolent — liking to eat live human or
        animal flesh — therefore their precepts are not intact, but they may
        nonetheless have mental powers.
          
      • Physical-bodied
        ogres:

        the third category of ogres are not even able to float in the air. They
        have a material body like a human, but are able to change their
        appearance. They eat the same sort of food as humans, but some are
        ferocious while others keep the Precepts.  

      Aa.lavaka belonged to the category of ‘fallen-angel’ ogres. He
      could float in the air because at the time when he was still a human, he had
      performed a mixture of meritorious and demeritorious deeds. Through the power
      of the merit, he gained the ability ot float in the air at will, along with
      various other miraculous powers — however the powers would work only within
      the boundaries of his own territory.

       


      The Purely Spiritual level

      The purely spiritual level is not dealt with in the Diighajaa.nu Sutta. His
      questions covered only the lower two levels. The question remains of what sort
      of economics one needs if one wants to reach beyond the heaven realms to
      Nirvana and a complete end of all defilements. In the answers of the Buddha, He
      has already used the word ‘ariya‘ or ‘transcendental’ several times –
      especially in the last virtue of the second set of practices for happiness in
      lives to come — where wisdom. The aim on this level, which we must not lose
      sight of is to bring oneself to an end of defilements.

      INTEGRATION OF MICROECONOMIC PRACTICE ON THREE LEVELS:

      The Economical Mandala of
      Phrabhavanaviriyakhun

      In the present day, educationalists and theoreticians alike need to produce
      graphics to help them to plan the economy for the years ahead. However, charts
      and graphics are not something that are an innovation for our generation –
      because ever since ancient times, Thai Buddhists have had a way of modelling
      economics as follows:

      They would summarized the
      practices on the level of a purely material goal in the form of a mandala
      to make it look a little more sacred. In the old days, when monks went to give
      a house an inaugural blessing, they used to mark such a diagram above the door.
      Sometimes the monk would not write the abbreviations in Thai, but in the Khom
      language of the old scriptures. In the beginning everyone would know the
      meaning of the abbreviations on the door lintel. Later generations changed the
      Khom characters to Thai characters for ease of comprehension. 

      They added a second layer of
      economic abbreviations around the original in order to denote practice on the
      level of a material/spiritual goal as follows:

      Usually the invited monk
      would write the mandala in flour mixed with water — but unfortunately
      in most cases, the monk would just write the mandala and return to the
      temple without explaining its meaning. Thus the owner of the house in later
      generations had no idea of the Buddhist economic principles encapsulated
      therein. They didn’t know the meaning and assumed that the mandala was
      sacred in itself — so once the monk had returned, they felt relieved that they
      had already done their duty as a good Buddhist and went back to playing poker
      in the assumption that they would soon be rich.

      This mandala so far
      gives only practices for economic aims on the material and material/spiritual
      levels. If you want to go all the way and have an economic aim that will take
      you to Nirvana, you need to add the Noble Eightfold Path to each of the eight
      corners of the mandala as illustrated in the diagram below:

      .
      . . where the abbreviations have the following meanings:

      Di

      meaning

      Sammaa Di.t.thii or Right View

      Sa.n

      meaning

      Sammaa Sa.nkappa or Right Intention

      Vac

      meaning

      Sammaa Vaacaa or Right Speech

      Ka

      meaning

      Sammaa Kammanta or Right Action

      Aj

      meaning

      Sammaa Aajiiva or Right Livelihood

      Vay

      meaning

      Sammaa Vayaamaa or Right Effort

      Sat

      meaning

      Sammaa Sati or Right Mindfulness

      Sam

      meaning

      Sammaa Samaadhi or Right Concentration

       

      Because
      the people of old found the mandala so important, but feared that it
      would be lost, they made mandalas of it on cloth — making the famous ‘yantra
      cloths found throughout Thailand. Later finding that even the ‘yantra
      cloths were not very long-lasting, they engraved the pattern on plates of gold,
      silver or other metals. Later, with the wish to be able to take the teaching around
      with them, they made miniatures in on small metal rolls and made necklaces out
      of them.

      These were skilful means of
      ancient Thai Buddhists who tried to integrate Buddhist teachings into everyday
      life on every level — especially so as not to get carried away with madness
      for material wealth, and in order to focus instead on cultivating spiritual
      values. Practising one’s livelihood, according to the principles of Buddhism
      would immediately grasp that, one’s duty as a Buddhist was to avoid one’s livelihood
      being the reason for accumulating demerit in one’s life. With such principles
      in mind, even though it might be a great temptation to make a quick profit from
      unscrupulous practices, if one knew that it involved the Wrong Livelihood
      prohibited by the Buddha, one would rather sacrifice one’s life than to do it.

      In conclusion, you can say
      that Buddhist economics teaches us to interact economically in life without
      abandoning one’s Dhamma principles.

      Wealth
      is lost nothing is lost


      INTERNATIONAL JIVAKA
      PRESUMPTIVE HEALTH PROTECTION (IJPHP)
            


      Bacopa monnieri


      Bacopa monnieri

      Scientific classification
      Kingdom: Plantae
      (unranked): Angiosperms
      (unranked): Eudicots
      (unranked): Asterids
      Order: Lamiales
      Family: Plantaginaceae
      Genus: Bacopa
      Species: B. monnieri
      Binomial name
      Bacopa monnieri
      L. Pennell[1]
      Synonyms

      Bacopa monniera
      Bramia monnieri (L.) Pennell
      Gratiola monnieria L.
      Herpestes monnieria (L.) Kunth
      Herpestis fauriei H.Lev.
      Herpestis monniera
      Herpestris monnieria
      Lysimachia monnieri L.
      Moniera euneifolia

      Brahmi herb at Talktora Gardens


      Bacopa monnieri (Coastal Waterhyssop, Brahmi, Thyme-leafed gratiola, Water
      hyssop
      ) is a perennial,
      creeping herb whose habitat includes wetlands and muddy
      shores. Brahmi is also the name given to Centella asiatica by some botanists,[2][3] while others consider that to be a
      mistake that arose during the 16th century, when brahmi was confused
      with mandukaparni, a name for C. asiatica.[4]

      Description

      The leaves
      of this plant are succulent and relatively thick. Leaves are oblanceolate and
      are arranged oppositely on the stem. The flowers are small and white, with four or five petals. Its
      ability to grow in water makes it a popular aquarium plant. It can even grow in slightly brackish conditions. Propagation is often
      achieved through cuttings.

      Ecology

      It commonly
      grows in marshy areas throughout India,
      Nepal, Sri Lanka, China,
      Taiwan, and Vietnam, and is also found in Florida and other southern states of the USA
      where it can be grown in damp conditions by the pond or bog garden.

      Uses

      Medicine

      This plant
      has a number of uses in Ayurveda. It is a
      traditional treatment for epilepsy and asthma.[5] It has antioxidant properties, reducing oxidation of
      fats in the bloodstream.[5] Studies in humans show that an extract
      of the plant has antianxiety effects.[5]

      It is
      listed as a nootropic, a drug that enhances cognitive
      ability. In India, this plant has also been used
      traditionally to consecrate newborn babies in the belief that it will open the
      gateway of intelligence. Laboratory studies on rats indicate that extracts of
      the plant improve memory capacity and motor learning ability.[5] Recent studies suggest bacopa may
      improve intellectual activity.[6][7][8] The sulfhydryl and polyphenol components of Bacopa monniera
      extract have also been shown to impact the oxidative stress cascade by
      scavenging reactive oxygen species, inhibiting lipoxygenase activity and
      reducing divalent metals.[9] This mechanism of action may explain
      the effect of Bacopa monniera extract in reducing beta-amyloid deposits
      in mice with Alzheimer’s disease.[9]

      Safety

      A
      standardized Bacopa monniera preparation was evaluated for safety and
      tolerability in 23 healthy adult volunteers.[10] Participants took 300 mg of the
      extract daily for 15 days, followed by 450 mg/daily for the subsequent 15
      days. No adverse effects were observed in biochemical, electrocardiographic,
      hematological or clinical parameters in the post-treatment vs. the
      pre-treatment period. There were some reports of mild gastrointestinal symptoms
      that resolved spontaneously.

       Kitchen

      It is used
      in Vietnamese cuisine,
      where it is called rau đắng. It is used in cháo cá, a variety of rice congee made with fish and nấm tràm
      mushrooms.

      International naming


      Health is lost something is lost



      A BLUE PRINT FOR LIFE


      ON  THE FUTURE

      THE WAY OF 
      DEVELOPMENT

                  The sadest
      thing in life is when a person has no hope

      for the future. Without hope, there is no future. People
      live on

      hope. People have kids to make provisions for old age; they

      raise and educate them hoping that they will be successful.

      Strengthening family ties and living in harmony with

      neighbours implies hope that we can all live together better
      in

      the future; planting trees and flowers and storing grain in the

      event of famine also exhibit a sense of boundless hope. The

      Chinese are concerned about continuing the family line over

      generations in hopes of extending life of the people. Even

      today’s organ transplants are a hope to life.


      Precepts (Character, morality
      self-discipline) is lost everything is lost


       

      FREE
      ONLINE TRAINING ON BUDDHISM FOR CHILDREN-35

      The Bull Called Delightful
      [All Deserve Respect]

      Once upon a time, in the country of Gandhara
      in northern India,
      there was a city called Takkasila. In that city the Enlightenment Being was
      born as a certain calf. Since he was well bred for strength, he was bought by a
      high class rich man. He became very fond of the gentle animal, and called him
      ‘Delightful’. He took good care of him and fed him only the best.

      When Delightful grew up into a big fine strong
      bull, he thought, “I was brought up by this generous man. He gave me such
      good food and constant care, even though sometimes there were difficulties. Now
      I am a big grown-up bull and there is no other bull who can pull as heavy a
      load as I can. Therefore, I would like to use my strength to give something in
      return to my master.”

      So he said to the man, “Sir, please find
      some wealthy merchant who is proud of having many strong bulls. Challenge him
      by saying that your bull can pull one- hundred heavily loaded bullock
      carts.”

      Following his advice, the high class rich man
      went to such a merchant and struck up a conversation. After a while, he brought
      up the idea of who had the strongest bull in the city.

      The merchant said, “Many have bulls, but
      no one has any as strong as mine.” The rich man said, “Sir, I have a
      bull who can pull one hundred heavily loaded bullock carts.” “No,
      friend, how can there be such a bull? That is unbelievable!” said the
      merchant. The other replied, “I do have such a bull, and I am willing to
      make a bet.”

      The merchant said, “I will bet a thousand
      gold coins that your bull cannot pull a hundred loaded bullock carts.” So
      the bet was made and they agreed on a date and time for the challenge.

      The merchant attached together one-hundred big
      bullock carts. He filled them with sand and gravel to make them very heavy.

      The high class rich man fed the finest rice to
      the bull called Delightful. He bathed him and decorated him and hung a
      beautiful garland of flowers around his neck.

      Then he harnessed him to the first cart and
      climbed up onto it. Being so high class, he could not resist the urge to make
      himself seem very important. So he cracked a whip in the air, and yelled at the
      faithful bull, “Pull, you dumb animal! I command you to pull, you big
      dummy!”

      The bull called Delightful thought, “This
      challenge was my idea. I have never done anything bad to my master, and yet he
      insults me with such hard and harsh words!” So he remained in his place
      and refused to pull the carts.

      The merchant laughed and demanded his winnings
      from the bet. The high class rich man had to pay him the one thousand gold
      coins. He returned home and sat down, saddened by his lost bet, and embarrassed
      by the blow to his pride.

      The bull called Delightful grazed peacefully
      on his way home. When he arrived, he saw his master sadly lying on his side. He
      asked, “Sir, why are you lying there like that? Are you sleeping? You look
      sad.” The man said, I lost a thousand gold coins because of you. With such
      a loss, how could I sleep?”

      The bull replied. “Sir, you called me
      ‘dummy’. You even cracked a whip in the air over my head. In all my life, did I
      ever break anything, step on anything, make a mess in the wrong place, or
      behave like a ‘dummy’ in any way?” He answered, “No, my pet.”

      The bull called Delightful said, “Then
      sir, why did you call me ‘dumb animal’, and insult me even in the presence of
      others? The fault is yours. I have done nothing wrong. But since I feel sorry
      for you, go again to the merchant and make the same bet for two thousand gold
      coins. And remember to use only the respectful words I deserve so well.”

      Then the high class rich man went back to the
      merchant and made the bet for two-thousand gold coins. The merchant thought it would
      be easy money. Again he set up the one hundred heavily loaded bullock carts.
      Again the rich man fed and bathed the bull, and hung a garland of flowers
      around his neck.

      When all was ready, the rich man touched
      Delightful’s forehead with a lotus blossom, having given up the whip. Thinking
      of him as fondly as if he were his own child, he said, “My son, please do
      me the honour of pulling these one hundred bullock carts.”

      Lo and behold, the wonderful bull pulled with
      all his might and dragged the heavy carts, until the last one stood in the
      place of the first.

      The merchant, with his mouth hanging open in
      disbelief, had to pay the two thousand gold coins. The onlookers were so
      impressed that they honoured the bull called Delightful with gifts. But even
      more important to the high class rich man than his winnings, was his valuable
      lesson in humility and respect.

      The moral is: Harsh words
      bring no reward. Respectful words bring honor to all.

      COMPREHENSIVE PALI COURSE

      LESSON 12

      Exercise 1

      Translate
      into English

      1.                 
      Akkhīhi oloketvā lokaṁ passanti manussā ñāna

      akkhīhi oloketvā Dhammaṁ passanti ñāṇino;

      Buddha akkhīhi oloketvā Nibbāṇañca sabbaṁ atitaṁ

      paccupannaṁ anāgataṁ passanti Tathāgatā.

       

      Having looked through the eyes, human beings see

      the world; having visualized through the eyes of

      insight the wise ones comprehend the truth; having

      envisioned through the eyes of an Awakened One,

      the Truth-Bearers penetrate into the Summum

      Bonum as well as into everything concerning the

      Past, the present and the future.

       

      2.                 
      Āma, mayaṁ acciṁ gahetvā nānā hāne puna puna

      sīghasīghaṁ gacchimha vāri
      pivituṁ. Kasm
      ā?

      Andhakāre
      araññe
        viharitvā tathā katu
      ṁ vaṭṭati.

       

       

      Yes, after holding firebrand flame, we quickly went

      To many
      places, again and again to drink water. Why?

      Having
      lived in a forest in darkness, it is to be done in

      that way.

       

      3.                 
      Pakkhino Sidddhattassa uyyānato upari sīghayāyino

      ahesuṁ. Devatto ekaṁ pakkhiṁ māresi; so

      patitvā
      Bodhisattassa satthi
      ṁpati.
      Devadatto,

      ‘pakkhiṁ dadāhi’ti, kujjhitvā Bodhisatta

      Siddhatthaṁ vadi; Bodhisatto pana pakkhiṁ

      hānetuṁ adatvā, sayameva pakkhiārakkhi.

       

      The birds were quickly moving above the garden of

      Siddhattha; Devadatta hit one bird; having fallen, it

            Dropped on the thigh of the
      Would-be-Buddha.

            Having become angry, saying: “Give me the
      bird”,

      Devadatta shouted at Siddhattha the Would-be-

      Buddha. The Would-be-Buddha, howevere, without

      allowing the bird to be killed, himself protected the bird.

       

      4.                 
      Dadhismā sappiṁ labhati, evaṁ Buddha-

      Dhammamhā
      Nibbā
      ṇaṁ. kathaṁ?
      Buddhassa

      Dhamme yeva Cattāri Ariyasaccāni honti, na

      aññatra.
      Yattha Ariyasaccāni honti, tattheva

      Nibbāṇaṁ.

       

      One gets ghee from curd, likewise the Ultimate Bliss

      from the
      Teaching of the Buddha. How? Only in the

      Teachings
      of the Buddha the Four Noble Truths are

      found not
      elsewhere. Wherever there are the Noble

      Truths,
      only there is Nibbāna.

       

      5.                 
      Mā rodatha, mā socathā’ti kasmā Buddho abhāsi?

      Yasmā loko
      anicco dukkho anattā, tasmā na kiñci pi

      Attano;
      attano attano iti kathetvā
        manussā
      socanti

      Rodanti;
      attāpi attano natthi, kasmā tena rodatha?

       

      Why did the Buddha say: “Don’t grieve?”

      Because the
      world is impermanent, unsatisfactory

      and
      unsubstantial; therefore nothing is one’s own.

      After
      saying: “My own, my own”, human beings

      Grieve and
      cry; oneself is not one’s own. Why then

      You cry?

      comments (0)
      09/15/09
      VR1 (WE ARE ONE ) +VE NEWS-MERITS makes us HAPPY MORALITY makes us HAPPIER MEDITATION makes us HAPPIEST.-Buddhist Microeconomics at the Ultimate Level-ONLINE TRAINING ON PRECEPTS AND TRADE-75- Centella Asiatica-INTERNATIONAL JIVAKA PRESUMPTIVE HEALTH PROTECTION (IJPHP) -Health is lost something is lost- A BLUE PRINT FOR LIFE ON INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS THE WAY OF TOLERANCE-Precepts (Character, morality self-discipline) is lost everything is lost-FREE ONLINE TRAINING ON BUDDHISM FOR CHILDREN-35 Best Friends [The Power of Friendship]
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      ALMOST EVERY FRAUD involves
      VICTIM

      sending “CASH” money to a
      Fraudster/Scammer.

      ABSOLUTELY DO NOT send any money
      using Western
      Union
      / Moneygram. 

      Always deal ONLY locally by meeting
      the seller/buyer in person.

      READ and UNDERSTAND the methods used
      by Fraudsters in the link above.

      ONLINE TRAINING ON PRECEPTS AND TRADE-75


      5

      Buddhist Microeconomics at the Ultimate
      Level 

       

      “The problem is not
      with the irresistable things of the world, but the desires in the human mind.
      In the absence of a desiring observer, the beautiful things of the world
      never caused harm to anyone. Thus recognizing the real root of the problem,
      the wise should make immediate efforts to avoid all elation with the
      beautiful things of the world”


       

      When looking for Buddhist
      economic principles to take us beyond the material comfort and economic
      security of Chapter 3 and the mental wellbeing of Chapter 4, to attain inner
      freedom (especially from the defilement of grasping in the mind). What becomes
      important is economic values and practices which lead to the uprooting of
      sense-pleasure from the mind. Before looking at microeconomics at the ultimate
      level, it is first necessary to examine the meaning of the word ’sensuality’.

      Sense pleasure means
      indulgence of the things that are attractive to the senses and it can be broken
      down into two components:

      1. Sense-side
        sensuality
        [kilesakama]: the emotion of desiring something
        which is a defilement existing in the mind and which forces the mind to
        grasp after things and desire for things without end with the defilements
        of grasping [raaga] and greed [lobha] as two examples of its
        products;
          
      2. Object-side
        sensuality

        [kamavatthu]
        :
        this means physical objects that
        are attractive to us — images, sounds, textures, smells and tastes which
        are attractive to the corresponding sense. An attractive image might mean
        a beautiful flower or a sparkling diamond. An attractive sound might be
        that of pleasant music, a pleasant voice, birdsong or the sound of a
        waterfall and nature. A pleasant smell might be the scent of perfume or
        the aroma of food. A pleasant taste might mean anything one finds tasty,
        whether it be sweet or sour, salty or oily which one prefers. Something
        pleasant to the touch [photabba] might be anything that which when
        it comes into physical contact with one’s body is soft or pleasant. 

      Sense
      objects have sometimes been compared to an unignited match head. The mental
      components of desire are like the striker on a matchbox. Only when sensual
      objects and their mental components come into contact with one another do we
      run the risk of becoming slave to our desires. In any case, it should be
      understood that the sensually tempting things of the world are not the reason
      for greed — they are only part of the story. The sensual grasping comes from
      the minds of men. Without the grasping in the human mind the attractive things
      of the world never caused any harm to anyone. Once knowing the danger that lies
      with the sensual grasping in the mind, the wise do their best to eradicate all
      trace of sensual grasping from the mind.

      Practically speaking, to
      eradicate grasping from the mind, one must follow the advice the Buddha gave to
      Bahiya Daaruciiriya (DhA.ii.209ff.):

      “When
      you see an object, be conscious of just the visible object (without being
      entranced thereby); when you hear a sound, be conscious of just the sound; when
      you smell or taste or touch something, be conscious of just the smell, the
      taste or the touch; and when you think of anything, be conscious of just that
      mind-object.”

      By
      doing this, one’s mind will always be without object-side sensuality [kaamavatthu].
      By not being entranced by a perception, the sense-side sensuality has no chance
      to flare up. The opposite would be the case if one becomes elated by the
      pleasing things one senses, becoming entranced thereby and allowing the emotion
      of grasping to hijack the ethical discretion of your mind.

      The Harm of Sensuality

      It follows that those whose mind is heavily under the influence of sensual
      grasping and craving for sensual pleasures will soon have reasons to take advantage
      of themselves or others or both.

      For those whose mind is
      overrun with grasping, killing, stealing, sexually molesting others and lying
      is not very far away. However, if our mind is free of sensual grasping, there
      will be no harmful thoughts to generate harmful speech or actions for us. This
      is the reason why the Buddha taught monks and laypeople alike:

      “You
      should cut down the forest of sensuality in the mind — whether it be a large
      forest or a small forest you should make sure none remains. Verily, I do say
      that sense-side sensuality is as a forest and object-side sensuality is like
      the trees.”

      When
      everyone is overrun with the defilements of greed the whole of the time, it
      causes people to seek endlessly for happiness from sensual objects — this is
      why such people are referred to as ‘consumers of sense pleasure’ [kaamabhogii].
      In such a search there is a never-ending work to do — whether it be
      acquisition, conservation or spending of wealth throughout one’s life.


       


      BOX 3:
      Kaamabhogii Sutta
      (A.v.176, S.iv.331)
       

      The Kaamabhogii Sutta tells us about the ten varieties of ’supposedly’
      wealthy people [kaamabhogii] — in so far as they deserve praise or blame.

       

      1. Consumers
        of sense-pleasure who acquire money by unscrupulous means (i.e. acquire wealth
        by wrong livelihood) and having acquired it derive no enjoyment from it,
        not do they disburse it for the benefit of others nor donate it for a
        meritorious cause. Such an attitude to wealth cannot be said to be smart
        — and on the contrary burdens them with worse demerit.
          
      2. Consumers
        of sense pleasure who acquire money by unscrupulous means, but who
        derive enjoyment from it, but who don’t disburse it for the benefit of
        others or donate it for meritorious causes. Such an attitude to wealth
        is not smart in the acquisition and not particularly smart in the
        spending — especially in the conservation of wealth, it is definitely
        not smart;
          
      3. Consumers
        of sense-pleasure who acquire money by unscrupulous means, but who
        derive enjoyment from their wealth, disburse their wealth for others,
        donating it for meritorious causes too;
          
      4. Consumers
        of sense-pleasure who acquire wealth by a mixture of scrupulous and
        unscrupulous means (wealth in this case might be acquired partly
        honestly by a salary, but the rest might come from bribes — i.e. both
        right and wrong livelihood) — but who derive no enjoyment from their
        wealth, don’t disburse their wealth for others and don’t donate it for
        meritorious causes. Such an attitude to wealth may or may not be smart
        in the acquisition and is definitely not smart in the spending and
        saving;
          
      5. Consumers
        of sense-pleasure who acquire wealth by a mixture of scrupulous and
        unscrupulous means, who derive enjoyment from it, but fail to disburse
        it for the benefit of others or to donate it for meritorious causes.
        Such an attitude to wealth may or may not be smart in the acquisition,
        is reasonably smart in the spending, but not in the saving;
          
      6. Consumers
        of sense-pleasure who acquire wealth by a mixture of scrupulous and
        unscrupulous means, who derive enjoyment from it and disburse it for the
        benefit of others and also donate it for meritorious causes. Such an
        attitude to wealth may or may not be smart in the acquisition, but which
        is smart in the usage and the saving;
          
      7. Consumers
        of sense-pleasure who acquire money solely by scrupulous means (solely
        by right livelihood) but who derive no enjoyment from their wealth and
        neither disburse their wealth for the benefit of others nor donate it
        for meritorious causes. Such an attitude to wealth can be considered
        smart in the acquisition but not smart in the usage or the saving;
          
      8. Consumers
        of sense-pleasure who acquire money solely by scrupulous means, who
        derive enjoyment from their wealth and but do not disburse their wealth
        for the benefit of others nor donate it for meritorious causes. Such an
        attitude to wealth can be considered smart in the acquisition and usage
        but not smart in the saving;
          
      9. Consumers
        of sense-pleasure who acquire money solely by scrupulous means, who
        derive enjoyment from their wealth and also do disburse their wealth for
        the benefit of others and donate it for meritorious causes. However in
        spite of all their good actions, the people of these categories remain
        blind to the harmfulness of sense-pleasure — they lack the wisdom to be
        motivated to renounce sense-pleasure. Such an attitude to wealth can be
        considered smart in the acquisition, the usage and the saving, but
        because such people lack insight into the harmfulness of sense pleasure,
        they lack the power to liberate themselves from the clutches of the
        defilements of sense-pleasure — because they haven’t had the chance to
        associate sufficiently with the wise;
          
      10. Consumers
        of sense-pleasure who acquire money solely by scrupulous means, who
        derive pleasure from their wealth, who disburse their wealth for others
        and donate it for meritorious causes. In addition, those of this
        category are no longer blind to the harmfulness of sense-pleasure –
        thus they have the wisdom to want to escape from the cycle of existence
        [sa.msara] and this wisdom will allow them to renounce attachment
        to the use of the wealth. Such an attitude to wealth can be considered
        smart in the acquisition, the usage and the saving and furthermore
        allows one to overcome oneís defilements, ultimately to enter upon
        Nirvana.  

      This classification offers a very complete model of how
      development of the mind can fit in with economic progress. The Buddha taught
      the Kaamabhogii Sutta to Anaathapi.n.dika. Anaathapi.n.dika was the
      Savatthii-based banker who was the sponsor for the building of Buddhism’s
      first temple at the Jetavana Grove — but he was moreover renowned for his
      wisdom. By teaching the Kaamabhogii Sutta to Anaathapi.n.dika, it was as if
      the Buddha intended to appreciate Anaathapi.n.dika for his belonging to the
      tenth category.

       

      From the Kaamabhogii Sutta,
      it can thus be concluded that the Buddha enumerated ten different sorts of
      attitude subscribed to by people as shown in the following table:

       

      Ten Attitudes to Wealth [kaamabhogii]

       

      Acquisition

      spending

      insight into harm of sense pleasure

      for self

      for others

      for meritorious work

      1.

      wholly unscrupulous

      derives no pleasure from
      wealth

      doesn’t share with others

      doesn’t donate

      blind to harm of sense
      pleasure

      2.

      wholly unscrupulous

      derives pleasure from
      wealth

      doesn’t share with others

      doesn’t donate

      blind to harm of sense
      pleasure

      3.

      wholly unscrupulous

      derives pleasure from
      wealth

      shares with others

      does donate

      blind to harm of sense
      pleasure

      4.

      parially unscrupulous, partially scrupulous

      derives no pleasure from
      wealth

      doesn’t share with others

      doesn’t donate

      blind to harm of sense
      pleasure

      5.

      parially unscrupulous, partially scrupulous

      derives pleasure from
      wealth

      doesn’t share with others

      doesn’t donate

      blind to harm of sense
      pleasure

      6.

      parially unscrupulous, partially scrupulous

      derives pleasure from
      wealth

      shares with others

      does donate

      blind to harm of sense
      pleasure

      7.

      wholly scrupulous

      derives no pleasure from
      wealth

      doesn’t share with others

      doesn’t donate

      blind to harm of sense
      pleasure

      8.

      wholly scrupulous

      derives pleasure from
      wealth

      doesn’t share with others

      doesn’t donate

      blind to harm of sense
      pleasure

      9.

      wholly scrupulous

      derives pleasure from
      wealth

      shares with others

      does donate

      blind to harm of sense
      pleasure

      10.

      wholly scrupulous

      derives pleasure from
      wealth

      shares with others

      does donate

      has insight into the harm
      of sense pleasure

      If a person can acquire their wealth solely by scrupulous means, and if they
      can manage to derive pleasure from that wealth, while at the same time
      disbursing their wealth for others and donating it for meritorious work, and
      also having the insight to see the harm of sense-desire and the importance of
      extricating oneself from it, this is the crème-de-la-crème of the ten
      attitudes.

      Wealth
      is lost nothing is lost



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      Centella
      Asiatica

       Family Name : APIACEAE 

      Botanical Name : CENTELLA ASIATICA 

      Common Name : PENNYWORT, INDIAN PENNYWORT,
      ARTAYNIYA-E HINDI, JAL BRAHMI 

      Part Used : WHOLE PLANT 

      Habitat : Grown in waterlogged places throughout
      India

      Uses : : It is Tonic,
      Diuretic and Alterative. It is used in treatment of leporasy and known to
      ameliorate the symptoms of the disease and improves general health of the
      patient. It is a brain tonic and stimulates hair growth. 

      Centella asiatica is a small herbaceous annual
      plant of the family Apiaceae, native to Asia.
      Common names include Gotu Kola, Asiatic Pennywort, Antanan, Pegaga, and Brahmi
      (although this last name is shared with Bacopa monnieri and other herbs). It is
      used as a medicinal herb in Ayurvedic medicine and traditional Chinese
      medicine. 

      The stems are slender, creeping stolons, green
      to reddish green in color, interconnecting one plant to another. It has
      long-stalked, green, reniform leaves with rounded apices which have smooth
      texture with palmately netted veins. The leaves are born on pericladial
      petioles, around 20 cm. The rootstock consists of rhizomes, growing vertically
      down. They are creamish in color and covered with root hairs. 

      The flowers are pinkish to red in color, born in
      small, rounded bunches (umbels) near the surface of the soil. Each flower is
      partly enclosed in two green bracts. The hermaphrodite flowers are minute in
      size (less than 3 mm), with 5-6 corolla lobes per flower. Each flower bears
      five stamens and two styles. 

      The crop matures in three months and the whole
      plant, including the roots, is harvested manually. When eaten raw as a salad
      leaf, pegaga is thought to help maintain youthfulness. A decoction of juice
      from the leaves is thought to relieve hypertension. This juice is also used as
      a general tonic for good health. A poultice of the leaves is also used to treat
      open sores. Interestingly, chewing on the plant for several hours induces
      entheogenic meditation, similar to the effects of salvia divinorum, although
      this practice is widely considered dangerous, as it can cause temporomandibular
      joint pains.

      Health is lost something is lost



      A BLUE PRINT FOR LIFE

      ON  INTERNATIONAL
      AFFAIRS

      THE WAY OF  TOLERANCE

                  The
      Subcommentry on Flower Ornament Sutra

      [Huyan Jing Sui Yanyi Chao] teaches, “The mind, the

      Buddha, and all sentient beings are all the same.” Mutual

      respect, forgiveness, by all peoples and nations. Because we

      all reside on this earth, we should all have the same hopes
      of

      living together and promoting the idea of equality between

      the Buddha and sentient beings, the sage and the oerdinary,

      and oneself and others, and eliminate divisions between

      peoples and nations. Everyone should adopt the international

      perspective of “extending in the ten directions and

      throughout the three time periods, “taking” the world as a

      single family” as their starting point. This will allow
      everyone

      to embrace the Dhamma realms and become a citizen of the

      world, protecting the environment and caring for all

      resources. By treating others as we would like to be
      treated,

      we can awaken ourselves as well as others, improve  life

      and have faith, form good affinities with all sentient
      beings,

      in this way can we promote world peace together.


      Precepts (Character, morality
      self-discipline) is lost everything is lost



      FREE
      ONLINE TRAINING ON BUDDHISM FOR CHILDREN-35


      Best Friends
      [The Power of Friendship]


      Before the time of this story, people in Asia used to say that there would never be a time when an
      elephant and a dog would be friends. Elephants simply did not like dogs, and
      dogs were afraid of elephants.

      When dogs are frightened by those who are
      bigger than they are, they often bark very loudly, to cover up their fear. When
      dogs used to do this when they saw elephants, the elephants would get annoyed
      and chase them. Elephants had no patience at all when it came to dogs. Even if
      a dog were quiet and still, any nearby elephant would automatically attack him.
      This is why everybody agreed that elephants and dogs were ‘natural enemies’,
      just like lions and tigers, or cats and mice.

      Once upon a time, there was a royal bull
      elephant, who was very well fed and cared for. In the neighbourhood of the
      elephant shed, there was a scrawny, poorly fed, stray dog. He was attracted by
      the smell of the rich sweet rice being fed to the royal elephant. So he began
      sneaking into the shed and eating the wonderful rice that fell from the
      elephant’s mouth. He liked it so much, that soon he would eat nowhere else.
      While enjoying his food, the big mighty elephant did not notice the tiny shy
      stray dog.

      By eating such rich food, the once underfed
      dog gradually got bigger and stronger, and became very handsome looking. The
      good-natured elephant began to notice him. Since the dog had gotten used to
      being around the elephant, he had lost his fear. So he did not bark at him.
      Because he was not annoyed by the friendly dog, the elephant gradually got used
      to him.

      Slowly they became friendlier and friendlier
      with each other. Before long, neither would eat without the other, and they
      enjoyed spending their time together. When they played, the dog would grab the
      elephant’s heavy trunk, and the elephant would swing him forward and backward,
      from side to side, up and down, and even in circles! So it was that they became
      ‘best friends’, and wanted never to be separated.

      Then one day a man from a remote village, who
      was visiting the city, passed by the elephant shed. He saw the frisky dog, who
      had become strong and beautiful. He bought him from the mahout, even though he
      didn’t really own him. He took him back to his home village, without anyone
      knowing where that was.

      Of course, the royal bull elephant became very
      sad, since he missed his best friend the dog. He became so sad that he didn’t
      want to do anything, not even eat or drink or bathe. So the mahout had to
      report this to the king, although he said nothing about selling the friendly
      dog.

      It just so happened that the king had an
      intelligent minister who was known for his understanding of animals. So he told
      him to go and find out the reason for the elephant’s condition.

      The wise minister went to the elephant shed.
      He saw at once that the royal bull elephant was very sad. He thought,
      “This once happy elephant does not appear to be sick in any way. But I
      have seen this condition before, in men and animals alike. This elephant is
      grief-stricken, probably due to the loss of a very dear friend.”

      Then he said to the guards and attendants,
      “I find no sickness. He seems to be grief-stricken due to the loss of a
      friend. Do you know if this elephant had a very close friendship with
      anyone?”

      They told him how the royal elephant and the
      stray dog were best friends. “What happened to this stray dog?” asked
      the minister. He was taken by an unknown man,” they replied, “and we
      do not know where he is now.”

      The minister returned to the king and said,
      “Your majesty, I am happy to say your elephant is not sick. As strange as
      it may sound, he became best friends with a stray dog! Since the dog has been
      taken away, the elephant is grief-stricken and does not feel like eating or
      drinking or bathing. This is my opinion.”

      The king said, “Friendship is one of
      life’s most wonderful things. My minister, how can we bring back my elephant’s
      friend and make him happy again?”

      “My lord,” replied the minister,
      “I suggest you make an official announcement, that whoever has the dog who
      used to live at the royal elephant shed, will be fined.”

      This was done, and when the villager heard of
      it, he released the dog from his house. He was filled with great happiness and
      ran as fast as he could, straight back to his best friend, the royal bull
      elephant.

      The elephant was so overjoyed, that he picked
      up his friend with his trunk and sat him on top of his head. The happy dog
      wagged his tail, while the elephant’s eyes sparkled with delight. They both
      lived happily ever after.

      Meanwhile, the king was very pleased by his
      elephant’s full recovery. He was amazed that his minister seemed to be able to
      read the mind of an elephant. So he rewarded him appropriately.

      The moral is: Even ‘natural enemies’ can become ‘best friends.’




      comments (0)
      09/13/09
      VR1 (WE ARE ONE ) +VE NEWS-Mayawati reviews flood situation-Buddhist Microeconomics for the Hereafter-ONLINE TRAINING ON PRECEPTS AND TRADE-74-Wealth is lost nothing is lost-Are you a cortisol victim? -INTERNATIONAL JIVAKA PRESUMPTIVE HEALTH PROTECTION (IJPHP) -FLAVOURS All steamed up -Health is lost something is lost-A BLUE PRINT FOR LIFE ON GOVERNMENT THE WAY OF POLITICAL PARTICIPATION-COMPREHENSIVE PALI COURSE LESSON 12
      Filed under: General
      Posted by: @ 8:04 pm





      Mayawati reviews
      flood situation

       

      STAFF WRITER 20:10 HRS IST

      Lucknow, Sept 12 (PTI) Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Mayawati today directed officials to
      launch relief and rescue operations in flood-hit areas of the state on a war
      footing, assuring that dearth of funds would not be allowed to hamper their
      efforts.

      Reviewing the floods caused by incessant rains during the last two days and
      water released by neighbouring Nepal
      at her official residence here, Mayawati asked the administrative machinery of
      the concerned districts to keep round-the-clock vigil and provide prompt relief
      to the affected people.

      Directing the officials to relocate the people to safer areas, Mayawati asked
      for keeping the flood companies of the PAC in a state of high alert and sending
      them to marooned areas for providing medicines and other necessary relief
      material


      ONLINE TRAINING ON PRECEPTS AND TRADE-74


      4

      Buddhist
      Microeconomics for the Hereafter


      “If beings knew . . . the result of giving and sharing, they would
      not eat without having given nor would they allow the stain of meanness to
      obsess them and take root in their minds. Even if it were their last morsel,
      their last mouthful, they would not enjoy eating without having shared it . .
      .”

      It. 26


       

      In
      the Buddhist microeconomics of the previous chapter, in fact we have spoken
      about only the profane category of happiness due to us from following the
      Buddha’s economic principles — i.e. the happiness we can expect in the present
      lifetime. Our Buddhist ancestors saw each person’s life as a sort of business
      which could run at a profit or at a loss. For those interested only in worldly
      wealth, but who ignored spiritual values, their business was seen to trade only
      in worldly wealth. However those who consecrated time for spiritual practice
      saw their profit and loss in terms of merit and demerit — which were the way
      to transcendental wealth. If you are not born human it is going to be difficult
      to deal in merit. An angel, even though considered fortunate in birth, in fact
      still has difficulty in accruing merit. If one is born in the nether realms such
      as hell, the animal realm, as hungry ghosts or as Titans, then it is all the
      more difficult to ‘deal in merit’. It is only in the human realm that we have
      the possibility to accumulate merit for ourselves. This is why the wise were
      wont to ask the Buddha two questions whenever they had the opportunity to meet
      with Him, in the same way as Diighajaa.nu Byagghapajja who wanted to know what
      he should do for his happiness and benefit both in this lifetime and the
      next. The four practices [byagghapajjadhamma] enumerated by the Buddha
      in response to Diighajaa.nu’s second question, which are for happiness in the
      hereafter are as follows [samparaayikattha sa.mvattanika dhamma]
      (A.iv.284): 

      1. faithfulness [saddhasampadaa]:
        Faithfulness is something that arises in a person when they have
        confidence (rather than blind-belief) in the wisdom and enlightenment of
        the Buddha. The benefit of having such faith in the Lord Buddha is that
        one is prepared to practise in his footsteps. Faith is thus no
        insignificant virtue for a person to have, because it will literally
        illuminate the mind from within. In general, any person who isn’t overly
        bent on wickedness has a little brightness in their heart — but it tends
        to be fleeting like distant lightning over the horizon or the glimmer of a
        firefly. Sometimes we have a flash of inspiration in our mind and we’d
        like to follow the thought further to its conclusion, but because of lack
        of continuity we are unable to follow the train of thought to completion.
        If only we had a little faith in mind to give a continuous level of
        brightnessin the mind, we would be able to follow our inspiration through
        to its logical conclusion — e.g. to realize that the Law of Karma is
        reasonable, that those who do good actions receive good returns on their action,
        that those who do evil actions will get evil retribution — allowing one
        to find the proper pathway in life for oneself. No-one should ever
        underestimate faith because it means that the mind is sufficiently
        illuminated to understand about the enlightenment of the Lord Buddha — to
        a degree that the causes and effects of any issue begin to become clear to
        one — that merit and demerit are no longer a myth or a mystery to one –
        and one gains the precursory discretion or ‘benefit of the doubt’ to discern
        the difference between appropriate and inappropriate, heaven and hell.
        When one’s mind is sufficiently illuminated to understand these issues,
        one will trust in the truth of the wisdom of the Buddha’s enlightenment –
        banishing the doubt and suspicion from one’s mind, and making one ready to
        practise in the Buddha’s footsteps. Even if one possesses faith alone,
        already one has a chance to protect oneself from falling into the
        nether realms — but the trouble with having faith alone is that it may
        not be very steadfast. For the cultivation of faith, one needs invest
        enough time, money and effort in one’s spiritual activities so that one’s
        faith can be developed into wisdom. Economically speaking, this justifies
        the expense of going to listen to Dhamma teachings in order to consolidate
        one’s level of faith in the Triple Gem.
         
      2. self-discipline [siilasampadaa]: By
        self-discipline, we mean at least the ability to keep all five of the
        Precepts — all the way from restraining oneself from taking the life of
        living beings, to restraining oneself from drinking alcohol. Apart from
        restraining ourselves from the behaviours prohibited by the Five Precepts,
        we must work on our mind too to uproot even the latent tendencies that
        make us want to break the Precepts in the first place. The reason we have
        to be so strict with ourselves is that one’s mind is filled with faith and
        has sufficient inner brightness to see the connections between causes and
        effects, we will start to be self-motivated to be more strict with ourselves.
        From an economic point of view, in cultivating self-discipline you need to
        find the time to go to the temple to keep the Precepts purely — rather
        than labouring under the misapprehension that extra salary will bring
        happiness both in this lifetime and the next;
          
      3. self-sacrifice [caagasampada]: A person
        is endowed with self-sacrifice when they are free of any further
        stinginess in their mind — someone who takes pleasure in giving. Such
        people, apart from having self-discipline and faith, can also be said to
        be skilled in saving up their wealth — but they choose not to save
        it up in this this world as material wealth, but as transcendental
        wealth
        for the next. They know that if they try to hoard what they
        have in this world, before long it will be nibbled away by unjust
        taxation, by thieves, fire, flood or uninvited inheritants. Some
        grandchildren who cannot wait for death of a wealthy grandparent might
        even conspire to murder them in order to receive a legacy before its due!
        Buying shares is no real security, because even the value of shares can
        sometimes collapse. Buying dollars or gold offers no real security either,
        because the market might slump at any time. However, if you transform
        material wealth into merit by giving it away, it will be wealth that will
        stay with you from one lifetime to the next — and without fear that the
        value of your assets will deteriorate — they will know only increase!
        Wherever there are those who practice self-sacrifice, there will never be
        a danger of economic exploitation — on the contrary, when self-sacrifice
        is abundant, everyone’s financial status will improve, both giver and
        recipient alike. This is why self-sacrifice is so important in laying the
        foundation of happiness for lifetimes to come. For self-sacrifice, you
        need do divide up an appropriate proportion of your wealth (as
        mentioned already in the section on skilful deployment of wealth
        ) for
        giving in charity to save as transcendental wealth for next lifetime. If
        we share wholeheartedly with others, in turn they will want to share with
        us — and this will save one from finding oneself on the breadline, or
        living from hand to mouth, with a job that destroys our health.
          
      4. wisdom [pa~n~naasampadaa]:
        Sometimes the word ‘wisdom’ is bandied about without real consideration of
        its true meaning. In Buddhism, the word means ‘penetrative insight into
        the vicissitudes of the psycho-physical constituents [khanda] and
        into the arising and decay of all things’. Knowledge of other things, for
        example engineering or computing, could hardly be considered wisdom
        according to the Buddhist definition. True wisdom means knowing every
        facet of the constant change taking place in our bodily make-up — knowing
        that there is birth, old-age, sickness and death, decay and destruction as
        in the words ‘arising, continuity and decay’. Even though a person might
        have several doctorates under their belt, if their knowledge cannot keep
        up with the working of the bodily make-up, it is still incomplete
        knowledge — and knowledge which is not completely pure because it still
        potentially harmful. Wisdom allows you to uproot the last of the
        defilements in your mind. True wisdom is not only reflection on a matter,
        but reflection in a way that you can see the arising and the decay of that
        thing. This sort of wisdom is indeed noble wisdom because it helps
        us to uproot the last of the defilements in the mind and can thus bring
        us, by the proper means, to an end of suffering. The importance of wisdom
        is that it shines forth like light which drives away the darkness that
        prevents us from seeing the reality of the world. Wisdom also functions
        like a spade which one can use to dig up the deepest roots of a poisonous
        weed — in this case the poisonous defilements which pollute the mind.
        Thus, economically speaking, we have to be self-disciplined in the use of
        our wealth to give ourselves sufficient freedom to use one’s time for
        meditation practice and Dhamma study to give rise to a constantly higher
        level of wisdom within oneself.  

      Of
      the four practices, the most important precursor of transcendental wealth is faith.
      Faith is something we have often heard about, but often misunderstood — so in
      our studies of the practices for happiness in the hereafter, we should start on
      the right foot by making sure we understand the concept of faith. With a
      correct understanding of faith, it will start to become clear how the the
      Buddha could teach that ‘each time faith arises for someone, in the end it will
      lead to wisdom.’ 

      Anyone
      who works diligently and is not reckless with their earnings, who knows how to
      earn their living in an appropriate way, while at the same time having faith,
      self-discipline, who is helpful to those in need (giving an amount to them
      which is appropriate), whose mind is free of stinginess, who cultivates
      continuously the path to happiness in the hereafter (rather than doing virtuous
      deeds sporadically or according to whim) — making such good deeds habitual.
      Thus, faith, self-discipline, self-sacrifice and wisdom are the microeconomic
      practices recommended by the Buddha for happiness in lives to come.

      Wealth
      is lost nothing is lost


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      PRESUMPTIVE HEALTH PROTECTION (IJPHP)
        


      Are you a cortisol victim?

      DR. SHEELA NAMBIAR M.D

      If you are dieting, working out and still not losing
      weight, it’s time to look at your stress levels.


      Sometimes weight is not all that meets the eye. What lies beneath may
      be the cause of the unmanageable cycle of weight-stress-and more weight.



      Have you been working out, “dieting” and still not losing any
      weight, or worse still, steadily gaining in girth? Are you anxious, annoyed and
      frustrated with your apparently pointless weight loss efforts? Well, you may
      very well be one of those people suffering from an overload of stress hormone
      Cortisol. It has been found that in certain people, Cortisol overload leads to
      weight gain, particularly around the abdomen.

      I am often faced with clients who believe they are near starving
      themselves, working out like dogs and yet not losing any weight. Aside from the
      irony that most dogs rarely work, it is with some trepidation that I approach
      this situation. It has been found that on questioning, most individuals
      under-estimate what they eat and over-estimate how much they exercise.

      What is Stress?

      If, however, it is established that you honestly are unable to
      lose weight despite following the necessary precautions, it may be time to
      evaluate the rest of your life and take into consideration your stress levels
      as one of the causes for weight gain or failure to lose weight.

      Emotional stress is defined as a person’s reaction to any
      situation that places special physical or psychological demands on the person
      so as to unbalance his/her equilibrium (Niemann 1998). Everyone from the
      corporate executive, housewife or student is under stress. How one’s body
      responds to stress may vary. Although the biochemical reaction to stress is
      similar for every human being, some individuals lose their appetite and weight
      during stressful times, while others gain steadily.

      The Stress Response: According to Hans Selye
      M.D, the pioneer of Emotional stress, when the human body is faced with a
      stressor (or what it perceives as a stressor), the sympathetic and endocrine
      system of the body set in motion physiological responses that include the
      release of hormones Cortisol and Epinephrine from the adrenal glands. Once the
      stressful event has passed, the body reverts to its ‘normal homeostasis’. Most
      times however, when the stress is ongoing or the individual has a personality
      type that responds to most situations like they are disasters waiting to
      happen, the body remains in a ‘high alert’ situation with the continuous
      outpouring of stress hormones. These situations cause certain bodily changes
      that include weight gain! Research findings suggest that Cortisol is the
      offender.

      In today’s fast paced society there is hardly an opportunity for
      the body to revert to normal homeostasis after a stressful event. Consider,
      deadlines at work, traffic jams, financial crisis, sick children, an unpleasant
      mother-in-law, school admissions, the list is endless. The stage is set for a
      body that is constantly on an over dose of Cortisol and other stress hormones.

      The Food Connection: To make matters worse, food
      as we all know, is not used solely to alleviate hunger. It is also seen as a
      form of psychological fulfilment. Periods of stress in your life — whether a
      bereavement, loss of job, divorce, exams or even change of home — can be times
      when you reach for food as comfort leading to weight gain. This is called
      Emotional Eating and is a common coping strategy to soothe disturbed feelings.
      The weight gain and dieting itself can be a source of stress especially in
      today’s world where the pressure to look slim is foisted on most people
      (particularly women), by the media depiction of super slim models. This
      often-unrealistic image can lead to a self-perpetuating cycle for a lot of
      women.

      Stress-related weight gain: Besides the regular exercise/
      healthy diet combination, “lifestyle” changes and a holistic approach to
      fitness has to be observed if stress is to be effectively combated.

      Exercise by itself is a great stress reliever, (Neimann, Kramer
      & Lee 1991, Blumenthal et al 1999). Conversely, it may serve as a source of
      stress for some people who approach it competitively or generate their own
      stress by setting unrealistic goals.

      Mind-Body Fitness disciplines like Yoga, Tai Chi and Pilates,
      which are introspective and focus on the breath can be use for stress
      management. They are an ideal support system to a regular cardio and iron
      pumping routine.

      Strategies

      The importance lies in the strategic combination of exercise modalities
      for each individual depending on his requirements. Some may need emotional
      assessment and counselling while others may require longer slower cardio
      sessions interspersed with high intensity weight training and/or Yoga. It is
      complete foolishness for instance for an obese individual to rely solely on a
      ‘stress relieving’, breathing and yoga routine paying no attention to his food
      or cardio in the hope of losing weight. He would also need to burn adequate
      calories to make a difference to his fat percentage.

      Certain foods and herbs like ginseng, ashwaganda, amla are
      believed to be useful in combating stress and are called ‘adaptogens’.
      Inclusion of these foods may be beneficial for some individuals.

      Other issues worth considering would be, is your workout too high
      in intensity? Are you providing your body with an opportunity to recover
      sufficiently between workouts to grow in strength and performance, or are you
      subjecting it to inappropriate, punishing, endless routines that are only
      serving to stress you further?

      Sometimes weight is not all that meets the eye. What lies beneath
      may be the cause of the unmanageable cycle of weight-stress-and more weight. As
      trying to lose the weight in itself can be stressful, attention needs to be
      paid to the psyche of the individual. Careful adjustment of schedules,
      monitoring of stress levels and progress and a positive approach needs to be
      implemented to overcome this barrier of Cortisol over-load leading to weight
      gain.

      Dr Sheela Nambiar M.D, is a Obstetrician/Gynaecologist, Fitness
      and Lifestyle Consultant NAFC (USA) and Director, TFL Fitness Studio, Chennai.
      E-mail
      drsheela@tfl-inc.com

      Did you know?

      The stress hormone Cortisol has been found to cause weight gain in
      some susceptible individuals.

      Losing weight for such people involves a strategic combination of
      exercise modalities and lifestyle.

      Food plays a major role in the weight gain, as Emotional Eating is
      a common coping strategy while some food items can aid in stress relief.

      Exercise is a stress buster but can be counterproductive in some
      people. The key lies in planning the right amalgamation of routines for such
      susceptible individuals.


      FLAVOURS

      All steamed up

      ROHINI RAMAKRISHNAN

      With the festive season coming up, try these healthy
      steamed goodies.



      Nothing prepared me for the steamed food festival organised by
      Chennai’s Cholayil Sanjeevanam. So far steamed food meant idly, iddiyappam and
      puttu. What more can they offer, I thought rather snootily. But this
      was one time I was glad to be proved wrong.

      The “fragrance” of steaming food was in itself wholesome. The Food
      and Beverage Manager, Elangovan, who designed the menu, said the focus was on Kozhukattai
      and Ela Ada, made extra special with palm candy, jaggery, and honey.
      Mushroom kozhukattai, aval kozhukattai, vegetable kozhukattai
      spiced up the menu with nendram, raw mango, groundnut and aval ela
      ada
      giving that extra dash.

      Tasting the goodies aesthetically arranged on banana leaves, I
      realised “steamed” did not mean “bland.” In fact, steaming retained the colour,
      flavour and nutrients.

      Here are some of the chef’s treasured recipes.

      * * *

      Stuffed Kozhukattai

      Take 500 gm of raw rice flour, add a pinch of salt and a few drops
      of oil. Add water gradually and knead it well.

      Oil mould and press the dough firmly. Fill it with the stuffing
      and close it in with a thin film of dough. Steam on a banana leaf in a steamer
      or idli cooker. Best eaten hot with chutney.

      For mushroom filling

      Chop mushroom and onions extra fine. Saute with green chilli and
      ginger- garlic puree, till golden.

      Piddi kollukattai

      Pound 500 gm raw rice into tiny granules. Heat two cups of water
      and stir in the granules so that the dough is smooth and without lumps. Leave
      it to cool.

      Meanwhile heat a little ghee and temper curry leaves, chopped
      green chillies, grated coconut and channa dal.

      Mix with the dough. Take a lime-sized ball of dough and shape it
      with your hand. Steam it.

      * * *

      Ela ada

      100 gm Wheat flour

      1 tsp Coconut oil

      Salt to taste

      70 -80 ml Water

      Mix flour, oil and salt together. Add water gradually till the
      mixture is slightly soggy. Let it ferment for about 45 minutes.

      Spread mixture evenly on a banana leaf cut into a round. Add
      prepared stuffing, fold in a semi circle and gently press. Steam for about 15
      minutes.

      Aval Stuffing

      25 gmRed aval

      10 gm fried gram coarsely ground

      Grated coconut 5 gm

      Cardamom powder a pinch. Soak the aval for 10-15 minutes. Drain
      and mix with the other ingredients. And make the ada as above.

      Groundnut stuffing

      Chop steamed or roasted peanuts and mix with chopped onions,
      coconut, curry leaves, salt and pepper. Add a dash of lime juice.

      Raw mango stuffing

      Chop raw mango and mix with chopped onions and green chillies.

      Banana Stuffing

      Mash ripe nendrampazham with ghee and powdered palm candy.

      * * *

      Kambu (millet) Idly:

      1 kg of millet

      300 gm Black gram dal

      Soak the Black gram dal for eight hours and grind it well. Roast
      millet without oil. Grind coarsely and soak for an hour.

      Drain it carefully and mix it with the black gram dal batter. Keep
      for 45 minutes and make the idlis the usual way. Serve hot with a green chilli
      coconut chutney.

      Health is lost something is lost


      A BLUE PRINT FOR LIFE

      ON GOVERNMENT

      THE WAY OF POLITICAL PARTICIPATION

                  With
      today’s freedom of religion and the protection and

      support of the government, Buddhism can assert a purifying

      influence on the government, and government should not

      be jealous of Buddhism, nor should it attend to trifling
      matters

      while neglecting essentials and only rewarding philanthropy.

      Instaed, it ought to encourage all activities that purify
      the

      mind and improve the social climate. Buddhism must also

      be directly concerned with society, defending human rights

      and the happiness and welfare of the people. As such,

      Buddhists should not seek to remain aloof from politics. The

      individual need not care about position, fame, and power,

      but cannot forsake concern for society or the responsibility
      of

      serving others. In order to spread Dhamma nad benefit

      others, Buddhists today should not seek to avoid politics
      but

      should be actively involved and do their share. For in
      society,

      who can avoid politics? Although Buddhists may not wish

      to be involved, they must be concerned about society and

      politics. The appropriate attitude for a Buddhist today is
      “ask

      after government without interfering in governance.”


      Precepts (Character, morality
      self-discipline) is lost everything is lost


      FREE
      ONLINE TRAINING ON BUDDHISM FOR CHILDREN-34


      Ladyface
      [Association]

      Once upon time, the King of Benares
      had a royal bull elephant who was kind, patient and harmless. Along with his
      sweet disposition, he had a lovely gentle face. So he was affectionately known
      as ‘Ladyface’.

      One night, a gang of robbers met together just
      outside the elephant shed. In the darkness they talked about their plans for
      robbing people. They spoke of beating and killing, and bragged that they had
      given up ordinary goodness so they would have no pity on their victims. They
      used rough he-man type gutter language, intended to scare people and show how
      tough they were.

      Since the nights were quiet, Ladyface had
      nothing else to do but listen to all these terrible plans and violent rough
      talk. He listened carefully and, as elephants do, remembered it all. Having
      been brought up to obey and respect human beings, he thought these men were
      also to be obeyed and respected, even as teachers.

      After this went on for several nights,
      Ladyface decided that the correct thing to do was to become rough and cruel.
      This usually happens to one who associates with those of a low-minded cruel
      nature. It happens especially to a gentle one who wishes to please others.

      A ‘mahout’ is what the Indians call the
      special trainer and caretaker of a particular elephant. They are usually very
      close. Early one morning, Ladyface’s mahout came to see him as usual. The
      elephant, his mind filled with the night’s robber-talk, suddenly attacked his
      mahout. He picked him up in his trunk, squeezed the breath out of him, and
      smashed him to the ground, killing him instantly. Then he picked up two other
      attendants, one after another, and killed them just as ferociously.

      Word spread quickly through the city that the
      once adored Ladyface had suddenly gone mad and become a frightening man-killer.
      The people ran to the king for help.

      It just so happened that the king had an
      intelligent minister who was known for his understanding of animals. So he
      called for him and asked him to go and determine what sickness or other
      condition had caused his favorite elephant to become so insanely violent.

      This minister was the Bodhisatta, the
      Enlightenment Being. Arriving at the elephant shed, he spoke gentle soothing
      words to Ladyface, and calmed him down. He examined him and found him in
      perfect physical health. As he spoke kindly to Ladyface, he noticed that the
      elephant perked up his ears and paid very close attention. It was almost as if
      the poor animal were starved for the sound of gentle words. So the
      understanding minister figured out that the elephant must have been hearing the
      violent words or seeing the violent actions of those he mistook for teachers.

      He asked the elephant guards, “Have you
      seen anyone hanging around this elephant shed, at night or any other
      time?” “Yes, minister,” they replied, “for the last couple
      of weeks a gang of robbers has been meeting here. We were afraid to do
      anything, since they were such mean rough characters. Ladyface could hear their
      every word.”

      The minister returned immediately to the king.
      He said, “My lord king, your favourite elephant, Ladyface, is in perfect
      physical health. I have discovered that it was by hearing the rough and vulgar
      talk of thieves during many nights, that he has learned to be violent and
      cruel. Unwholesome associations often lead to unwholesome thoughts and
      actions.”

      The king asked, “What is to be
      done?” The minister said, “Well my lord, now we must reverse the
      process. We must send wise men and monks, who have a high-minded kind nature,
      to spend just as many nights outside the elephant shed. There they should talk
      of the value of ordinary goodness and patience, leading to compassion,
      loving-kindness and harmlessness.”

      So it was carried out. For several nights the
      kind wise ones spoke of those wonderful qualities. They used only gentle and
      refined language, intended to bring peacefulness and comfort to others.

      Lo and behold, hearing this pleasant
      conversation for several nights, Ladyface the bull elephant became even more
      peaceful and pleasant than before!

      Seeing this total change, the minister
      reported it to the king, saying, “My lord, Ladyface is now even more
      harmless and sweet than before. Now he is as gentle as a lamb!”

      The king said, “It is wonderful indeed
      that such a madly violent elephant can be changed by associating with wise men
      and monks.” He was amazed that his minister seemed to be able to read the
      mind of an elephant. So he rewarded him appropriately.

      The moral is: As rough talk
      infects with violence, so do gentle words heal with harmlessness.

      COMPREHENSIVE
      PALI COURSE


      LESSON 12

      Nahāpita = barber

      Parinibbuta = Demised one, Arahat who
      has passed away

      Visayaṁ = object

      Ārammanā = object

      Saṁyojanāni = fetters

      The ten fetters are:

      1.                 
      Sakkāyadiṭṭhi = Lust pertaining to sensual world

      2.                 
      Vicikiccā = skeptical doubt

      3.                 
      Sīlabbata Parāmāsa = superstitious adherence to
      rites and rituals

      4.                 
      Kāmarāga = Lust pertaining to sensual world

      5.                 
      Vyāpāda = ill-will

      6.                 
      Rūparāga = desire pertaining to fine material sphere

      7.                 
      Arūparāga = desire pertaining to immaterial sphere

      8.                 
      Māna = pride, conceit

      9.                 
      Uddhacca = restlessness

      10.            
      Avijjā = ignorance

       

      Nānā = separately, different        Puna = again

      Evaṁ = thus, yes                    Vā or Athavā = or

      Sīghaṁ = quickly                     Kathaṁ = how

      Kasmā = why                                   Tathā = in that way

      So = he, that                           Aññatra
      =except

      Yattha = wherever                          Tattha = there

      Yasmā = because                           Tasmā = therefore

      Attano = one’s own                        Kiñci = anything

      Pi = emphatic particle                        Tena
      = by that

      Vaṭṭati = to be done               Atita
      = past

      Paccupanna = present, now   Anāgata = future

      Uyyāna = garden                            Upari = above

      Ekaṁ = one                                      pana = however

      Subhāsaṁsī
      = well-wisher
                    Asubha = repulsive   

      Apekkhati = expects, desires            Sattā = being           

      Jarā/vuddhavaya = old age         Pāni = living being

      Kujjhitvā = having become angry          Catutro = cunning

      comments (0)
      09/11/09
      VR1 (WE ARE ONE ) +VE NEWS-MAY YOU BE EVER HAPPY, WELL AND SECURE! MAY YOU LIVE LONG! MAY ALL BEINGS BE EVRER HAPPY, WELL AND SECURE! MAY YOU ALWAYS HAVE CALM, QUIET, ALERT, ATTENTIVE AND EQUANIMINTY MIND! WITH A CLEAR UNDESRSATNDING THAT NOTHING IS PERMANENT!-Buddhist Micro-economics for the here-and-now “It’s not what you earn that counts — but how much you have left over at the end of the month . . .”-ONLINE TRAINING ON PRECEPTS AND TRADE-73-Wealth is lost nothing is lost INTERNATIONAL JIVAKA PRESUMPTIVE HEALTH PROTECTION (IJPHP) Mentha x piperita citrata - (Ehrh.)Briq. Eau De Cologne Mint-Health is lost something is lost A BLUE PRINT FOR LIFE ON NATURE THE WAY OF ENVIRONMAENTAL PROTECTION-Precepts (Character, morality self-discipline) is lost everything is lost FREE ONLINE TRAINING ON BUDDHISM FOR CHILDREN-33 Dirty Bath Water [Cleanliness] -The moral is: Even animals value cleanliness.COMPREHENSIVE PALI COURSE LESSON 12
      Filed under: General
      Posted by: @ 8:48 pm


      VR1

      (WE  ARE  ONE )

      +VE  NEWS

      MAY YOU BE EVER HAPPY, WELL AND SECURE!

      MAY YOU LIVE LONG!

      MAY ALL BEINGS BE EVRER HAPPY, WELL AND SECURE!

      MAY YOU ALWAYS HAVE CALM, QUIET, ALERT, ATTENTIVE AND

      EQUANIMINTY MIND!

      WITH A CLEAR UNDESRSATNDING THAT

      NOTHING IS PERMANENT!




      ALMOST EVERY FRAUD involves
      VICTIM

      sending “CASH” money to a
      Fraudster/Scammer.

      ABSOLUTELY DO NOT send any money
      using Western
      Union
      / Moneygram. 

      Always deal ONLY locally by meeting
      the seller/buyer in person.

      READ and UNDERSTAND the methods used
      by Fraudsters in the link above.


      ONLINE TRAINING ON PRECEPTS AND TRADE-73


      3

      Buddhist Micro-economics for the
      here-and-now


      “It’s not what you earn that counts — but how much you have left
      over at the end of the month . . .”

       

      The Buddha gave a total of
      four principles of economic practice for finding happiness in the present
      lifetime [di.t.t.hadhammikattha-sa.mvattanika dhamma] (A.iv.281): 

      1. Diligent
        acquisition
        [u.t.thaanasampadaa]:
        Diligent acquisition means skilfulness in the acquisition of wealth.
        Diligent acquisition refers to the habits of a person who works hard for
        their living — in contrast to those who are too lazy to make the effort.
        It also refers to the patience needed for people to work together as a
        team and the wisdom to recognize the work left undone — being able to
        perform, organize and administer the work as required. The most important
        feature of this first stage of the economic process can be summarized as
        acquiring wealth in an ethical way. As Buddhists we would say that taking
        advantage of others economically, in whatever form, is unethical
        acquisition of wealth. Particular forms of livelihood which the Buddha
        advised us to avoid in this respect are the five sorts of Unwholesome
        Livelihood [micchaa va.nijjaa] (A.iii.207) mentioned below:
          
      1. trading
        in weapons:
        The
        weapon trade is a major source of income for every superpower of the
        world. It is only normal that those who supply weapons will be on the
        receiving end of hatred from the victims of the destruction caused by the
        weapons they have sold. Selling weapons is the starting point of a long
        chain of negative karmic consequences. Weapons have had a part in every
        violent catastrophe occurring worldwide over the years — and it is not
        our place here to say who is right or wrong — but no-one can deny the
        magnitude of the death toll coming from armed conflict. Not selling
        weapons means refraining from any sort of trade in instruments for
        destroying life, whether it be guns, knives or even hunting equipment
        like traps or bait. Anything used for killing people or animals are
        considered weapons for the purposes of Unwholesome Livelihood. Even
        without physically harming a person, maltreatment can cause resentment
        which lasts across lifetimes — thus, it is up to all of us to check our
        own aggression without waiting for prodding from others . . .
         
      2. trading
        in people:

        Trading in people is also making profit out of the suffering of others.
        It formerly meant trading in slaves, but nowadays has come to include
        child labour, wage-slaves and prostitution;
         
      3. selling
        live animals to the slaughterhouse:
        Selling
        live animals to the slaughterhouse is taking a profit from the suffering
        of animals in a way that leads inevitably to their death;
         
      4. trading
        in alcohol or intoxicants:
        Trading
        in alcohol and intoxicants including non-medicinal drugs such as
        marijuana;
         
      5. trading
        in poison:
        Trading
        in poison means selling poison such as insecticide or rat-poison. The
        Buddha advised us not to sell such agents because otherwise their
        retribution will find its way back to us. Even though when we sell the
        poison it has not yet caused any harm, but as soon as it is used it has
        the same potency as already mentioned for weapons. If only we were to
        follow the Buddha’s advice more widely we wouldn’t have to waste our time
        in the present day for so much campaigning for biologically grown
        vegetables.
          

      It is not to say that there are no more than these five ways of
      unwholesomely earning a living — but these are the main ones. Thus if you
      would like to know where to start looking for ways to reduce the amount of
      conflict in the world, the present author’s advice would be to start by
      minimizing your involvement with Unwholesome Livelihood. The Buddha taught that
      any person who lapses into Unwholesome Livelihood will eventually attract a
      heavy burden of negative karma for themselves. Other ways of making money which
      involve economic exploitation in various ways can also be included as
      unwholesome livelihood, such as criminal activities, or for example:
       

        • Making
          one’s living out of interest:

          The present author’s still remembers when he was a child, his mother
          always maintained, “In our household and our family we have never
          liked living off the interest earned from the money we lend to
          others.” She explained, “It is making a living out of the
          suffering of people who are incompetent in managing their own finances.
          If they were really competent in their financial management, they
          wouldn’t have to come borrowing money from the likes of us! Those who are
          financially careless would rather borrow at a high interest rate than go
          without — which would indicate that they don’t have much idea about the
          effective way to earn, save and use their finances. If you get too
          involved with these sort of people, it will just lead you to unnecessary
          frustration. If you really want to help such people, then just give the
          money to them without strings attached. It is not worthwhile to extend the
          mutual agony of having to be paid back for the interest on a loan.”
           
      1. Careful
        conservation
        [aarakkhasampadaa]:
        Careful conservation means skilfulness in the saving of wealth. Having
        earned wealth by the sweat of one’s brow in a scrupulous way, a person should
        take good care of their wealth, not allowing it to be eroded away by
        unjust taxation, theft, natural disaster or unintended inheritants. As for
        unwholesome conservation of wealth — this refers to excessive hoarding or
        stockpiling as mentioned above. Furthermore, when saving up one’s wealth
        — one should not allow doing so to bring us into conflict with those
        around us. Good reasons to put money on the side, according to Buddhist
        principles (A.iii.45) are in case of emergency such as repairing the consequences
        of fire, flood, excess taxation, theft or exhortion by malevolent
        relatives! You have to consider carefully, however what form you ought to
        save your money in. Of course the best way to conserve your wealth is as
        transcendental wealth or merit (see self-sacrifice of Chapter 4) –
        because in such a form it is beyond the touch of interest rates and it
        will appreciate with the passing of the years — thus saving in the form
        of transcendental wealth is really the most skilful way of conserving one’s
        wealth.
         
      2. Having
        virtuous friends
        [kalyaa.namittata]:
        Having virtuous friends means surrounding yourself with a network of
        virtuous friends in all areas of your life. The sort of friends one should
        cultivate are those endowed with faith [saddha], self-discipline [siila],
        self-sacrifice [caaga] and wisdom [pa~n~naa]. Apart from
        facilitating our cultivation of wisdom, it will also strengthen the
        network of good friends of which we are a part. Such networking is
        particularly relevant to teamwork because when one earns one’s living, one
        does not usually do so alone — whether it be working in the same office
        as one’s colleagues or cooperating in an international network. The most
        important attribute of teamwork is that the team members must have a
        similarly high level of scrupulousness in their work dealings and a
        similarly high level of faith in spiritual teachings. Furthermore,
        everyone in the team should have a similarly high level of self-sacrifice,
        dedicated to the collective good — thereby avoiding the dangers of
        networking with those who are overcome by their own selfishness. The
        Buddha taught that worldly wealth is exhausted in a moment — but the
        value of training other people to be virtuous never knows an end. The
        importance of this virtue is emphasized over and over again by the Buddha
        — who especially in the context of economics, taught that simply
        acquiring, storing and using wealth is not good enough. We have to build
        up a network of good people to work with too, before we get round to using
        our wealth — the way we use our wealth should be in cooperation with such
        good friends, if we really want happiness and prosperity in life.The
        Buddha emphasized that when one is earning one’s living, one should try to
        avoid associating with those who break the Precepts — no matter
        whether they be young or old. If not only the Precepts, but also their
        faith in Buddhism is lacking, then that is all the more reason to avoid
        associating with them. It is as if we are selective about channelling our
        resources — devoting our resources to encourage the proliferation of
        virtuous people in our society. Those who encourage virtue in their
        co-workers at the same time they earn their living will never have to
        complain at a later date of being ’stabbed in the back’ by their colleagues.
        You have no-one else but yourself to blame if your employees are left
        incompetent, unable to work as a team or unable to delegate — you cannot
        just expect competent people to rain down on you from the sky! You have to
        build on your employees competency by training them yourself. At the same
        time you need to continue to train yourself — seeing what virtues you can
        pick up from those more experienced than yourself — in this way, you will
        soon produce a network of good co-workers for yourself.
         
      3. Living
        within your means
        [samajiivitaa]:
        Living within your means means skilfulness in spending. Those who realize
        the ease with which wealth can come and go, should lead their life in a
        way that is appropriate to their means — not being extravagent but at the
        same time, not too spendthrift either! When we talk of generosity [daana]
        in this context we mean giving those things which are surplus to our
        needs. Some people might doubt as to how much they really need or might be
        unable to distinguish between ‘need’ and ‘want’ and hence the Buddha gave
        guidance about how householders should budget their earnings so that their
        generosity is neither reluctant nor a burden on the family expenditure.
        The Buddha taught (Aadiya Sutta A.iii.45 [36/93]) that the family budget
        should be divided into five. He did not say that each part should be 20%
        of your earnings, but he taught that you should budget for each of these
        sorts of expenditure. As for the “working capital” which you
        have built up for yourself, the Buddha taught in the Si”ngalovaada
        Sutta (D.iii.180ff.) that you should apply one-quarter of your earnings
        for your immediate needs, one-half should be reinvested in your business
        and the remaining quarter should be saved in case of emergency. It is up
        to each individual to decide how much of their income to use as
        “working capital” and how much to use for generosity. If you
        budget in this way, you will be able to practise generosity, giving
        neither too much nor too little. The fivefold division of one’s funds
        mentioned above should be as follows:
          
        1. one
          part to support the immediate needs of yourself, your parents, your
          children, spouse, servants
            
        2. one
          part to extend generosity towards your friends
            
        3. one
          part to be saved in case of emergency (as already mentioned above)
            
        4. one
          part which should be used for five sorts of dedication  
        1. for
          one’s extended family  
        2. for
          hospitality  
        3. for
          dedicating merit for the departed  
        4. for
          taxes  
        5. for
          dedicating merit to the things that you believe in according to your
          local custom (e.g.ascetics, animals, physical forces and elements, lower
          deities or higher deities depending on your culture)
            
      1. one
        part to extend support to well-practising monks and ascetics 

      2. In the old days they used to compare an extravagent person with a low income to
        the owner of a fig-tree who shakes the tree so that all the figs fall off, but
        who picks up only a few of them to eat. At the other extreme, a person with a
        good income who is not generous with their wealth will die in hardship
        out of keeping with their social status. Steering the middle way between
        stinginess and extravagence in a way appropriate to your level of income is
        said to be living within your means. Aside of the main five forms of
        Unwholesome Livelihood (mentioned above) which cause deterioration of
        wealth, there are another four sorts of behaviour, known as the ‘Four Roads to
        Ruin’ which if we can avoid them, will also help to protect our hard-earned
        income:
         

          1. womanizing;  
          2. drinking
            alcohol;  
          3. gambling;  
          4. associating
            with bad company 

          In
          conclusion, for anyone to remain scrupulous after wholesomely acquiring and
          saving their wealth, it is necessary to build up a network of good people [kalyaa.namitta]
          around themselves first, before they come to spending their hard-earned wealth.
          Habitually associating with good friends will cause one to expend with
          reflection as to true benefit, and thereby use one’s wealth solely for things
          which help in cultivating faith, keeping one’s precepts purely, practising
          self-sacrifice and cultivating wisdom in keeping with the guidance of the
          Buddha for happiness in lives to come (see next chapter).

          Thus, throughout one’s life
          one should earn one’s living carefully according to the four principles
          of happiness in the present lifetime — never compromising one’s Buddhist
          scrupulousness — and the same goes for saving one’s wealth. At the same
          time one needs to develop those around one as a protective fence or network of
          good friends. Surrounded by virtuous people, the tendency for our mind to be
          tempted by unethical compromises will be significantly reduced — and the
          interactions we have with our fellow workers will be for mutual encouragement
          of further good deeds.

          Metaphor of the reservoir

          The four economic principles for happiness in the present lifetime can be
          compared to four channels of water which supply a pool. The Four Roads to Ruin
          can be compared to four outlets from the pool. If we close the inlets and open
          the outlets, in the absence of rain, the pool will soon become completely dry.
          There will certainly be no increase in the water level. On the contrary, if one
          opens all four of the inlets by conducting oneself in keeping with the Buddhist
          economic principles, while closing the outlets by avoiding all four roads to
          ruin, before long the pool will be full or even overflowing. Thus, whether we
          are speaking economically on a personal level or on national level, it is vital
          to seal up the four possible outlets from our economic prosperity — by not
          womanizing, drinking alcohol or gambling — and by associating with good
          friends. These are the basics of Buddhist microeconomics for the present
          lifetime — economics that you won’t find described anywhere else in the world.
          If you heed the Buddha’s words on economics and put them in to practice you
          will have prosperity in your future, never falling upon hard times.

          Wealth
          is lost nothing is lost



          INTERNATIONAL JIVAKA
          PRESUMPTIVE HEALTH PROTECTION (IJPHP)
                


          Mentha
          x piperita citrata
          - (Ehrh.)Briq.

          Eau
          De Cologne Mint

          Author

          (Ehrh.)Briq.

          Botanical references

          17, 200

          Family

          Labiatae

          Genus

          Mentha

          Synonyms

          Mentha citrata - Ehrh.

          Known Hazards

          warning signAlthough no specific mention has been seen for this
          sub-species, it should be noted that, in large quantities, the closely allied
          M. x piperita vulgaris can cause abortions, especially when used in the form
          of the extracted essential oil, so it should not be used by pregnant women.

          Range

          Britain.

          Habitat

          A natural hybrid, M. aquatica x
          M. spicata found in moist soils on the sides of ditches, roadsides etc in S. England[5, 17].

          Edibility Rating

          apple iconapple icon2 (1-5)

          Medicinal Rating

          apple iconapple icon2 (1-5)

          Physical
          Characteristics

          icon of manicon of perennial/biennial/annual

          Perennial growing to 0.3m by 1m.

          It is hardy to zone 3 and is not
          frost tender. It is in flower from August to October. The flowers are
          hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.
          It is noted for attracting wildlife.

          The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy)
          and heavy (clay) soils and can grow in heavy clay soil. The plant prefers acid,
          neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland)
          or no shade. It requires moist soil.

          Habitats

          Woodland Garden; Dappled Shade; Shady Edge; Cultivated Beds;

          Edible
          Uses

          Edible Parts: Leaves.

          Edible Uses: Condiment; Tea.

          Leaves - raw or cooked. Used as a flavouring in
          salads or cooked foods[5]. A very pungent flavour, the leaves of the true
          eau-de-cologne mint are too aromatic for most tastes, though the cultivar ‘Basil’
          has an excellent flavour and makes a very good substitute for basil in
          pesto[K]. A herb tea is made from the fresh or dried leaves[21, 183].

          Medicinal
          Uses

          Plants For A Future can not take any
          responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek
          advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.

          Anodyne; Antiseptic; Antispasmodic; Carminative; Cholagogue; Diaphoretic; Refrigerant; Stomachic; Tonic; Vasodilator.

          Eau de Cologne mint, like many other members of
          this genus, is often used as a domestic herbal remedy, being valued especially
          for its antiseptic properties and its beneficial effect on the digestion. Like
          other members of the genus, it is best not used by pregnant women because large
          doses can cause an abortion. The leaves and flowering plant are anodyne,
          antiseptic, antispasmodic, carminative, cholagogue, diaphoretic, refrigerant,
          stomachic, tonic, vasodilator[4, 9, 21, 165]. A tea made from the leaves has
          traditionally been used in the treatment of fevers, headaches, digestive
          disorders and various minor ailments[222]. The medicinal uses of this herb are
          more akin to lavender (Lavandula spp) than the mints. It is used to treat
          infertility, rapid heartbeat, nervous exhaustion etc[238]. The leaves are
          harvested as the plant comes into flower and can be dried for later use[238].
          The essential oil in the leaves is antiseptic, though it is toxic in large
          doses[222].

          Other
          Uses

          Essential; Repellent; Strewing.

          An essential oil obtained from the whole plant is
          a source of lavender oil which is used in perfumery[46, 105, 238]. It is also
          used in oral hygiene preparations, toiletries etc[238]. Formerly used as a
          strewing herb[14], the plant repels insects, rats etc[14, 18, 20]. Rats and
          mice intensely dislike the smell of mint. The plant was therefore used in homes
          as a strewing herb and has also been spread in granaries to keep the rodents
          off the grain[244].

          Scented
          Plants

          Leaves: Crushed Dried

          The
          leaves have a very strong aroma, somewhat like ‘Eau de Cologne’.

          Cultivation
          details

          A very easily grown plant, it succeeds in most
          soils and situations so long as the soil is not too dry[1, 200]. Grows well in
          heavy clay soils. A sunny position is best for the production of essential oils,
          but the plant also succeeds in partial shade. Prefers a slightly acid soil[16].
          Plants are very tolerant of neglect, succeeding in long grass[K]. Hybridizes
          freely with other members of this genus. Most mints have fairly aggressive
          spreading roots and, unless you have the space to let them roam, they need to
          be restrained by some means such as planting them in containers that are buried
          in the soil[K]. The flowers are very attractive to bees and butterflies[24]. A
          good companion for growing near cabbages and tomatoes, helping to keep them
          free of insect pests[14, 20]. The mint will need to be grown in containers to
          prevent it spreading too aggressively into the other plants. The whole plant
          has a strong minty aroma with a hint of ginger[245]. The plant produces a
          better quality essential oil if the plant is grown in dry ground[115]. Members
          of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer[233].

          Propagation

          Seed - sow spring in a cold frame. Germination is
          usually fairly quick. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they
          are large enough to handle and plant them out in the summer. Mentha species are
          very prone to hybridisation and so the seed cannot be relied on to breed true.
          Even without hybridisation, seedlings will not be uniform and so the content of
          medicinal oils etc will vary. When growing plants with a particular aroma it is
          best to propagate them by division[K]. Division can be easily carried out at
          almost any time of the year, though it is probably best done in the spring or autumn
          to allow the plant to establish more quickly. Virtually any part of the root is
          capable of growing into a new plant. Larger divisions can be planted out direct
          into their permanent positions. However, for maximum increase it is possible to
          divide the roots up into sections no more than 3cm long and pot these up in
          light shade in a cold frame. They will quickly become established and can be
          planted out in the summer.

          Cultivars

          ‘Basil’

          The
          leaves have a true basil flavour though rather more minty. They can be used as
          a flavouring in similar ways to basil and make an excellent pesto[K].

          Health is lost something is lost


          A BLUE PRINT FOR LIFE

          ON NATURE

          THE WAY OF ENVIRONMAENTAL PROTECTION

                      If we wish
          to lead a wonderful life, then the laws of

          Nature must be obeyed. Spouses should be respectful of and

          understand one another, among neighbours, friends, and

          relatives there should be amity; and colleagues should aid

          and support one another. To start a business, one should

          first conduct market surveys, collect money, and make

          appropriate arrangements for human resources and

          management. To govern a nation, one should understand

          public opinion, employ loyal and honest people, carefully

          consider one’s words, and diligently carry out good laws.

          Buddhists should set an example in fostering happiness and

          good ties, meditating and increasing wisdom, as well as

          shouldering the responsibility to instruct and guide all

          sentient beings. If one conforms to the way in daily life –

          that is Buddhist way of natural life and way of living – then

          one will behave appropriately.



          Precepts (Character, morality
          self-discipline) is lost everything is lost


          FREE
          ONLINE TRAINING ON BUDDHISM FOR CHILDREN-33


          Dirty Bath Water
          [Cleanliness]

          Once upon a time, in a kingdom in India, the
          finest of the royal horses was taken down to the river to be bathed. The grooms
          took him to the same shallow pool where they always washed him.

          However, just before they arrived, a filthy
          dirty horse had been washed in the same spot. He had been caught in the
          countryside and had never had a good bath in all his life.

          The fine royal horse sniffed the air. He knew
          right away that some filthy wild horse had bathed there and fouled the water.
          So he was disgusted and refused to be washed at that place.

          The grooms tried their best to get him into
          the water, but could do nothing with him. So they went to the king and
          complained that the fine well-trained royal stallion had suddenly become
          stubborn and unmanageable.

          It just so happened that the king had an
          intelligent minister who was known for his understanding of animals. So he
          called for him and said, “Please go and see what has happened to my number
          one horse. Find out if he is sick or what is the reason he refuses to be
          bathed. Of all my horses, I thought this one was of such high quality that he
          would never let himself sink into dirtiness. There must be something
          wrong.”

          The minister went down to the riverside
          bathing pool immediately. He found that the stately horse was not sick, but in
          perfect health. He noticed also that he was deliberately breathing as little as
          possible. So he sniffed the air and smelled a slight foul odour. Investigating
          further, he found that it came from the unclean water in the bathing pool. So
          he figured out that another very dirty horse must have been washed there, and
          that the king’s horse was too fond of cleanliness to bathe in dirty water.

          The minister asked the horse grooms, “Has
          any other horse been bathed at this spot today.?” “Yes,” they
          replied, “before we arrived, a dirty wild horse was bathed here.” The
          minister told them, “My dear grooms, this is a fine royal horse who loves
          cleanliness. He does not wish to bathe in dirty water. So the thing to do is to
          take him up river, where the water is fresh and clean, and wash him
          there.”

          They followed his instructions, and the royal
          horse was pleased to bathe in the new place.

          The minister returned to the king and told
          what had happened. Then he said, “You were correct your majesty, this fine
          horse was indeed of such high quality that he would not let himself sink into
          dirtiness!”

          The king was amazed that his minister seemed
          to be able to read the mind of a horse. So he rewarded him appropriately.

          The moral is: Even animals value cleanliness.


          COMPREHENSIVE
          PALI COURSE


          LESSON 12

          Declension of Neuter words
          ending in ‘i’and ’ī’

           

          (a)  
          i – ending

          Vibhati            
                      Ekavacana                  
          Bahuvacana

           

          1.   Paṭhamā                     
          i                                  i,
          īni

          2.  
          Dutiyā                         
          i
                                  i, īni

          3.  
          Tatiyā                         
          inā                              
          ībhi, īhi

          4.  
          Catutthī                       
          ino, issa                   
          īna

          5.  
          Pañcami                     
          inā, ismā, imhā          ībhi,
          īhi

          6.   Chaṭṭhi                       
          ino,issa                     
          īna

          7.  
          Sattamī                       
          ismi
          ṁ,imhi,  
                  
             isu,
          īsu

          8.  
          Ālapana                      
          i,
                                           ī, īno

          For example: Akkhi = Eye

          Vibhati            
                      Ekavacana                  
          Bahuvacana

           

          1.   Paṭhamā                     Akkhi                      Ahhki,
          Ahhkīni

          2.   Dutiyā                         
          Ahhki
                           Ahhki,
          Ahhkīni

          3.  
          Tatiyā                         
          Ahhkinā                     Ahhkībhi,
          Ahhkīhi

          4.   Catutthī                       Ahhkino, Ahhkissa    Ahhkīna

          5.  
          Pañcami                     
          Ahhk
          inā, Ahhkismā, 

          Ahhkimhā                  Ahhkībhi, Ahhkīhi

          6.   Chaṭṭhi                      Ahhkino,
          Ahhk
          issa     Ahhk īna

          7.  
          Sattamī                       
          Ahhkismi
          ṁ, Ahhkimhi, Ahhkisu, Ahhkīsu

          8.  
          Ālapana                      
          Ahhki,
                                              Ahhkī,
          Ahhkīno

          Similarly declined are:

          Vāri
          = water
                                    Sappi =
          ghee                       A
          ṭṭhi = bone

          Acci = flame                  Dadhi = curd                 Satti
          = thigh

          (b)  
          ī – ending

           

          Vibhati            
                      Ekavacana                  
          Bahuvacana

           

          1.   Paṭhamā                     
          ī                                 ī,
          īni

          2.   Dutiyā                         
          i
                                  ī, īni

          3.  
          Tatiyā                         
          inā                              
          ībhi, īhi

          4.  
          Catutthī                       
          ino, issa                   
          īna

          5.  
          Pañcami                     
          inā, ismā, imhā          ībhi,
          īhi

          6.   Chaṭṭhi                       
          ino,issa                     
          īna

          7.  
          Sattamī                       ini,
          ismi
          ṁ, imhi,  
                  
          isu, īsu

          8.   Ālapana                      
          ī
                                            ī, īni

          For
          example:
          Da
          ī

          Vibhati            
                      Ekavacana                  
          Bahuvacana

           

          1.   Paṭhamā                     Daī                      Daī, Daīni

          2.  
          Dutiyā                         
          Da
          i                Daī, Daīni

          3.  
          Tatiyā                         
          Da
          inā                    Daī, Dabhi, Daīhi

          4.   Catutthī                       
          Da
          ino, Daissa Daīna

          5.  
          Pañcami                     
          Da
          inā, Daismā, 

          Daimhā                 Daībhi,
          Da
          īhi

          6.   Chaṭṭhi                       
          Da
          ino,
          Da
          issa Daīna

          7.  
          Sattamī                       Da
          ini, Daismiṁ,

          Daimhi,  
                  
                Daisu, Daīsu

          8.   Ālapana                      
          Da
          ī                        Daī, Daīni

          Similarly declined are:

          Sukhakārī  = giver of
          happiness

          Sukhakāmi = well-wisher

          Pāpi = evil one

          Sighayāyi = that which moves quickly

          Pāni = living being

          ñāī = one endowed with
          with knowledge

          Vāsī
          = dweller

          Pakkhī = bird, winged one

          Inī = one with debt

          Leṇnvāsī = cave-dweller

          Rogī = ailing one, sick

          Kuṇi = crooked-handed one

           

          Vocabulary:

          Āma = yes

          Na = no

          Payojanaṁ = need, useful

          Mā = don’t

          Vayogata = in old age

          Saṭho = crooked

          comments (0)
          09/10/09
          VR1 (WE ARE ONE) +ve NEWS-Kanshi Ram memorial, Buddha Sthal, Ambedkar memorial and Prerna Bhawan in Lucknow are pet projects of UP Government-Central Government should include three irrigation projects of State in National projects —Chief Minister-Uttar Pradesh hits back at centre for reprimand on IPS transfers-ONLINE TRAINING ON PRECEPTS AND TRADE-72 2 The Distinguishing features of Buddhist Economics “Don’t eat just because you feel like it — eat when you feel hungry . . .”-Wealth is lost nothing is lost- INTERNATIONAL JIVAKA PRESUMPTIVE HEALTH PROTECTION (IJPHP) -Health is lost something is lost-A BLUE PRINT FOR LIFE ON FUNERALS AND CELEBRATIONS THE WAY OF RIGHT VIEWS- FREE ONLINE TRAINING ON BUDDHISM FOR CHILDREN-32 The Great Horse Knowing-one [Courage] -The moral is: True peace is only won by peaceful means.- Precepts (Character, morality self-discipline) is lost everything is lost COMPREHENSIVE PALI COURSE-LESSON 11 Exercise 2
          Filed under: General
          Posted by: @ 4:51 am

          VR1

          (WE
          ARE ONE)

          +ve
          NEWS




          The statues of Chief Minister Mayawati and other Aboriginal Inhabitants of Jambudvipa; that is, the Great Prabuddha Bharath leaders
          at Ambedkar Sthal in Lucknow.


          Kanshi Ram memorial, Buddha Sthal, Ambedkar memorial and Prerna Bhawan in
          Lucknow are pet projects of UP Government



          (C.M. Information Campus)

          Information & Public Relations Department, U.P.

          Central Government should include three
          irrigation projects of State in National projects
          —Chief Minister

          Lucknow : September 08, 2009

          The Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Ms. Mayawati has requested the
          Prime Minister Dr. Manmohan Singh to classify Jhansi, Chitrakoot and
          Mirjapur revenue divisions as special category under Accelerated Irrigation
          Benefit Programme (AIBP) for ensuring rapid development of backward
          areas like Bundelkhand and Vindhyachal. She has demanded from the Prime
          Minister to include at least three irrigation projects of the state as national
          projects.

          In a letter written to the Prime Minister in this regard today, the C.M.
          said that the Central Government had been conducting AIBP with a view to
          completing the ongoing irrigation project of the states quickly. She said that
          Jhansi, Chitrakoot and Mirjapur revenue divisions of Bundelkhand and
          Vindhyachal regions were very backward and hilly areas. They received
          scanty rainfall and because of water scarcity these regions faced drought
          situation repeatedly.

          Ms. Mayawati said that under the AIBP, being conducted by
          Government of India, some states which were backward from the irrigation
          point of view and few districts of Orissa had been classified as special
          category states/districts. She said that from the irrigation point of view the
          Bundelkhand and Vindhyachal regions were very difficult and backward
          areas. The State Government had drawn several irrigation projects for the
          development of these backward areas, but since these projects were not
          accorded special category, their financing was not getting priority. She
          requested the Prime Minister to accord these areas special category
          according to the guidelines of the AIBP. She said that it would help in
          removing the backwardness of these areas.

          It may be recalled that under the AIBP guidelines, the projects
          bracketed within special category were provided 90 per cent central share
          while state had to bear 10 per cent share.

          The C.M., in her letter, said that under the current policy of the Water
          Resources Ministry of the Centre, one irrigation project of every state was
          included as the national project. She said that U.P. was the country’s largest
          state population-wise and it housed 1/5th part of the country’s population.
          She said that considering the requirements of the state, at least three
          irrigation project should be accepted as the national projects.

          *******

          Uttar Pradesh hits back at centre for reprimand on IPS transfers

          LUCKNOW - The Uttar Pradesh government has taken exception to the
          central government’s objection against alleged frequent transfers of
          Indian Police Service (IPS) officers.

          Responding to a letter by union Home Secretary G.K. Pillai to the
          state, Uttar Pradesh Chief Secretary Atul Kumar Gupta Wednesday night
          faxed a strongly worded reply.

          “It is not clear from where the union home ministry has got its
          figures, claiming that IPS officers were being transferred even in a
          day, a week, month or less than a year,” Gupta pointed out in his
          letter.

          “The Uttar Pradesh government has framed a policy of giving two-year
          long tenures to IPS officers and that was being adhered to as far as
          possible. Changes at the senior level have to be made in accordance
          with the requirements of the state.

          “No transfer has been carried out without the express approval of
          the Civil Services Board, specially constituted for the purpose,” he
          added.

          The chief secretary also blamed the central government for allocating very few IPS officers to the state.

          “Uttar Pradesh was allotted only eight IPS officers in 2005, six in
          2006, six again in 2007 and as low as five in 2008, against our demand
          for 14 officers in each of those years,” he pointed out.

          “That led to increasing shortage of directly recruited IPS officers
          required by the state. Therefore we have now demanded 15 officers this
          year,” he said.

          “Even the promotion of our Provincial Police Service (PPS) officers
          to the IPS cadre usually gets delayed at the centre, with the result
          that we are left handicapped,” he added.

           ALMOST EVERY FRAUD involves
          VICTIM

          sending “CASH” money to a
          Fraudster/Scammer.

          ABSOLUTELY DO NOT send any money
          using Western
          Union
          / Moneygram. 

          Always deal ONLY locally by meeting
          the seller/buyer in person.

          READ and UNDERSTAND the methods used
          by Fraudsters in the link above.

          ONLINE TRAINING ON PRECEPTS AND TRADE-72

          2

          The Distinguishing features of Buddhist
          Economics

           

          “Don’t eat just because you feel like it 
          – eat when you feel hungry . . .”


           

          There are many points of similarity and
          difference between Western Economics and Buddhist Economics. What the two have
          in common is in their recognition of three stages in the economic process.
          However, in the detail of each of the three stages, we find significant
          divergence: