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Contents

40.   TRI-PITAKA   AND   TWELVE  
DIVISIONS


  1. TRI-PITAKA   AND   TWELVE  
    DIVISIONS

    Tripitaka (or Tipitika) is the collection of the teachings of the Buddha over
    45 years. It consists of Sutra (the conventional teaching), Vinaya
    (Disciplinary code) and Abhidhamma (commentaries).

    The Tripitaka was compiled and arranged in its present form by the disciples
    who had immediate contact with Shakyamuni Buddha.

    The Buddha had passed away, but the sublime Dharma which he unreservedly bequeathed
    to humanity still exists in its pristine purity.

    Although the Buddha had left no written records of his teachings, his
    distinguished disciples preserved them by committing to memory and
    transmitting them orally from generation to generation.


    40.1   Brief historical background


    Immediately after the final passing away of the Buddha, 500 distinguished
    Arahats held a convention known as the First Buddhist Council to rehearse
    the Doctrine taught by the Buddha. Venerable Ananda, who was a faithful
    attendant of the Buddha and had the special privilege of hearing all the
    discourses the Buddha ever uttered, recited the Sutra, whilst the
    Venerable Upali recited the Vinaya, the rules of conduct for the
    Sangha.

    One hundred years after the First Buddhist Council, some disciples saw the
    need to change certain minor rules. The orthodox Bhiksus said that nothing
    should be changed while the others insisted on modifying some disciplinary
    rules (Vinaya). Finally, the formation of different schools of Buddhism
    germinated after his council. And in the Second Council, only matters pertaining
    to the Vinaya were discussed and no controversy about the Dharma was reported.

    In the 3rd Century B.C. during the time of Emperor Asoka, the Third Council
    was held to discuss the differences of opinion held by the Sangha community.
    At this Council the differences were not confined to the Vinaya but were
    also connected with the Dharma. The Abhidhamma Pitaka was discussed
    and included at this Council. The Council which was held in Sri Lanka in
    80 B.C. is known as the 4th Council under the patronage of the pious King
    Vattagamini Abbaya. It was at this time in Sri Lanka that the Tripitaka
    was first committed to writing in Pali language.


    40.2   Sutra Pitaka

    The Sutra Pitaka (Sutra Pitaka in Sanskrit) consists mainly of discourses
    delivered by the Buddha himself on various occasions. There were also a
    few discourses delivered by some of his distinguished disciples (e.g. Sariputta,
    Ananda, Moggallana) included in it. It is like a book of prescriptions,
    as the sermons embodied therein were expounded to suit the different occasions
    and the temperaments of various persons. There may be seemingly contradictory
    statements, but they should not be misconstrued as they were opportunely
    uttered by the Buddha to suit a particular purpose.

    This Pitaka is divided into five Nikayas or collections, viz.:-

    1. Dlgha Nikaya (Collection of Long Discourses)
    2. Majjhima Nikaya (Collection of Middle-length Discourses)
    3. Samyuita Nikaya (Collection of Kindred Sayings)
    4. Anguttara Nikaya (Collection of Discourses arranged in accordance
      with number)
    5. Khuddaka Nikaya (Smaller Collection)

    The fifth is subdivided into fifteen books:-

    1. Khuddaka Patha (Shorter Texts)
    2. Dhammapada (The Way of Truth)
    3. Udana (Heartfelt sayings or Paeons of Joy)
    4. Iti Vuttaka (’Thus said’ Discourses)
    5. Sutta Nipata (Collected Discourses)
    6. Vimana Vatthu (Stories of Celestial Mansions)
    7. Peta Vatthu (Stories of Petas)
    8. Theragatha (Psalms of the Brethren)
    9. Therigatha (Psalms of the Sisters)
    10. Jataka (Birth Stories)
    11. Niddesa (Expositions)
    12. Patisambhida (Analytical Knowledge)
    13. Apadana (Lives of Saints)
    14. Buddhavamsa (The History of Buddha)
    15. Cariya Pitaka (Modes of Conduct)


    40.3   Vinaya Pitaka

    The Vinaya Pitaka mainly deals with the rules and regulations of the Order
    of monks (Bhikhus) and nuns (Bhikhunis). It also gives an account of the
    life and ministry of the Buddha. Indirectly it reveals some useful information
    about ancient history, Indian customs, arts, sciences, etc.

    For nearly twenty years since his enlightenment, the Buddha did not lay down
    rules for the control of the Sangha. Later, as the occasion arose, the Buddha
    promulgated rules for the future discipline of the Sangha.

    This Pitaka consists of the following five books:-

    1. Parajika Pali (Major Offences)
    2. Pacittiya Pali (Minor Offences)
    3. Mahavagga Pali (Greater Section)
    4. Cullavagga Pali (Smaller Section)
    5. Parivara Pali (Epitome of the Vinaya)


    40.4   Abhidhamma Pitaka

    The Abhidhamma (Abhidharma in Sanskrit), also known as Shastra, is the most
    important and interesting, as it contains the profound philosophy of the
    Buddha’s teaching in contrast to the illuminating but simpler discourses
    in the Sutra Pitaka.

    In the Sutra Pitaka one often finds references to individual, being, etc., but
    in the Abhidhamma, instead of such conventional terms, we meet with ultimate
    terms, such as aggregates, mind, matter etc.

    In the Abhidhamma everything is analyzed and explained in detail, and as such
    it is called analytical doctrine (Vibhajja Vada).

    Four ultimate things (Paramattha) are enumerated in the Abhidhamma.
    They are Citta (Consciousness), Cetasika (Mental concomitants).
    Rupa (Matter) and Nibbana.

    The so-called being is microscopically analyzed and its component parts are
    minutely described. Finally the ultimate goal and the method to achieve it
    is explained with all necessary details.

    The Abhidhamma Pitaka is composed of the following works:

    1. Dhamma-Sangani (Enumeration of Phenomena)
    2. Vibhanaga (The Book of the Treatises)
    3. Ikatha Vatthu (Point of Controversy)
    4. Puggala Pannatti (Description of Individuals)
    5. Dhatu Katha (Discussion with reference to Elements)
    6. Yamaka (The Book of Pairs)
    7. Patthana (The Book of Relations)


    40.5   Twelve Divisions of Buddhist
    Canons

    The content of Buddhist canons is divided into twelve divisions, categorized
    by the types of forms of literature (i.e., Sutra, Geya and Gatha) and the
    context (i.e., all other nine divisions). It is known as the Twelve
    Divisions.

    1. Sutra (Sutta in Pali) - These are the short, medium, and long
      discourses expounded by the Buddha on various occasions. The whole Vinaya
      Pitaka is also included in this respect.
    2. Geya (Geyya in Pali) - i.e., the metrical pieces. These are
      discourses/proses mixed with Gathas or verses.
    3. Gatha - i.e., verses, chants or poems. These include verses formed
      in the Dharmapada, etc., and those isolated verses which are not classified
      amongst the Sutra.

    4. Nidana - i.e., the causes and conditions of the Buddha’s
      teachings.
    5. Itivrttaka - i.e., the sutras in which the Buddhas tell of the
      deeds of their disciples and others in previous lives.
    6. Jataka - i.e., stories of the former lives of Buddhas. These are
      the 547 birth-stories.
    7. Abbhuta-dharma - i.e., miracles, etc. These are the few discourses
      that deal with wonderful and inconceivable powers of the Buddhas.
    8. Avadana - i.e., parables, metaphors. Illustrations are used to
      facilitate the human beings to understand the profound meanings of the
      Buddhist Dharma.
    9. Upadesa - i.e., dogmatic treatises. The discourse and discussions
      by questions and answers regarding the Buddhist doctrines. It is a synonym
      for Abhidharma Pitaka.
    10. Udana - i.e., impromptu or unsolicited addresses. The Buddha speaks
      voluntarily and not in reply to questions or appeals, e.g., the Amitabha
      Sutra.

    11. Vaipulya - i.e., interpretation by elaboration or deeper explanation
      of the doctrines. It is the broad school or wider teachings, in contrast
      with the “narrow” school. The term covers the whole of the specifically
      Mahayana sutras. The Sutras are also known as the scriptures of measureless
      meaning, i.e., infinite and universalistic.

    12. Vyakarana (Veyyakarama in Pali) - i.e. prophecies, prediction by
      the Buddha of the future attainment of Buddhahood by his disciples.


    40.6   Nine Divisions of Buddhist
    Canons

    The term is generally referred to Hinayana. There are only nine divisions
    excluding Udana, Vaipulya and Vyakarana.

    However, there is also a Mahayana division of nine of the Twelve Divisions,
    i.e., all except Nidana, Avadana and Upadesa.





Vinaya Pitaka


The collection of texts concerning the rules of conduct governing the
daily affairs within the Sangha — the community of bhikkhus (ordained
monks) and bhikkhunis (ordained nuns). Far more than merely a list of
rules, the Vinaya Pitaka also includes the stories behind the origin of each
rule, providing a detailed account of the Buddha’s solution to the question of
how to maintain communal harmony within a large and diverse spiritual community
.


Thousands of candles can be lit from a single
candle, and the life of the candle will not be shortened. Happiness never
decreases by being shared.



Namo Amitabha



Filial
piety has profound meanings in Buddhism. It means to take care of
parents physically, mentally and to fulfill their wishes. To further
extend and enhance our respect and care for our parents, we have
compassion for all beings in this world. As stated in a precept sutta,
“All men are my father; all women are my mother”. This is the
broadening of our mind of filial piety so that it encompasses all
beings in the universe, in the past, present and future


The History of Buddhism





Soon after
Buddha’s death or parinibbana, five hundred monks met at the first council at
Rajagrha, under the leadership of Kashyapa.  Upali recited the monastic
code (Vinaya) as he remembered it.  Ananda, Buddha’s cousin, friend, and
favorite disciple — and a man of prodigious memory! — recited Buddha’s
lessons (the Suttas).  The monks debated details and voted on final
versions.  These were then committed to memory by other monks, to be
translated into the many languages of the Indian plains.  It should be
noted that Buddhism remained an oral tradition for over 200 years.

In the next few centuries, the original unity of Buddhism began to fragment.
The most significant split occurred after the second council, held at Vaishali
100 years after the first.  After debates between a more liberal group and
traditionalists, the liberal group left and labeled themselves the Mahasangha
– “the great sangha.”  They would eventually evolve into the
Mahayana tradition of northern Asia.

The traditionalists, now referred to as Sthaviravada or “way of the
elders” (or, in Pali, Theravada), developed a complex set of philosophical
ideas beyond those elucidated by Buddha.  These were collected into the
Abhidhamma or “higher teachings.”  But they, too, encouraged
disagreements, so that one splinter group after another left the fold. 
Ultimately, 18 schools developed, each with their own interpretations of
various issues, and spread all over
India
and
Southeast Asia.  Today, only the
school stemming from the Sri Lankan Theravadan survives
.

Ashoka

Image:Ashoka2.jpg

One of the most significant events in the history of Buddhism is the chance
encounter of the monk Nigrodha and the emperor Ashoka Maurya.  Ashoka,
succeeding his father after a bloody power struggle in 268 bc, found himself
deeply disturbed by the carnage he caused while suppressing a revolt in the
land of the Kalingas.  Meeting Nigrodha convinced Emperor Ashoka to devote
himself to peace.  On his orders, thousands of rock pillars were erected,
bearing the words of the Buddha, in the brahmi script — the first written
evidence of Buddhism.  The third council of monks was held at Pataliputra,
the capital of Ashoka’s empire.

There is a story that tells about a poor young boy who, having nothing to
give the Buddha as a gift, collected a handful of dust and innocently presented
it.  The Buddha smiled and accepted it with the same graciousness he
accepted the gifts of wealthy admirers.  That boy, it is said, was reborn
as the Emperor Ashoka.

Ashoka sent missionaries all over India and beyond.  Some went
as far as
Egypt, Palestine, and Greece.  St. Origen even
mentions them as having reached
Britain
The Greeks of one of the Alexandrian kingdoms of northern
India adopted
Buddhism, after their King Menandros (Pali:  Milinda) was convinced by a
monk named Nagasena — the conversation immortalized in the Milinda
Pañha.  A Kushan king of north
India
named Kanishka was also converted, and a council was held in
Kashmir
in about 100 ad. Greek Buddhists there recorded the Sutras on copper sheets
which, unfortunately, were never recovered.
.

Sri Lanka
and Theravada

Emperor Ashoka sent one of his sons, Mahinda, and one of his daughters, Sanghamitta,
a monk and a nun, to Sri Lanka
(Ceylon)
around the year 240 bc.  The king of Sri Lanka, King Devanampiyatissa,
welcomed them and was converted.  One of the gifts they brought with them
was a branch of the bodhi tree, which was successfully transplanted.  The
descendants of this branch can still be found on the island.

The fourth council was held in Sri Lanka,
in the Aloka Cave, in the first century bc. 
During this time as well, and for the first time, the entire set of Suttas were
recorded in the Pali language on palm leaves.  This became Theravada’s
Pali Canon, from which so much of our knowledge of Buddhism stems.  It is
also called the Tripitaka (Pali:  Tipitaka), or three
baskets:  The three sections of the canon are the Vinaya Pitaka (the monastic
law), the Sutta Pitaka (words of the Buddha), and the Abhidamma Pitaka (the
philosophical commentaries).

In a very real sense, Sri Lanka’s
monks may be credited with saving the Theravada tradition:  Although it
had spread once from
India
all over southeast Asia, it had nearly died out due to competition from
Hinduism and Islam, as well as war and colonialism.  Theravada monks
spread their tradition from
Sri Lanka
to
Burma, Thailand, Malaysia,
Cambodia, and Laos, and from these lands to Europe
and the west generally
.

Mahayana

Mahayana began in the first century bc, as a development of the Mahasangha
rebellion.  Their more liberal attitudes toward monastic tradition allowed
the lay community to have a greater voice in the nature of Buddhism.  For
better or worse, the simpler needs of the common folk were easier for the
Mahayanists to meet.  For example, the people were used to gods and
heroes.  So, the Trikaya (three bodies) doctrine came into being: 
Not only was Buddha a man who became enlightened, he was also represented by
various god-like Buddhas in various appealing heavens, as well as by the Dharma
itself, or Shunyata (emptiness), or Buddha-Mind, depending on which
interpretation we look at — sort of a Buddhist Father, Son, and Holy Ghost!

More important, however, was the increased importance of the
Bodhisattva.  A Bodhisattva is someone who has attained enlightenment, but
who chooses to remain in this world of Samsara in order to bring others to
enlightenment. He is a lot like a saint, a spiritual hero, for the people to
admire and appeal to.

Along with new ideas came new scriptures.  Also called Sutras, they are
often attributed to Buddha himself, sometimes as special transmissions that
Buddha supposedly felt were too difficult for his original listeners and
therefore were hidden until the times were ripe.  The most significant of
these new Sutras are these:

Prajñaparamita or Perfection of Wisdom, an enormous collection of
often esoteric texts, including the famous Heart Sutra and Diamond Sutra. 
The earliest known piece of printing in the world is, in fact, a copy of the
Diamond Sutra, printed in
China
in 868 ad.

Suddharma-pundarika or White Lotus of the True Dharma, also often
esoteric, includes the Avalokiteshwara Sutra, a prayer to that Bodhisattva.

Vimalakirti-nirdesha or Vimalakirti’s Exposition, is the teachings of
and stories about the enlightened householder Vimalakirti.

Shurangama-samadhi or Hero’s Sutra, provides a guide to meditation,
shunyata, and the bodhisattva.  It is most popular among Zen Buddhists

Sukhavati-vyuha or Pure Land Sutra, is the most important Sutra for
the Pure Land Schools of Buddhism.  The Buddha tells Ananda about Amitabha
and his Pure Land or heaven, and how one can be
reborn there.

There are many, many others.  Finally, Mahayana is founded on two new
philosophical interpretations of Buddhism: Madhyamaka and Yogachara.

Madhyamaka

Madhyamaka means “the middle way.”  You may recall that
Buddha himself called his way the middle way in his very first sermon.  He
meant, at that time, the middle way between the extremes of hedonistic pleasure
and extreme asceticism.  But he may also have referred to the middle way
between the competing philosophies of
eternalism and annihilationism — the belief that the soul exists forever and
that the soul is annihilated at death.  Or between materialism and
nihilism….  An Indian monk by the name of Nagarjuna took this idea and
expanded on it to create the philosophy that would be known as Madhyamaka, in a
book called the Mulamadhyamaka-karika, written about 150 ad.

Basically a treatise on logical argument, it concludes that nothing is
absolute, everything is relative, nothing exists on its own, everything is
interdependent.  All systems, beginning with the idea that each thing is
what it is and not something else (Aristotle’s law of the excluded middle),
wind up contradicting themselves.  Rigorous logic, in other words, leads
one away from all systems, and to the concept of shunyata.

Shunyata means emptiness.  This doesn’t mean that nothing exists. 
It means that nothing exists in and of itself, but only as a part of a
universal web of being.  This would become a central concept in all
branches of Mahayana.  Of course, it is actually a restatement of the central
Buddhist concepts of anatman, anitya, and dukkha!

Yogachara

The second philosophical innovation, Yogachara, is credited to two brothers,
Asanga and Vasubandhu,  who lived in India in the 300’s ad.  They
elaborated earlier movements in the direction of the philosophy of idealism or
chitta-matra.  Chitta-matra means literally mind only.  Asanga and
Vasubandhu believed that everything that exists is mind or consciousness. 
What we think of as physical things are just projections of our minds,
delusions or hallucinations, if you like.  To get rid of these delusions,
we must meditate, which for the Yogachara school means the creation of pure
consciousness, devoid of all content.  In that way, we leave our deluded
individual minds and join with the universal mind, or Buddha-mind.

Tantra

The last innovation was less philosophical and far more practical: 
Tantra.  Tantra refers to certain writings which are concerned, not with
philosophical niceties, but with the basic how-to of enlightenment, and not
just with enlightenment in several rebirths, but enlightenment here-and-now!

In order to accomplish this feat, dramatic methods are needed, ones which,
to the uninitiated, may seem rather bizarre.  Tantra was the domain of the
siddhu, the adept — someone who knows the secrets,  a magician in the
ways of enlightenment.  Tantra involves the use of various techniques,
including the well-known mandalas, mantras, and mudras.  mandalas are
paintings or other representations of higher awareness, usually in the form of
a circular pattern of images, which may provide the focus of one-pointed
meditation.  Mantras are words or phrases that serve the same purpose,
such as the famous “Om mani padme
hum.”  Mudras are hand positions that symbolize certain qualities of
enlightenment.

Less well known are the yidams.  A yidam is the image of a god or
goddess or other spiritual being, either physically represented or, more
commonly, imagined clearly in the mind’s eye.  Again, these represent
archetypal qualities of enlightenment, and one-pointed meditation on these
complex images lead the adept to his or her goal.

These ideas would have enormous impact on Mahayana.  They are not
without critics, however:  Madhyamaka is sometimes criticized as
word-play, and Yogachara is criticized as reintroducing atman, eternal soul or
essence, to Buddhism.  Tantra has been most often criticized, especially
for its emphasis on secret methods and strong devotion to a guru. 
Nevertheless, these innovations led to a renewed flurry of activity in the first
half of the first millenium, and provided the foundation for the kinds of
Buddhism we find in China, Tibet, Japan,
Korea, Vietnam, and elsewhere in east
Asia.

China

Legend has it that the Chinese Emperor Ming Ti had a dream which led him to
send his agents down the Silk Road — the ancient trade route between China and the
west — to discover its meaning.  The agents returned with a picture of
the Buddha and a copy of the Sutra in 42 Sections.  This Sutra would, in
67 ad, be the first of many to be translated into Chinese.

The first Buddhist community in China
is thought to be one in Loyang, established by
“foreigners” around 150 ad, in the Han dynasty. Only 100 years later,
there emerges a native Chinese Sangha.  And during the Period of Disunity
(or Era of the Warring States, 220 to 589 ad), the number of Buddhist monks and
nuns increase to as many as two million!  Apparently, the uncertain times
and the misery of the lower classes were fertile ground for the monastic
traditions of Buddhism.

Buddhism did not come to a land innocent of religion and philosophy, of
course.  China,
in fact, had three main competing streams of thought:  Confucianism,
Taoism, and folk religion.  Confucianisim is essentially a moral-political
philosophy, involving a complex guide to human relationships.  Taoism is a
life-philosophy involving a return to simpler and more “natural” ways
of being.  And the folk religion — or, should we say, religions –
consisted of rich mythologies, superstitions, astrology, reading of entrails,
magic, folk medicine, and so on.  (Please understand that I am simplifying
here:  Certainly Confucianism and Taoism are as sophisticated as
Buddhism!)

Although these various streams sometimes competed with each other and with
Buddhism, they also fed each other, enriched each other, and intertwined with
each other.  Over time, the Mahayana of India became the Mahayana of China

and, later, of Korea, Japan, and Vietnam.

Pure Land

The first example historically is Pure Land Buddhism (Ching-T’u, J:
Jodo).  The peasants and working people of China were used to gods and
goddesses, praying for rain and health, worrying about heaven and hell, and so
on.  It wasn’t a great leap to find in Buddhism’s cosmology and theology
the bases for a religious tradition that catered to these needs and habits,
while still providing a sophisticated philosophical foundation.

The idea of this period of time as a fallen or inferior time — traditional
in China
– led to the idea that we are no longer able to reach enlightenment on our own
power, but must rely on the intercession of higher beings.  The
transcendent Buddha Amitabha, and his western paradise (”pure land”),
introduced in the Sukhavati-vyuha Sutra, was a perfect fit.

Ch’an

Another school that was to be particularly strongly influenced by Chinese
thought was the Meditation
School — Dhyana, Ch’an,
Son, or Zen.  Tradition has the Indian monk Bodhidharma coming from the
west to China
around 520 ad.  It was Bodhidharma, it is said, who carried the Silent
Transmission to become the First Patriarch of the Ch’an School in China:

From the very beginning, Buddha had had reservations about his ability to
communicate his message to the people.  Words simply could not carry such
a sublime message.  So, on one occasion, while the monks around him waited
for a sermon, he said absolutely nothing.  He simply held up a
flower.  the monks, of course, were confused, except for Kashyapa, who
understood and smiled.  The Buddha smiled back, and thus the Silent
Transmission began.

Zen Buddhism focuses on developing the immediate awareness of Buddha-mind
through meditation on emptiness.  It is notorious for its dismissal of the
written and spoken word and occasionally for his rough-house antics.  It
should be understood, however, that there is great reverence for the Buddha,
the Dharma, and the Sangha, even when they are ostensibly ignoring, poking fun,
or even turning them upside-down.

Zen has contributed its own literature to the Buddhist melting-pot,
including The Platform Sutra, written by Hui Neng, the Sixth Patriarch, around
700 ad., The Blue Cliff Record, written about 1000 ad., and The Gateless Gate,
written about 1200 ad.  And we shouldn’t forget the famous Ten Ox-Herding
Pictures that many see as containing the very essence of Zen’s message.

The Blossoming of Schools

During the Sui dynasty (581-618) and T’ang dynasty (618-907), Chinese
Buddhism experienced what is referred to as the “blossoming of
schools.”  The philosophical inspirations of the Madhyamaka and
Yogachara, as well as the Pure
Land and Ch’an Sutras,
interacting with the already sophisticated philosophies of Confucianism and
Taoism, led to a regular renaissance in religious and philosophical thought.

We find the Realistic School, based on the “all things exist”
Hinayana School;  the Three-Treatises School, based on Madhyamaka; the
Idealist School, based on Yogachara; the Tantric School; the Flower Adornment
School (Hua-Yen, J: Kegon), which attempted to consolidate the various forms;
and the White Lotus School (T’ien-T’ai, J: Tendai), which focused on the Lotus
Sutra.

All the Chinese Schools had their representatives in neighboring
countries.  Korea
was to develop its own powerful form of Ch’an called Son.  Vietnam developed a form of Ch’an that
incorporated aspects of Pure
Land and Hinayana. 
But it was Japan that would
have a field day with Chinese Buddhism, and pass the Mahayana traditions on to
the US
and the west generally.

Japan

Again, we begin with the legendary:  A delegation arrived from Korea with
gifts for the Emperor of Japan in 538 ad., including a bronze Buddha and
various Sutras.  Unfortunately a plague led the Emperor to believe that
the traditional gods of Japan
were annoyed, so he had the gifts thrown into a canal!  But the imperial
court on the 600’s, in their constant effort to be as sophisticated as the
courts of their distinguished neighbors, the Chinese, continued to be drawn to
Buddhism.

Although starting as a religion of the upper classes, in the 900’s, Pure Land
entered the picture as the favorite of the peasant and working classes. 
And in the 1200’s, Ch’an, relabeled Zen, came into Japan, where it was
enthusiastically adopted by, among others, the warrior class or Samurai.

Zen was introduced into Japan
by two particularly talented monks who had gone to China for their educations: 
Eisai (1141-1215) brought Lin-chi (J: Rinzai) Ch’an, with its koans and
occasionally outrageous antics;  Dogen (1200-1253) brought the more sedate
Ts’ao-tung (J: Soto) Ch’an.  In addition, Dogen is particularly admired
for his massive treatise, the Shobogenzo.

Ch’an has always had an artistic side to it.  In China and
elsewhere, a certain simple, elegant style of writing and drawing developed
among the monks.  In Japan,
this became an even more influential aspect of Zen.  We have, for example,
the poetry, calligraphy, and paintings of various monks — Bankei (1622-1698),
Basho (1644-1694), Hakuin (1685-1768), and Ryokan (1758-1831) — which have
become internationally beloved.

One last Japanese innovation is usually attributed to a somewhat unorthodox
monk named Nichiren (1222-1282).  Having been trained in the Tendai or
White Lotus tradition, he came to believe that the Lotus Sutra carried all that
was necessary for Buddhist life.  More than that, he believed that even
the name of the Sutra was enough!  So he encouraged his students to chant
this mantra:  Namu-myoho-renge-kyo, which means “homage to the Lotus
Sutra.”  This practice alone would ensure enlightenment in this
life.  In fact, he insisted, all other forms of Buddhism were of little
worth.  Needless to say, this was not appreciated by the Buddhist powers
of the day.  He spent the rest of his life in relative isolation. 
The Nichiren School nevertheless proved to be one of
the most successful forms of Buddhism on the planet!

Tibet


Finally, let’s turn out attention to the most mysterious site of Buddhism’s
history, Tibet
Its first encounter with Buddhism occurred in the 700’s ad, when a Tantric
master, Guru Rinpoché, came from India
to battle the demons of Tibet
for control.  The demons submitted, but they remained forever a part of
Tibetan Buddhism — as its protectors!

During the 800’s and 900’s, Tibet
went through a “dark age,” during which Buddhism suffered something
of a setback.  But, in the 1000’s, it returned in force.  And in
1578, the Mongol overlords named the head of the Gelug School
the Dalai Lama, meaning “guru as great as the ocean.”  The title
was made retroactive to two earlier heads of the school.  The fifth Dalai
Lama is noted for bringing all of Tibet under his religious and
political control.

The lineage continues down to the present 14th Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso,
born 1935.  In 1989, he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts
on behalf of his people and nation, which had been taken over by the Communist
Chinese in 1951.

The West

It was in the latter half of the 1800’s that Buddhism first came to be known
in the west.  The great European colonial empires brought the ancient
cultures of India and China back to the attention of the intellectuals
of Europe.  Scholars began to learn Asian
languages and translate Asian texts.  Adventurers explored previously
shut-off places and recorded the cultures.  Religious enthusiasts enjoyed
the exotic and mystical tone of the Asian traditions.

In England,
for example, societies sprang up for devotees of “orientalia,” 
such as T. W. Rhys Davids’ Pali Text Society and T. Christmas Humphreys’
Buddhist Society
.  Books were published, such as Sir Edwin Arnold’s
epic poem The Light of Asia (1879).  And the first western monks
began to make themselves know, such as Allan Bennett, perhaps the very first,
who took the name Ananda Metteya.  In Germany
and France
as well, Buddhism was the rage.

In the United States,
there was a similar flurry of interest.  First of all, thousands of
Chinese immigrants were coming to the west coast in the late 1800’s, many to
provide cheap labor for the railroads and other expanding industries. 
Also, on the east coast, intellectuals were reading about Buddhism in books by
Europeans.  One example was  Henry Thoreau, who, among other things,
translated a French translation of a Buddhist Sutra into English.

A renewal of interest came during World War II, during which many Asian
Buddhists — such as the Zen author D. T. Suzuki — came to England and the U.S.,
and many European Buddhists — such as the Zen author Alan Watts — came to the
U.S. 
As these examples suggest, Zen Buddhism was particularly popular, especially in
the U.S.,
where it became enmeshed in the Beatnik artistic and literary movement as
“beat Zen.”

One by one, European and Americans who studied in Asia returned with their
knowledge and founded monasteries and societies, Asian masters came to Europe

and America to found
monasteries, and the Asian immigrant populations from China, Japan,
Vietnam
and elsewhere, quietly continued their Buddhist practices.

Today, it is believed that there are more than 300 million Buddhists in the
world, including at least a quarter million in Europe, and a half million each
in North and South America.  I say
“at least” because other estimates go as high as three million in the
U.S.
alone!  Whatever the numbers may be, Buddhism is the fourth largest
religion in the world, after Christianity, Islam, and Hinduism.  And,
although it has suffered considerable setbacks over the centuries, it seems to
be attracting more and more people, as a religion or a philosophy of life.





BSP mulls changes to foil Cong-SP pact

BY AMITA VERMA

LUCKNOW

Oct. 30: With political realignments waiting to crystallise in Uttar
Pradesh, the Bahujan Samaj Party is changing its candidates for the Lok
Sabha elections.

According to party sources, the BSP plans to change candidates in
over a dozen Lok Sabha constituencies in view of the emerging political
equations. The proposed Congress-Samajwadi Party alliance seems to have
forced the BSP to do some rethinking about its candidates and though
the Congress-SP alliance is yet to take off, the BSP is not taking any
chances.

According to a senior BSP minister, “The BSP has always benefited in
multi-cornered contests. However, if the Congress-SP alliance
materialises, Uttar Pradesh will see a three-cornered contest
(Congress-SP versus BSP versus BJP) on most seats. We will have to put
up candidates who suit the new political equations and for this, some
changes may be effected.”

According to party sources, BSP president and UP chief minister
Mayawati has already changed candidates in about 10 Lok Sabha
constituencies and is likely to effect changes in another 8-10 segments.

“We cannot announce the changes since the names, in the first place,
had also not been officially announced. Changes are being done to
increase the winnability quotient of BSP candidates and some more
changes will be made once the Congress-SP and BJP announce their
candidates,” said a senior BSP functionary.

Party sources say that the BSP plans to field Muslim candidates in
constituencies where the Samajwadi Party-Congress candidate could be in
a winning position. “A Muslim candidate will attract votes from his own
community and along with the party’s Original Inhabitants of Jambudvipa, that is, the Great Prabuddha Bharath and Brahmin vote base, he
can easily establish an edge over the rivals,” reasoned the party
functionary.

The BSP, it is learnt, is also waiting for some “influential”
candidates to defect from other parties in near future. These turncoats
will have to be accommodated as party candidates.

For instance,  Rizwan Zaheer recently
quit the Samajwadi Party to join the BSP and he has been made the party
candidate from Balrampur.

The BSP, it may be recalled, had already finalised candidates on 80
per cent of the Lok Sabha seats in Uttar Pradesh and the contestants
had even been asked to start preparing for the elections in
coordination with local party workers.

The party has been regularly taking a feedback on the candidates’
image and performance in their respective constituencies. Some
candidates, whose pre-poll performance has not been found to be
satisfactory, may also face the axe.

Maya to launch BSP campaign in four states

BY MANISH ANAND

New Delhi

Oct. 30: BSP supremo Mayawati is set to launch her election campaign
in the poll-bound states of Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan and Delhi with
the capital as her base. She has mobilised most of her ministers and
party MLAs for electioneering.

With a six-seater jet and a chopper at her disposal, Ms Mayawati is set to hop from one state to another.

The BSP chief is set to criss-cross the four states, that she is
looking at the possibility to expand the party’s base and step out of
Uttar Pradesh. Ms Mayawati will spend a day in Chhattisgarh in the
first week of November.

The state BSP in-charge Dauram Ratnakar informed, “Behenji is giving
a day each for first and second phase of elections in Chattisgarh. The
BSP MLAs and ministers from UP will start coming here from tomorrow.”

The BSP supremo has chosen Madhya Pradesh for the most intense electioneering.

Ms Mayawati is tipped to address a minimum of 25 public meetings in
the state. The state is going to the Assembly polls on November 27.

Also, playing the caste cards deftly, Ms Mayawati has pressed into
action the combination of a Muslim (Mr Naseemuddin), a Brahmin (Anant
Kumar Mishra) and a Kayastha (Mr Lalji Verma) leaders to tour the
poll-bound states ahead of her.

The close confidante of the BSP supremo and UP minister Naseemuddin,
who had played a crucial role in breaking the Samajwadi Party ahead of
the July trust vote, is hopping from one state to another to prepare
grounds for Ms Mayawati to give the last “push” before the elections.

Mr Naseemuddin has toured MP and Delhi recently and has asked all the UP ministers and MLAs to move into the poll-bound states.

The BSP supremo has also planned to address five rallies in Delhi in
November. She has stationed a dozen of UP MLAs in the capital who have
been assigned specific roles by Mr Naseemuddin.

The UP ministers are also overseeing party’s election campaign in the capital.

However, speculation is rife that Ms Mayawati is planning to change the candidates’ list announced so far for Rajasthan.

The former external affairs minister K. Natwar Singh’s son Jagat
Singh is set to contest from the Bharatpur Assembly constituency as the
BSP candidate.

Haj flight cancelled

Lucknow: The first flight scheduled to take Haj pilgrims from Uttar
Pradesh on Thursday was cancelled after many passengers failed to get
their visas and Chief Minister Mayawati accused the Centre of giving a
“step motherly treatment” to the State.

Maya plans action against 12 IPS officers

By Our Special Correspondent

Lucknow

Oct. 30: The Mayawati government is planning action against 12 more
IPS officers, found guilty of committing irregularities in the police
recruitment scam. The state government has already forwarded the names
of these IPS officers to the Centre for necessary permission before it
gives the nod for their prosecution to the investigating agency. A
total of about 40 officers, who were heading the selection boards, are
to be prosecuted for their role in the recruitment scam which took
place during the Mulayam Singh regime in 2005-2006.

‘Gifted orator’ Obama on an historic path

The man with the funny man, Barack Obama may make history by becoming the first black US President. (AP)
The man with the funny man, Barack Obama may make history by becoming the first black US President. (AP)

Washington, October 31: :
Barack Obama burst
onto the national stage four years ago with a speech describing himself
self-deprecatingly as a skinny guy with a funny name and an improbable
life story.

On Tuesday, he may make history by becoming the first black man elected US president.

Born in Hawaii to a white mother from Kansas and a black father from Kenya, Obama spent part of his childhood in Indonesia.

In the 2004 speech to the Democratic National
Convention that vaulted him to rock-star status, he introduced himself
to America as someone who hoped to bridge divisions, political and
racial.


This time the white voters would not retract from voting to
Barack Obama, and will prove to the world that they have a Mighty Great Mind.
Just like the poor Upper Caste voters who would also not retract from voting Ms
Mayawati who is vying to become the first Original Inhabitant of Jambudvipa,
that is, the Great Prabuddha Bharath Prime Minister. The Entire People of both
US and India
will prove to the world that they have Mighty Great Mind

that  will bring the change the US and India needs by seeking people’s involvement in democracy and resurrecting the tattered economy.”For both India and America, the time for change has come.” to equally distribute the National wealth to all sections of the society.For healthy seads and land to the tillers, Government Loans for all those who wanted to start business through honest government employees.

Uttar Pradesh university to team up with Italian university


Lucknow: The Ram Manohar Lohia National Law University (RMLNLU) here will tie up with the University of Naples, Italy, to promote academic research, especially in the field of international law.

“RMLNU and the University
of Naples will enter into an agreement to start an exchange programme
for the academic staff and researchers in compliance with the relevant
laws of two countries,” RMLNLU vice-chancellor Balraj Chauhan said on
Thursday.

“The exchange programme will help our teachers and students to have first-hand knowledge of international law,” he added.

According to university officials, a memorandum of understanding
(MoU) between the two institutes will be signed within a week. The MoU
will enable students and teachers to undertake joint research projects
which in turn will enhance their respective curricula, they said. IANS

http://nichirenscoffeehouse.net/Ryuei/skema.jpg

Any
one can B a Good Hindu, Muslim or Christian!

And
go to Heaven!

Just
have a Mighty Great Mind of a Human!



Want 2 B Little Tommy thin or big mommy fat ?
Everything is in UR mouth !
Eat More U R fat !
If its less U R thin and neat !



comments (0)
10/30/08
Tipitaka The Pali Canon-C.M. condemns incident involving Dharmdeo Narain Rai’s death in Mumbai -Mayawati blames it on Centre, Maharashtra - C.M. greets people on Deepawali-185 farmers committed suicide in Karnataka in first half of 2008-09-Obama is America’s future: Bill Clinton -Most US groups back Obama -Obama leads in eight states
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Posted by: @ 8:24 am




Awe-inspiring The Buddha of Kamakura radiates serenity

Buddha


Tipitaka

The Pali Canon

Sutta Index

The Tipitaka (Pali ti, “three,” + pitaka,
“baskets”), or Pali canon, is the collection of primary Pali language
texts which form the doctrinal foundation of Theravada Buddhism. The Tipitaka
and the paracanonical
Pali texts
(commentaries,
chronicles,
etc.) together constitute the complete body of classical Theravada texts.

The Pali canon is a vast body of literature: in English translation the
texts add up to thousands of printed pages. Most (but not all) of the Canon has
already been published in English over the years. Although only a small
fraction of these texts are available on this website, this collection can be a
good place to start.

The three divisions of the Tipitaka are:

Vinaya Pitaka

The collection of texts concerning
the rules of conduct governing the daily affairs within the Sangha — the
community of bhikkhus (ordained monks) and bhikkhunis (ordained
nuns). Far more than merely a list of rules, the Vinaya Pitaka also includes
the stories behind the origin of each rule, providing a detailed account of the
Buddha’s solution to the question of how to maintain communal harmony within a
large and diverse spiritual community.

Sutta Pitaka

The collection of suttas, or
discourses, attributed to the Buddha and a few of his closest disciples,
containing all the central teachings of Theravada Buddhism. (More than nine
hundred sutta translations are available on this website.) The suttas are
divided among five nikayas (collections):

·        
Digha Nikaya
the “long collection”

·        
Majjhima Nikaya
— the “middle-length collection”

·        
Samyutta Nikaya
— the “grouped collection”

·        
Anguttara Nikaya
— the “further-factored collection”

·        
Khuddaka Nikaya
— the “collection of little texts”:

o       
Khuddakapatha

o       
Dhammapada

o       
Udana

o       
Itivuttaka

o       
Sutta Nipata

o       
Vimanavatthu

o       
Petavatthu

o       
Theragatha

o       
Therigatha

o       
Jataka

o       
Niddesa

o       
Patisambhidamagga

o       
Apadana

o       
Buddhavamsa

o       
Cariyapitaka

o       
Nettippakarana (included only in the Burmese
edition of the Tipitaka)

o       
Petakopadesa (  ”   ”
 )

o       
Milindapañha
(  ”   ”  )

Abhidhamma Pitaka

The collection of texts in which
the underlying doctrinal principles presented in the Sutta Pitaka are reworked
and





BSP IN POLL MODE
Maya to address five rallies in Delhi
New Delhi, PTI:
Viewing the Delhi Assembly
polls as the “semi-finals” to the crucial Lok Sabha elections, BSP
Chief Mayawati will address five rallies here to firm the party’s foray
in the national capital.

Mayawati’s
right-hand man Satish Chandra Mishra will camp in the city during the
election days to monitor the campaign while entire ministers of the
Uttar Pradesh cabinet will be assigned particular constituencies to
help candidates decide on strategy.


“Mayawati is giving special importance to Delhi
polls and she will be attending five rallies in the capital. Further
details like where these rallies will be organised are being worked
out,” a senior BSP leader told PTI.


The
party has already announced candidates for 68 out of the 70 Assembly
seats so that candidates, most of them first timers, get acquainted
with the constituency. After reviewing the work of candidates, the
party had also changed some of its candidates for “non-performance”.


The
leader said UP ministers will be assigned particular constituencies on
the basis of the caste combinations in the segment so that they can win
over “particular” communities.


“Winning seats in Delhi
polls are important as a message will spread across the country ahead
of Lok Sabha polls. We want Mayawati to be the next prime minister,”
BSP Delhi President Brahm Singh Bidhuri said.

As
the party made inroads into the national capital after the last year’s
Municipal Corporation polls by winning 17 of the 272 seats, Bidhuri
exuded confidence that the party will win at least 40 seats of the 70
segments this time.

“Price
rise, complete statehood demand, basic amenities such as Bijli, Sadak,
Pani and unauthorised colonies are some of the issues that the BSP
would be raising during the elections,” Bidhuri said.

He
said his party will take on the Congress and the BJP simultaneously as
the two parties have “done nothing for the people of the state” and
“only played politics to garner their support”.

The
rise of BSP in the capital is seen as a threat to the Congress
traditional vote-bank of Original Inhabitants of Jambdvipa, that is, the Great Prabuddha Bharath, Muslims and the people hailing from
eastern Uttar Pradesh and
Bihar.




C.M. condemns incident involving Dharmdeo Narain Rai’s death in Mumbai

Mayawati blames it on Centre, Maharashtra

Atiq Khan

LUCKNOW: Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Mayawati has condemned
Tuesday’s lynching of a labourer from the State by a gang allegedly
associated with the Maharashtra Navnirman Sena at the Khapoli suburban
railway station in Mumbai.

In a letter to the Centre and the Maharashtra government on
Wednesday, Ms. Mayawati demanded immediate action against those
responsible for the violence against the migrant population from the
north Indian States.

The Chief Minister accused the Centre and the Maharashtra government
of having failed to control the violence let loose by MNS supporters
against north Indians.

Dharamdeo Rai, migrant labourer from Goria Ghat village in Sant
Kabir Nagar district, was pulled out of a compartment and killed when
he was returning home. Rai is survived by his wife and daughter. He has
three brothers. Ms. Mayawati sanctioned Rs. 2 lakh to the bereaved
family.

A decision that came bit late

Lucknow: After only three months in Maharashtra, Dharamdev Ramnarain
Rai had decided to come back home to his village in Uttar Pradesh
following the increasing attacks against North Indians. Had he taken
the decision a little earlier he might still be alive.

The 25-year-old from Goriya Ghat village in east Uttar Pradesh’s
Sant Kabir Nagar district was lynched on a suburban train to Mumbai on
Diwali night.

The humanities graduate who found work in a steel manufacturing unit
in Khopoli, 120 km from Mumbai, had been married for three years and
had a 15-month-old daughter.

His wife is expecting their second child.


Only regrets remain

His grieving father Ram Narain Rai, a teacher in a local school in
Goriya Ghat, said: “Dharamdev had made up his mind to return home in
view of the escalating attacks against North Indians in Maharastra.”

Detailing the events of the night, Mr. Rai told IANS over the phone:
“My son had boarded a suburban train, along with two of his other
friends from Sant Kabir Nagar, to go to Kalyan from where they had
proposed to take the Kushinagar Express to return home.”

“But just as the train reached Badlapur station (in neighbouring
Thane), a band of some 15-20 MNS (Maharashtra Navnirman Sena) goons
stormed into the compartment. Raising pro-MNS slogans, they instantly
asked for U.P. ‘bhaiyas’ whom they could identify easily as the
non-Marathi speaking passengers on board.


Pleas go unheard

“My son and his friends Virendra and Satya Prakash kept on pleading
for mercy and sought to explain to the MNS activists that they had
already made up their mind to leave the State; but the violent group
was not prepared to listen to anything and went about thrashing the
three helpless boys until they fell unconscious.”

He added that Dharamdev was hit on the head with an iron rod and could not recover.

He was declared brought dead when police turned up about 30 minutes later and took him to the nearest hospital. — IANS

185 farmers committed suicide in Karnataka in first half of 2008-09

 Nagesh Prabhu

BANGALORE: The number of reported cases of farmer suicides in
Karnataka touched 185 in the first half of this financial year
(2008-09).

The State’s agricultural sector has been facing a plethora of
problems. Apart from the erratic monsoon this year, the shortage of
fertilizers disrupted kharif sowing, leading to a delay in sowing
operations in several districts.

The global economic slowdown is likely to depress the prices of
cotton, while sugarcane growers are threatening an agitation seeking
higher support price for their produce. Sugarcane growers are unhappy
with the procurement price (Rs. 811 a tonne) offered by the government.

The State has not been able meet the sowing target set for the
kharif season (2008). Sowing took place on 65.36 lakh hectares of land
against the target of 74.4 lakh hectares, achieving 87 per cent of the
target. As on September 30, the highest number of suicide cases was
reported from Hassan district (23). A large tract of potato crop was
destroyed in Hassan district owing to incessant rain during the kharif
season. The loss has been estimated at over Rs. 300 crore. Hassan
topped the list in the number of suicides by farmers in 2003-04 (69)
and 2004-05 (37). In Bidar district, 20 farmers committed suicide
followed by 15 in Belgaum, 13 in Chikmagalur, 12 in Mandya, and 10 each
in Bijapur and Chitradurga. The number of cases reported from other
districts are: Haveri — 2; Uttara Kannada — 6; Dharwad — 8; Koppal,
Ramanagaram and Raichur — 3 each; Tumkur, Gulbarga, Gadag and Mysore —
7 each; Shimoga — 8; Kodagu — 4; Davangere — 6; and Dakshina Kannada —
1, according to government sources. Not a single case of suicide by
farmers has been reported from six districts.

The two drought-prone districts of Kolar and Chikkaballapur, and
Bangalore Rural, Bangalore Urban, Chamarajnagar and Udupi districts
reported no suicide cases between April and September 2008. The number
of farmers committing suicide has seen a decline from 2000-01, when
2,360 farmers ended their lives. As many as 708 suicide cases were
reported in 2003-04, 271 in 2004-05, 163 in 2005-06, 343 cases in
2006-07, and 340 in 2007-08.



C.M. greets people on Deepawali

Uttar Pradesh : One year of development and progress

Steps towards social Democracy

Ms. Mayawati
assumed office of the Chief Minister of Uttar Pradesh for the fourth time. Out
of the five year term given by the electorate, she has completed first year of
her rule on May, 2008.

            During
the short period, her Government fulfilled its promise made to the people to
bring an end to the ‘Jungle Raj’ and put an effective check on extortion of the
‘goonda tax’
by enforcing the
‘rule of law by the law’ for 17 crore people of
the State and creating an ideal climate for all round development of the State.
This augured well for people who gave expression to their feelings in the
recently held by-polls for two Parliamentary seats and three Assembly seats in
which all the BSP candidates won with big margins.. It was priceless gift of
the  Mighty Great Minded People of Uttar
Pradesh to the Chief Minister, Ms. Mayawati, one month ahead of the completion
of one year in office.

            Last
one year evidenced State Government’s resolve to deal with criminals with an
iron hand. This resulted in total normalcy on the law and order front. No
untoward incident took place during the period and all the religious and
national festivals passed off peacefully. Her Government took several historic
and bold decisions which will go down in the history as epoch making. These
decisions are aimed at bettering the lot of deprived and weaker sections of the
society who have been suffering for a long time. This presages the glimmer of
hope in the eyes and smile on the lips of millions of people who found a
messaiah in Ms. Mayawat.

            The
decisions like connecting Ballia with NOIDA by Ganga

Express-Way,

Providing employment opportunities to
thousands of people by filling backlog vacancies,

Appointing more than one lakh Arogya
Rakshakas (Protectors of lives of all beings),

Recruitment of 88,0000 primary school
teachers and lifting ban on the recruitment of general category candidates,

Striking at the roots of corruption,

Non-acquisition of of farming land by the
government for industrial purposes,

Banning of auction of small farmers’ land by
the banks,

Opening of big hospitals, medical colleges
and institutions for providing better health and education to common people are
such noteworthy decisions which are bound to have far reaching impact on the
progress of the State. The constructive and positive steps taken by Ms.
Mayawati and her constructive approach would prove milestone in the direction
of transforming Uttar Pradesh into a better and prosperous State.

            During
the last 57 years, the State was burdened with loans amounting to crores of
rupees due to the wrong economic policies pursued by previous governments. The
Country has a poor record on distribution of wealth. The economic situation
worsened and the public welfare works could not be carried out in a proper way.
Keeping in view, the problems pertaining to medical and health, education,
power supply and drought conditions of Bundelkhand, the State government
demanded a package of Rs. 80,000 crore from the Central Government. But the
Union Government did not pay attention to it. The Central Government did not
release full amount of the schemes and whatever amount was released was done in
the last days of March. Consequently, the State Government undertook works with
its own resources and got them completed.

Vinay Shankar Tiwari from Gorakhpur in Eastern Uttar Pradesh or some
nearby seat on a BSP ticket. His elder son Kushal Tiwari had won
Khalilabad Lok Sabha by-elections on BSP ticket early this year. With
an aim of sending his two sons to Lok Sabha, Tiwari is trying to
strengthen his position in eastern U.P. to counter Hindu Yuva Vahini
chief Yogi Adityanath’s increasing influence. The ruling BSP is
expected to help him in this endeavour.
In a bid to ensure the entry of his son Mahesh Verma into Lok
Sabha, former Speaker of the Assembly Dhaniram Verma has switched to
BSP. The BSP has also named him as party candidate from the Kannauj
seat.
Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama stands with former President Bill Clinton at a rally in Florida.
Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama stands with former President Bill Clinton at a rally in Florida.

Obama is America’s future: Bill Clinton


Washington, October 30: : Democratic White House
front-runner Barack Obama and party veteran Bill Clinton have buried
the hatchet six days before the polls, with the former President
appealing to people to vote for the Illinois Senator who represented
“America’s future”.

“Are you ready for a new President? And are you ready for this
(Obama) new President,” Clinton said during his first joint appearance
with the Democratic nominee for the November 4 polls at a rally in
Kissimmee, Florida last night.

Clinton, whose wife Hillary abandoned her bid for White House
in June after losing in primaries to Obama, told a huge gathering of
over 30,000 people that he was “honoured” to voice his support for the
47-year-old Senator from Illinois.

“The presidential campaign is the greatest job interview in the
world. And on Tuesday, you get to make the hire,” he said, describing
Obama as “America’s future.”


Most US groups back Obama

By Kenneth J. Cooper

BOSTON

Oct. 29: To win an American election, it takes a broad coalition,
and Mr Barack Obama appears to have assembled one, recent polls
indicate.

The Democratic presidential nominee leads or ties Mr John McCain in
almost every demographic group when the electorate is sliced by age,
gender, income or race. By a wide margin, young voters in their 20s
have long favoured Obama, who is 47. The elderly, once sceptical
because of his relative inexperience, have shifted since the stock
market collapse hit their retirement accounts. Mr Obama and Mr McCain,
72, now run about even among voters age 65 and older.

Mr Obama has a big advantage among women, reflecting a “gender gap”
that has benefited Democrats. But Mr McCain appears to have lost the
clear Republican edge with men. Various polls show either an even
split, or an advantage for Mr McCain or Mr Obama.

A poll for Reuters puts Mr Obama ahead with voters from every income
group except those who earn more than $100,000 a year. That prosperous
group tends to favour Republicans because of the party’s opposition to
higher taxes.

With the majority of voters who are white, Mr Obama runs even with
Mr McCain in a New York Times poll, and two points behind in the
Reuters survey. Mr Obama has an overwhelming edge with fellow black
Americans, and not quite as large a margin with Hispanics.

When race and class are combined, polls for the Times and Newsweek
magazine show Mr Obama with a surprising lead among working-class
whites.

Many had looked askance at a black candidate who attended elite
colleges. But the bad economy appears to have changed some of their
minds. Mr Obama leads by a marginal two points in the Newsweek poll,
but by a solid 10 points in the Times poll.

Obama leads in eight states
 

Washington, Oct. 29: Barack
Obama now leads in four states won by President Bush in 2004 and is
essentially tied with John McCain in two other Republican red states,
according to new AP-GfK battleground polling. The results help explain
why the Democrat is pressing his money and manpower advantages in a
slew of traditionally GOP states, hoping not just for a win but a
transcendent victory that remakes the nation’s political map.

Less than a week before Election Day, the AP-GfK
polls show Obama winning among early voters, favoured on almost every
issue, benefitting from the country’s sour mood and widely viewed as
the winning candidate by voters in eight crucial states — Colorado,
Florida, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania and
Virginia. “If you believe in miracles,” said GOP consultant Joe Gaylord
of Arlington, Va., “You still believe in McCain.” Despite a mounting
chorus of Republicans predicting their nominee’s demise, McCain aides
insist their internal surveys show victory is still within reach.

McCain was written off prematurely last year, and
Obama seemed poised for victory in New Hampshire’s Democratic primary
just before Hillary Clinton thumped him. Even this close to Election
Day, racial tensions and the numbers of late-deciding voters identified
by the AP-GfK polling leave room for doubt. But the surveys confirm
what McCain aides acknowledge privately — their chances of winning are
low. The polling shows Obama holding solid leads in Ohio (7 percentage
points), Nevada (12 points), Colorado (9) and Virginia (7), all red
states won by Bush that collectively offer 47 electoral votes.





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10/29/08
Buddha Images-Right Concentration-When words of the Exalted, Noble, Blessed,Awakened One with full awareness was a bridge between Lanka and Tamil Nadu Even Now it could be so by making Human Chain of both-Make me PM Write Down on the Wall was Dr. Ambedkar’s Sign ! Two Thousand Nine ! Will Be Mine ! - Says Ms Mayawati Bahen !
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Buddha Images

 In pensive thought (Determining all beings)

      

A
short period after the awakenment , while the Lord Buddha stayed
under the Banyan tree , he stated that it was too difficult for
ordinary people to understand dhamma and bring it into practices. He
was discouraged to teach dhamma.

 

This
Dhamma that I have found is profound, hard to see, hard to understand;
it is peaceful, sublime, beyond the sphere of mere reasoning, subtle,
to be experienced by the wise. But this generation takes delight in
attachment, is delighted by attachment, rejoices in attachment and as
such it is hard for them to see this truth, namely�Nibbana.

 

However
, with his great mercy and loving - kindness , he clearly understood
that living creatures possessed different habits just like nature of a
lotus.


 

Even
though the Buddha was inclined not to teach the Dhamma, another part of
him, which was stronger, decided to teach. Having made up his mind, the
Buddha reflected on the different natures of beings in the world and
saw that they could be divided into four levels or groups:

First group: Extremely clever-merely listening to the name of a teaching they immediately understand it.

Second group: very clever: after listening to an explanation of the teaching, they understand it.

Third group: moderately clever: the “veneyya” beings. They must devote a lot of time to training their minds before they can understand.

Fourth group:
the “padaparama,” the fools, the idiots, who are unteachable. In other
words they are the people the Buddha had nothing to do with.

 

The first group are like lotuses that have grown and risen above the water level. As soon as they contact sunlight, they open out. The second group are like lotuses that are just under the surface of the water, ready to rise above it. The third group are like lotuses that are deeper down in the water, which will at a later time grow up and rise above the water level. The fourth group are
like lotuses that are very deep down in the water, so deep that there
is no way they will rise above the surface because they fall food to
fishes and turtles. The Buddha saw the different levels of wisdom among
people like this.

 

Therefore , he decided to teach dhamma in different level that fit for each living creatures.

 

 

 

A Talk to Upaka

 

THE Blessed One wondered who was worthy
of being the first to hear the word of salvation. “Where is there a man
of virtue, intelligence and energy, to whom I can teach the law?” he
asked himself. “His heart must be innocent of hatred, his mind must be
tranquil, and he must not keep the knowledge to himself as if it were
some dark secret.”

He thought of Rudraka, son of Rama but he learned that Rudraka, son of Rama, had been dead seven days. He thought of Arata Kalama ,but he learned that Arata Kalama had been dead three days . He
thought again, and he remembered Rudraka’s five disciples who had once
joined him. They were virtuous; they were energetic; they would
certainly understand the law. The Blessed One knew, by virtue of his
intelligence, that Rudraka’s five disciples were living in the Deer Park at Benares. So he set out for Bernares.

At Mount Gaya he met a monk named Upaka. At the sight of the Blessed One, Upaka uttered a cry of admiration. My Lord, may I ask who your master was?”

“I had no master,” answered the Blessed One. “There is no one like me. I alone am wise, calm, incorruptible.”

“What a great master you must be!” said Upaka. “Yes, I am the only master in this world; my equal can not be found on earth or in the sky.” “Where are you going?” asked Upaka.

“I am going to Benares,”
said the Blessed One, “and there I shall light the lamp that will bring
light into the world, a light that will dazzle even the eyes of the
blind. I am going to Benares, and
there I shall beat the drums that will awaken mankind, the drums that
will sound even in the ears of the deaf. I am going to Benares, and there I shall teach the law.”

Upaka left in disbelief , so Lord Buddha continued on his way.

 



 The first sermon  [Dhammachak Kappawattana Sutta]

          



On
the full-moon day at the eight month ( Asalha Month) , the Buddha
taught dhamma to Bhadda Vaggi ( a group of five disciples) at Isipatana
forest , Banarasi city , leading to the first monk - Kondanna - in the
world Triple Gems � Buddha , Dhamma and Sangha completed the first time
in this day. The dhamma taught in this day was called the First Sermon
or Dhammacak kappavattanasutta. The First Sermon prohibited two
extremist ways. The first is Kamasukhallikanuyoga or self � indulgence.
The other was Attakilamatanuyoga or self - mortification. The Lord
Buddha taught the middle way or Majjhima � patipada � Magga 8 which
were the ways to cease Dhukka ( suffering) and Catari Ariyasaccani (
the Four Noble Truths) respectively. This day was one of the most
important Buddhist days so called - Asalhapuja Day.

 

 

               The first sermon (Throne sitting)

             

                             The first sermon [standing]

                              

 

 

                             Teaching the five Brahmins

                            


Now the Buddha
wanted to tell other people how to become wise, good and do service for
others. He thought, “Now Asita, Alara and Uddaka are dead but my
friends Kondanna, Bhaddiya, Vappa, Mahanama and Assaji are in Benares.
I must go there and talk to them.”

Then he set out for
Benares, till at last he came to a grove where his five friends were.
This grove at Sarnath was called the Deer Park. They saw him coming
towards them and one said to another, “Look yonder! There is Gotama,
the luxury-loving fellow who gave up fasting and fell back into a life
of ease and comfort. Don�t speak to him or show him any respect. Let
nobody go and offer to take his bowl or his robe. We�ll just leave a
mat there for him to sit on if he wants to and if he does not, he can
stand. Who is going to attend on a good-for-nothing ascetic like him.”

However, as the Buddha
came nearer and nearer, they began to notice that he had changed. There
was something about him, something noble and majestic such as they had
never seen before. And in spite of themselves, before they knew what
they were doing, they forgot all they had agreed on. One hastened
forward to meet him, and respectfully took his bowl and robe, another
busily prepared a seat for him, while a third hurried off and brought
him water to wash his feet.

After he had taken a
seat the Buddha spoke to them and said, “Listen, ascetics, I have the
way to deathlessness. Let me tell you, let me teach you. And if you
listen and learn and practise as I tell you, very soon you will know
for yourselves, not in some future life but here and now in this
present lifetime, that what I say is true. You will realise for
yourself the state that is beyond all life and death.”

Naturally the five
ascetics were very astonished to hear their old companion talking like
this. They had seen him give up the hard life of fasting and
consequently believed that he had given up all efforts to find the
truth. So initially they simply did not believe him, and they told him
so.
But the Buddha replied, “You
are mistaken, Ascetics. I have not given up all effort. I am not living
a life of self-indulgence, idle comfort and ease. Listen to me. I
really have attained supreme knowledge and insight. And I can teach it
to you so you may attain it for yourselves.”

Finally the five were
willing to listen to him and he delivered his first teachings. He
advised his followers to follow the Middle Way, avoiding the two
extremes of self-indulgence and self-torture. For the first time he
taught the Four Noble Truths and how to practise the Eightfold Path,
the Noble Way that would lead to freedom from suffering and to the way
of enlightenment. With the conversion of the five ascetics at the Deer
Park at Sarnath, the order of monks was established.

 

                           Granted first Bhikkhu

                          

While
teaching the First Preach to the Bhadda Vaggi and then Kondanna became awakened , the Lord Buddha allowed Kondanna to adopt the ascetic
life through Ahi� Bhikkhu. Kondanna became the first Buddhist monk. Ahi
� Bhikkhu was provided for those believing in Buddhism by the Buddha
saying � They shall be Bhikkhus and accurately practice dharma for no
Dukkha (suffering)�.

 

Preaching

Once
, the Buddha taught dhamma to Yasakulbutra who escaped his hectic house
to see the former at Isipatana forest. He persuaded Yasakulbutra to
listen to the following dharma. No hectic ones , no troubles. He also
taught Anupubbikatha ( a gradual instruction) to Yasakulbutra who
became enlightened. Yasakulbutra adopted the ascetic life and later
attained Arahantship. While the Lord Buddha taught dharma , he did it
with strong intention from the first saving to the last one.

 

 

 

 Pointing way for Princes (Yasa and friends)

 

 

 

Yasa wearies of his wealth and wanders into the Deer Park; meeting the Buddha, he receives a teaching

The Buddha, together with the five noble disciples, spent the rains retreat at the Deer Park
at Isipatana, the place of his first teaching. That was the first rains
retreat. At this stage the Buddha did not yet travel around to teach
others because it was the rainy season, but a young man named Yasa did
come to see him.

 

Yasa was the son of a rich man in Varanasi.
His parents had built three mansions for him, one for each of the
seasons [hot, rainy and cool], and in each of the mansions there were a
great number of dancing girls to entertain him. One day, at midnight,
Yasa awoke and saw the dancing girls sleeping in various ungainly
postures (here the story is just the same as for the Bodhisatta on the
day he left home for the homeless life) and became wearied of his life.

 

Yasa ran away from his home in the dead of night, and made for the Deer Park,
muttering to himself as he went,  “Here it is confusing, here it is
oppressive!” He was referring to the confusion and oppression he felt
inside.
At
that time a sound came in response from the edge of the forest: “Here
it is not confusing, here there is no obstruction!”. It was the Buddha.
At the time of this exchange it was very late, almost dawn in fact. The Buddha said to Yasa, “Come, come here and sit down. I will teach you.”

Yasa
approached the Buddha and bowed to his feet, then sat down to one side.
The Buddha gave him a teaching, at the completion of which Yasa
attained Arahatship, full enlightenment. He asked for admission to the
Buddha’s order as a monk.

Not
long after Yasa had become a monk, a great number of his friends, 54 of
them, having heard of his going forth, went to see the Buddha, listened
to the teaching and were all, like Yasa, fully enlightened. Thus within
the first vassa, or rains retreat, there were altogether 61 Arahats in
the world.

 

 

          Taking a Meal (at Yasa’s house )

                  

Once , the Buddha taught dhamma to Yasa. Yasa adopted the ascetic life and later attained Arahantship. After
teaching dhamma to Yasa and his father , the Lord Buddha went to have
food at the house of Yasa�s father. This was the first time the Lord
Buddha ever having food inside a house. Then , he taught Anupubbikatha
to Yasa�s mother and ex-wife who later became the first two female
disciples. 
    

   

 

 

To Uruvela

 

After the rains retreat, on the 15th waxing day of the twelfth lunar month, the Buddha convened a meeting of his 60 disciples (savaka) at the Deer Park
in Isipatana. All of those disciples were Arahats. The Buddha’s
intention in calling the meeting was to send these disciples out to
spread the teaching to other places.

 

At the meeting, the Buddha addressed the monks (bhikkhus) as follows:

“Monks!
Released am I from all bonds. Released are you from all bonds. Go ye
forth to declare the teaching in other lands for the benefit and
happiness of the many. Go each of you alone. Give the teaching that is
beautiful in the beginning, in the middle and in the highest levels,
which is pure, and which I have declared to you. Monks! There are in
this world people with only few defilements and with sufficient
intelligence to understand the Dhamma. But because they have had no
chance to hear the Dhamma they do not obtain the benefit that they
rightly should obtain. Go forth. I myself will go to declare the
teaching at Uruvela Senanigama.”

 

Thus
on the morning of the first waning moon of the twelfth lunar month, the
60 disciples split up, each going alone to spread the teaching
according to the Buddha’s instructions. The Buddha himself journeyed to
Uruvela Senanigama, which was where he had gained his own
enlightenment. Reaching there, the Buddha proceeded to the ashram of a
group of famous ascetics there by name of “the three brother ascetics.”

 

The
oldest brother’s name was Uruvela Kassapa. He had 500 disciples and had
an ashram for performing religious practice, worshipping fire on the
banks of the northern Neranjara River.
The middle brother’s name was Nadi Kassapa. He had a following of 300,
while the youngest brother’s name was Gaya Kassapa, with a following of
200. They had established separate ashrams on sand banks just south of
the oldest brother.

 

The
Buddha went first to the ashram of the oldest brother. Approaching the
leader, he asked for a place to stay. The ascetic leader told the
Buddha that the only place left was the fire house, but that a
ferocious and dangerous Naga was living there.

 

Taken
by the stranger?s self-confidence and personality Kashyapa did not dare
refuse, but warned him that the place was haunted by a venomous divine
serpent (
naga).
But the Buddha did not allow himself to be frightened off, and spent
the night in the hut. As soon as he went in the hut the serpent entered
and a terrible struggle ensued. Smoke against smoke appeared, fire
against fire, so that the whole structure seemed to go up in flames.
While the brahmin ascetics seem stricken with horror and the novices
rush forward with jugs of water to put out the fire. In the end the
supernatural power of the Buddha overcame the naga’s fury, and he
placed the serpent in his begging bowl. When morning came, Kashyapa and
his followers went to the hut and said: “The young monk must have been
fiercely burned by the serpent?s fire.” But the Buddha came out of the
hut and presented the distressed brahmins with the serpent quietly
coiled inside his alms bowl. Totally overpowered by this miraculous
feat, Kashyapa and his five hundred threw their ritual utensils into
the river and converted to the Buddhist faith. Sometime after their
conversion the Buddha delivered the well-known Fire Sermon, that if
anyone?s senses are ruled by greed, hatred and delusion, all his
perceptions will kindle, because they arouse further desires and
aversions in him: for him the world is on fire. But whoever exerts
control over the six senses is free from lusts and passions, and will
gain freedom from rebirth.

 

 

 

Stopping the torrent to overflow

 

            


When
a great flood arose, the ascetics thought that the Buddha must have
surely drowned, and took boats to go and find him, only to find that he
was walking meditation amidst the water.


Meditating amidst the water


Water
gathered its volumn to from a circle around the Lord Buddha. Within the
circle where the ground was completely dry, the Lord Buddha brgan to
walk in meditation. This demonstration of his power were softened their
pride. Thus the leader of the ascetic group floated his
fire-worshipping gear on the Neranjara River, bowed at the Buddha’s
feet and asked for acceptance as a disciple. The two younger brothers
who lived downstream, seeing their older brother’s gear floating down
the river, thought that some accident must have befallen him and went
to see what had happened.
When the two brothers found out what had happened they also became followers of the Buddha.

The
Buddha spent two full months converting the ascetics, after which the
ascetic who led the largest group, Uruvela Kassapa, becoming
disillusioned, realized that he was not an Arahat as he had at first
mistakenly believed. His realization was a result of the power of the
Buddha’s silent teaching.

 

                        

           Taking cloth from the corpse

                        

When
the Lord Buddha stayed at Uruvela � Kassapa , Punnathasi , a female
servant of a millionaire in Uruvelasenanikom , passed away. Her corpse
was brought to be dropped at a place close to where the Lord Buddha
stayed. He went to see the shroud. He cleaned the shroud to eliminate
the corpse smell and made it as his robe. According to life � story of
the Buddha , Indra came down to help the Lord Buddha from washing ,
drying and serving the robe. All were completed in one night.

 

 

                                        Sewing his own clothing

                                          

The
Lord Buddha was staying at Veluvana monastery in Rajagaha. At that time
, the robe of Anuruddha monk was so torn so he tried to look for
clothes to do a new robe. Then , an angel named Jalini who once was his
wife in the previous life had offered him the cloth by placing it at a
pile of rags. When the monk had seen the clothes , he took it to do a
new robe. In sewing the new robe, the Lord Buddha along with all the
senior monks including Venerable Kassapa had joined to give the helping
hands. The Lord Buddha himself helped put thread into the needle ,
while other monks helped spin the thread. The action of the Lord Buddha
who presided over the group of monk showed his great leadership and
showed the proper deed of being together and the importance of sewing
the monk�s robe.


Right
Concentration
:  The way to discernment,
knowledge and release: If we class concentration according to how it’s
practiced in general, there are two sorts: right and wrong.

A. Wrong
Concentration: Why is it called wrong? Because it doesn’t give rise to the
liberating insight that leads to the transcendent qualities. For example, after
attaining a certain amount of concentration, we may use it in the wrong way, as
in magic — hypnotizing other people or spirits of the dead so as to have them
in our power, or exerting magnetic attraction so as to seduce or dupe other
people — all of which causes the heart to become deceitful and dishonest. Or
we may use concentration to cast spells and practice sorcery, displaying powers
in hopes of material reward. All of these things are based on nothing more than
momentary (khanika) concentration.

Another
type of Wrong Concentration is that used to develop forms of knowledge falling
outside of the Buddha’s teachings and belonging to yogic doctrines and
practices: for example, staring at an external object — such as the sun or the
moon — or at certain kinds of internal objects. When the mind becomes steady
for a moment, you lose your sense of the body and become fastened on the object
to the point where your mindfulness and alertness lose their moorings. You then
drift along in the wake of the object in whatever direction your thoughts may
take you: up to see heaven or down to see hell, seeing true things and false
mixed together, liking or disliking what you see, losing your bearings, lacking
the mindfulness and alertness that form the present.

Another
instance of Wrong Concentration is when — after you’ve begun practicing to the
point where you’ve attained threshold (upacara) concentration — you
then stare down on the present, focusing, say, on the properties of breath,
fire or earth, forbidding the mind to think; staring down, getting into a
trance until the property becomes more and more refined, the mind becomes more
and more refined; using force to suppress the mind until awareness becomes so
dim that you lose mindfulness and alertness and all sense of the body and mind:
Everything is absolutely snuffed out and still, with no self-awareness. This is
called the plane of non-perception (asaññi-bhava), where you have no
perception of anything at all. Your awareness isn’t well-rounded, your
mindfulness lacks circumspection, and as a result discernment has no chance to
arise. This is called Wrong Concentration, Wrong Release, a mental blank — no
awareness of past, present or future.

Another
instance of Wrong Concentration is when we can give rise to momentary
concentration, threshold concentration, all the way to the four levels of
jhana, but aren’t adept at entering and leaving these levels, so that we focus
in until only the property of consciousness is left, with no sense of the body:
This is called arupa jhana. Bodily processes disappear, leaving only the
four types of mental acts, which form the four levels of arupa jhana
[see The
Craft of the Heart
], the first being when we focus on a feeling of
space or emptiness. The mind attains such a relaxed sense of pleasure that we
may take it to be a transcendent state or nibbana, and so we search no
further, becoming idle and lazy, making no further effort because we assume
that we’ve finished our task.

In
short, we simply think, or focus, without having any finesse in what we’re
doing — entering, leaving, or staying in place — and as a result our
concentration becomes wrong.

B. Right
Concentration: This starts with threshold concentration, which acts as the
basis for the four levels of jhana, beginning with the first: vitakka,
thinking of whichever aspect of the body you choose to take as your object,
such as the four physical properties, starting with the in-and-out breath. And
then vicara: adjusting, expanding, letting the breath sensations flow
throughout the body and at the same time evaluating the results you obtain. For
instance, if the body feels uncomfortable or constricted, adjust the breath
until it feels right throughout the body. The mind then sticks to its single
object: This is termed ekaggata. When mindfulness enters into the body,
keeping the breath in mind, and alertness is present in full measure, keeping
track of the causes that produce results congenial to body and mind, then your
sense of the body will benefit. Bathed with mindfulness and alertness, it feels
light, malleable and full — saturated with the power of mindfulness and
alertness. The mind also feels full: This is termed piti. When both body
and mind are full, they grow quiet, like a child who, having eaten his fill,
rests quiet and content. This is the cause of pleasure on the level of the
Dhamma, termed sukha. These factors, taken together, form one stage of
Right Concentration.

As you
continue practicing for a length of time, the sense of fullness and pleasure in
the body becomes greater. Ekaggata — interest and absorption in your
one object — becomes more intense because you have seen the results it
produces. The mind becomes steady and determined, focused with full mindfulness
and alertness, thoroughly aware of both body and mind, and thus you can let go
of your thinking and evaluating, and enter the second level of jhana.

The
second level of jhana has three factors. Ekaggata: Keep the mind with
its one object, the breath, which is now more subtle and refined than before,
leaving simply a feeling of piti, fullness of body and mind. The
sensations of the body don’t clash with one another. The four properties –
earth, water, fire, and wind — are properly balanced. The mind and body don’t
interfere with each other, so both feel full and satisfied. The body feels
pleasant (sukha) — solitary and quiet. The mind, too, feels pleasant
and at ease — solitary and quiet. When you’re mindful, alert, and adept at
doing this — entering, staying in place, and withdrawing — side-benefits will
result. For example, knowledge of certain matters will arise either on its own or
after you’ve posed a question in the mind. Doubts about certain issues will be
put to rest. As the sense of bodily pleasure grows stronger, the sense of
mental pleasure and ease grows stronger as well, and thus you can let go of the
sense of fullness. Awareness at this point becomes refined and so can detect a
subtle level of the breath that feels bright, open, soothing, and spacious.
This enables you to go on to the third level of jhana.

The
third level of jhana has two factors, pleasure and singleness of preoccupation.
The pleasure you’ve been experiencing begins to waver in flashes as it reaches
saturation point and begins to change. You thus become aware of another,
subtler level of sensation, and so the mind shifts to a sense of openness and
emptiness. The breath grows still, with no moving in or out, full in every part
of the body. This allows you to let go of the sense of pleasure. The mind
enters this stage through the power of mindfulness and alertness. Awareness is
tranquil and still, bright in the present, steady and on its own. It lets go of
the breath and is simply observant. The mind is still, with no shifting back
and forth. Both breath and mind are independent. The mind can let down its
burdens and cares. The heart is solitary and one, infused with mindfulness and
alertness. When you reach this stage and stay with it properly, you’re
practicing the fourth level of jhana.

The
fourth level of jhana has two factors. Ekaggata: Your object becomes
absolutely one. Upekkha: You can let go of all thoughts of past and
future; the five Hindrances are completely cut away. The mind is solitary,
clear, and radiant. The six properties — earth, water, fire, wind, space, and
consciousness — become radiant. The heart feels spacious and clear, thoroughly
aware all around through the power of mindfulness and alertness. As mindfulness
becomes tempered and strong, it turns into intuitive knowledge, enabling you to
see the true nature of body and mind, sensations and mental acts, past,
present, and future.

When this
happens, if you aren’t skilled, you can become excited or upset. In other
words, you may develop pubbenivasanussati-ñana, the ability to remember
previous lives. If what you see is good, you may get engrossed, which will
cause your mindfulness and alertness to weaken. If what you see is bad or
displeasing, you may get upset or distressed, so intent on what you remember
that your sense of the present is weakened.

Or you
may develop cutupapata-ñana: The mind focuses on the affairs of other
individuals, and you see them as they die and are reborn on differing levels.
If you get carried away with what you see, your reference to the present will
weaken. If you find this happening, you should take the mind in hand. If
anything pleasing arises, hold back and keep mindfulness firm. Don’t let
yourself fall into kamasukhallikanuyoga, contentment and delight. If
anything bad or displeasing arises, hold back — because it can lead to attakilamathanuyoga,
discontentment and distress. Draw the mind into the present and guard against
all thoughts of approval and disapproval. Keep the mind neutral. This is the
middle way, the mental attitude that forms the Path and gives rise to another
level of awareness in which you realize, for instance, how inconstant it is to
be a living being: When things go well, you’re happy and pleased; when things
go badly, you’re pained and upset. This awareness enables you truly to know the
physical sensations and mental acts you’re experiencing and leads to a sense of
disenchantment, termed nibbida-ñana. You see all fashionings as
inconstant, harmful, stressful, and hard to bear, as lying beyond the control
of the heart.

At this
point, the mind disentangles itself: This is termed viraga-dhamma,
dispassion. It feels no desire or attraction; it doesn’t gulp down or lie
fermenting in sensations or mental acts, past, present, or future. It develops
a special level of intuition that comes from within. What you never before
knew, now you know; what you never before met with, now you see, through the
power of mindfulness and alertness gathering in at a single point and turning
into asavakkhaya-ñana, enabling you to disentangle and free yourself
from mundane states of mind — in proportion to the extent of your practice –
and so attain the transcendent qualities, beginning with stream entry.

All of
this is termed Right Concentration: being skilled at entering, staying in
place, and withdrawing, giving rise to —

Right Intuition: correct, profound and penetrating;

Right View: correct views, in line with the truth;

Right Practice: in which you conduct yourself with full
circumspection in all aspects of the triple training, with virtue,
concentration, and discernment coming together in the heart.

This,
then, is Right Concentration. For the most part, people who have attained true
insight have done so in the four levels of jhana. Although there may be others
who have gone wrong in the practice of jhana, we’ll achieve the proper results
if we study so as to gain an understanding and adjust our practice so as to
bring it into line.


When words of the Exalted, Noble,
Blessed,Awakened One with full awareness was a bridge between Lanka and Tamil
Nadu Even Now it could be so by making Human Chain of both

 

There was a phase in history, between the
early years of the14th century, when Tamil Nadu and Sri Lanka enjoyed very
close ties, thanks to a shared interest in the
words of the
Exalted, Noble, Blessed, Awakened One with full awareness.

At that time, the Palk Strait

was not seen as a divider. The words of the Exalted, Noble, Blessed, Awakened
One with full awareness had many adherents in Tamil Nadu, especially in the
influential urban cum trading centers.

As the religion of the elite, the words of the
Exalted, Noble, Blessed, Awakened One with full awareness contributed
tremendously to Tamil Nadu’s art, literature and culture. This was so even when
the Tamil Nadu kings, namely, the Pallavas, Cholas, Cheras, and Pandyas. Contrary
to the general impression, Tamil kings patronised Buddhism.

Close ties developed between the Buddhist monasteries, monks
and scholars in Tamil Nadu and those in Sri Lanka, which was already a
Buddhist country. The interactions between Buddhist scholars and institutions
across the Palk Strait helped sustain Buddhism
and develop Buddhist thought and action in both countries.

The fascinating story of the historical links between the
Buddhists of Tamil Nadu and Sri Lanka was narrated by Dr S Pathmanathan,
Professor of History at the University of Peradeniya, in his Fourth Vesak
Commemoration Lecture delivered under the auspices of the Deputy High
Commission of Sri Lanka at Chennai on May 14.

Buddhism in Tamil Nadu Buddhism began to make an impact on
Tamil Nadu only in 4th century AD, says Prof Pathmanathan. According to him,
Buddhism flourished in Tamil Nadu in two phases: (a) The early years of Pallava
rule (400-650 AD) (b) The Chola period (mid 9th to early 14th century AD).
During the Pallava period, Tamil Nadu boasted of “outstanding”
Buddhist monks who had made “remarkable” contributions to Buddhist
thought and learning, he says.

The commentaries of Buddhadutta (5th century AD) had won him
“wide and enduring” reputation in the history of the Theravada school of Buddhism,
which in subsequent years, became the predominant form of Buddhism in Sri Lanka.

During this period, the other great Buddhist commentator
from Tamil Nadu was Dharmapala, a resident of Kanchi or Kanchipuram, near
Chennai. Nagapattinam, further south, along the Tamil Nadu coast, was another
major seat of Buddhist learning.

This was where Dharmapala wrote “Paramatta Dipani”
and the “Paramatta Manjusha”, the latter a commentary on
Buddhaghosa’s “Visuddhimagga”. Dinnaga (early 6th century AD) and
Bodhidharma were two other renowned Buddhist scholars associated with Kanchi. An
adherent of the Mahayana school
of Buddhism, Dinnaga
occupies a “special” position as the founder of Buddhist logic.
Bodhidharma was an exponent of the Dhyana school of thought.

Manimekalai The 6th century Tamil Buddhist work
“Manimekalai” by Sattanar, is perhaps the most famous of the work
done in Tamil Nadu. “The Manimekalai is a product of a tradition of
learning cultivated in the leading monastic centers in Tamilakam (another name
for Tamil Nadu).

It is essentially a work expounding the doctrines and
propagating the values of Buddhism,” says Prof Pathmanathan. “The
Manimekalai does not seem to have been written with a view to promoting the
claims of any particular sect of Buddhism to superiority over others.

It is essentially synthetic in character and the emphasis is
uniformly on the fundamentals of Buddhist teaching and practice,” he
notes. Manimekalai was not about individual salvation only. It stressed the
need for giving relief to those who were distressed and in want.
“Kuntalakesi” was another great Tamil work written to propagate
Buddhism.

Under the Cholas (9th to the 13th century AD)
Nagapattinam became a major centre of Buddhism. Pathmanathan says that Rajaraja
Perumpalli and the Rajendra Chola Perumpalli were the principal monastic
establishments during Chola rule in the Coromandel Coast.

 

These were named after Chola Kings. These
establishments were handsomely funded by merchants and artisans as well as
royalty. Under the Cholas, the Tamil Nadu Buddhists produced exquisite bronzes
for which the Tamil country is well known even now. Among the great religious
works of this period, Pathmanathan mentions “Veeracholiyam” a
treatise on grammar and poetics.

It was written by the monk Puttamittirar (Buddhamitra) of
Ponparri during the reign of Vira Rajendra. Chola rule also saw the revival of
the Theravada school in terms of the growth of study centers. Prof Pathmanathan
notes that this also led to the revival of Pali studies in Tamil Nadu.

The monk Anuruddha from Kaverinagara of Kanchi, was one of
the earliest exponents of Theravada Buddhism in Tamil Nadu. He summarized the
“Abbidhamma” in two works called “Paramattha-Vinicchaya”
and “Namarupa”. Kassapa, from the Chola country, also won acclaim. A
Brahmin, he was a strong advocate of the strict observance of Vinaya rules.

The interaction between Tamil Nadu and Sri Lankan monks
finds mention in “Manimekalai” which is set in the Tamil towns of
Kaveripumpattinam, Kanchi and Vanchi.

There is mention about the presence of wandering monks from
“Irattinativu” (Island of Gems or Sri Lanka)
in Vanchi, which was the capital of the Chera kings of Deep
South
Tamil Nadu and Kerala.The Chinese traveler, Tsuan-Tsang,
wrote that there were around 300 Sri Lankan monks in the monastery at the
southern sector of Kanchipuram.

The “Pattini” cult, which was
mentioned in “Manimekalai” was later to become a major cult in Sri Lanka.
Pattini, the heroine of another Tamil classic “Silapadikaram” was
deified in Tamil Nadu. Later, she went on to become one of the
“Guardians” of Sri
Lanka
. Appearance of schisms Sri Lanka
had been, and is, the bastion of Theravada Buddhism. But Mahayana Buddhism
appeared on the scene in Sri
Lanka
quite early in the first four
centuries. Prof Pathmanathan attributes this to South Indian influence.

Mahayana Buddhism created schisms in Anuradhapura, then the
seat of Buddhism in Sri
Lanka
. The schism led to the emergence of
three “Nikayas” or chapters, namely, Maha Vihara, Abhayagiri Vihara
and Dakkhina Vihara.

The conversion of Mahasena to the Mahayana school was
brought about by Sanghamitta, a monk from Kaveripattinam in Tamil Nadu, who had
been invited by Mahasena’s father, King Gothabhaya (253-266 AD) to teach his
two sons.

The arrival of the disciples of the South Indian monk,
Dhammaruchi, from Pallavarama (probably Andhra Pradesh), made a great deal of
difference to the Abhayagiri Vihara.

It became a seat of Mahayana Buddhism. Abhayagiri Vihara and
the Dakkhina Vihara prospered. According to the Chinese pilgrim Fa-Hsien, the
orders had 5,000 monks.

The arrival in Sri Lanka
of Vajrabodhi, (7th.century AD) a monk from South India,
was a shot-in-the-arm for the Mahayana school in the island. His disciple,
Amoghavajra, who came to Sri Lanka
after visiting China,
is credited with “having fixed the Mahayana doctrine in its final form,”
says Prof Pathmanathan. The Maha Vihara too had a Tamil Nadu connection.

It was associated with the famous Tamil monk-scholar
Buddhadutta (5th century AD). Hailing from Uraiyur in Tamil Nadu, Buddhadutta
was ordained at the Maha Vihara in Anuradhapura.
He later became a great exponent of Theravada Buddhism and the Pali language in
Tamil Nadu.

“A Sri Lankan tradition attributes to Buddhadutta the
authorship of Maduratta Vilasini and the Jinalankara. The former is a
commentary on the Buddhavamsa, which is a compilation of legends dealing with
the lives of Gotama,” says Prof Pathmanathan. Tamil Nadu gave shelter to
fleeing Lankan monks When Magha of Kalinga persecuted Buddhists during his rule
in Sri Lanka in the early 13th century, monks from the island fled to Tamil
Nadu.

The great Pali chronicle of Sri Lankan history, the
“Mahawamsa” mentions this exodus and says that monks found shelter in
the land of the “Pandus” “Cholas” and “other
peoples”. The Sinhala monks were looked after by Chudaganga, a Vanniyar
feudatory of the Pandya king of Madurai.

A Sinhala monk, Bhadanta Ananda, who had sought refuge in
Gunakara Perumpalli, had left for posterity valuable information on Buddhism in
Tamil Nadu. Vijayabahu III facilitates return Later, in the same century, King
Vijayabahu III (1232-1235 AD) brought the Buddhist refugees back, after having
established peace in Sri
Lanka
. He had set up a kingdom in South Western Sri Lanka. But, as Prof Pathmanathan notes, ties
with Tamil Nadu continued to be maintained.

King Parakramabahu II (1236-1271 AD) invited leading monks
like Dhammakitti from the Chola country “to render assistance in
re-establishing the community of monks on a formal basis.” The Mahawamsa
lauds Dhammakitti as being “radiant in the glory of moral discipline.”

Prof Pathmanathan quotes fellow Sri Lankan historian,
Amaradasa Liyanagamage, to say that King Parakramabahu II revived Buddhism in Sri Lanka by bringing all the religious texts
from Jambudvipa (India).

“Although Jambudvipa meant the entire Indian
sub-continent and even much more, in this context, in all probability, it meant
the Chola country, where Theravada Buddhism was very much alive during this
period,” Liyanagamage says. Sri Lanka preserves documents By the 5th
century AD, confrontation between the Maha Vihara, Abhayagiri Vihara and
Dakkhina Vihara orders ceased, and they started documentation and preservation
of texts for mutual benefit.

There was a regular exchange of visits between the three
orders and between Sri Lanka
and South India. Monks from South
East Asia
also came to study and hold discussions. “It is
significant that in the conservation and transmission of Buddhist literary
heritage the Buddhist establishments of Anuradhapura
held a unique position,” says Prof Pathmanathan.

“The whole range of Early Buddhist
literature that had been transmitted to them from India during the early stages
of their development were preserved, copied and distributed among leading
monasteries where they were deposited and studied with assiduity by generations
of learned monks.

 

“Early Buddhist literary heritage, which is also an
important component of Indian cultural heritage, was preserved almost in its
entirety in the island, and transmitted from Sri Lankan monasteries to Myanmar,
Thailand and other South East Asian countries.”

“Another notable contribution by the Sri Lankan
monastic orders was the development of a wide range of commentarial
literature,” he notes. Sri Lankan monks pioneer recording history It was
in Sri Lanka
that the recording of history commenced in a systematic way, following an early
Buddhist tradition of chronicling the life and work of the Buddha.

The Sri Lankan Pali chronicles “Mahavamsa” and
“Dipavamsa” have helped historians with valuable material on the life
and times of ancient Sri Lanka
and India.
“A notable feature of this tradition was the development of a scheme of
chronology reckoned from the ‘parinibbana’ (pari nirvana) of the Buddha,”
says Prof. Pathmanathan.

“This tradition was the precursor and the prototype for
historical traditions that were developed in the island,” he says. (Hindustan Times) The sinews and bones of the Buddha’s
body are revealed beneath the barest amount of flesh that still remains.

The realism characteristic of this work, and in particular the
familiarity with the details of human anatomy, is inherited from the Hellenic
worlds in which there was a preoccupation with detailed depictions of physical
reality.

http://www.lakehouse.lk/mihintalava/gaya05.htm

alokatrust@lakehouse.lk

Tamilakum was a region which had the north-east Ventcata
hill or the Tiruppati hill, the southern part of the modern Andhra Pradesh, as
its northern border, Kanniya Kumari or Cape
Comerin as the southern border, the
bay of Bengal and the Arabian Sea as its
eastern and western borders respectively.

The ancient Tamilakum encompassed modern Kerala too.
Tamilakum was actually located in the southern part of the Indian peninsula. Present Tamil Nadu State is much smaller than the
Tamilakum.

Now Tamil Nadu is the only land where the language Tamil is
spoken. At present Tamil country is famous as Tamil Nadu. According to
Historians, Buddhism began to make an impact on Tamil Nadu only in the 4th
century AD.

Buddhism flourished in Tamil Nadu in Two phases. (1) The
early years of Pullava rule (400-650 AD) (2) The Chola period (mid 9th to early
14th century AD). Buddhism had then enjoyed a very remarkable popularity in the
Tamil soil.

Buddhism has contributed a great deal to the
enrichment of Tamil culture and has exerted a significant influence, both
directly and indirectly, on the Tamil religious and spiritual consciousness,
present as well as past.

 

It has expressed itself in exquisite artistic forms and
given an enduring colour and richness to Tamil culture as a whole. It has
exerted a profound influence on the existing religious and social institutions,
language and literature as well as on art and architecture.

The fascinating story of the historical links - Golden
threads between Buddhism in Tamil Nadu and Sri
Lanka
was narrated by Dr. Shu Hikosake Director Professor
of Buddhism, Institute of Asian Studies in Madras in his book “Buddhism in Tamil Nadu a
new Perspective.”

Dr. Hikosaka’s study is based on his doctoral
dissertation submitted to the University
of Madras.

The Buddhist monks looked for greener pastures in the
neighbouring countries. They found propitious soil in Ceylon and South East Asian
countries. A comparative study of the development of Buddhism in Tamil Nadu and
the neighbouring countries clearly shows the fact that it witnessed tremendous
growth in the neighbouring countries.

The monks of Tamil Nadu, have contributed a great deal for
the growth of Buddhism abroad. In this sense we may say that the Tamil Buddhist
genius was sublimated in another direction where it has grown with fresh vigour
and vivacity.”

The earliest inscriptions in Tamil Nadu belong to the third
century BC. They are written in Brahmi character of the time, on the walls of
the natural caves in the Tamil districts of Madura, Ramnad and Tirnnelveli.
They are of considerable interest to students of South Indian Buddhism.

It is learnt from these Brahmi inscriptions which
palaeographically belong to 3rd century BC that Buddhism had come into Tamil
Nadu even then. It was to Asoka and his son Mahinda that the introduction of
Buddhism into Tamil Nadu may be attributed.

Epigraphical evidence seems to confirm this statement. In
his Rock-Edict No. 3, Asoka says that his Dharma Vijaya prevailed in the border
kingdoms of the Colas, Pandyans and at Tambapanni. But it was his son Mahinda
who was responsible for the introduction of Buddhism in Tamil Nadu.

In this task, he was helped by Maha Aritta, a nephew of the
Sri Lankan king Devanampiyatissa. Mahinda is said to have erected seven viharas
at Kaveripattinum while he was on his way to Sri Lanka.

Some Indian scholars are of the opinion that Aritta or
Maha-Aritta might have lived in the caves of the village of Arittapatti
in Madura, which is in Tamil Nadu. According to Dr. Hikosaka Buddhism might
have gone to Sri Lanka
from Tamil Nadu, contrary to the general impression.

“Taking all evidence into account, we may fairly conclude
that Mahendra and the Buddhist missionaries who went to Ceylon (Sri Lanka) could have embarked for
the island from the East coast of the Tamil country. So, it is quite probable
that the Tamil country received Buddhism directly through missionaries of
Asoka.

Buddhism might have gone to Ceylon
(Sri Lanka) from Tamil Nadu
by sea-route, a route by which one can reach Ceylon
(Sri Lanka)
easily. Since there existed close cultural affinities between Ceylon (Sri Lanka)
and the Tamil country from time immemorial, the Buddhist activities in India could have easily influenced in some way
or other the Buddhism of Ceylon
(Sri Lanka)”
says Dr. Hikosaka.

It is interesting and appropriate to investigate the
interactions of Buddhist monastic centres between Sri Lanka and Tamil Nadu. The remains
of a Buddhist monastery excavated at Kaveripattinum which could be assigned to
the fourth century, are believed to be the earliest archaeological relics of
Buddhism in Tamil Nadu.

During the Pallava period, Tamil Nadu boasted of
“outstanding Buddhist monks who had made remarkable contributions to Buddhism
thought and learning. A Buddhist writer Buddhadatta or Thera Buddhaatta as he
is called lived during the time of Accyutarikkanta, Kalabra ruler of the
Cola-nadu.

Under the patronage of this ruler, Buddhadatta wrote many
books. In his book Vinayaviniccaya, he says that due to the patronage of this
king he was able to compose this work

In the Abhidhammaratara he gives a glowing account at
Kaveripattinum, Uragapuram, Bhutamangalam and Kanchipuram and the Mahavihara at
Ceylon (Sri Lanka).
While he was at Sri Lanka,
he composed many Buddhist works such as Uttara-viniccaya Ruparupa Vibhaga
Jinalankara etc. Buddhaghosha, contemporary of Buddhadatta composed many
Buddhist commentaries.

Buddhaghosha is a Tamil monk, who made a remarkable
contribution to Buddhism in Sri
Lanka
. He stayed and studied Buddhist
precepts at Mahavihara in Anuradhapura.
The Visuddhimagga was the first work of Buddhaghosha which was written while he
was in Ceylon.

According to Mahavamsa, it is a summary of the three Pitakas
together with the commentary. When Buddhaghosha had been staying at Granthakara
Pirivena at Anuradhapura,
he completed his task of rendering Sinhalese commentaries of Tripitakas into
Pali.

After a considerable period of religious service in Sri Lanka,
he returned to Tamil Nadu. After Buddhaghosha, the important Theravada monk
from the Tamil country was Dhammapala. Dhammapala lived in the Mahavihara at Anuradhapura.

He composed paramathadipani which was a commentary on
Buddhaghosha’s work on Khuddaka Nikaya and Paramathamanjusa, which was a
commentary on Buddhaghosha’s Visuddhimagga. A close study of the three Buddhist
monks viz Buddhadatta, Buddhaghosha and Dhammapala shows that Tamil Buddhists
were closely associated with the Sri Lankan Buddhists around the 5th century
AD.

The interaction between Tamil Nadu and Sri Lankan monks
finds mention in “Manimekalai”. The 6th century Tamil Buddhist work Manimekali
by Sattanar, is perhaps the most famous of the work done in Tamil Nadu. It is a
work expounding the doctrines and propagating the values of Buddhism.

The interaction between Tamil Nadu and Sri Lankan monks
finds mention in “Manimekalai” which is set in the Tamil towns of
Kaveipumpattinam Kanchi and Vanchi.

There is mention about the presence of wandering monks of Sri Lanka in
Vanchi, which was the capital of the Chera Kings of Tamil Nadu. The Chinese
traveller, Tsuan Tsang, wrote that there were around 300 Sri Lankan monks in
the monastery at the Southern sector of Kanchipuram.

SRI Lanka`s king Devanampiyatissa (246 BCE) believer of
human beings with first, second, third, fourth and no soul and who ruled from
Anuradhapura in the north-central province of Sri Lanka was on a hunting
mission and chasing after a spotted deer. And suddenly, he heard a voice:
Someone calling him by his first name. No one in his kingdom would dare to
utter his name. Shocked, he stopped his chase and turned towards the direction
from where the voice was heard.



There was Mahinda Thera, son of Emperor Asoka
who never believed in souls but all sentient and non-sentient beings were equal.
He urged the king not to kill. With this advice began the spread of Buddhism in
Sri Lanka.
On Saturday, June 30, Sri Lankan Buddhists marked this event with religious
ceremonies throughout the country. But there was not much celebration in the
north and the east. It was not because of the war. But there aren`t many
Buddhists in these areas, especially in the north.

 

The north is pre-dominantly Tamil believers of
human beings with first, second, third, fourth and no soul . Many people in the
north see Buddhism as the religion of the `Sinhala` Army, which they respect
least but fear most. The Buddhism, which Mahinda Thera preached, spoke of
non-violence and social egalitarianism. The appeal of this reformist religion
was so overwhelming that it spread like wildfire. For centuries, it was the
main religion of Tamils in India`s Tamil Nadu and in Sri Lanka, since they were
all the Original Inhabitants of Jambudvipa, that is, the Great Prabuddha
Bharath who never believed in soul, but all are equal as per the practice
taught by the Exalted, Blessed, Noble, Awakened Mighty Great Mind with full of
awareness.
           

Statistically seventy percent of the people in
Sri Lanka
are said to profess Buddhism. There is hardly any place in the country where an
ancient or modern Buddhist monument or monastery in not found. There are around
twenty thousand monks attending to the religious needs of people today.
Religious ceremonies and related activities are going on continuously. The
teachings of the Buddha in its most pristine form is found in Dhamma texts.
Even non- Buddhist laymen and politicians liberally quote chapter and verse
from the Buddha’s Words in their public utterances. When one sees and hears all
this, one gets the impression, that Sri Lanka is a Buddhist country.

Chanda brings about of alienation between one another in the minds of the people. The existing caste, linguistic, racial, communal or other differences are surreptitiously and sometimes openly used by political parties to promote their own self-interest, instead of promoting compassion and the idea of well-being of all in the minds of people. Therefore, the political parties hold a notorious record for promoting alienation among the people. 
	
Dvesha is illwill, which is the direct result of the aforementioned alienation. Organised gossip, rumour, falsehood and so on supplement various kinds of apparently democratic, political and economic propaganda, carried out by most of the leaders of political parties. While the political elite may have a common understanding of the game they play according to their own rules, the unwary ordinary people fall prey to their machinations and develop longstanding enmities and irreconcilable conflicts. This explains the origin of a lot of the violent confrontations we witness today. 
	
The third characteristic, bhaya, is mutual fear. In post- independent while an unjust, unhealthy and a borrowed party political system was kept going for the benefit of a small class of people, to whatever party they belonged to, mutual suspicion and fear among common people also kept gathering momentum. The “communal” violence are promoted by a handful of politically powerful people who are in a microscopic minority. Yet, they are able to rouse this spirit of mutual fear in most people and they kept them away from any constructive intervention to prevent the escalation of that violence. 
	
Of course there was a negative kind of intervention on the part of some educated people, interventions in the form of scholarly analyses based on a hoard of statistical data and historical facts. This mostly negative intervention because they did not affect in any way the thinking of either the man on the street or our basic political and economic structure that promoted the situation of disharmony and conflict. In other words, philosophising that does not touch the basic roots of mental defilements and social realities resulting from them, in Buddhist terminology, is simply called moha or ignorance. When ignorance becomes organised, and one calls it social science, it is a disaster for communities who have a right to expect more positive interventions from the more educated sectors. We see a situation today of different groups holding onto their own uncompromising positions while the sound of guns and explosions continue to be heard. 
	
The economic goals, structures and processes that are officially promoted also are not, conducive to building peace in a Buddhist way. Promoting consumerism is one extreme which Lord Buddha rejected as Kamasukhallikanuyoga. Since independence the country has been drawing away from the Middle Path. Four hundred and fifty years of western influence and rule, the deliberate promotion of the materialistic way of life and the existence of a small elite group who have achieved that affluent level, have made the general population also aspire to achieve material prosperity as their sole aim in life. But few succeed. Most end up in a situation worse than they were in before. With the introduction of the so-called free economy during the last ten years and with plenty of imported consumer goods floating around, everyone is bent on making quick money to acquire these non-essentials. Malnutrition is on the increase; crime is on the increase; the cost of living is skyrocketing and bribery and corruption have taken unprecedented proportions. 
	
When any kind of social unrest sets in, there are small gangs of undisciplined people who take advantage of the situation. These are mostly teenagers who have had no proper schooling or education in cultural values. But the media has conditioned their minds to desire various material things. They go on a rampage of looting and arson at the slightest opportunity. This is what happened in many places.Some young people looted television sets from shops and only after taking them home to their shanty dwellings did they realise that they had neither electricity nor a place to keep them in. Then they smashed them on the ground. This kind of psychological reaction is a clear example of the frustrations developed in people who see a consumerist society around them, but are denied the opportunities to be a part of it. 
	
So the economic environment is not conducive to the mental peace and contentment of individuals and communities when it is supported by a vicious power- oriented political system. In a Buddhist society, neither political nor economic activities promoted by the state should contradict the teachings of the Buddha. Furthermore, in both these fields of human activity there are teachings that can guide a state dedicated to following the teachings of the Buddha. Primarily a Buddhist has to abstain from killing, stealing, committing adultery, lying and consuming intoxicants. When all five injunctions are formally promoted directly or indirectly by the state it is far from building a Buddhist economy. When speaking of economic development, Lord Buddha not only stressed the importance of increased efficiency in production (Uttana Sampada), but also the importance of the protection of resources and the environment (Arakkha Sampada- 
 
Energetic and heedful in his tasks,
Wisely administering his wealth,
He lives a balanced life,
Protecting what he has amassed.
 
Endowed with faith and virtue too,
Generous he is and free from avarice;
He ever works to clear the path
That leads to weal in future life.
 
Thus to the layman full of faith,
By him, so truly named ‘Enlightened,’
These eight conditions have been told
Which now and after lead to bliss.),

a friendly
social milieu in which economic activities should take place (
Kalyana
Mittata-
Kalyā
a-mittatā (Pali; Skt.: -mitratā) is a Buddhist
concept of “spiritual friendship” within Buddhist community
life, applicable to both monastic and householder relationships. One involved in
such a relationship is known as a “good friend,” “virtuous
friend,” “noble friend” or “admirable friend” (kalyāa-mitta, -mitra).

Since early Buddhist history, these relationships have involved spiritual
teacher-student dyads as well as communal peer groups. In general, such is a
supportive relationship based on shared Buddhist ethical values and the
pursuit of enlightenment.

In contemporary Western society, this concept has gained increased currency
within the Friends of the Western Buddhist
Order
(FWBO) (UK)[1]
and Jack
Kornfield
’s Spirit Rock Meditation Center (USA).[2]) and a wholesome lifestyle towards which all the economic
activities are directed (
Sama Jeevakata).

Getting the Message

by

Thanissaro Bhikkhu

 

The Buddha is famous for having
refused to take a position on many of the controversial issues of his day, such
as whether the cosmos is finite or infinite, eternal or not. In fact, many
people — both in his time and in ours — have assumed that he didn’t take a firm
position on any issue at all. Based on this assumption, some people have been
exasperated with the Buddha, accusing him of being wishy-washy and indecisive,
while others have been pleased, praising him for being tolerant and
refreshingly free from ideas of right and wrong.

Both reactions, however, are
misinformed. The early texts report that a group of wanderers, in a discussion
with one of the Buddha’s lay disciples, once accused the Buddha of not taking a
position on any issue, and the disciple replied that they were mistaken. There
was one issue on which the Buddha’s position was very clear: what kind of
behavior is skillful, and what kind of behavior is not. When the disciple later
reported the conversation to the Buddha, the Buddha approved of what he had
said. The distinction between skillful and unskillful behavior lies at the
basis of everything the Buddha taught.

In making this distinction, the
Buddha drew some very sharp lines:

“What is unskillful? Taking life
is unskillful, taking what is not given… sexual misconduct… lying…
abusive speech… divisive tale-bearing… idle chatter is unskillful.
Covetousness… ill will… wrong views are unskillful. These things are called
unskillful…

“And what is skillful?
Abstaining from taking life is skillful, abstaining from taking what is not
given… from sexual misconduct… from lying… from abusive speech… from
divisive tale-bearing… abstaining from idle chatter is skillful. Lack of
covetousness… lack of ill will… right views are skillful. These things are
called skillful.”

MN 9

Killing is never skillful. Stealing, lying,
and everything else in the first list are never skillful. When asked if there
was anything whose killing he approved of, the Buddha answered that there was
only one thing: anger. In no recorded instance did he approve of killing any
living being at all. When one of his monks went to an executioner and told the
man to kill his victims compassionately, with one blow, rather than torturing
them, the Buddha expelled the monk from the Sangha, on the grounds that even
the recommendation to kill compassionately is still a recommendation to kill —
something he would never condone. If a monk was physically attacked, the Buddha
allowed him to strike back in self-defense, but never with the intention to
kill. As he told the monks,

“Even if bandits were to carve you
up savagely, limb by limb, with a two-handled saw, he among you who let his
heart get angered even at that would not be doing my bidding. Even then you
should train yourselves: ‘Our minds will be unaffected and we will say no evil
words. We will remain sympathetic, with a mind of good will, and with no inner
hate. We will keep pervading these people with an awareness imbued with good
will and, beginning with them, we will keep pervading the all-encompassing
world with an awareness imbued with good will — abundant, expansive,
immeasurable, free from hostility, free from ill will.’ That’s how you should
train yourselves.”

— MN 21

When formulating lay precepts based
on his distinction between skillful and unskillful, the Buddha never made any
allowances for ifs, ands, or buts. When you promise yourself to abstain from
killing or stealing, the power of the promise lies in its universality. You
won’t break your promise to yourself under any conditions at all. This is
because this sort of unconditional promise is a powerful gift. Take, for
instance, the first precept, against killing:

“There is the case where a
disciple of the noble ones, abandoning the taking of life, abstains from taking
life. In doing so, he gives freedom from danger, freedom from animosity, freedom
from oppression to limitless numbers of beings. In giving freedom from danger,
freedom from animosity, freedom from oppression to limitless numbers of beings,
he gains a share in limitless freedom from danger, freedom from animosity, and
freedom from oppression. This is the first gift, the first great gift —
original, long-standing, traditional, ancient, unadulterated, unadulterated
from the beginning — that is not open to suspicion, will never be open to
suspicion, and is unfaulted by knowledgeable contemplatives &
brahmans.”

AN
8.39

 If you make exceptions in your
promise to yourself — trying to justify killing in cases where you feel
endangered or inconvenienced by another being’s existence — your gift of
freedom is limited, and you lose your share in limitless freedom. Thus the gift
of freedom, to be fully effective, has to be unconditional, with no room for
exceptions, no matter how noble they may sound, of any kind.

The dynamic of this kind of gift, of
course, depends on an important principle, the teaching of karma and rebirth:
If you act on unskillful motivations, the act will result in your suffering,
now or in lives to come; if you act on skillful intentions, the act will result
in your pleasure now or in lives to come. If you don’t kill anyone, you are not
creating the circumstances where anyone or anything will cut short your life
span. Your past karma may still leave an opening for your murder or accidental
death — you can’t go back and undo what you’ve already done — but once you make
and follow through with the promise not to kill again, you are creating no new
openings for having your life cut short. As the Dhammapada says,

If there’s no wound on the hand,
that hand can hold poison.
Poison won’t penetrate
where there’s no wound.
There’s no evil
for those who don’t do it.

Dhp
124

This is why the Buddha listed virtue
as one of a person’s greatest treasures. Kings and thieves can steal your
material belongings and even take your life, but they can’t take your virtue.
If it’s uncompromising, your virtue protects you from any true danger from now
until you reach nirvana.

Even if you’re not ready to accept
the teaching on karma and rebirth, the Buddha still recommended an absolute
standard of virtue. As he told the Kalamas, if you decide to act skillfully at
all times, harming no one, then even if it turned out that there was no life
after death, you’d still come out ahead, for you would have been able to live
and die with a clear conscience — something that no amount of money or
political influence can buy.

So the Buddha’s position on the
precepts was uncompromising and clear. If you want to follow his teachings,
there’s absolutely no room for killing, stealing, or lying, period. However, in
our current climate of terrorism and counter-terrorism — where governments have
claimed that it’s their moral duty to lie, kill, and torture in order to
prevent others from lying, killing, and torturing — a number of Buddhist
teachers have joined in the effort, trying to find evidence that there were
some occasions, at least, where the Buddha would condone killing or offer a
rationale for a just war. Exactly why they would want to do this is up to them
to say, but there’s a need to examine their arguments in order to set the
record straight. The Buddha never taught a theory of just war; no decision to
wage war can legitimately be traced to his teachings; no war veteran has ever
had to agonize over memories of the people he killed because the Buddha said
that war was okay. These facts are among the glories of the Buddhist tradition,
and it’s important for the human race that they not be muddied in an effort to
recast the Buddha in our own less than glorious image.

Because the Pali Canon is such an
unpromising place to look for the justification of killing, most of the
arguments for a Buddhist theory of just war look elsewhere for their evidence,
citing the words and behavior of people they take as surrogates for the Buddha.
These arguments are obviously on shaky ground, and can be easily dismissed even
by people who know nothing of the Canon. For example, it has been argued that
because Asian governments claiming to be Buddhist have engaged in war and
torture, the Buddha’s teachings must condone such behavior. However, we’ve had
enough exposure to people claiming to be Christian whose behavior is very
un-Christian to realize that the same thing can probably happen in the Buddhist
world as well. To take killers and torturers as your guide to the Buddha’s
teaching is hardly a sign of good judgment.

On a somewhat higher note, one writer
has noted that his meditation teacher has told soldiers and policemen that if
their duty is to kill, they must perform their duty, albeit compassionately and
with mindfulness. The writer then goes on to argue that because his teacher is
the direct recipient of an oral tradition dating back to the Buddha, we must take
this as evidence that the Buddha would give similar advice as well. This
statement, of course, tells us more about the writer’s faith in his teacher
than about the Buddha; and when we reflect that the Buddha expelled from the
Sangha a monk who gave advice of this sort to an executioner, it casts serious
doubts on his argument.

There are, however, writers who try
to find evidence in the Pali Canon for a Buddhist theory of just war, not in
what the Buddha said, but in what he didn’t. The arguments go like this: When
talking with kings, the Buddha never told them not to engage in war or capital
punishment. This was his tacit admission that the king had a justifiable duty
to engage in these activities, and the kings would have understood his silence
as such. Because these arguments cite the Pali Canon and claim a historian’s
knowledge of how silence was interpreted in the Buddha’s day, they seem to
carry more authority than the others. But when we actually look at the Pali
record of the Buddha’s conversations with kings, we find that the arguments are
bogus. The Buddha was able to communicate the message to kings that they
shouldn’t kill, but because kings in general were not the most promising
students of the Dhamma, he had to bring them to this message in an indirect
way.

It’s true that in the Pali Canon
silence is sometimes interpreted as acquiescence, but this principle holds only
in response to a request. If someone invited the Buddha to his house for a meal
and the Buddha remained silent, that was a sign of consent. However, there were
many instances in which the Buddha’s silence was a sign, not of acquiescence,
but of tact. A professional soldier once went to the Buddha and said that his
teachers had taught the existence of a heaven awaiting soldiers who die in
battle. What did the Buddha have to say about that? At first the Buddha
declined to answer, but when the soldier showed the sincerity of his question
by pressing him three times for a response, he finally replied:

“When a warrior strives &
exerts himself in battle, his mind is already seized, debased, &
misdirected by the thought: ‘May these beings be struck down or slaughtered or
annihilated or destroyed. May they not exist’: If others then strike him down
& slay him while he is thus striving & exerting himself in battle, then
with the breakup of the body, after death, he is reborn in the hell called the
realm of those slain in battle. But if he holds such a view as this: ‘When a
warrior strives & exerts himself in battle, if others then strike him down
& slay him while he is striving & exerting himself in battle, then with
the breakup of the body, after death, he is reborn in the company of devas
slain in battle,’ that is his wrong view. Now, there are two destinations for a
person with wrong view, I tell you: either hell or the animal womb.”

SN
42.3

The soldier then broke down and cried
— not because he felt that the Buddha’s words were cruel, but because he
believed their truth and was upset at his earlier teachers for having lied to
him. In this case, the Buddha’s reticence and tact helped to make his teaching
effective. A similar set of events happened when an actor asked the Buddha if
there is a special heaven reserved for actors. The Buddha’s reticence and tact
in informing the actor of a hell for actors who incite their audiences to
greed, anger, and delusion inspired the actor to respond in the same way as the
soldier.

If the pride of soldiers and actors
required special handling, even more care was required in the handling of
kings, for their pride was often coupled with an unrestrained sense of power. A
remarkable feature of the Pali Canon is that even though the Buddha was a
member of the noble warrior caste, the discourses generally show a low regard
for the spiritual standing of kings. In many passages, kings are mentioned in
the same breath with thieves: They confiscate property and show little regard
for the rule of law. The Canon does recognize exceptions — King Bimbisara of
Magadha achieves stream-entry the first time he hears the Dhamma, and he never
engages in war — but for the most part, kings are depicted as spiritually
stunted. King Ajatasattu, on first seeing the Buddha sitting surrounded by
monks, can’t tell which person in the assembly is the Buddha, a sign of his
spiritual blindness; this blindness is later proven by his asking the Buddha’s
advice on how to defeat his innocent neighbors in war. As one of the discourses
suggests, this sort of blindness is an occupational hazard for rulers, in that
the unfair exercise of power can make a person unfit for learning the truth.

“Because of having wrongly
inflicted suffering on another person through beating or imprisonment or
confiscation or placing blame or banishment, [with the thought,] ‘I have power.
I want power,’ when told what is factual, he denies it and doesn’t acknowledge
it. When told what is unfactual, he doesn’t make an ardent effort to untangle
it [to see], ‘This is unfactual. This is baseless.’”

AN
3.69

Even King Pasenadi of Kosala, the
king most closely associated with the Buddha, comes across as well-meaning but
somewhat dense. An entire discourse, MN 90,
is a satire of how his royal position has thwarted his ability to learn the
Dhamma. He can’t phrase his questions properly, has trouble following a
discussion for more than a few sentences, and is unable to come to any certain
conclusions about the truth. Still, in other discourses he has his occasional
moments of spiritual clarity, and the Buddha uses those moments as
opportunities to teach the Dhamma. The Buddha’s approach here is twofold: to
try to expand the king’s perspective on life at times when the king is willing
to be frank; and to encourage the king when the latter gains insights on his
own.

For example, there’s the famous
discourse (SN
3.25
) where Pasenadi comes to visit the Buddha in the middle of the day.
The Buddha asks him what he’s been doing, and the king replies — in a moment of
rare and wonderful frankness — that he’s been involved in the sort of
activities typical of a king intoxicated with his power. The Buddha takes this
moment of frankness as an opportunity to teach the Dhamma. Suppose, he says,
that four mountains were rolling in inexorably from the four directions,
crushing all life in their path. Given that the human birth is so rare and hard
to achieve, what should be done? The king’s reply: What else should be done but
living in line with the Dhamma? The Buddha then draws the lesson: Aging and
death are rolling in inexorably. Given that the human birth is so rare and hard
to achieve, what should be done? The king draws the obvious conclusion that,
again, the only thing to be done is to live in line with the Dhamma. He then
goes on to make the observation that when aging and death are rolling in
inexorably, there is no role for armies, wars, clever advisors, or great wealth
to prevent their rolling in. The only thing to do is to live in line with the
Dhamma.

In another discourse, Pasenadi comes
to the Buddha and reports his own independent observation:

“Those who engage in bodily
misconduct, verbal misconduct, & mental misconduct leave themselves
unprotected. Even though a squadron of elephant troops might protect them, a
squadron of cavalry troops, a squadron of chariot troops, a squadron of
infantry troops might protect them, still they leave themselves unprotected.
Why is that? Because that’s an external protection, not an internal one.
Therefore they leave themselves unprotected. But those who engage in good
bodily conduct, good verbal conduct, & good mental conduct have themselves
protected. Even though neither a squadron of elephant troops, a squadron of
cavalry troops, a squadron of chariot troops, nor a squadron of infantry troops
might protect them, still they have themselves protected. Why is that? Because
that’s an internal protection, not an external one. Therefore they have
themselves protected.”

SN
3.5

It’s highly unlikely that Pasenadi would
have come to this conclusion if he hadn’t spent time in conversation with the
Buddha. From that conversation, he would have learned the meaning of good
bodily, verbal, and mental conduct: the ten forms of skillful action. As a
tactful teacher, the Buddha simply concurred with the king’s insight. The
discourses suggest that this strategy encouraged the king to spend time in
reflection of this sort, for in other discourses the king reports many similar
insights for the Buddha to confirm.

We learn that the king did not always
follow through with his insights, but that’s not because the Buddha encouraged
him to view killing as his duty. In fact, there is one striking example where
these insights had at least a partial effect. Ajatasattu once attacked Pasenadi’s
kingdom, and Pasenadi responded by raising an army to fight him off. After an
initial setback, Pasenadi was able to capture Ajatasattu. He could have killed
him in revenge, for that was allowable under the rules of engagement during his
time. But he chose not to, and it’s hard not to see the Buddha’s impact on this
decision. When told of the battle, the Buddha said:

A man may plunder
as long as it serves his ends,
but when others are plundered,
he who has plundered
gets plundered in turn.
 
A fool thinks,
‘Now’s my chance,’
as long as his evil
has yet to ripen.
But when it ripens,
the fool
falls
into pain.
 
Killing, you gain
your killer.
Conquering, you gain one
who will conquer you;
insulting, insult;
harassing, harassment.
 
And so, through the cycle of action,
he who has plundered
gets plundered in turn.

SN
3.15

Benighted as he was, Pasenadi still
got the message. The question is, why can’t we?

 

Attempt has to be made by authorities and
Mighty Great Minds all over the world to highlight this historic fact and
make
  human chain for the peace, welfare,
happiness and security of all sentient and non-sentient beings.         


comments (0)
10/27/08
Uttar Pradesh : One year of development and progress Steps towards social Democracy -BSP picks candidates against Rahul, Sonia -Snake smugglers snared in Uttar Pradesh-It is high time that Intel concentrate more on the Manufacturing sector to train students with the help of the latest application software and also on softwares on convergence of Information Technology, Bio-Technology and Nano Technology.-JC -Intel for a computer literate UP-Intel has already provided 50 computers thus far and will be providing more soon.-UP tells Rahul to cooperate, visits causing problem-Want 2 B Little Tommy thin or big mommy fat ? Everything is in UR mouth ! Eat More U R fat ! If its less U R thin and neat !
Filed under: General
Posted by: @ 7:25 pm


BSP picks candidates against Rahul, Sonia

By Venkatesh Kesari

New Delhi

Oct. 27: The BSP has decided to field Mr Akhilesh Shukla, a former
Congressman, against Mr Rahul Gandhi from Amethi while Mr R.S. Kushwah,
an OBC, would be its nominee against Congress chief Sonia Gandhi in Rae
Bareli constituency in the Lok Sabha elections.

According to well-informed sources in the BSP, the Mayawati-led
party has decided to field Mr Naresh Agarwal in Farukkabad, Mr Shahid
Siddiqui in Bijnore and Dr Akhilesh Das from Lucknow, represented by
former Prime Minister Atal Behari Vajpayee. Dr Das is a former mayor of
Lucknow where the baniya or vaishya vote could be decisive.

UP chief minister Mayawati would be fielding minority candidates in Akbarpur and Hardwar (Uttarakhand).

The sources added the BSP would be fielding 51 candidates from the
brahmin, Muslim and SC communities (17 from each) and the remainder
would be allotted to OBCs, banias and other communities.

The BSP is gearing up for polls at a time when the Congress and the SP have yet to finalise seat-sharing.


Snake smugglers snared in Uttar Pradesh

Lucknow, Oct 27 (IANS) Seven people were caught
smuggling out a rare species of snakes from Uttar Pradesh’s Bahraich
district to Nepal, a forest official said Monday.

‘Acting on a tip-off, we nabbed the smugglers Sunday
midnight in Mihinpurwa village in Bahraich, about 270 km from Lucknow,’
Divisional Forest Officer (DFO) R.K. Singh told IANS.

‘Several red boya snakes, a rare species, were seized from the seven
smugglers, who claimed that the skin of each snake fetched nearly
Rs.200,000 in international markets,’ Singh said.

Several species of snakes including the red boya snakes are found in the Kakraha forest of Bahraich.

‘The colour of these snakes is close to crimson and they have two mouths,’ Singh said.

The red boya snakes are around three and a half feet long.

The smugglers, who are being interrogated, have admitted that they
are part of an animal trade racket that operates from Nepal, forest
officials said.

Under the Wildlife Protection Act (WPA) 1972, it is illegal to injure, catch, or own snakes.

Snakes come under the Schedule I and IV of the WPA and keeping them in captivity is an offence.

Snakes can only be exhibited in a zoo where they have to be kept as per rules framed by the Central Zoo Authority (CZA).

UP tells Rahul to cooperate, visits causing problem

Lucknow, October 26 : The Uttar Pradesh Government
advised Amethi MP Rahul Gandhi on Sunday to cooperate with the security
agencies, saying his unscheduled visits and programmes in UP created
problems in ensuring his security.

“There are examples when Rahul Gandhi broke the security cordon”
and also visited places deviating from his scheduled programme, where
ensuring security arrangements was not possible in the absence of prior
information, the Government said in a statement.

As recently as October16, the UP government had written a
letter to the SPG director, highlighting the problems created by the
lack of timely information and requested him to make available the tour
programmes of Rahul Gandhi well in time, the statement said. On
September 11 and 12, when Rahul visited Deoriya, Gorakhpur and
Azamgarh, there was a problem in ensuring security because his
programme was communicated to the state government at a short notice.
Also, the Amethi MP visited places which were not on his schedule and
information regarding these places was made available after he reached
Gorakhpur, the statement added.

Regarding the alleged security lapse during his Kanpur visit,
Cabinet Secretary Shashank Shekhar Singh said DGP Vikram Singh had got
the matter investigated and found that the reports were baseless. The
detailed report had been sent to the Centre. The Union Home Secretary
and the Director of Intelligence Bureau had spoken to UP DGP Vikram
Singh regarding the alleged security lapse, he added.

As for reports that the pilot car abandoned Rahul’s cavalcade,
the government said the pilot drove on to the Circuit House as
instructed earlier. He joined the cavalcade after 10 minutes near the
Chandra Shekhar Azad Agriculture University.

Intel for a computer literate UP

It is high time that Intel concentrate more on the Manufacturing sector to train students with the help of the latest application software and also on softwares on convergence of Information Technology, Bio-Technology and Nano Technology.-JC

Intel has already provided 50 computers thus far and will be providing more soon.

News just in, is that the Uttar Pradesh government
has teamed up with chip manufacturing major, Intel to propagate
computer literacy in the most densely populated state of India.

The
principal secretary of secondary education, A. K. Mishra told IANS, “By
collaborating with Intel, we would set up computer labs in nearly 5,000
schools across the state.” He also said that the new computer labs
would be set up initially in various schools of Lucknow and Allahabad
districts and the same would happen in other districts later.

The benefits of this will be passed on to students and teachers of
rural and far-flung areas, which are not enrolled in computer training
programs.

It may be interesting to note that computer science is not a
compulsory subject in the Uttar Pradesh board, unlike in ICSE and CBSE.
According to an official, this partnership with Intel would be a step
in the right direction by making this subject compulsory in the UP
board.

Intel has already provided 50 computers thus far and will be
providing more soon. Seems that the UP government is finally taking
steps to a progressive state to create employment for its people and we
think that this will be the first step to help solve a lot of problems,
including mass exodus to other states with greener avenues.



comments (0)
Frenetic pace and blissful tranquillity co-exist in Tokyo -Dalai Lama hints at retirement -Pratibha Patil to inaugurate Buddha Vihara in Gulbarga -Nanded set for tercentenary of Guru Granth Sahib -”Cultivation of mind should be the ultimate aim of human existence.” -Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar- Allegation of security lapses in Rahul Gandhi’s programme is baseless Launch drive for realisation of Commercial Tax Dues Charge of Ban on Rahul Gandhi’s programme totally baseless C.M. orders for providing Rs. two lakh each to the family members of two deceased of Kalanyanpur village in Jaunpur State Government gives nod for prosecuting 12 Senior I.P.S. Officers under Cr.P.C. Section-197 for irregularities in police recruitment scam C.M. directs for completing repairing works of damaged roads by October 31, 2008 C.M. condemns attacks on North Indians by Maharashtra Navnirman Sena C.M. announces increase of Rs. 50 in nutrition allowance for police officers and employees -IN FOCUS:BAHUJAN SAMAJ PARTY Mayawati will become the first woman Original Inhabitant of Jambudvipa, that is, the Great Prabuddha Bharath Prime Minister Historic Initiatives By Mayawati Uttar Pradesh : One year of development and progress Steps towards social Democracy-Maya asks Left for 2 Bengal seats -Caste alone counts for Mayawati as she eyes Delhi (News Analysis)-Karnataka: JD(S) to alliance with BSP in LS polls
Filed under: General
Posted by: @ 5:35 am
Frenetic
pace and blissful tranquillity co-exist in Tokyo






Buddham Sharanam Gacchaami

Did you know that:
The Full Moon Day of the month of Vaishaakha (May) is the:

  1. The Birthday of Gautama Buddha

  2. The Renunciation day of Gautama Buddha

  3. The Enlightenment day (Nirvaana) day of Gautama Buddha.

Buddha was born near Kapilavastu in Nepalese Terai. 

Buddhists
associate Mansarovar with the legendary Anotatta Lake, where Buddha’s mother,
Queen Maya, conceived him. Legend says that the Queen, while in a dream state,
was transported to Mansarovar by the Gods and bathed in the lake’s holy waters.
When her body was purified and her womb thus ready to receive Buddha, he
appeared from the direction of Kailash riding a white elephant. 

Above paragraph
information from:

http://www.kailashmansarovar.org/ 

At his
birth-site stands an engraved pillar, erected by Ashoka proclaiming: ‘Here the
Buddha was born!’ Here Siddhartha lived a life of luxury up to the age of 29
years. After the young prince witnessed ‘old age’, ’sickness’ and ‘death’, the
future Buddha renounced his princely life in search of the key to ‘freedom from
sorrow’.

After 7 years of severe austerities, Buddha went into a state of
deep meditation and attained ‘Nirvaana’ (Enlightenment) under the shade of a
peepal tree in Bodh Gaya, 6 miles south of Gaya in Bihar.

Budh’ means ‘knowledge’

Buddha attained Supreme Nirvaana in his 80th year after
spreading his wondrous message to so many. When Buddha was asked if he was
enlightened, he replied: “I am awake”

Vivekananda considered Buddha to be a great seeker, probably the
‘greatest’

Though Buddha was fearless and bent to neither caste nor
traditions, he was extremely kind and loving.

Today, on the full moon day of the month of Vaisaakha, let us
pay homage to the man who taught humanity to follow the ‘Middle Path’ (Not too
much austerity, not too much indulgence)

Who expounded the theory that Desire is the root of all
suffering.

And who preached and urged man to practice compassion and to
have love in their hearts for their fellow beings on earth. Probably some of the
qualities that one must aspire for in excess.

Before
the rise of Kalki, Buddha is considered the 10th or final avatar of the
Dashavtaar.

 


Thought 2

The Four Noble Truths that the Great Buddha pondered upon are:

1 The existence of suffering.

2 The causes of suffering

3 The cessation of suffering

4 The path that leads to the cessation of suffering - this is known as the
Noble Eightfold Path and is divided into Shila - moral discipline comprising
of Right Speech, Right Action, Right Livelihood, then Samatha or developing Mental
Discipline by meditation. It is made up of Right Effort, Right Right
Awareness and Right Concentration. Finally there is prajna or wisdom that
comprises Right View and Right Thought.

Thought 3

There are three dimensions ordinarily available to approach truth.

The first dimension creates the scientist…the scientist
works with analysis, reason, observation…

The second dimension, …the poet functions through the
heart…the Sufis Bauls-they all have an aesthetic approach…hence they have so
many beautiful mosques, churches, cathedrals, temples…

(M L Varadpande also states that Indian tradition
considers all art to be of divine origin. Art is spiritual in nature and is a
blissful way of reaching and staying with God)

The third approach is that of grandeur. The old
 testament prophets – Moses Abraham Islam’s prophet Mohammed; Krishna and Ram
– their approach is through the dimension of grandeur…the awe that one feels
looking at the vastness of the universe. The Upanishads, Vedas, they all
approach the world of truth through grandeur. They are full of wonder. It is
unbelievably there, such grandeur that you simply bow down before it—nothing
else is possible…the rarity of a Buddha consists of this—that his approach is
a synthesis of  all the three and beyond the three.

No belief is required to travel with Buddha…first he
convinces your mind…by and by you start feeling that he has a message which is
beyond mind…Because of this rational approach he never brings any concept
which cannot be proved…Because he has never talked about God, many think that
he is an atheist—he is not. He has not talked about God because there is no
way to talk about God.

Buddha

Excerpted from Dhammapada




It is night when I get into Tokyo from the airport. I reel at the
sight of giant-sized billboards and bright neon lights that greet me
when I step out of the Shinjuku subway station. “When in Tokyo, take
time to stand on the street and absorb the sights and sounds around
you,” is my husband’s attempt at being helpful when he sees my baffled
expression.

A wave of black-suited men crosses the street, most murmuring on
their cell phones. When motorbikes come to a grinding halt in front of
us at pedestrian crossing, my daughters gape at the riders — teenagers
with coloured punk hairstyles, wearing torn leather jackets and
dangling earrings and hard rock music blaring from their earpieces.

I almost stumble when a kimono-clad woman brushes past me, her
wooden clogs clacking on the pavement. I hadn’t yet been an hour in the
city. We then make our way to the famous Ginza shopping district. The
ever-present neon signs seem to throb with the pulse of the crowds that
throng the thoroughfares and side streets. Young people and those
working jostle one another as they catch an evening meal or drink sake
and sing karaoke.

Garishly-lit Pachinko parlours and the sound of the pachinko
machines add to the cacophony. Everywhere around the Ginza station, the
sounds, sights and smells of a giant party permeate and stay with me
all the way to my hotel.

The next morning, we head out to catch Tokyo by the day. As we walk
through the Shinagawa district, I marvel at neatly laid out gardens
between giant skyscrapers — an unexpected oasis in the midst of a
mostly concrete landscape.

Walkways connect the buildings several stories above ground level
and I find myself enjoying the window-shopping offered by stores at
either end of the walkways.

It is with some reluctance that I allow myself to be torn from the
shops of Tokyo to head out for a short trip to the countryside. The sun
is slowly headed towards the Western horizon as our train pulls into
Kamakura, an old town barely an hour from Tokyo.

We hail a taxi for the short ride to Kamakura’s most famous
landmark. Large hands folded in a meditative pose are the first thing
that I see. I have to lean way back to look up to the serene face of
the giant bronze Buddha of Kamakura, the Daibutsu. I stand transfixed —
everything seems to fade into the background.

Set against the backdrop of the wooded hills in Kamakura, the
Daibutsu with its tranquil expression and mammoth size is the most
popular tourist sight in Japan. At a height of nearly 12 metres, it is
the second largest Buddha in Japan.

Originally housed in a temple, the Daibutsu remained untouched,
though the temple was destroyed in a tsunami in the late 15th Century.
The cherry blossom trees at dusk, the devotion of the monks and slight
twitter of birds transport me into a meditative state.

The statue radiates a serenity that envelopes all. My daughters’
tugging at my arm brings me back to reality. I realise that we are the
only visitors remaining. I reluctantly trail behind the family to our
bus.

Back on the train to Tokyo, the frenetic pace of the previous two days in the city seems but a distant dream.

Two worlds, so close and yet such contrast, I think. Yet, somehow
the bustle of Tokyo seems a perfect foil to the serenity of the
Daibutsu. 


Dalai Lama hints at retirement



AP



Dharamsala: Hinting that he is planning to retire, the Tibetan
spiritual leader, Dalai Lama, has said he has “given up” on efforts to
convince China to allow greater autonomy for Tibet.

Pratibha Patil to inaugurate Buddha Vihara in Gulbarga

It
has been built by Siddhartha Vihara Trust at a cost of Rs. 4 crore


The Buddha statue is the largest in south India

Bangalore: President Pratibha Patil will inaugurate the Buddha
Vihara, built by the Siddhartha Vihara Trust at a cost of around Rs. 4
crore on the outskirts of Gulbarga on January 7.

Tibetan Buddhist religious leader the Dalai Lama would inaugurate an
all-religion conference on January 19 and launch the consecration
ceremonies of the 18-ft-tall bronze statue of Buddha according to
Buddhist rituals. The Buddha statue, the largest in south India, has
already been installed.

A Buddhist monastery, a prayer hall and a meditation centre would be opened at the vihara.

State Government withdraws gram sabha land for rail coach factory in Raebareli keeping in view anger of local people

Nanded set for tercentenary of Guru Granth Sahib

S. Harpal Singh


Devotees from all over the world are flooding the city for the
celebration

The Hazur Sahib Gurdwara was built by Maharaja Ranjit Singh between 1830 and 1835

35 ‘langars’ which can feed about 5 lakh people a day now functional




— PHOTOS: P.V. SIVAKUMAR





SPIRITUAL CROWN: Baba Ranjit Singh of the Buddha Dal
sports a 200-metre-long ‘sava man da damla’ that weighs 40 kg at the
Sachkhand Sri Hazur Abchalnagar Sahib in Nanded for the Gurta Gaddi on
Sunday. (Right) The Holy Granth Sahib recitation in progress at the
shrine.

NANDED (MAHARASHTRA): Centred around the Sikh shrines here, the most
sacred of them being the Takhat Sachkhand Shri Hazur Abchalnagar Sahib
Gurdwara, the growth of Nanded city has remained steadfast for the last
300 years as was visualised by Guru Gobind Singh, the tenth Guru of
Sikhs. He had christened Nanded as ‘Abchalnagar’ or the steadfast city
in October 1708 at the time of elevating the Adi Granth, the holy book
of Sikhs as their perpetual Guru.

A steady flow of devotees and pilgrims from all over the world is
flooding the city, now hosting the tercentenary celebration of this
event and also the one marking the departure of Guru Gobind Singh to
his heavenly abode on November 3, 1708.

Guru Gobind Singh had also raised the status of the gurdwara at
Nanded to that of a Takhat or throne symbolising the seat of authority.
The Sachkhand Hazur Sahib Gurdwara became one of the five Takhats, the
others being the Akal Takhat at Amritsar’s Golden Temple complex,
Takhat Keshgarh Sahib at Anandpur, Takhat Damdama Sahib in Talwandi
Sabo and Takhat Patna Sahib. The first three are in Punjab and the
Takhat Patna Sahib, the place of birth of Guru Gobind Singh is in Bihar.

The Hazur Sahib Gurdwara with the golden dome and intricate art
work, was built by Maharaja Ranjit Singh between 1830 and 1835. Nanded
also has 10 other gurdwaras that have historical importance for Sikhs.
The Nagina Ghat, Bandh Ghat, Maltekdi, Heera Ghat, Mata Saheb, Shikar
Ghat, Sangat Sahib, Ratangarh, Gobind Bagh and Damdama Sahib (Basmat)
are located in the vicinity of Nanded. The Nanaksar, Langar Sahib and
Bhajangarh Sahib were later additions to the list of pilgrim sites.

Nanded had been a part of the Hyderabad State ruled by the Nizam
until 1948 when Hyderabad was liberated following the famous police
action. It went into Maharashtra in 1956 when the reorganisation of
States on linguistic basis was done.

One of the unique aspects of the Sikh way of life like the 24-hour
‘langar’ or community kitchen is on display here. Among other things,
the system of ‘langar’ envisages doing away with class and status
within the community.

The NRI langar facility, opened on Saturday, serves to enhance the
overall capacity to feed pilgrims during the tercentenary of the
elevation of the Adi Granth. There are some 35 ‘langars’ functional
here with a cumulative capacity to feed about 5 lakh people per day.

The tradition of ‘langar’ was started by the third Sikh Guru,
Amardas, and it has come to be one of the main activities at community
level for the Sikhs. Irrespective of the social status people eat
seated on one plane that symbolises equality among the members of the
community.

The ‘langar’ cannot be run without the active participation of the
sevadars or volunteers who also signify the importance attached to
community service.

The Langar Sahib Gurdwara here is the largest of such facilities
and in Nanded, which can accommodate about three lakh people every day.
There are others that have been set up by people and organisations from
Punjab.


Long turban




It is simply a matter of routine for Baba Ranjit Singh, an ageing
Nihang Singh of the Buddha Dal of Sangrur district in Punjab who ties
his 200-metre-long turban twice every day. The bulky turban, known as
the ‘sava man da damla,’ weighs about 40 kg.

The Baba is in Nanded to participate in the tercentenary
celebrations. He was spotted sauntering towards the Nagina Ghat
Gurdwara on the banks of river Godavari on Sunday, sporting on his head
the traditional but formidable head gear.


Nihang tradition

The Nihang Singhs comprised the army of Guru Gobind Singh, the 10th
Guru of Sikhs and were known as Guru di ladli faujan, the beloved
soldiers of the Guru.

They continue with the tradition of wearing the blue uniform of
which the blue or saffron turban forms a part. Some Nihangs wear the
huge sava man da damla following an incident from the life of Guru
Gobind Singh’s sons.

According to Nanded journalist Ravinder Singh Modi, Sahibzada Jujhar
Singh, the second son of Guru Gobind Singh was denied participation in
a battle by his elder brother Sahibzada Ajit Singh on the grounds that
the former was too ‘small’ or young for it. Sahibzada Jujhar Singh
tried to convince his brother that he was eligible to fight alongside
by tying a huge turban that made him look taller than Sahibzada Ajit
Singh. The Nihangs have since then sported the larger head gear as a
tribute to the young Sahibzada.

Baba Ranjit Singh bathes and washes his hair twice daily after which
he ties the long turban after combing the hair. He then attaches the
small versions of the arms that are carried by the Nihangs. There are
nine small and one big khanda, eight small kirpans, half a dozen small
spears and one simran mala or rosary visible on the turban. He also has
five small arms or shastras besides two small combs tucked inside the
turban. “This exercise takes only two hours,” quips Baba Ranjit Singh.

(Nihang
of the Buddha Dal with traditional “Dastar Bunga” turban, mostly worn
on occasions such as Hola Mohalla.
)

The Dal Khalsa: the Buddha Dal and the Taruna Dal

In 1733, the Mughal government decided, at the insistence of Zakarya
Khan, to stop the persecution of the Sikhs and made an offer of a grant
to them. The title of Nawab was conferred upon their leader, with a jagir consisting of the three parganas of Dipalpur, Kanganval and Jhabal.

After some mutual discussion, the Panj Piare (five revered Sikhs) - Baba Deep Singh, Jassa Singh Ramgarhia, Hari Singh Dhillon,
Bhai Karam Singh and Bhai Buddh Singh decided to make Kapur Singh the
Supreme Leader of the Sikhs. Kapur Singh was thus chosen for the title
and became Nawab Kapur Singh.

Word was sent round to Sikhs passing their days in distant jungles
and deserts that peace had been made with the government and that they
could return to their homes. Nawab Kapur Singh undertook the task of
consolidating the disintegrated fabric of the Sikh Jathas. They were merged into a single central fighting force (The Dal) divided into two sections - The Budha Dal, the army of the veterans, and the Taruna Dal,
the army of the young. Hari Singh Dhillon was elected leader of the
Taruna Dal. The former was entrusted with the task of looking after the
holy places, preaching the word of the Gurus and inducting converts
into the Khalsa Panth by holding baptismal ceremonies. The Taruna Dal
was the more active division and its function was to fight in times of
emergencies and fighting Afghan armies of Ahmed Shah Abdali.

Jassa Singh Ramgarhia and Sultan ul Quam Baba Jassa Singh Ahluwalia were then youngsters who led regiments under Hari Singh Dhillon in the Taruna Dal, reporting to Nawab Kapur Singh at Diwali and Vaisakhi.



Good Read

BJP criticised

Chitradurga: General Secretary of the Bahujan Samaj Party (BSP)
Suresh Mane has said the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) has lost the
moral authority to be in power in Karnataka. He accused that the BJP
was responsible for the attacks on churches in the State. Addressing a
State-level BSP convention here on Sunday, he charged that the BJP was
practising communal politics. Mr. Mane criticised the party for “having
failed to protect the interests of the minorities.” — Staff
Correspondent



The nationwide rally by Bahujan Samaj Party against Indo-US nuclear deal started from the city here on Thursday.

 
Flagging off rally, BSP South India in-charge Suresh Mane said that the
rally intends to generate public awareness on “perils of Indo-US
nuclear deal” across the length and breadth of the country. Branding
the deal as  a “conspiracy to pledge the sovereignity of the country”,
he called upon the citizens to be vigilant against such destructive
measures.

“Management of nuclear waste is a Herculean task. It requires
investment of crores of rupees to set up waste management unit.
Further, nuclear power could meet only 6 pc of the total demand and
hence, Agreement is an exercise in futility. ”, he reasoned.

He claimed that India will not gain anything from the said deal and the
party has organised the rally  to sensitise people on the perceived
pitfalls of the Indo-US nuclear deal.

The rally is
scheduled to reach KGF via Narasapur, Malur and Tekal and further
proceed to Mulabagal, Srinivasapur, Chintamani, Shidlaghatta,
Gudibande, Gowribidanur, Chikkaballapur, Doddaballapur and reach
Devanahalli in three days.

On
20-10-2008 the Jeep rally from KGF will enter Yelahanka and pass
through Pulikeshinagar, Sarvagna Nagar, Shivaji Nagar, CV Raman Nagar,
KR Puram and Mahdevpura.Will generate public awareness on the perils of
Indo-US Nuclear deal, people’s apathy on the ever rising price rise and
unemployment problem which is because

The country has a poor
record on distribution of wealth

both by the Congress Party at the Centre and the BJP at the State.

Price
rise, regularising unauthorised colonies besides
unemployment and poor living conditions in slums were going to be the
key points to be raised in the Jeep Rally.

 

Explaining
that his party’s priorities were different from those of the Congress
and BJP, state party unit chief said, “BJP and
Congress have only done lip service. That is what we are going to tell
the voters.”

 

Claiming
that all poll calculations will be proved wrong in Karnataka as had been
the case in Uttar Pradesh.

.

 social
engineering of BSP would bear fruit since the party had accommodated
every community and caste while distributing tickets.

Vegetable prices to remain high

The high prices of vegetables and fruits in the City are expected to increase even further in the
coming days, reaching its peak


 This year, it is particularly obvious because of the high inflation rate.

Vegetable prices have
virtually hit the roofs in recent weeks. Carrots
are selling at Rs 48 per kg, tomatoes ( Rs 30 per kg), cauliflower,Cabbage has
risen  to Rs 15 a kg and beans  to Rs 29 a kg.Peas to Rs.150 a kg.
Brinjal (small) prices has doubled and coriander has seen a 300 per
cent increase. Among fruits pomegranate is the highest at Rs 150 per
kg. 

The price rise has hurt both sellers and buyers alike. Sellers have seen their margins
diminish with the rise in costs and buyers now have to fork out more money to meet their basic requirements.


The main reasons for the vegetable price rise is the rising inflationary trends in the
economy. 



Srinath of Reliance Fresh felt that only when there was a nationwide
decrease in inflation levels would the food price levels come down. 
The local vendors and Hopcom outlets  are also facing similar problems
due to rise in vegetable price.

India has 200 million hungry people: report
Gargi Parsai

High levels of child under-nutrition and poor calorie count


NEW DELHI: Punjab, the granary of India, ranks below countries like
Honduras and Vietnam in terms of hunger levels while Madhya Pradesh has
the most severe level of hunger in the country, followed by Jharkhand
and Bihar, says a report prepared by U.S.-based International Food
Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in collaboration with Welthungerhilfe
and Concern
Worldwide, California.
“When Indian States are compared to countries in the 2008 Global
Hunger Index, Madhya Pradesh ranks between Ethiopia and Chad. Punjab, is below Gabon, Honduras and Vietnam,” says
the Country Report released here on Tuesday by G.K. Chadha, member of
Prime Minister’s Economic Advisory Council, on the eve of World Food
Day
.
“India is home to the world’s largest food insecure population,
with more than 200 million people who are hungry,” the India State
Hunger Index (ISHI) said. The country’s poor performance is driven by
its high levels of child under-nutrition and poor calorie count. “Its
rates of child malnutrition are higher than most countries in
sub-Saharan Africa,” the report said.

India, which scored 66th place in the 2008
Global Hunger list of 88
countries, does not have a single State in the ‘low hunger’ or
‘moderate hunger’ categories. Despite years of robust economic growth,
India scored worse than nearly 25 sub-Saharan African countries and all
of South Asia, except Bangladesh.

“Figuring amongst the 88 countries itself is shameful for the
country.. Policy-makers have to think about it. High GDP growth is not
sufficient. Inclusive growth is necessary. The country has a poor
record on distribution of wealth,”
Dr. Chadha said.

The India State Hunger Index measures hunger on three leading indicators and combines them into one index.
The three indicators are: prevalence of child malnutrition, rates of
child mortality, and the proportion of people who are
calorie
deficient. This approach is similar to the 2008 Global Hunger Index,
which includes India, and was also released on Tuesday for World Food
Day on October 16.
The ISHI found that 12 States fell in the ‘alarming’ category, and
one State – Madhya Pradesh – fell in the ‘extremely alarming’ category.
Four States – Punjab, Kerala, Haryana and Assam – were in the ‘serious’
category.

India’s slightly better performance relative to Bangladesh is
entirely due to better access to food in India, which in turn is a
consequence of India’s higher agricultural productivity. On the other
two components of the Global Hunger Index – child underweight and child
mortality – India ranks below Bangladesh.

In a few States, such as Kerala and Tamil Nadu,
calorie deficiency contributes almost as much as child underweight.
The report identified that strong economic growth does not
necessarily translate into lower hunger levels. Even States with high
rates of economic growth in recent years, such as Gujarat,
Chhattisgarh, and Maharashtra, have high levels of hunger, while States
with relatively slower economic growth, such as Punjab, achieved a
lower hunger level.

“Hunger and malnutrition are often rooted in poverty,” said Ashok
Gulati, IFPRI director in Asia. “Part of the solution rests with
increasing investments in agriculture and poverty reduction
programmes.”

How to eradicate poverty and unemployment problem in india ?


Jambudvipa,
that is the Great Prabuddha Bharath is a vast country diversified
geographically and humanly.We can
eradicate poverty and unemployment by making optimum use of our single
most vital asset, i.e. human resource or sheer manpower. It is the duty
of the Government to distribute the nations wealth to all sections of
the society.Supply healthy seeds to the farmers and distribute at least
10 acres of land to the tillers. Provide loans to all those who want to
start bussiness and trade. The Government employees must be montitored
to do their job honestly and sincerly.
Prime Minister


Historic Initiatives By Mayawati



The
one decision to construct Greater Noida-Balia Expressway by Mayawati
Government can change the entire landscape of Uttar Pradesh. Mayawati’s
thought about this mammoth project,only exemplifies her hidden
developmental streak.Nobody even dared to think about this earlier but
Mayawati not only conceptualised this and hopefully, will be able to
complete in time also.
Had the central government taken such
imitative then the state selected would have been either any southern
state or north-western state.U.P and Bihar come last in the reckoning,
always.
This is more significant for the simple reason that a state
chief minister has taken initiative of her own and if other chief
ministers also follow her, then, the infrastructure woes of the country
will be greatly reduced quickly.Nobody knows how much time National
Highways Authority of India,NHAI, will take to provide better motorable
roads to the citizens of this country.
As the U.P and Bihar have
non-UPA governments,it would deliberately not speed up construction
activities due to internal pressure.The condition of roads in U.P is
not bad but it is far worse in Bihar, mainly because of NHAI apathy.NHAI
never bothers to repair even existing National Highways. So,
constructing newer ones is asking for far too much.It is the state
government of Bihar which is managing even NHAI roads.The reasons for
NHAI’s discriminatory attitude is known to everyone.Under the pressure
of Rashtriya Janta Dal,NRJD, NHAI is skirting its
responsibility.RJD,would obviously not want to see the contrasting
picture under Nitish Kumar Government.Under its 16 years rule, RJD had
ensured that no stretch of road remained motorable, so that Charwaha
vidyalayas and bullock-cart transportation could be popularised. NHAI has ensured that the National Highways remain in such
condition that deter any one from travelling on that path.
The
proposed Expressways will pass through many ancient Pilgrimage
centers.Travelling between
Delhi-Kanpur,Kanpur-Allahabad,Allahabad-Varanasi would become a breeze
and millions of reluctant people will finally start visiting the most
sacred places on this earth.There will be all round developmental
activities and millions of employment opportunities would be generated.
Mayawati
has tremendous hold over bureaucracy and she is most likely to achieve
this ambitious feat ,but politicians are already roaming with open
daggers in their hands.They are most likely to stab from behind at the
very first opportunity they get. Like RJD of Bihar they would never like
to see Mayawati as a chief minister who transformed U.P of her very own
will.
If U.P. and Bihar have to come out of the rut then the
respective state governments have to take bold and path braking
initiatives.Bundelkhand has been facing famine for years now but no
concrete measures were taken to improve the situation.Similarly,Kosi
has been flooding a large part of Bihar but no measures to provide some
solace to the victims were ever tried.One or two trains for Bihar
announced by railway minister invites widespread derision and criticism
but they fail to appreciate how this state has been overlooked for
decades.
There are many aspects of Mayawati which should be praised for what is due to her and
this she deserves completely.



Allegation of security lapses in Rahul Gandhi’s programme is baseless


No security lapse during Rahul’s visit: U.P. government

Lucknow: The Uttar Pradesh government on Sunday rejected the charge
that there was any lapse on its part in providing security to AICC
general secretary Rahul Gandhi during his recent visit to Kanpur.

An inquiry was initiated after the Centre raised the issue with the
State police , which concluded that there was no security lapse during
Mr. Gandhi’s visit on October 24. Mr. Gandhi was provided security as
per the set norms, Cabinet Secretary Shashank Shekhar Singh told
reporters here.

“Whatever confusion was there was due to the organisers and the
State government has nothing to do with this,” Mr. Singh said adding
that Principal Secretary Home Kunwar Fatehbahadur Singh had written a
letter to the Centre informing it about the State government’s stand.


‘Letter not received’

He said the government had not received any letter from the Centre raising the issue of the alleged security lapse.

“The Union Home Secretary and Director IB had talked to U.P.
Director General of Police over phone on the issue and subsequently an
inquiry was ordered by him to probe the matter,” Mr. Singh said. — PTI



Launch drive for realisation of Commercial Tax Dues



Charge of Ban on Rahul Gandhi’s programme totally baseless



C.M. orders for providing Rs. two lakh each to the family members of two deceased of Kalanyanpur village in Jaunpur



State
Government gives nod for prosecuting 12 Senior I.P.S. Officers under
Cr.P.C. Section-197 for irregularities in police recruitment scam



C.M. directs for completing repairing works of damaged roads by October 31, 2008



C.M. condemns attacks on North Indians by Maharashtra Navnirman Sena



C.M. announces increase of Rs. 50 in nutrition allowance for police officers and employees


Maya asks Left for 2 Bengal seats

By Sanjay Basak

New Delhi

Oct. 26: BSP supremo Mayawati is trying to drive a hard bargain with
her new Left allies, particularly the CPI(M) and CPI), over seats in
the coming general elections. These two want to piggyback on her
strength in northern India, and the BSP chief has demanded at least two
Lok Sabha seats in West Bengal. In return, she is ready to give the
CPI(M) and CPI one ticket each in Uttar Pradesh.

Ms Mayawati had earlier decided that her party would contest all 81
seats in UP on its own. The Left is, however, still pitching for some
berths, and sources said she might be willing to leave Ghosi for the
CPI and Varanasi for the CPI(M).

“The talks are on,” a senior CPI leader said. Names are yet to be
finalised, but the sources indicated CPI national secretary Atul Anjan
might contest from Ghosi. The CPI(M) will take a decision only after Ms
Mayawati gives the green signal.

CPI(M) general secretary Prakash Karat’s plans to strengthen the
party in the Hindi heartland took a major hit when it failed to win
even a single seat in the last UP Assembly elections. This was the
first time the CPI(M) had failed to get any seat in the state.

The Left parties jumped on to the Mayawati bandwagon in the hope
that she could be their ticket to Parliament from UP. But her
unilateral decision to contest all 81 seats caught them on the wrong
foot, forcing them to have to request her to leave two seats for them.

Mr Karat met Ms Mayawati in Lucknow last Wednesday to discuss the
forthcoming Assembly elections in five states, where BSP general
secretary Satish Mishra was also present. The CPI(M) has decided to
support the BSP wherever it does not have any candidate itself in the
election-going states. This, the sources said, “signalled a possible
Left-BSP alliance during the Lok Sabha elections.” While there has been
no response from the BSP side so far, Mr Karat is “working round the
clock to give shape” to his proposed new third front, a CPI(M) leader
said. He added that the BSP was yet to agree to hold any joi-nt rallies
with the CPI(M).

IndiBlitz.com

You read it here first, right from the newsdesk

Caste alone counts for Mayawati as she eyes Delhi (News Analysis)

Lucknow,
Oct 25 (IANS) Bahujan Samaj Party
(BSP) chief and Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Mayawati appears to be
banking entirely on the caste factor to race to the portals of power in
New Delhi. Be it Original Inhabitants of Jambudvipa, that is, the Great
Prabuddha Bharath, upper castes or religious minorities, she is
wooing them all for what they are.

Having scripted her success story in a
highly caste-ridden Uttar Pradesh where she managed to ride to power in
May last year by way of ’social engineering’, bringing
together the lowest and the highest castes in the Hindu social
hierarchy, Mayawati seems to be hoping to play the same card to capture
the centre.

We need a still broader caste
base to achieve our ultimate goal of grabbing power at the
centre,& she told three consecutive conventions of different
castes, convened by her in Lucknow within a span of 10 days.

Mayawati is busy mobilising the broader caste groups as well as
religious minorities ahead of the general election next year.

It began earlier this month with the
BSP much publicised Muslim conference. Shortly thereafter came
a convention of OBCs and Scheduled Castes, followed by a separate meet
of upper castes - all within a span of 10 days.

The meets turned into mutual admiration
societies, with Mayawati leaving no stone unturned to woo the
respective castes at these conventions and the key invitees singing
paens for the chief minister.

Making no bones about her intent to
mobilise support pointedly on the basis of caste and religion, Mayawati
had also gone to the extent of declaring that every caste or religion
would get its due in proportion to its contribution to the party.

Recalling her mentor Kanshi Ram 
much publicised slogan, jiski jitni sankhya bhaari, utni uski
bhagedaari (every caste will get representation on the basis of its
numerical strength), she has made it a point to tell the crowds
at each meet that the scenario has since changed and the party
new slogan for different castes is jitni jiski tayyari hogi,
utni uski bhagedaari hogi.

The message I wish to convey
through this slogan is plain and simple - the share of every caste in
governance will depend on its preparedness to help the BSP, she
said.

Mayawati has made it a point to list the number of her elected party representatives from different castes and religions.

When it came to the convention of upper
castes a week ago, she said: The prominent leaders of every
caste must get down to mobilising support for the party among their
respective castes.

Just as she went about giving full
points to her party blue-eyed Brahmin face and the BSP
national general secretary, Satish Chandra Mishra, for bringing in a
chunk of upper castes into the party fold, she implored a more recent
entrant, Akhilesh Das, to follow course and ensure larger support of
the Vaishya community.

Likewise, she urged Shahid Siddique, a former Samajwadi Party MP, to mobilise Muslim support for the BSP.

Mayawati makes no bones about caste

being the sole criterion not only in the selection of candidates for
the forthcoming Lok Sabha elections but even in administrative
appointments at all levels.

Be it the appointment of a commissioner,
a district magistrate, a superintendent of police or other key jobs,
the chief minister always seems keen to know the caste of the person.

There have been umpteen occasions when
she has publicly announced the caste of officers handpicked by her for
certain key positions in the state.

aggregator.in

Karnataka: JD(S) to alliance with BSP in LS polls

Bangalore, Oct 25: Ruling out any electoral allliance with Congress,
former Prime Minister and JD(S) National President H D Deve Gowda on
Saturday, Oct 25 said his party will fight the future elections in an
understanding with Bahujan Samaj Party (BSP).



JD(S) to have alliance with BSP in Karantaka for LS elections



Bangalore

,
Oct 25: Ruling out any electoral allliance with Congress, former Prime
Minister and JD(S) National President H D Deve Gowda today said his party will fight the future elections in an understanding with Bahujan Samaj Party (BSP).

Talking to newspersons here, he said
JD(S) will have an alliance with BSP, TRS, Telugu Desam and Left
parties both in Karnataka and at national level.

Describing the coming assembly elections in Delhi

,
Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh, Mizoram, Chhattisgarh and Jammu and Kashmir
as ‘mini general elections’, Mr Gowda said the results in these states
would set the trend for the coming Lok Sabha elections.

BSP has
already announced its intention to field its candidates for all the
assembly seats in Rajasthan and Madhya Pradesh. JD(S) has also
identified two to three assembly constituencies in Madhyra Pradesh and
Rajasthan, he said.

He alleged that both Congress and BJP, two
major political forces in these six states were struggling to find ways
to fight the anti-incumbancy factor. The mood of the voters was
strongly against both Congress and BJP. ‘’It is not plain sailing for
the two main political parties in these states and people want to have
an alternate political front'’ he said.

He said elections to Lok Sabha were likely to be held either in Aprll or May 2009.

Expressing solidarity with Lok Sabha Speaker Somanath Chatterjee, Mr Deve Gowda expressed concern over the attitude
of the members of the Lok Sabha during the session. He also expressed
regrets over decreasing number of sittings of the Parliament session in
a year. It was only 39 days in 2008, he pointed out.

Calling
upon all the political parties to look into the matter seriously the
former prime minister wondered whether ‘Parliamentary institution was
losing its relevance. ‘’There is a need for all the political parties
to have an intraction on the matter and find ways to restore the
supremacy of Parliament, the highest institution in a democracy'’ he
said.

— UNI


BSP to finalise Delhi poll candidates list early November


New Delhi, Oct 26 (IANS) The Bahujan Samaj Party has
‘made some changes’ in its list of candidates for the Delhi assembly
elections and the ‘final list’ will be released in the first week of
November, a party official said Sunday.

The party has made some changes in the list of
candidates and our final list will be released in the first week of
November,said state party unit chief Brahm Singh Bidhuri.

Delhi will go to polls Nov 29 to elect 70 legislators.

Inflation, statehood for Delhi, regularisation of unauthorised
colonies besides poor condition of roads and electricity shortage will
be the issues that will form part of the BSP’s election campaign.

Complete statehood, regularising unauthorised colonies besides
unemployment and poor living conditions in slums will be the main
issues on which our party will focus in our campaign,said Bidhuri.

However, the party officials are silent on whether the demand for a
judicial probe into the Jamia Nagar shootout in which two suspected
terrorists were gunned down Sep 19 will form a part of the election
campaign.

Although the party MPs have raised the issue in parliament,
whether the demand for judicial probe will form a part of election
campaign in Delhi or not will be decided by our party priesident,Bidhuri told IANS.

With 16.9 percent Original Inhabitants of Jambudvipa, that is, the Great
Prabuddha Bharath population, 15 councillors in the Municipal
Corporation of Delhi and 5.7 percent vote share in 2003, the BSP is
confident of recreating the success of its social engineering effort in
Uttar Pradesh.

Behenji (Mayawati) is thinking about sarvajan (everybody). BSP
will erase other parties from the political scene. People have come to
know about the real colours of the Congress and the Bharatiya Janta
Party who have not done anything for the people, except pay lip
service,said Bidhuri.



comments (0)
10/24/08
The Marvel of the Dhamma -Make me PM Write Down on the Wall was Dr. Ambedkar’s Sign ! Two Thousand Nine ! Will Be Mine ! - Says Ms Mayawati Bahen ! Good Read Uttar Pradesh : One year of development and progress Steps towards social Democracy-Orginal Inhabitants of Jambudvipa,that is, the Great Prabuddha Bharath SC/ST -Mayawati promises quota for upper caste poor (Lead) -Making science more interactive in Uttar Pradesh schools-Intel Launches World Ahead Program In Uttar Pradesh -Uttar Pradesh to debar over 300 schools from conducting exams-Uttar Pradesh school dropouts to be given industrial training-Boxing comes alive in Uttar Pradesh, girls too enter the ring-Uttar Pradesh government to hone madrassa students’ English skills-Uttar Pradesh madrassas to offer job-linked courses for poor Muslim girls-Mid-day meals bungle lands 17 Uttar Pradesh principals in soup-Uttar Pradesh plans drive against unqualified teachers -3 BSP’s Brahmin face in MP-BSP to announce remaining nominations soon -Maya: Govt to support families of slain cops
Filed under: General
Posted by: @ 7:27 pm





The Marvel of the Dhamma



Mayawati calls for Orginal Inhabitants of Jambudvipa,that is, the Great Prabuddha Bharath( SC/ST -OBC ) unity

Giving a call for unity between

Orginal Inhabitants of Jambudvipa,that is, the Great Prabuddha Bharath SC/ST  and Other Backward Classes (OBCs), Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Mayawati told a convention of her Bahujan Samaj Party here Saturday that such a caste combine could propel the BSP to power in New Delhi.

“It is high time
people realised that the plight of OBCs was quite similar to that of
downtrodden SC/STs, but the backwards cannot get what they deserve
unless there was change of policies at the national level,” Mayawati
told her
party representatives belonging to different OBC groups and SC/STs, drawn from all corners of the state.

“OBCs and SC/STs are like two children
of the same father; the only difference was that while SC/STs chose to
abide by Babasaheb Ambedkar’s advice right from the beginning,
realisation dawned on the OBCs much later after the Mandal commission
made its recommendations,” she said.

“Once we form our own government at the national level,
then we can frame our own policies to rid these castes of all their
backwardness,” she said, urging her
party workers to get down to roping in all such backward castes that were still not associated with the BSP.

She told her audience amidst cheers: “Brace yourself for the
coming Lok Sabha election in which we must grab the larger chunk of
Uttar Pradesh’s 80 seats. I am confident that by bringing together SC/STs, OBCs, minorities and upper castes under the common
BSP
umbrella, we will open our account in other states too. That is bound
to put us on a different footing when it comes to the formation of the
next national government.”

Mayawati in her 90-minute speech told her party leaders to remain wary of both the Congress and its allies.

The BSP chief did not mince words in criticising Congress stalwarts like late prime ministers Jawaharlal Nehru, Indira Gandhi and Rajiv Gandhi and also hit out at Rahul Gandhi.

“Remember, if you are benefiting today as an OBC, it is not because
of Nehru, Indira Gandhi or Rajiv Gandhi, but solely because of the
foundations laid by Babasaheb Bhimrao Ambedkar, that got translated
through the Mandal commission.

“And don’t get impressed by the gimmicks played of late by the
Congress Yuvaraj,” she added in an obvious reference to Congress
general secretary Rahul Gandhi.

With the “social engineering” in mind, she said the BSP’s rise to power in the country’s most populous state entirely on its own for the first time could not have been possible without the support of upper castes, whom she thanked profusely.

“Today, our motto is to take along with us all castes,
including the upper castes as well as religious minorities, as it was
their support that became crucial in our ride
to power in Uttar Pradesh,” she added.

Referring to her political mentor and party founder Kanshi Ram, she told her supporters how this “architect of social change” was never given his due by the powers that be.

“Kanshi Ram was not only responsible for translating Ambedkar’s
dream about

Orginal Inhabitants of Jambudvipa,that is, the Great Prabuddha Bharath SC/ST 

empowerment, but also for propelling OBCs to
positions of power. Yet, neither the Congress-led UPA (United
progressive Alliance) government at the centre nor the Mulayam Singh Yadav-led Samajwadi Party regime here agreed to observe mourning on the day of his demise.”

Mayawati promises quota for upper caste poor (Lead)


Lucknow, Oct 19 (IANS) With the next Lok Sabha
elections round the corner, Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Mayawati
Sunday promised to provide reservation to the poor among the upper
castes if her Bahujan Samaj Party (BSP) came to power at the national
level.

‘The reservation on the basis of economic and other
parameters will enable the upper caste community members to address
their problems, especially those related to poverty and unemployment,’
she said.

‘I have already written a letter to Prime Minister Manmohan Singh in this regard.’

Addressing a convention of upper castes here, Mayawati held the
Congress party ‘most responsible for the sorry status’ of these
communities.

Post-independence, the Congress has ruled the country and this state
most of the time, but it never thought seriously of addressing the
problems of upper castes, she said.

Accusing the Bharatiya Janata Party of misguiding the upper castes,
Mayawati said: ‘The BJP projects itself as a custodian of upper caste
rights. But during my three earlier stints (as chief minister) when BSP
ruled with the support of BJP, the latter always pressurised us to drop
the welfare schemes for the upper caste community members.’

Mayawati called upon the upper castes to join hands with Scheduled
Castes, Scheduled Tribes and Other Backward Classes ‘in order to get
the key to the central and the state governments’.

‘With this master key, all communities will be able to get rid of
their problems themselves by involving themselves in policy-making,’
she said.

Talking about the representation of various upper castes in the Lok
Sabha and the assembly, Mayawati said: ‘The BSP ticket will be given
only to those who can solicit full support of their community members.’

This was why more Brahmin candidates than those from other upper
castes were fielded in the last assembly elections, said Mayawati.

The chief minister also accused the Congress-led United Progressive
Alliance (UPA) government of not taking adequate steps for the
all-round development of the state.

‘For undertaking welfare schemes for upper caste sections and other
communities, I have written several letters to the central government,
but it has not replied to any of the letters,’ she said.

‘Had the central government released funds for the Rs.80,000 crore
(Rs.800 billion) package we sought, the development scene of the state
would have been altogether different.’

The chief minister said the BSP was the sole political outfit that can work for an-all round development of all communities.

‘BSP has no vested interests - unlike other political outfits, which
have become a puppet in the hands of industrialists and multinational
companies,’ Mayawati told the gathering.

The
Bharatiya Janata Party
(BJP) was pointlessly
trying to woo the POOREST of the POOR of the Original Inhabitants of
Jambudvipa, that is, the Great Prabuddha Bharath vote bank with their
pseudo sympathy.

‘It 
is only fooling the POOREST of the POOR of the Original Inhabitants of
Jambudvipa only to side track the reservation opportunities to the
reserved categories and to draw wedge between the communities in the
name of the so called CREAMY LAYERS and the POOREST of the POOR of the
Original Inhabitants of Jambudvipa,that is, the Great Prabuddha Bharath
and once the elections were over and won they backtracked and applied
TRIPLE NAMAS on the fore head of both

the so called CREAMY LAYERS in the name of MERIT and the POOREST of the POOR of the Original Inhabitants of Jambudvipa,

that is, the Great Prabuddha Bharath

‘Wehereas
the Chief Minister of Uttar Pradesh and the next Prime Minister Ms
Mayawati admits that 80 percent of the upper caste residents of 

Jambudvipa,that is, the Great Prabuddha Bharath are poor and would be eligible for reservation.

Thaindian News

Making science more interactive in Uttar Pradesh schools

Lucknow, May 23 (IANS) Learning science could soon become more
enjoyable in Uttar Pradesh schools as scientists at the Central
Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants (CIMAP) here are gearing to
train teachers to make the subject interactive and easier. “The move
intends to change the age-old science teaching methods in classrooms
that remain confined to the blackboard, mugging up facts, preparing
notes and passing examinations. Our new programme aims to equip
teachers with simple techniques that will assist students in
understanding science,” A.K. Singh, a scientist and CIMAP spokesperson,
told IANS Friday.

“Teachers, who will undergo our training programme, will learn to
set up simple projects to help students understand science-based
topics. It will help students understand the relation between the cause
and the effect,” he added.

The innovative training programme would be implemented in a phased manner in Uttar Pradesh.

“In the initial phases, we will train teachers of 15 schools in
Lucknow and Sitapur districts. Gradually, we will extend the programme
to other districts of the state,” said Singh.

Intel to promote computer literacy in Uttar Pradesh

Lucknow, Oct 24 (IANS) Uttar Pradesh has teamed up with Intel, the
chip manufacturing giant, for spreading computer literacy in the
country’s most populous state, an official said Friday.”By
collaborating with Intel, we would set up computer labs in nearly 5,000
schools across the state,” principal secretary of secondary education
A.K. Mishra told IANS.

He said the computer labs would be initially set up in various
schools of Lucknow and Allahabad districts and later to other
districts. The move will immensely benefit students and teachers of
rural and far-flung areas not enrolled in computer training programmes.

Unlike ICSE and CBSE, computer science is not a compulsory subject
in the Uttar Pradesh board. The government’s pact with Intel would be
the first step to make computer science a compulsory subject in the
Uttar Pradesh board, an official said.

Under the tie-up, Intel has already provided 50 computers.

Uttar Pradesh to debar over 300 schools from conducting exams

Lucknow, Oct 16 (IANS) In its attempt to curb copying during
examinations, the Uttar Pradesh government will debar over 300 schools
from conducting the state board’s high school and intermediate
examinations, an official said Thursday.”As there were repeated
complaints of mass copying, tampering and leak of question papers, the
300-odd schools would not be made examination centres for the next
board exams,” Uttar Pradesh board secretary Prabha Tripathi told IANS.

The blacklisted schools are in various districts including
Allahabad, Aligarh, Etah, Hardoi, Ghazipur, Ballia, Mathura,
Shahjahanpur and Kaushambhi, she added.

More than four million students across Uttar Pradesh had appeared for the high school and intermediate 2008 examinations.

The Uttar Pradesh board examinations are conducted by the Uttar Pradesh Madhyamik Shiksha Parishad.


Uttar Pradesh school dropouts to be given industrial training

Lucknow, Oct 10 (IANS) The Uttar Pradesh government has decided to
allow people with basic reading and writing skills to enroll for
industrial training programmes that are at present open only to those
who have studied upto Class 10, an official said Friday.”Special
short-duration courses will be designed for the unskilled school
dropouts. They will undergo training in 258 Industrial Training
Institutes (ITIs) across the state,” R. Dev, additional technical
education director, told IANS.

“The move intends to create better job avenues for school dropouts and uneducated youths,” he added.

Small-term courses varying from 60 hours, 120 hours and 720 hours on
dress making, footwear manufacturing, leather goods manufacturing,
automobile repair and others would be offered. The training programmes
are expected to start within the next two months.

At present, 50,000 students are enrolled in various ITIs across the state.

Boxing comes alive in Uttar Pradesh, girls too enter the ring

By Asit Srivastava

Lucknow, Sep 7 (IANS) Haryana lad Vijender Singh’s boxing bronze
medal at the Beijing Games has provided an impetus to the sport in
Uttar Pradesh. And it isn’t just the boys who are getting ready to pack
a punch in the ring — the girls are equally keen. Boxing training
programmes in the state have this year attracted as many as 50
aspirants as compared to only five or six in previous years. And the
numbers are going to increase, sources said.

“It is incredible. Call it the Vijender-effect,” said Abhishek Kumar, a boxing coach at the K.D. Singh Babu Stadium.

“The training sessions that are being organised here for the last 15
years have not witnessed such a response till date,” he added.

Interestingly, girls have also shown interest in joining the boxing training sessions, officials said.

About 10 girls have already applied for the training sessions. After
a medical test, they would be enrolled in the training programme,
officials added.

“It is heartening that girls are now opting for this sport,” said a
girl trainee Komal Gupta, a class 10 student, who aspires to become a
professional boxer like Laila Ali.

According to officials, barring a few states, including Mizoram,
Kerala, Sikkim and Nagaland, participation of women in boxing is nearly
nil.

In Uttar Pradesh, Lucknow is the only centre that offers regular
training programmes for aspiring boxers. Besides the K.D. Singh Babu
Stadium, boxing sessions are also organised at the Chowk stadium in
Lucknow.


Uttar Pradesh government to hone madrassa students’ English skills

Lucknow, July 28 (IANS) Students of madrassas will now be included
in the upcoming pilot project of the Uttar Pradesh government that aims
to hone spoken English skills of government-run primary school students
through radio programmes, an official said Monday. “The move intends to
expand the reach of the interactive English learning programmes through
radio communication,” said District Institute of Educational Training
principal Lalita Pradeep.

“We have already apprised the state’s minority department about the
spoken English radio programmes. The department has assured us to
extend all necessary help in this regard,” she added.

Initially, the `Angrezi Sikhe’ radio programme, which will start Aug
1, will be included in the curriculum of about 1,700 government schools
in Lucknow. The programme will later be included in the course of
schools in 17 other districts of the state as well, officials said.

In June, the state government had decided to start the spoken
English learning project in association with State Council and
Educational Research and Training (SCERT), Centre for Learning
Resources (CLR), All India Radio (AIR), DIET, Unicef and a Pune-based
NGO.

Uttar Pradesh madrassas to offer job-linked courses for poor Muslim girls

By Asit Srivastava
Lucknow, July 9 (IANS) Shedding their age-old image of imparting only
religious teachings, madrassas in Uttar Pradesh are all set to
introduce job-oriented courses exclusively aimed at making poor Muslim
girls and women self-reliant. To generate self-employment for
economically weak women and girls, the Uttar Pradesh Madrassa Board
will open training centres at a cost of Rs.110 million in various
seminaries across the state offering courses in tailoring, embroidery
and other trades related to craft work.

“Our upcoming scheme intends to help poor Muslim girls and women
stand on their own feet. Such vocational courses will immensely help
the community’s girls to earn their livelihood,” board registrar Shoaib
Ahmad told IANS.

The training centres would be set up in madrassas in over 30 districts in the state, he added.

Once these centres are established, around 3,000 girls and women
would be trained in different madrassas of the state, officials said.

The maximum number of four training centres would be established in
Kanpur district, followed by Lucknow, which will have three, board
officials added.

Other training centres will come up in Aligarh, Balia, Pratapgarh,
Kannauj, Ambedkar Nagar, Sitapur, Sultanpur, Azamgarh, Kushinagar,
Maharajganj, Balrampur, Barabanki and several other districts including
in the Bundelkhand region, officials said.

The centres will be set up in a phased manner. The foremost
criterion for establishing a centre will be the strength and status of
poor Muslim girls in a district, officials added.

Initially, the training centres will open in those districts having
a greater number of economically weak Muslim girls than other
districts, officials said.

To gain first-hand information about the status and strength of
Muslim girls, the board will soon initiate a survey in different
districts of the state, officials added.

“We are in constant touch with the state government, to start the
process of setting up the training centres at the earliest,” Ahmad said.

Uttar Pradesh has over 1,900 madrassas recognised by the Madrassa
Education Board and where around 170,000 students - the highest among
all Indian states - are enrolled.


Mid-day meals bungle lands 17 Uttar Pradesh principals in soup

Lucknow, Sep 26 (IANS) An inquiry has been initiated against
principals of 17 government-run primary schools in Uttar Pradesh’s Sant
Ravidas Nagar district for irregularities in the Mid-Day Meal (MDM)
scheme run for students, an official said Friday.”The anomalies in the
MDM scheme came to the fore during our surprise inspections of the
schools,” R.S. Dwivedi, officer in-charge of basic education in Sant
Ravidas Nagar, told IANS by phone.

During the surprise checks “we learnt that some of the schools were
not regularly providing lunch to their students under the MDM scheme.
In other schools, the food under the MDM scheme was being cooked in
unhygienic conditions,” he added.

Education authorities raided nearly 24 schools in Bhikripur,
Babusarai, Tulsipur, Kodhra and other villages to find out the quality
of lunch being provided to students under the MDM scheme, officials
said.

Sant Ravidas Nagar, better known by its old name of Bhadohi, is about 250 km from Lucknow.

About 150,000 schools are covered under the mid-day meal scheme in
Uttar Pradesh. Under the scheme, lunch is provided to students till
Class 8. Over 18.6 million students are enrolled under the scheme in
the state.


Uttar Pradesh plans drive against unqualified teachers


Lucknow, July 17 (IANS) The Uttar Pradesh government is planning to
launch a state-wide drive to check mushrooming of private schools with
unqualified and untrained staff, education department sources said
Thursday. “We have already summoned staff records pertaining to
educational qualification and training of teachers from the 7,000-odd
private schools in the state,” a senior official with the state board
directorate in Allahabad told IANS by phone.

The campaign against the private schools aims to ensure whether the
teachers, particularly the part-timers, are appointed according to
norms, the official added.

This move by the government comes after repeated complaints by Om
Prakash Sharma, leader of the teachers’ group in the state legislative
council.

“The move was long overdue. If the exercise is conducted in letter
and spirit, it would reveal startling facts about the functioning of
private schools,” Sharma told IANS.


http://www.efytimes.com/efytimes/29756/news.htm

Intel Launches World Ahead Program In Uttar Pradesh

 

Also announced a donation of 50 PCs for the benefit of schools in the state.


10/21/08
CPM backs Maya as PM candidate-Vote for BSP, says CPI-M!-Ban outfit involved in church attack - CPI-M, BSP stage walkout in Lok Sabha (Second Lead) -Ban MNS and arrest Raj Thackeray, demand Congress, Samajwadi Party and BSP -Ban MNS and arrest Raj Thackeray, demand Congress, Samajwadi Party and BSP -Mayawati’s concerted bid to Assure upper castes representation in government and in distribution of tickets if they are committed to the party
Filed under: General
Posted by: @ 11:17 am


Tuesday, October 21, 2008
CPM backs Maya as PM candidate

DH News Service, New Delhi:
Keen to push through their
Third Front agenda with Mayawati as prime minister, the CPM has asked
its supporters to vote for BSP in the forthcoming assembly elections
wherever the Left candidates are not in the fray.



The party has also demanded that a full-fledged winter session of the
Parliament be convened in December after the elections in six states.

In a review report submitted to the party’s highest decision-making
body — the Central Committee — the party leadership says, the cadre
should work for ousting the BJP from power in Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh
and Chhattisgarh while keeping the Congress at bay. “Apart from the
seats where we or CPI are contesting, we should vote for non-Congress
secular parties like BSP,” the “Report on Political Developments” says.
Noting that the BJP is trying hard to retain power in Madhya Pradesh,
Chhatisgarh and Rajasthan, the CPM said, “in these states, we should
call for the defeat of the BJP and the ouster of their governments, and
also oppose the policies of the Congress.”



Vote for BSP, says CPI-M!

New Delhi: Indicating further closeness
with the Mayawati-led Bahujan Samaj party (BSP), the Communist Party of
India- Marxist (CPI-M) has asked its cadres to vote for “non-Congress
secular parties like BSP” in the coming state elections where the party
and CPI are not contesting.


In its assessment of the current
political situation prevailing in the country, the CPI-M told its
cadres to work for ousting BJP from power in Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh
and Chhattisgarh while keeping the Congress at bay.


“Apart from seats where we or CPI are contesting, we
should vote for non-Congress secular parties like BSP,” the ‘Report on
Political Developments’ adopted by CPI-M central committee said.

“The BSP has emerged as a strengthened force after the
elections in UP. It has used its base among the Original Inhabitants of Jambudvipa, thatis, the Great Prabuddha Bharath to build a wider
coalition of caste politics. This sort of caste-based political
mobilisation is sought to be introduced in other states by the BSP,”
the resolution had said. 

CPI-M resolution on the
Congress was of the view that BSP will be an “important factor” in
places like Madhya Pradesh and Delhi, which are going to polls next
month
.

Ban outfit involved in church attack

Press Trust of India Posted: Sep 22, 2008 at 2342 hrs IST

LUCKNOW: Alleging that the UPA Government
at the Centre was unsuccessful in tackling attacks on Christians in
BJP-ruled states, Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Mayawati on Sunday
demanded a ban on organisations involved in the act. “We demand that
the Centre exercise its power to ban BJP offshoot organisations
involved in the attacks on Christians in Karnataka, Orissa and Madhya
Pradesh,” said Mayawati.

CPI-M, BSP stage walkout in Lok Sabha (Second Lead)

New Delhi, Oct 21 (IANS) Members of the Bahujan
Samaj Party (BSP) and the Communist Party of India-Marxist (CPI-M)
staged a walkout in the Lok Sabha Tuesday over the house’s alleged
inability to protect its members’ privileges and the anti-Christian
violence in Orissa.

The house had earlier seen two adjournments in the
day on various issues including the attack on north Indians by the
Maharashtra Navnirman Sena (MNS), the Tamil civilians caught in the
military conflict in Sri Lanka and the alleged discrimination against
Kerala by the central government.

When the house re-assembled after lunch, CPI-M leader Basudev
Acharya wanted the house to discuss the anti-Christian violence in
Orissa, but Speaker Somnath Chatterjee stopped him and said: ‘I asked
you (to speak) but your deputy leader (Mohammed Salim) did not allow
you to speak. I’ll allow you to talk later now.’

Chatterjee was forced to adjourn the house till 2 p.m. after BSP
member Brajesh Pathak alleged that he had been threatened by a Central
Bureau of Investigation (CBI) official on instructions by the
government before the July 22 trust vote.

Pathak demanded a probe into his allegation, which the speaker
refused to entertain. The BSP leader then wanted the matter to be
forwarded to the privilege committee of parliament.

CPI-M’s Mohammed Salim had then supported the BSP MP on the issue.
It was at this time that Acharya had started speaking on the communal
violence in Orissa, but could not complete what he was saying due to
the uproar in the house.

The BSP members, meanwhile, took up Pathak’s complaint again and
started shouting anti-government slogans and marched to the speaker’s
podium. Soon after, they announced a walkout.

N.N. Krishnadas of the CPI-M then urged the speaker to allow them to
speak since they had maintained decorum. But Chatterjee asked Bharatiya
Janata Party (BJP) leader Ananth Kumar to speak instead.

CPI-M leaders disrupted proceedings, called for two adjournment
motions - on the Orissa violence and the alleged negligence of Kerala
by the central government, and finally staged a walkout.

The Lok Sabha was first adjourned following chaos in the house as
soon as it assembled in the morning. While Rashtriya Janata Dal (RJD)
MPs shouted slogans to protest the attacks in Maharashtra by activists
of the Maharashtra Navnirman Sena (MNS) on north Indian job aspirants
at railway recruitment exam centres, DMK MPs wanted to raise the issue
of the protection of Tamil civilians affected in the military conflict
between the Tamil Tiger rebels and the Sri Lankan government.

MPs from Kerala protested against the alleged negligence of the state by the United Progressive Alliance (UPA) government.


Ban MNS and arrest Raj Thackeray, demand Congress, Samajwadi Party and BSP


New Delhi, Oct 20 (IANS) A day after Rashtriya
Janata Dal (RJD) chief Lalu Prasad called for a ban on the Maharashtra
Navnirman Sena (MNS) and the arrest of its leader, the Congress,
Samajwadi Party and Bahujan Samaj Party (BSP) Monday joined in the
demand terming the MNS’ attacks on non Maharashtrians as ‘regional
terrorism’.

‘The activities of the MNS have
become a serious threat to the security and integrity of our country.
The activities of MNS can be termed as regional terrorism for which Raj
Thackeray along with his activists should be arrested,’ said Minister
of State for Home Shakeel Ahmad of the Congress.

Railways
Minister Lalu Prasad had Sunday condemned the attack by MNS activists
on northern Indian candidates appearing for railway board examinations
in Mumbai and the tearing up of their answer sheets.

Lalu Prasad had called MNS chief Raj Thackeray a ‘mental case’.

The
Samajwadi Party equated the activities of the MNS with terrorists in
Kashmir and demanded the immediate arrest of Raj Thackeray and a ban on
the Maharashtra party.

‘There
is no difference between the MNS and the terrorists in Kashmir. Both
are spreading terror. Both are challenging the constitution of this
country. The government should immediately ban the MNS and arrest Raj
Thackeray to uphold the rule of law,’ said Kamal Akhtar, Rajya Sabha MP
of the Samajwadi Party.

The BSP also joined the chorus in terming MNS a terrorist outfit and demanding a ban on it.

‘The
Shiv Sena was born out of a feeling of hatred, earlier its target was
South Indians, and after that the target were Muslims. Now it is
spitting venom against north Indians. Organisations playing divisive
politics need to be banned,’ said Shahid Siddiqui, senior BSP leader.

Many north Indian candidates were injured and some had to be admitted to hospital after the MNS attack Sunday.

The
MNS was founded on March 9, 2006, in Mumbai after splitting of the
parent party Shiv Sena. Its president and founder is Raj Thackeray. The
party has courted controversy for its anti-north Indian propaganda and
use of violent means to pursue its political agenda.

Mayawati’s concerted bid to Assure upper castes

representation in government and in distribution of
tickets if they are committed to the party


Assures them representation in government and in distribution of
tickets if they are committed to the party

Upper castes should help form a BSP Govt. at the Centre

Job reservation for poor among upper castes




- Photo: Subir Roy





GREETINGS: Chairman of UP Advisory Council Satish
Chandra Mishra presenting a bouquet to BSP supremo Mayawati during a
party convention on upper castes in Lucknow on Sunday.

LUCKNOW: Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Mayawati on Sunday assured the
upper castes that they would be given adequate representation in the
distribution of tickets and in the government, but only after ensuring
their support to the party.

Ms. Mayawati made it clear that though the Bahujan Samaj Party’s
core ideology of social brotherhood would not change, certain aspects
of mobilisation were introduced to broadbase the party’s upper caste
base.

Population of the different upper castes would not be the basis for
giving them representation. Instead, their commitment to the BSP’s
ideology and support for the party would be the deciding factor, Ms.
Mayawati said.

Addressing the convention on upper castes here, she said adequate
representation was given to the Brahmins before the 2007 U.P. Assembly
elections only after she was assured that the Brahmin ‘samaj’ would
vote for the party. Stating that poverty and unemployment stared in the
face of about 80 per cent of the upper castes in the country, Ms.
Mayawati said they should contribute in the formation of a BSP
government at the Centre, which was the safest bet for improving their
condition.

The poor among the upper castes would be given reservation in government jobs, she said.

She said several decisions had been taken by the BSP government for
the welfare of the upper castes. Ms. Mayawati attacked the Congress-led
UPA government on its silence on the Rs.80,000-crore package, which,
she said, would have enabled her to take more decisions in the interest
of the upper castes. Ms. Mayawati exhorted them to join forces with the
deprived sections of the Bahujan Samaj for getting political power at
the Centre.


“Strengthen foundation”

The Chairman of UP Advisory Council, Satish Chandra Mishra, called
upon the gathering to strengthen the foundation of social revolution
fostered by Ms. Mayawati.

He said the social engineering formula was a success as the
non-Brahmin and non-Thakur upper castes like the Vaishyas were moving
towards the BSP.

comments (0)
10/19/08
Make me PM-U.P. to retain surplus staff -Ms. Mayawati said the decision on the land issue was to foil the Congress’ ‘political conspiracy’ to defame the government. -State government demanded a special economic package of Rs. 5000 crore from the Central government for the rehabilitation of the sick and closed industrial units in Rae Bareli district, Sultanpur, Amethi and Jagdishpur.
Filed under: General
Posted by: @ 6:28 am


The dispute over land for the proposed rail coach factory
in Lalganj between the Uttar Pradesh government and the Centre was
resolved on Saturday, with the former deciding to return to the
Railways the 189.25 hectares it had acquired.



Lucknow, dhns: UP Chief Minister and BSP supremo Mayawati on Saturday
exhorted her partymen to gear up for the next Lok Sabha polls to ensure
that the BSP gets a lion’s share of seats.




Addressing a conference here, Mayawati asked BSP workers to be ready in
view of the coming assembly elections in five states and later for the
Lok Sabha polls.




“The ills facing Original Inhabitants of Jambudvipa,that is, the Great Prabuddha Bharath and backward communities could be resolved only
if the BSP gets power at the Centre”, she said. “Hand me the master key
of power and I would ensure that your woes will be removed.” She had
made her intention clear soon after assuming the charge as the Chief
Minister in May 2007.



BSP government
decided to increase the income limit for creamy layer in OBC to Rs five
lakh per annum from the existing Rs three lakh.


U.P. to retain surplus staff

Special Correspondent

LUCKNOW: The Uttar Pradesh Government has decided that its surplus
staff would be accommodated in posts left vacant by employees who
retire after November 1 this year. The decision was approved by the
Cabinet on Saturday.

Chief Minister Mayawati said the Cabinet had also decided to
increase the State Advised Price of sugarcane for the 2008-09 crushing
season from Rs.125 per quintal for early maturing varieties to Rs.140
per quintal. She said this was the first time that an increase of Rs.15
per quintal had been made in the sugarcane price.

The Chief Minister said it had also been decided to increase the
creamy layer income limit for the Other Backward Castes from Rs.3 lakh
to Rs.5 lakh. The Centre, she added, had increased the income limit to
only Rs.4.50 lakh.


LUCKNOW: The dispute over land for the proposed rail coach factory
in Lalganj between the Uttar Pradesh government and the Centre was
resolved on Saturday, with the former deciding to return to the
Railways the 189.25 hectares it had acquired.

The Cabinet, presided over by Chief Minister Mayawati, decided that
the 189.25 hectares in Lalganj, Rae Bareli district would be given to
the Railways on a 90-year lease.

“We want the issue to be buried once and for all, and therefore, returning the land to the railways”, Mayawati said.

She said that the
railways had already acquired 940 acres of land in September and AICC
President Sonia Gandhi could very well have conducted the “bhumi pujan”
for the rail coach factory project. “It shows that the Congress is not
interested in setting up the factory but is using it as a pretext to
defame us,” she claimed.
The allotment was cancelled after District Magistrate’s report said that the villagers are angry over the allotment of land.

She said that in view of  the poverty and unemployment in   Rae Bareli
and Sultanpur districts, she had  written to Prime Minister Manmohan
Singh as well as UPA chairperson Sonia Gandhi, asking for a special
package of Rs 5,000 cr for reviving the sick  units there.



State government demanded a special economic
package of Rs. 5000 crore from the Central government for the
rehabilitation of the sick and closed industrial units in Rae Bareli
district, Sultanpur, Amethi and Jagdishpur.

Addressing a press conference after inaugurating the new media
centre in the Lal Bahadur Shastri Annexe Bhavan, the Chief Minister
said separate letters, to the Ministry of Railways pertaining to the
Cabinet decision on the land, and Prime Minister Manmohan Singh
demanding the special package, were sent.She announced that she would hold a ‘maha rally’ in Rae Bareli
to ‘expose’ the Congress.

Ms. Mayawati said the decision on the land issue was to foil the Congress’ ‘political conspiracy’ to defame the government.


comments (0)
10/18/08
Safe Release from all Anxiety:-We Will, We Will Seize You -Cong delays J-K poll as it fears drubbing: BSP - BSP confident of coming to power in MP: Mishra-Mayawati targets SP’s OBC base -Jamia Nagar vows not to vote for Congress or BJP-# Flash: UP cabinet decides to return land in Rae Bareli to Rlys. for building coach factory. -The country has a poor record on distribution of wealth both by the Congress Party at the Centre and the BJP at the State.-Former BSP member Isham Singh disqualified from Rajya Sabha-
Filed under: General
Posted by: @ 8:59 am


Safe Release from all
Anxiety:

The young deity Subrahma once asked the Buddha:
Always frightened is this Mind!
Always agitated is this Mind!
About present problems.
About future problems.
If there is a release from this Anxiety,
please then explain it to me…

Whereupon the Blessed Buddha declared:

I see no other real safety for any living being,


except from control of the senses,


except from the relinquishment of all,


except from awakening into Awakenment!



We Will, We Will Seize You

NEW
DELHI: Though political pundits claim that the role of the Bahujan
Samaj Party (BSP) will be limited to only spoiling the Congress’ hopes
of a hattrick in the forthcoming Assembly elections, the opinion in the BSP camp is quite different.

 

Party
leaders said they will not only script the “obituary” of the Congress
in the assembly polls, but also bury hopes of the BJP of making it to
power. Armed with an “impressive” share of SC population in at least 18
constituencies above 20% and banking on the “social engineering”
mantra, they claim their party will throw up many surprises.

 

Top
party leaders said the task of ticket distribution being completed well
before time had given candidates enough opportunity to constitute booth
level committees and they were ready to take the fight ahead, waiting
as they were only for the official party manifesto to be released.

 

In
the meantime, the issues to be addressed had been shortlisted. Price
rise, complete statehood, regularising unauthorised colonies besides
unemployment and poor living conditions in slums were going to be the
key points to be raised.

 

Explaining
that his party’s priorities were different from those of the Congress
and BJP, state party unit chief Brahm Singh Bidhuri said, “BJP and
Congress have only done lip service. That is what we are going to tell
the voters.”

 

Claiming
that all poll calculations will be proved wrong in Delhi as had been
the case in Uttar Pradesh, Bidhuri added, “We will tell people how the
entire sealing drive started during NDA rule.”

 

Party
nominee for New Delhi constituency Rajiv Singh said the social
engineering of BSP would bear fruit since the party had accommodated
every community and caste while distributing tickets. “Besides,
Mayawati addressing rallies ahead of polls would make a difference.
Even when she did not address a single rally during MCD elections, we
surprised everyone,” Singh said.

 

To
gain support from all communities, the party has given the most number
of tickets to Brahmins and Gujjars nine seats each. Aware that Jats
were going to play a key role in outer Delhi, BSP will field eight Jats
candidates. Vyshyas have got seven and Muslims have six tickets.
Punjabis have got tickets for four seats, Yadavs and Kshatriyas in
three each. The present status of the party’s list tally shows Sikhs
have got two tickets and Saini and Balmikis have got one each.

 

Commenting
on whether the party was “worried” about the recent Mayawati bashing by
Jama Masjid Shahi Imam Syed Ahmed Bukhari, Bidhuri said they were not
concerned about “baseless” allegations. “In municipal elections we gave
tickets to 27 Muslim candidates. In Delhi, BJP will do nothing for the
community and Congress should also spell oyt what it has done. We have
already finalised tickets for three Muslim candidates in the next
general elections,” he claimed.

 

Party
leaders also said they were banking on the support of poor and lower
middle class voters and lower rank government employees whom they
categorised as a “troubled lot”.

Cong delays J-K poll as it fears drubbing: BSP

The Bahujan Samaj Party (BSP) today (Oct 17) alleged
that the Congress is delaying assembly elections in Jammu and Kashmir
as it feared a drubbing at the hustings.

“BSP is ready for polls in Jammu and Kashmir, but the Congress is
delaying the process,” party General Secretary Narendra Kashyap told
reporters in Srinagar.

The Election Commission, which recently announced the poll schedule
for Delhi, Chattisgarh, Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan and Mizoram, had
deferred a decision on elections in the state.

When his attention was drawn that it was the commission’s decision
to delay the polls, he said it acted upon the report given by the
government on security and related issues.

“The Commission will take a decision based on the report of the
government. That is where the Congress is delaying the polls as it
fears for its future,” he added.

The party would decide on the number of seats it would contest once the election is announced, he said.

The BSP leader also announced expulsion of former party state
president Yashpal Bhagat and two other office bearers from the party
and said T K Langhe would now head the party unit in the state.

BSP confident of coming to power in MP: Mishra
Khargone (MP), Oct 18
(PTI) The Bahujan Samaj Party (BSP) today claimed it will form the next
government in Madhya Pradesh after the November 25 Assembly elections
as people were fed up with both the ruling BJP and the opposition
Congress in the state.
Both the BJP and the Congress are afraid of
the BSP, which will emerge as the leading force and not the third force
in the state, BSP leader and Uttar Pradesh Education Minister Rangnath
Mishra told reporters here.

The BSP has declared candidates for 130 of 230 constituencies.

Mishra, who is in the state to launch the poll campaign here, was addressing ‘Brahman Sammelan’, a party workers conference.

After coming to power, the BSP would work for development in Madhya Pradesh as it had done in Uttar Pradesh, he said.

The BSP leader, who is in-charge of the Sammelan, claimed that his
party was getting support from all sections of society and it would
raise issues including corruption, law and order and development during
the elections.

People in the state are fed up with both the BJP and the Congress, he said.

About one hundred Congress workers, including district panchayat
member Tarachand Yadav, Prakash Rayali from Kasrawad and Vijay Verma
joined the BSP at the Sammelan. PTI


Flash:
The UP state cabinet decided to
return the land for the
for building coach factory 
project at Lalganj town.


Asia ReView

Go to know more about Asia with us

Mayawati targets SP’s OBC base

 
Flagging off rally, BSP South India in-charge Suresh Mane said that the
rally intends to generate public awareness on “perils of Indo-US
nuclear deal” across the length and breadth of the country. Branding
the deal as  a “conspiracy to pledge the sovereignity of the country”,
he called upon the citizens to be vigilant against such destructive
measures.

“Management of nuclear waste is a Herculean task. It requires
investment of crores of rupees to set up waste management unit.
Further, nuclear power could meet only 6 pc of the total demand and
hence, Agreement is an exercise in futility. ”, he reasoned.

He claimed that India will not gain anything from the said deal and the
party has organised the rally  to sensitise people on the perceived
pitfalls of the Indo-US nuclear deal.

The rally is
scheduled to reach KGF via Narasapur, Malur and Tekal and further
proceed to Mulabagal, Srinivasapur, Chintamani, Shidlaghatta,
Gudibande, Gowribidanur, Chikkaballapur, Doddaballapur and reach
Devanahalli in three days.

On
20-10-2008 the Jeep rally from KGF will enter Yelahanka and pass
through Pulikeshinagar, Sarvagna Nagar, Shivaji Nagar, CV Raman Nagar,
KR Puram and Mahdevpura.Will generate public awareness on the perils of
Indo-US Nuclear deal, people’s apathy on the ever rising price rise and
unemployment problem which is because

The country has a poor
record on distribution of wealth

both by the Congress Party at the Centre and the BJP at the State.

Price
rise, regularising unauthorised colonies besides
unemployment and poor living conditions in slums were going to be the
key points to be raised in the Jeep Rally.

 

Explaining
that his party’s priorities were different from those of the Congress
and BJP, state party unit chief said, “BJP and
Congress have only done lip service. That is what we are going to tell
the voters.”

 

Claiming
that all poll calculations will be proved wrong in Karnataka as had been
the case in Uttar Pradesh.

.

 social
engineering of BSP would bear fruit since the party had accommodated
every community and caste while distributing tickets.

Vegetable prices to remain high

The high prices of vegetables and fruits in the City are expected to increase even further in the
coming days, reaching its peak


 This year, it is particularly obvious because of the high inflation rate.

Vegetable prices have
virtually hit the roofs in recent weeks. Carrots
are selling at Rs 48 per kg, tomatoes ( Rs 30 per kg), cauliflower,Cabbage has
risen  to Rs 15 a kg and beans  to Rs 29 a kg.Peas to Rs.150 a kg.
Brinjal (small) prices has doubled and coriander has seen a 300 per
cent increase. Among fruits pomegranate is the highest at Rs 150 per
kg. 

The price rise has hurt both sellers and buyers alike. Sellers have seen their margins
diminish with the rise in costs and buyers now have to fork out more money to meet their basic requirements.


The main reasons for the vegetable price rise is the rising inflationary trends in the
economy. 


Srinath of Reliance Fresh felt that only when there was a nationwide decrease in inflation levels would the food price levels come down.  The local vendors and Hopcom outlets  are also facing similar problems due to rise in vegetable price.

India has 200 million hungry people: report
Gargi Parsai

High levels of child under-nutrition and poor calorie count


NEW DELHI: Punjab, the granary of India, ranks below countries like
Honduras and Vietnam in terms of hunger levels while Madhya Pradesh has
the most severe level of hunger in the country, followed by Jharkhand
and Bihar, says a report prepared by U.S.-based International Food
Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in collaboration with Welthungerhilfe
and Concern
Worldwide, California.
“When Indian States are compared to countries in the 2008 Global
Hunger Index, Madhya Pradesh ranks between Ethiopia and Chad. Punjab, is below Gabon, Honduras and Vietnam,” says
the Country Report released here on Tuesday by G.K. Chadha, member of
Prime Minister’s Economic Advisory Council, on the eve of World Food
Day
.
“India is home to the world’s largest food insecure population,
with more than 200 million people who are hungry,” the India State
Hunger Index (ISHI) said. The country’s poor performance is driven by
its high levels of child under-nutrition and poor calorie count. “Its
rates of child malnutrition are higher than most countries in
sub-Saharan Africa,” the report said.
India, which scored 66th place in the 2008
Global Hunger list of 88
countries, does not have a single State in the ‘low hunger’ or
‘moderate hunger’ categories. Despite years of robust economic growth,
India scored worse than nearly 25 sub-Saharan African countries and all
of South Asia, except Bangladesh.
“Figuring amongst the 88 countries itself is shameful for the
country.. Policy-makers have to think about it. High GDP growth is not
sufficient. Inclusive growth is necessary. The country has a poor
record on distribution of wealth,”
Dr. Chadha said.
The India State Hunger Index measures hunger on three leading indicators and combines them into one index.
The three indicators are: prevalence of child malnutrition, rates of
child mortality, and the proportion of people who are
calorie
deficient. This approach is similar to the 2008 Global Hunger Index,
which includes India, and was also released on Tuesday for World Food
Day on October 16.
The ISHI found that 12 States fell in the ‘alarming’ category, and
one State – Madhya Pradesh – fell in the ‘extremely alarming’ category.
Four States – Punjab, Kerala, Haryana and Assam – were in the ‘serious’
category.
India’s slightly better performance relative to Bangladesh is
entirely due to better access to food in India, which in turn is a
consequence of India’s higher agricultural productivity. On the other
two components of the Global Hunger Index – child underweight and child
mortality – India ranks below Bangladesh.
In a few States, such as Kerala and Tamil Nadu,
calorie deficiency contributes almost as much as child underweight.
The report identified that strong economic growth does not
necessarily translate into lower hunger levels. Even States with high
rates of economic growth in recent years, such as Gujarat,
Chhattisgarh, and Maharashtra, have high levels of hunger, while States
with relatively slower economic growth, such as Punjab, achieved a
lower hunger level.
“Hunger and malnutrition are often rooted in poverty,” said Ashok
Gulati, IFPRI director in Asia. “Part of the solution rests with
increasing investments in agriculture and poverty reduction
programmes.”

How to eradicate poverty and unemployment problem in india ?


Jambudvipa, that is the Great Prabuddha Bharath is a vast country diversified geographically and humanly.We can
eradicate poverty and unemployment by making optimum use of our single
most vital asset, i.e. human resource or sheer manpower. It is the duty of the Government to distribute the nations wealth to all sections of the society.Supply healthy seeds to the farmers and distribute at least 10 acres of land to the tillers. Provide loans to all those who want to start bussiness and trade. The Government employees must be montitored to do their job honestly and sincerly.


India’s
employment perspective

Overview
of unemployment
Underemployment
Sector-wise
absorption of labour
Age
structure of population: 1997-2002
Trends
in  Labour Force Participation
Participation
in labour force by age & sex
Labour
Force Projections by Age Groups
Population
& Labour Force: 1997-2012
Projections
of work opportunities
Population,
Labour Force & Employment

Home

 







Overview

  • Economic reforms may have given a boost to industrial productivity and brought in
    foreign investment in capital intensive areas. But the boom has not created jobs. This was
    not unexpected. According to a report by the Washington-based Institute of Policy Studies
    (IPS), the combined sales of the world’s top 200 MNCs is now greater than the combined GDP
    of all but the world’s nine largest national economies. Yet, the total direct employment
    generated by these multinationals is a mere 18.8 millions -one-hundredth of one per cent
    of the global workforce.

  • India’s Ninth Five-Year Plan projects generation of 54 million new jobs during the Plan
    period (1997-2002). But performance has always fallen short of target in the past, and few
    believe that the current Plan will be able to meet its target.

  • India’s labour force is growing at a rate of 2.5 per cent annually, but employment is
    growing at only 2.3 per cent. Thus, the country is faced with the challenge of not only
    absorbing new entrants to the job market (estimated at seven million people every year),
    but also clearing the backlog.

  • Sixty per cent of India’s workforce is self-employed, many of whom remain very poor.
    Nearly 30 per cent are casual workers (i.e. they work only when they are able to get jobs
    and remain unpaid for the rest of the days). Only about 10 per cent are regular employees,
    of which two-fifths are employed by the public sector.

  • More than 90 per cent of the labour force is employed in the “unorganised
    sector”, i.e. sectors which don’t provide with the social security and other benefits
    of employment in the “organised sector.”

  • In the rural areas, agricultural workers form the bulk of the unorganised sector. In urban India, contract and
    sub-contract as well as migratory agricultural labourers make up most of the unorganised
    labour force.

  • Unorganised sector is made up of jobs in which the
    Minimum Wage Act is either not, or only marginally, implemented. The absence of unions in
    the unorganised sector does not provide any opportunity for collective bargaining.

  • Over 70 per cent of the labour force in all sector combined (organised and unorganised)
    is either illiterate or educated below the primary level.

  • The Ninth Plan projects a decline in the population growth rate to 1.59 per cent per
    annum by the end of the Ninth Plan, from over 2 per cent in the last three decades.
    However, it expects the growth rate of the labour force to reach a peak level of 2.54 per
    cent per annum over this period; the highest it has ever been and is ever likely to
    attain. This is because of the change in age structure, with the highest growth occurring
    in the 15-19 years age group in the Ninth Plan period.

  • The addition to the labour force during the Plan period is estimated to be 53 millions
    on the “usual status” concept. The acceleration in the economy’s growth rate to
    7 per cent per annum, with special emphasis on the agriculture sector, is expected to help
    in creating 54 million work opportunities over the period. This would lead to a reduction
    in the open unemployment rate from 1.9 per cent in 1996-97 to 1.47 per cent in the Plan’s
    terminal year, that is, by about a million persons - from 7.5 million to 6.63 million.

  • In other words, if the economy maintains an annual growth of 7 per cent, it would be
    just sufficient to absorb the new additions to the labour force. If the economy could grow
    at around 8 per cent per annum during the Plan period, the incidence of open unemployment
    could be brought down by two million persons, thus attaining near full employment by the
    end of the Plan period, according to the Plan.

  • However, there appears to be some confusion about the figure of open
    unemployment. The unemployment figure given in the executive summary of the Ninth Plan,
    gives the figure of open unemployment at 7.5 million while the annual report of the Labour
    Ministry, for 1995-96, puts the figure for 1995 at 18.7 million. An internal government
    paper prepared in 1997 put the unemployment figure at the beginning of the Eighth Plan at
    17 millions and at 18.7 million at the end of 1994-95. Perhaps the Planning Commission
    referred to the current figure while the Labour Ministry figure referred to the
    accumulated unemployment backlog.


    Underemployment

  • Open
    unemployment is not a true indicator of the gravity of the unemployment
    problem in an economy such as India, characterised as it is by
    large-scale underemployment and poor employment quality in the
    unorganised sector, which accounts for over 90 per cent of the total
    employment. The organised sector contributes only about 9 per cent to
    the total employment.

  • Underemployment in various segments of the labour force is quite high.
    For instance, though open unemployment was only 2 per cent in 1993-94, the incidence of
    under-employment and unemployment taken together was as much as 10 per cent that year.
    This, in spite of the fact that the incidence of underemployment was reduced substantially
    in the decade ending 1993-94.

  • According to the Planning Commission, the States which face the prospect
    of increased unemployment in the post-Ninth Plan period (2002- 2007) are Bihar, Rajasthan,
    Uttar Pradesh, Kerala and Punjab.

    Top


Sector-wise
absorption
of labour

Agriculture 62 per cent
Manufacturing & construction 16 per cent
Services 10 per cent

Sundry / miscellaneous jobs

12 per cent

Top

Table 1 : Age structure of population: 1997-2002

Age-group 1997 2002
0
- 14
37.23% 33.59%
15
- 59
56.07% 59.41%
60+ 6.70% 7.00%

Table 2 : Trends in  Labour Force Participation Rates(Per Thousand of Population)

Age
Group
Period Male Female
Rural Urban Rural Urban
15-29
1977-78
1987-88
1993-94
879
824
804
746
710
684
515
478
455
257
211
204
30-44
1977-78
1987-88
1993-94
990
988
990
990
987
986
619
603
600
324
301
300
45-59
1977-78
1987-88
1993-94
963
964
968
940
933
937
538
538
543
291
275
283
60+
1977-78
1987-88
1993-94
667
670
699
517
482
443
221
220
241
130
123
114
All
(15+)
1977-78
1987-88
1993-94
904
879
877
831
810
811
517
496
491
269
239
238

Note: Constituent shares in labour force in 1993-94 are Rural Male 0.499, Rural Female 0.270,Urban Male 0.182 and Urban  Female 0.049.

Table 3: Participation in Labour Force by Age Group and by Sex: 1997 - 2012(per thousand of population)
Age Male Female
1997 2002 2007 2012 1997 2002 2007 2012
15-19
20-24
25-29
30-34
35-39
40-44
45-49
50-54
55-59
60+
517
871
975
988
996
986
981
961
914
637
482 447

(a)

412 302
408
454
505
526
538
524
476
411
205
282 261

(a)

241
Note: (a) No change in labour force participation in age groups above 20 years.

 

Table 4 : Labour Force Projections by Age Groups




Age
Group
1997 2002 Growth
(Million) (%
p.a.)

15-19
20-24
25-29
30-34
35-39
40-44
45-49
50-54
55-59
60+

40.31
55.45
56.89
52.64
46.60
39.56
32.90
25.86
18.86
28.15
45.03
62.91
61.47
58.88
52.80
46.04
38.13
30.27
22.45
31.64
2.24
2.55
1.56
2.26
2.53
3.08
2.99
3.20
3.55
2.37

15+

397.22 449.62 2.51
Table 5: Population and Labour Force: 1997 - 2012(million - 1st April)

  1997 2002 2007 2012
Population 951.18 1028.93 1112.86 1196.41
Labour Force 397.22 449.62 507.94 562.91
   
Table 6 :  Projections of Work opportunities 1997-2002












Sector GDP Growth
(% p.a.)
Work
Opportunities
(Million)
1997-02 1997 2002

Agriculture

3.9 238.32 262.48

Mining & Quarrying

7.2 2.87 3.54

Manufacturing

8.2 43.56 48.22

Electricity

9.3 1.54 1.93

Construction

4.9 14.74 17.03

Wholesale & Retail Trade

6.7 34.78 41.67

Transport, Storage &
Communication

7.3 11.96 14.57

Financing, Real Estate,
Insurance and Business Services

8.5 4.55 5.68

Community, Social and Personal
Service

7.1 38.98 46.41

All Sectors

6.5 391.30 441.52
Table 7 : Population, Labour Force and Employment(Million)






  1978
(a)
1983
(b)
1994
(a)
8th
Plan
9th
Plan
10th
Plan
(1992-97)
(f)
(1997-02)
(f)
(2002-07)
(f)

Population
(c)

637.6 718.2
(2.19)
895.0
(2.12)
951.2
(1.89)
1028.9
(1.58)
1112.9
(1.58)

Labour
Force

255.8 286.6
(2.09)
368.5
(2.42)
374.2 423.4 478.8

Employment

249.1 281.2
(2.23)
361.5
(2.42)
367.2 416.4 474.7
(d)
Unemployment 6.7 5.4 7.0 7.0 7.0 4.1
(e)

Rate
(%)

2.63 1.89 1.89 1.87 1.66 0.86
(e)
Notes:1. Estimates of labour force and employment are on usual status concept and pertain to 15 yearsand above.2. Figures in brackets are compound growth rates in the preceding period.
	
(a) As on 1st January(b) As on 1st July(c) Population at the terminal year of the plan(d) Required to attain near full employment.(e) Unemployment reduces to negligible level by the year 2007 	  (f) Labour force, employment and unemployment are stated as annual averages during the Plan period.

Former BSP member Isham Singh disqualified from Rajya Sabha


New Delhi, Oct 17 (ANI): Former Bahujan Samaj Party (BSP) member Isham
Singh has been disqualified from the membership of the Rajya Sabha as
of July 4, 2008.
Rajya Sabha Chairman Mohammad Hamid Ansari today gave a ruling to this
effect in the House, after giving the entire background of the case.
Ansari said that he came to his conclusion after going through the case
thoroughly and listening to both sides.
In 2006, Singh had floated his own party against the interests of the
BSP. (ANI)

The Ease of
Serene Calm:

A radiant deity once asked the
Buddha:
Those who
dwell deep in the forest,
Peacefully living the Noble life,
Eating only a single meal a day,
Why is their appearance so serene?

The Blesses Buddha responded:
They do not trouble
over the past,
Nor do they crave for any future,
They live just with what is present,
Therefore are their looks so serene!

By urging towards the yet unreal
future,


By longing back into a forever lost past,


Fools verily dry up and wither away,


Like a green creeper cut at the root…



comments (0)
10/17/08
Nuke deal: BSP rally flagged off-BSP office opened -Vegetable prices to remain high till Diwali-BSP to gain in biennial Rajya Sabha election -BSP to hold Original Inhabitants of Jambudvipa, that is the Great Prabuddha Bharath convention in Lucknow -Mayawati has announced a public rally in Rae Bareli but the date has not been declared as yet.-Uttar Pradesh to launch urban poor housing scheme- Further rise in OBC creamy layer income ceiling likely- Three arrested for trading elephant molar teeth and ivory -Stock Report Tata Chemicals inaugurates first rural BPO in Uttar Pradesh -UPTU to woo engg students for other streams than IT-UP tells Delhi: Divert drain, we don’t want your pollution-Obama warns against overconfidence -“Ask States to enforce ban on manual scavenging”
Filed under: General
Posted by: @ 1:05 am


BSP office opened

BANGALORE: Dr.(Prof.) Suresh Mane hoisted Party Flag.The function started with Buddhist prayer by Buddha Vihara Banthejees.Shri.Ashok Kumar Siddhartha did Ribbon Cutting of Meeting Hall.Shri. Marasandra Muniappa welcomed the gathering.Report was presented by Shri. Bulla Subba Rao. Shri Ashok Kumar Siddhartha thanked Shri. Veer Singh for his intiative to get sanctioned by Mayawati Ji to buy the office for Karnataka and the effort by Shri. Bulla Rao to renovate the building in  two months time. Veer Singh, MP and general secretary of the Bahujan Samaj
Party, on Thursday inaugurated the BSP Bhavan on Cockburn Road here
built at a cost of Rs. 1 crore. Addressing the party workers, he said
that Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Mayawati had encouraged the State
unit to have its own building. Prof. Suresh Mane in his speech said that all the four southern states were now having their own office buildings.He said that ” We may be exist or not but the building will be there forever to carry forward the movement ahead. In his press conference he said the party would contest from all
the 28 Lok Sabha constituencies in the coming elections.Shri. Kamal Nabhan proposed a vote of thanks. — Special
Correspondent




BSP to gain in biennial Rajya Sabha election

By Amita Verma

Lucknow

Oct. 16: The Bahujan Samaj Party (BSP) is all set to emerge as the
biggest gainer in the biennial Rajya Sabha electoral for 10 seats,
scheduled to be held on November 21.

Three of BSP members are completing their term in November and the
party can now return to the Rajya Sabha with double strength. BSP MP’s
Gandhi Azad and Veer Singh are retiring next month while Isam Singh has
already been disqualified.

To make it to the Rajya Sabha, a candidate will require 37 first
preference votes and with 217 MLAs in the state Assembly, the BSP can
comfortably get five members elected. The BSP can also get its sixth
member elected with the help of some independent MLAs who would be too
willing to oblige and its second preference votes.

The Samajwadi Party will be able to get only two members comfortably
elected to the Rajya Sabha. The Samajwadi Party also faces the threat
of cross-voting since two of its MLAs, Gauri Shankar and Sandeep
Agarwal, have already joined the BSP and BJP.


BSP to hold Original Inhabitants of Jambudvipa, that is the Great Prabuddha Bharath convention in Lucknow

Lucknow :  Bahujan Samaj Party
(BSP) will now organise a meet here for Other Backward Classes (OBCs)
and Original Inhabitants of Jambudvipa, that is the Great Prabuddha Bharath ahead of the Lok Sabha elections
.

According to BSP officials, Chief Minister Mayawati will hold the convention for Original Inhabitants of Jambudvipa, that is the Great Prabuddha Bharath and OBCs Oct 18 in the state capital.

“The chief minister is likely to announce several schemes for the
upliftment of Scheduled Castes, Scheduled Tribes and OBC community
members during the convention,” a BSP official told IANS.

“Such conventions intend to unite people of different communities,” BSP state president Swami Prasad Maurya told IANS.

In the national Muslim convention, Mayawati announced various
schemes for Muslims, including setting up of an Arabic-Persian
University, schools in Muslim dominated areas, employment schemes and
other welfare projects for the minority community members
.

Lucknow: Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Mayawati on Wednesday
accused Congress president Sonia Gandhi of ‘hatching a political
conspiracy’ against the Bahujan Samaj Party (BSP) even as the Congress
condemned her remarks.
“It is a calculated move by the Congress party ahead of the Lok Sabha
elections. Sonia Gandhi and her party are misguiding people by
projecting that the BSP is against development,” Mayawati said


Mayawati earlier said, The central government is just not interested
in all-round development of the state as it has still not released a
penny of the Rs 800 billion package we sought for the uplift of the
state.

Mayawati has announced a public rally in Rae Bareli but the date has not been declared as yet.

Uttar Pradesh to launch urban poor housing scheme

Lucknow, Oct 7 (IANS) Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Mayawati will
Thursday launch a much-awaited, ambitious housing project for the urban
poor, according to officials.The launch will mark the beginning of
construction of as many as 110,000 houses that would come up under the
Kanshiram Urban Housing Project (KUHP), housing department officials
said here Tuesday.

“Apart from the housing department, the Public Works Department
(PWD) and various government construction agencies will work on the
project,” Housing Minister Naseemuddin Siddiqui said.

Under the scheme, the houses will be provided free of cost to the
urban poor -destitutes, widows and handicapped people - across the
state, the officials added.

For allotment, the state government has fixed 23 percent quota for
the Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes, 27 percent for Other
Backward Classes (OBCs) and 50 percent for the general category, they
said
.


Further rise in OBC creamy layer income ceiling likely

LUCKNOW: A political battle to retain
hold over Other Backward Classes (OBCs) is all set to be intensified in Uttar
Pradesh with the Mayawati gove

rnment considering to redefine the annual income
ceiling fixed for the creamy layer by the Centre.



If sources are to
be believed, the Mayawati government is not averse to increasing the income
ceiling of Rs 4.5 lakh fixed by the Centre for the creamy layer within the OBCs.




A senior official puts it: “We are actively considering the
issue and final decision would be taken at appropriate
time.”



The issue of the income ceiling needs to be revisited
and this could be fixed at Rs 5 lakh or a little more. This would widen the
scope of the job reservation


Three arrested for trading elephant molar teeth and ivory

New Delhi (PTI): Three persons have
been arrested for alleged illegal trade of elephant molar teeth and
ivory from Bijnor area in Uttar Pradesh.

A joint team of the Wildlife Crime
Control Bureau (Wccb) along with Uttar Pradesh police and Wildlife
Trust of India (WTI) seized ten kgs of molar teeth from the accused,
identified as Furkan, Bahajuddin and Munsif.

“Following a tip-off, a trap was laid
and a decoy customer was sent to finalise a deal. The accused were
caught red-handed while exchanging molar teeth in lieu of money in
Chandpur area,” Ramesh Pandey, Deputy Director (Northern) of the Bureau
said.

He said the two molars weighing around 5 kgs each were seized from their possession in the raid conducted two days ago.

“Trade in molar teeth is much more
serious crime compared to ivory as the former can be extracted either
by killing the elephant or when the animal dies.

“The seizure indicates that the
poachers have reach deep inside the forests,” Pandey said suggesting
that so far ivory trade has been known to be a major drive for elephant
poaching.

A case under various sections of
Wildlife Protection Act has been registered against the accused and

further investigation is on.

Stock Report

Tata Chemicals inaugurates first rural BPO in Uttar Pradesh

Babrala,
Uttar Pradesh: Tata Chemicals Society for Rural Development (TCSRD), a
community initiative arm of Tata Chemicals (TCL), today unveiled its
latest community initiative targeted at the youth of rural India with
the inauguration of Uttar Pradesh’s first rural BPO “UDAY” at Babrala
in Badaun district. The call centre was inaugurated by R
Gopalakrishnan, vice chairman, TCL and executive director, Tata Sons.

Situated
at Babrala, UP, close to the Tata Chemicals plant, the 125-seat call
centre lends itself to provide alternative employment to the dedicated
youth of rural India with an aim of creating self sustained community
development.

Speaking at the inauguration Gopalakrishnan said,
“The Tata Group is committed to sustainable development and believes
that large enterprises are built with the coming together of the local
populace which has helped us attain many milestones. We are confident
that this call centre in Uttar Pradesh will become a benchmark in the
way rural empowerment is nurtured by corporate India in the coming
years. Personally, I hope this paves the way for the industry to take a
concerted and pragmatic look at fostering development in rural India.”

Initially,
the call centre will employ 123 call agents, who have been selected and
hired from Babrala and the adjoining villages and will be further
scaled up to 200 agents by the end of the current fiscal. The call
centre will function as a back office logistic support for Tata Indicom
customers in the state of Uttar Pradesh.

Kapil Mehan, executive
vice president, CNAB, Tata Chemicals, added: “We are happy to
collaborate with Group companies in empowering the youth of today;
despite the general focus of development being urban India. We, at Tata
Chemicals, take pride in bringing about an equilibrium and equal
opportunity for the youth of rural India.”

Promoted by TCL, Uday
foundation was established in the year 2007-08 to promote, undertake
and assist directly or indirectly any activity that creates employment
for rural masses and promotes growth of rural economy and upliftment of
people in rural areas. Uday foundation established its first rural BPO
centre at the TCL facility in Mithapur, Gujarat.

Uday Foundation
will be responsible in identification and selection of human capital
and imparting of training which includes enhancing of skill sets as
prescribed by the statutory requirements. Additionally, TCSRD will
undertake the responsibility of facilitating capacity upgradation,
integration and delivery for the business process outsourced by Tata
Teleservices.

Source: Equity Bulls

Posted On: 10/13/2008 1:10:08 AM

UPTU to woo engg students for other streams than IT

Lucknow, October 12 As the world tries to come
to grips with the current financial crisis, over one lakh students of
information technology (IT) in Uttar Pradesh now face an uncertain
future.

Though experts believe that the situation will soon ease, the
engineering institutions and students are already looking for other
opportunities.

A case in this regard is the Uttar Pradesh Technical University
(UPTU). The university is mulling over an idea to encourage students to
take up other engineering streams from the new academic session.

UPTU Vice-Chancellor Professor Prem Vrat was delivering a
speech on “Information Technology Enabled Engineering Education:
Opportunities and Challenges,” organised by Computer Society of India,
Lucknow Chapter on Sunday
.

UP tells Delhi: Divert drain, we don’t want your pollution

Lucknow, October 12 The Uttar Pradesh Government has asked Delhi administration that it does not want its Shahadra drain to flow into Noida.

A delegation of senior officials from the UP government, including
the chief executive officer of Noida Authority, was in the Capital last
week to hold a meeting with Delhi government officials to push for
diverting the drain. The official reason cited by the officials was
that they “do not want Delhi’s pollution to enter UP”.

“We had a meeting with the CEO and senior officials from the UP
Irrigation and Flood Control. They have demanded that the Shahadra
drain should not flow through Noida and be instead diverted along the
Hindon directly into the Yamuna. Delhi and UP have now set up a joint
committee to look into the feasibility of the proposal. The committee
will also to consult the Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee, for
technical feasibility of implementing the proposal,” said Delhi Chief
Secretary Rakesh Mehta.

Officials in the Delhi government said the demand made by the
UP government might not be technically feasible. “The flow of the drain
and the topography of the area are such that it may not be possible to
divert the drain. In any case, this will be an extremely expensive
proposition. The diversion cost aside, once the drain is diverted,
water is likely to accumulate to the height of two metres or more on
the Delhi side, which will need to be pumped out at a very high cost.
But UP is so keen to have the drain diverted that they have offered to
bear this cost,” said a senior official. If the proposal is sanctioned,
Delhi will have to divert six kilometres — the Delhi-Noida stretch — of
the drain.

Sashikanth –

I just finished the last debate before the election.

Now the outcome of this campaign is up to you. I need your help to get our message out — and to get out the vote.

I wouldn’t ask for your support if this campaign didn’t urgently need it.

Your donation of $25 or more today is essential to our unprecedented get out the vote operation in these final days.

The most dangerous thing you can do right now is nothing. Your support and hard work are exactly what we need between now and Election Day.

While he didn’t mention the middle class, John McCain chose to repeat the false, negative attacks that make up 100% of his advertising these days.

The truth is that his choices say more about his campaign than they do about me.

But John McCain and his allies are not going to stop fighting — or attacking — until the very end.

We’re doing this a different way. Tonight I talked about the real problems ordinary people face during this economic crisis and concrete ways that I will create jobs, cut health care costs, build a new energy policy, and get our economy moving.

But time is running out. Our strength and our success in these last 20 days depends on you:

https://donate.barackobama.com/finaldebate

Thank you for all you do,

Barack

Sashikanth –

John McCain wants you to forget about his role in our country’s last major financial crisis and costly bailout: the savings and loan crisis of the late ’80s and early ’90s.

But voters deserve to know that the failed philosophy and culture of corruption
that created the savings and loan crisis then are alive in the current
crisis — and in John McCain’s plans for our economic future.

We just released a short documentary about John McCain’s role
in that financial crisis — watch it now and share it with your

friends:

http://my.barackobama.com/keatingvideo

Voters should know the facts about John McCain’s poor judgment
– judgment that has twice placed him on the wrong side of history.

Please forward this email to everyone you know.

Thanks,

David

David Plouffe
Campaign Manager

Obama for America

Obama warns against overconfidence

NEW YORK: Democratic presidential nominee Barack Obama warned his
supporters to guard against overconfidence on Thursday as he and
underdog Republican rival John McCain opened a 19-day sprint to
Election Day.


“Ask States to enforce ban on manual scavenging”

J. Venkatesan

Law
Commission Chief writes to Centre

NEW DELHI: Chairman of Law Commission Justice A.R. Lakshmanan has
written to the Union government to take up with six State governments
the issue of manual scavenging still prevalent in their States and to
ask them to enforce the ban.

In a letter written to Union Minister for Social Justice and
Empowerment Meira Kumar on October 14, Justice Lakshmanan pointed out
that according to a report of the Safai Karamchari Andolan, about 13
lakh of people in the country “carry human excreta for disposal.”

Quoting a letter received by him from the Uttar Pradesh Governor
T.V. Rajeswar in this regard, Justice Lakshmanan said that in 1993 the
Centre had enacted the Employment of Manual Scavengers and Construction
of Dry Latrines (Prohibition) Act and this Act was notified in 1997.

However, the States of Delhi, Madhya Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh,
Maharashtra, Rajasthan and Bihar had not notified the Act and the
problem was rampant in these States.

(The Governor had urged the Commission to consider issuing
directions to the States concerned for effective implementation of the
law banning manual scavenging.)

Justice Lakshmanan said: “I also the share the sentiments of the
Governor that carrying of human excreta is most inhuman and therefore,
a time limit should be fixed by which all State governments concerned
should certify that the provisions of the Act have been fully
implemented.

“Since the Law Commission is only a recommendatory body, I thought
it prudent to bring this important human issue to your kind attention
for taking up this issue with the States.

India has 200 million hungry people: report

Gargi Parsai


High levels of child under-nutrition and poor calorie count


NEW DELHI: Punjab, the granary of India, ranks below countries like
Honduras and Vietnam in terms of hunger levels while Madhya Pradesh has
the most severe level of hunger in the country, followed by Jharkhand
and Bihar, says a report prepared by U.S.-based International Food
Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in collaboration with Welthungerhilfe
and Concern Worldwide, California.

“When Indian States are compared to countries in the 2008 Global
Hunger Index, Madhya Pradesh ranks between Ethiopia and Chad. Punjab, is below Gabon, Honduras and Vietnam,” says
the Country Report released here on Tuesday by G.K. Chadha, member of
Prime Minister’s Economic Advisory Council, on the eve of World Food
Day
.

“India is home to the world’s largest food insecure population,
with more than 200 million people who are hungry,” the India State
Hunger Index (ISHI) said. The country’s poor performance is driven by
its high levels of child under-nutrition and poor calorie count. “Its
rates of child malnutrition are higher than most countries in
sub-Saharan Africa,” the report said.

India, which scored 66th place in the 2008 Global Hunger list of 88
countries, does not have a single State in the ‘low hunger’ or
‘moderate hunger’ categories. Despite years of robust economic growth,
India scored worse than nearly 25 sub-Saharan African countries and all
of South Asia, except Bangladesh.

“Figuring amongst the 88 countries itself is shameful for the
country. Policy-makers have to think about it. High GDP growth is not
sufficient. Inclusive growth is necessary. The country has a poor
record on distribution of wealth,”
Dr. Chadha said.

The India State Hunger Index measures hunger on three leading indicators and combines them into one index.

The three indicators are: prevalence of child malnutrition, rates of
child mortality, and the proportion of people who are calorie
deficient. This approach is similar to the 2008 Global Hunger Index,
which includes India, and was also released on Tuesday for World Food
Day on October 16.

The ISHI found that 12 States fell in the ‘alarming’ category, and
one State – Madhya Pradesh – fell in the ‘extremely alarming’ category.
Four States – Punjab, Kerala, Haryana and Assam – were in the ‘serious’
category.

India’s slightly better performance relative to Bangladesh is
entirely due to better access to food in India, which in turn is a
consequence of India’s higher agricultural productivity. On the other
two components of the Global Hunger Index – child underweight and child
mortality – India ranks below Bangladesh.

In a few States, such as Kerala and Tamil Nadu, calorie deficiency contributes almost as much as child underweight.

The report identified that strong economic growth does not
necessarily translate into lower hunger levels. Even States with high
rates of economic growth in recent years, such as Gujarat,
Chhattisgarh, and Maharashtra, have high levels of hunger, while States
with relatively slower economic growth, such as Punjab, achieved a
lower hunger level.

“Hunger and malnutrition are often rooted in poverty,” said Ashok
Gulati, IFPRI director in Asia. “Part of the solution rests with
increasing investments in agriculture and poverty reduction
programmes.”


Kindly visit:
http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org

comments (0)
10/15/08
Invite your gracious presence on the occasion of the opening of BAHUJAN BHAVAN (Head office of the Karnataka unit of the BSP) On Thursday 16th of October 2008 -Mayawati hits back, accuses Sonia of farce-Mayawati calls Rae Bareli rally to expose Congress -’I could have fulfilled Sonia’s wish of going to jail’-Maya returns fire-People have been suffering due to rising prices caused by the wrong policies of the ruling Congress at Centre while the BJP Government in the State has failed to fulfil its promise to ensure law and order and basic facilities such as roads, water and electricity-BSP says no to pre-poll deal in M.P. -Nodal centres to promote science in rural Uttar Pradesh-CM seeks probe into Delhi encounter -Five injured in Kanpur blast, police deny terror angle
Filed under: General
Posted by: @ 11:30 pm

BAHUJAN SAMAJ PARTY

BANGALORE - KARNATAKA

THE STATE CO-ORDINATORIN CHARGE OF
KARNATAKA STATE
AND
THE STATE PRESIDENT

Invite your gracious presence on the occasion
of the opening of

BAHUJAN BHAVAN
(Head office of the Karnataka unit of the BSP)
On Thursday 16th of October 2008

At
No.23, Cockburn Road
Near Cantonment Railway Station, Shivaji Nagar,
Bangalore-560071

At 3:0 p.m.

Followed by High Tea

Dr. Ashok Kumar Siddhartha             Marasandra Muniappa
State Co-ordinator                             State President

PROGRAMME

15:00 Hrs     Arrival of Guests
15:05 Hrs    Party Flag hoiting by Dr.(Prof) Suresh Mane
15:07 Hrs    Ribbon Cutting at the Main Enterance by
                    Shri. Veer Singh M.P.
15:10 Hrs    Buddhist Prayer by Buddha Vihar Banthejees
15:40 Hrs    Ribbon Cutting of Meeting Hall by
                    Shri. Ashok Kumar Siddhartha
15:45 Hrs   Commensment of Meeting
15:46 Hrs   Welcome Address by
                   Shri. Marasandra Muniappa
15:55 Hrs  Report Presentation by Shri. Bulla Subba rao
15:57 Hrs  Speech by Shri. Askok Kumar Siddhartha
16:05 Hrs  Speech by the Chief Guest Shri. Veer Singh M.P.
16:15 Hrs  Presidential Address by Dr.(Prof) Suresh Mane
16:25 Hrs  Vote of thanks by Shri. Kamal Nabhan
16:30 Hrs  High Tea
16:45 Hrs  Press Meet






This is the famous original sandstone sculpted Lion Capital of Ashoka preserved at Sarnath Museum which was originally erected around 250 BCE atop an Ashoka Pillar at Sarnath. The angle from which this picture has been taken, minus the inverted bell-shaped lotus flower, has been adopted as the National Emblem of India showing the Horse on the left and the Bull on the right of the Ashoka Chakra in the circular base on which the four Indian lions
are standing back to back. On the far side there is an Elephant and a
Lion instead. The wheel “Ashoka Chakra” from its base has been placed
onto the center of the National Flag of India.

Those who practice the Dhamma will begin
to know the Dhamma or to gain a feel for the Dhamma in the area of
meditation more markedly than in other areas, and more extensively. For
example, the gratification that comes from being generous is moving in
one way, the gratification that comes from maintaining the precepts is
moving in another way, the feelings of gratification that come from the
different forms of goodness are moving in their own separate ways. This
is called finding gratification in skillfulness.

But
all of these feelings of gratification converge in the practice of
meditation. We begin to feel moved from the moment the mind begins to
grow still, when the heart gathers its currents together to stand
solely on its own. Even though we may not yet obtain a great deal of
stillness from the inward gathering of the mind, we still find
ourselves gratified within, in a way we can clearly sense. If the mind
or the Dhamma were a material object, there wouldn’t be anyone in the
world who wouldn’t respect the religion, because the goodness, the
well-being, and the marvels that arise from the religion and from the
practicing in line with the teachings of the religion are things
desired the world over.

Goodness, well-being,
marvels: These are things the world has always desired from time
immemorial — with a desire that has never lost its taste — and they are
things that will always be desired until the world loses its meaning,
or until people become extinct, having no more sense of good and evil.
That’s when the world will no longer aspire for these great blessings.
The well-being that comes from the marvels — the Dhamma in the area of
its results — is something to which all living beings aspire, simply
that their abilities differ, so that some attain their aspirations,
while others don’t.

But the Dhamma can’t be
displayed for the world to perceive with its senses of sight, hearing,
smell, taste, or touch in the way other things can. Even though there
may be other immaterial phenomena similar to the Dhamma — such as
smells — still they aren’t like the true Dhamma that is touched by the
hearts of those who have practiced it. If the Dhamma could be displayed
like material objects, there is no doubt but that the human world would
have to respect the religion for the sake of that Dhamma. This is
because the Dhamma is something more marvelous than anything else. In
all the three levels of existence, there is no greater marvel than in
the Dhamma.

The Dhamma can appear as a
marvel, conspicuous and clear in the mind. The mind is what knows it —
and only the mind. It can’t be displayed in general like material
objects, as when we take things out to admire or to show off to others.
The Dhamma can’t possibly be displayed like material objects. This is
what makes the world lack interest — and lack the things that could be
hoped from the Dhamma — in a way that is really a shame.

Even
those who want the marvel of the Dhamma don’t know what the marvel is,
or what the profundity of the Dhamma is, because the mind has never had
contact with that profundity. The eye has never had contact with the
marvel. The ear has never obtained any marvel from the current of the
Dhamma, because the Dhamma can’t be displayed as a current of sound as
other things can. This is one obstacle that prevents people from
becoming moved by the Dhamma, that prevents them from fully believing
and fully entrusting themselves to the Dhamma in a way consistent with
the world’s long-felt hunger for well-being and prosperity.

Each
of the Buddhas who has gained Awakening and taught the Dhamma to the
world has had to reflect to the full extent of his intelligence and
ability on the myriad ways of teaching the Dhamma to the world so that
the world could see it as a marvel, inasmuch as the Dhamma can’t be put
in shop windows or in public places. This is because the true Dhamma
lies in the heart and reveals itself only in words and deeds, which
doesn’t excite a gratifying sense of absorption in the same way as
touching the Dhamma directly with the heart.

Because
there is no way to display the Dhamma directly, the Buddhas display it
indirectly through teaching. They point out the causes — the Dhamma of
conduct and practices leading to the Dhamma of results at this or that
point or this or that level; and at the same time they proclaim the
results — the excellence, the marvels of the stages and levels of the
Dhamma that can be touched with the heart, all the way to the highest
marvel, vimutti, the mental release called nibbana within the heart.

Every
Buddha has to devise strategies in teaching the Dhamma so as to bring
that marvel out to the world by using various modes of speech and
conduct — for example, describing the Dhamma and showing the conduct of
the Dhamma as being like this and that — but the actual Dhamma can’t be
shown. It is something known exclusively in the heart, in the way in
which each Buddha and each arahant possesses this marvel. None of the
Buddhas, none of the arahants who possess this marvel are in any way
deficient in this regard.

The marvel lies in
their hearts — simply that they can’t take the marvel that appears
there and display it in the full measure of its wonder. Thus they
devise strategies for displaying it in their actions, which are simply
attributes of the Dhamma, not the actual Dhamma itself. For instance,
the doctrine they teach in the texts is simply an attribute of the
Dhamma. Their act of teaching is also just an attribute of the Dhamma.
The actual Dhamma is when a meditator or a person who listens to their
teachings about the Dhamma follows the Dhamma in practice and touches
it stage by stage within his or her own heart. This is called beginning
to make contact with the actual Dhamma, step by step. However much
contact is made, it gives a sense of gratification felt exclusively
within the heart of the person who has gained that contact through his
or her own practice.

When it comes to
ingenuity in teaching, no one excels the Buddhas. Even so, they reveal
only what they see as appropriate for humanity. They can’t reveal the
actual Dhamma — for example, by taking out the true marvel in their
hearts and unfolding it for the world to see, saying, ‘This is the
marvel of the Tathagata, of each Buddha. Do you see it?’ This can’t be
done, for here we’re talking about the marvel of the purity of a heart
that was previously swamped with defilement like a heap of assorted
excrement, but now has become a pure, unsullied nature, or a pure,
amazing nature because of the practice of constantly and relentlessly
cleansing it. They can’t show that Dhamma to the world, saying, ‘Do you
see this? Look at it. Look at it. Feast your eyes till they’re full and
then strive to make this treasure your own!’ So instead, they teach by
using various strategies for those who practice, describing the path in
full detail, in terms both of causes and of results.

What
they bring out to show is simply the current of their voices, the
breath of their mouths. That’s what they bring out to speak, simply the
breath of their mouths. They can’t bring out the real thing. For
example, when they say, ‘It’s marvelous like this,’ it’s just sound.
The marvelous nature itself can’t be brought out. All they can bring
out is the action of saying, ‘That nature is marvelous,’ so that we can
speculate for ourselves as to what that marvel is like. Even though
this doesn’t remove our doubts, it’s better than if we had never heard
about it at all.

But the basic principle in
making us come to know and see the marvel of the Dhamma is that first
we have to speculate and then we follow with practice. This qualifies
as following the principles of the Dhamma the Buddha taught, and this
is fitting and proper. No matter what the difficulties and hardships
encountered in following the path, we shouldn’t let them form barriers
to our progress, because this is where the path lies. There are no
other byways that can take us easily to the goal. If our practice is
difficult, we have to stick with it. If it’s painful, we have to bear
it, because it’s a duty we have to perform, a burden we have to carry
while working so as to attain our aims.

The
Dhamma of a pure mind is like this: The mind is the Dhamma, the Dhamma
is the mind. We call it a mind only as long as it is still with the
body and khandhas. Only then can we call it a pure mind, the mind of a Buddha, or the mind of an arahant. After it passes from the body and khandhas, there is no conventional reality to which it can be compared, and so we can’t call it anything at all.

No
matter how marvelous that nature, no matter how much it may be ours,
there is no possible way we can use conventional realities to describe
it or to make comparisons, because that Dhamma, that realm of release,
has no conventions against which to measure things or make comparisons.
It’s the same as if we were in outer space: Which way is north, which
way is south, we don’t know. If we’re on Earth, we can say ‘east,’
‘west,’ ‘north,’ and ’south’ because there are things that we can
observe and compare so as to tell which direction lies which way. We
take the Earth as our standard. ‘High’ and ‘low’ depend on the Earth as
their frame of reference. How much higher than this, lower than this,
north of this, south of this: These things we can say.

But
if we’re out in outer space, there is no standard by which we can
measure things, and so we can’t say. Or as when we go up in an
airplane: We can’t tell how fast or how slow we’re going. When we pass
a cloud, we can tell that we’re going fast, but if we depend simply on
our eyesight, we’re sure to think that the speed of the airplane is
nowhere near the speed of a car. We can clearly see how deceptive our
eyesight is in just this way. When we ride in a car, the trees on both
sides of the road look as if they were falling in together down on the
road behind us. Actually, they stay their separate selves. It’s simply
that the car runs past them. Since there are things that we sense, that
lie close enough for comparison, it seems as if the car were going
really fast.

As for the airplane, there’s
nothing to make comparisons with, so it looks as if the plane were
dawdling along, as if it were going slower than a car, even though it’s
actually many times faster.

This is how it is when we compare the mind of an ordinary run-of-the-mill person with the mind of the Buddha. Whatever the Buddha says is good and excellent, we ordinary people tend to say that it’s not.
Whatever we like, no matter how vile, we say that it’s good. We don’t
admit the truth, in the same way as thinking that a car goes faster
than an airplane.

The practice of attending to the mind is something very important. Try to develop mindfulness (sati)
and discernment so that they can keep up with the things that come and
entangle the mind. By and large, the heart itself is the instigator,
creating trouble continually, relentlessly. We then fall for the
preoccupations the heart turns out — and this makes us agitated, upset,
and saddened, all because of the thoughts formed by the heart.

These
come from the heart itself, and the heart itself is what falls for
them, saying that this is this, and that is that, even though the
things it names ‘this’ and ‘that’ merely exist in line with their
nature. They have no meaning in and of themselves, that they are like
‘’this’ or ‘that.’ The mind simply gives them meanings, and then falls
for its own meanings, making itself glad or sad over those things
without end. Thus the stress and suffering that result from
thought-formations have no end, no point of resolution, just as if we
were floating adrift in the middle of the sea waiting to breathe our
last breath.

The Buddhas all reached
Awakening here in this human world because the human world is rich in
the Noble Truths. It’s where they are plain to see. The Noble Truth of
stress (dukkha) lies in the human body. Human beings know about
stress — because they’re smarter than common animals. The Noble Truth
of the origin of stress: This lies in the human heart. The Noble Truth
of the path — the path of practice to cure defilement (kilesa), craving (tanha), and mental effluents (asava),
which are the things that produce stress: This, human beings also know.
What is the path? To put it briefly: virtue, concentration, and
discernment. These things human beings know and can put into practice.
The Noble Truth of the cessation of stress: This, human beings also
know. No matter which of these truths, all human beings know them —
although they may not know how to behave toward them or take interest
in behaving in line with them, in which case there is no way the Dhamma
can help them at all.

The Buddhas thus taught
the Dhamma in the human world, because the human world lies in the
center of all the levels of existence. We have been born in the center
of existence, in the midst of the religion. We should conform correctly
to the central point of the religion, so as to comprehend the
religion’s teachings that lie in the center of our heart.

The
superlative Dhamma lies right here. It doesn’t lie anywhere else. The
mind is what can reach the Dhamma. The mind is what knows all dhammas.
The affairs of the Dhamma, then, do not lie beyond the mind, which is a
fitting vessel for them. Good, evil, pleasure, pain: The mind knows
these things before anything else knows them, so we should develop
mindfulness and discernment to be resourceful, to keep up with the
events that are always becoming involved with the mind in the course of
each day.

If we’re intent on investigating
the origin of stress, which fans out from our various
thought-formations, we will find that it arises without stop. It arises
right here in the mind. It’s fashioned right here. Even though we try
to make it quiet, it won’t be still. Why? Because of the ‘unquietness’,
the thoughts with which the mind disturbs itself, which it forms and
sends out towards its preoccupations (arammana) all the time.
Once the mind sends out its thoughts, it then gathers in stress for
itself. It keeps at it, in and out like this. What goes out is the origin of stress, and what comes back in is stress.
In other words, thoughts form and go out as the origin of stress, and
when the results come back to the heart, they’re stressful. These
things are constantly being manufactured like this all the time.

When
we want the mind to have even just a little bit of calm, we really have
to force it; and even then these things still manage to drive the mind
into forming thoughts whenever we let down our guard. This is how it is
with the origin of stress, which is constantly producing suffering. It
lies in the heart and is always arising. For this reason, we must use
mindfulness and discernment to diagnose and remedy the origin of
stress, to keep an eye out for it, and to snuff it out right there,
without being negligent. Wherever we sit or stand — whatever our
activity — we keep watch over this point, with mindfulness alert to it,
and discernment unraveling it so as to know it constantly for what it
truly is.

All those who practice to remove
defilement practice in this way. In particular, those who are ordained
practice by going into the forest to look for a place conducive to
their striving in order to wipe out this very enemy. Even when they
stay in inhabited areas, or wherever they go, wherever they stay, they
keep their attention focused continually, step by step, on the
persistent effort to remove and demolish the origin of stress, which is
a splinter, a thorn in the heart. Such people are bound to develop more
and more ease and well-being, step by step, in proportion to the
persistence of their striving.

We can see
clearly when the mind is still and settles down: Thought-formations are
still, or don’t exist. Turmoil and disturbances don’t occur. The stress
that would otherwise result doesn’t appear. When the mind is quiet,
stress is also quiet. When thought-formations are quiet, the origin of
stress is also quiet. Stress is also quiet. All that remains at that
moment is a feeling of peace and ease.

The
war between the mind and the defilements causing stress is like this.
We have to keep fighting with persistence. We have to use mindfulness
and discernment, conviction and persistence to contend with the war
that disturbs and ravages the mind, making it stagger and reel within.
The disturbances will then gradually be suppressed. Even when there is
only a moment of quiet, we will come to see the harm of the
thought-formations that are constantly disturbing us. At the same time,
we will see the benefits of mental stillness — that it’s a genuine
pleasure. Whether there is a lot of stillness or a little, pleasure
arises in proportion to the foundation of stillness or the strength of
the stillness, which in the texts is called samadhi, or concentration.

A
mind centered and still is called a mind in concentration, or a mind
gathered in concentration. This is what genuine concentration is like
inside the heart. The names of the various stages of concentration are
everywhere, but actual concentration is inside the heart. The heart is
what gives rise to concentration. It produces it, makes it on its own.
When concentration is still, the mind experiences cool respite and
pleasure. It has its own foundation set firmly and solidly within.

It’s
as if we were under an eave or under the cooling shade of a tree. We’re
comfortable when it rains, we’re comfortable when the sun is out,
because we don’t have to be exposed to the sun and rain. The same holds
true with a mind that has an inner foundation of stillness: It’s not
affected by this preoccupation or that, which would otherwise disturb
and entangle it repeatedly, without respite. This is because stillness
is the heart’s dwelling — ‘concentration,’ which is one level of home
for the heart.

Discernment (pañña) is
ingenuity, sound judgment, evaluating causes and effects within and
without; above, below, and in between — inside the body — all the way
to the currents of the mind that send out thoughts from various angles.
Mindfulness and discernment keep track of these things, investigating
and evaluating them so as to know causes and effects in terms of the
heart’s thought-formations, or in terms of the nature of sankhara within us, until we see the truth of each of these things.

Don’t go investigating these things off target, by being clever with labels and interpretations that go against the truth — because in the investigation of phenomena, we investigate in line with the truth. We don’t resist the truth, for that would simply enhance the defilements causing stress at the very moment we think we’re investigating phenomena so as to remove them.

Birth
we have already experienced. As for old age, we’ve been growing old
from the day of our birth, older and older, step by step. Whatever our
age, that’s how long we’ve been growing old, until we reach the end of
life. When we’re old to the nth degree, we fall apart. In other words,
we’ve been growing old from the moment of birth — older by the day, the
month, the year — older and older continually. We call it ‘growing up’,
but actually it’s growing old.

See? Investigate it for what it really is. This is the great highway — the way of nature. Don’t resist it.
For example, the body is growing old, but we don’t want it to be old.
We want it always to be young. This is called resisting the truth —
which is stress. Even when we try to resist it, we don’t get anywhere.
What do we hope to gain by resisting it and creating stress for
ourselves? Actually, we gain nothing but the stress that comes from
resisting the truth.

Use discernment to
investigate just like this. Whenever pain arises in any part of the
body, if we have medicine to treat it, then we treat it. When the
medicine can take care of it, the body recovers. When the medicine
can’t, it dies. It goes on its own. There’s no need for us to force it
not to die, or to stay alive for so-and-so many years, for that would
be an absurdity. Even if we forced it, it wouldn’t stay. We wouldn’t
get any results and would just be wearing ourselves out in vain. The
body has to follow its own natural principles.

When we investigate in line with its truth this way, we can be at our ease.
Wherever there’s pain, keep aware of it continually in line with its
truth. Whether it hurts a lot or a little, keep aware of its
manifestations until it reaches the ultimate point of pain — the death
of the body — and that’s as far as it goes.

Know it in line with its truth. Don’t resist it. Don’t set up any desires,
because the setting up of desire is a deficiency, a hunger. And hunger,
no matter when or what the sort, is pain: Hunger for sleep is pain,
hunger for food is pain, hunger for water is pain. When was it ever a
good thing?

The hunger, the desires that
arise, wanting things to be like this, wanting them to be like that:
These are all nothing but disturbances, issues that give rise to stress
and pain. This is why the Buddha doesn’t have us resist the truth.

Use your discernment to investigate, to contemplate in line with the natural principles of things as they already are. This is called discernment that doesn’t fly in the face of truth — and the heart can then be at ease.

We
study the four ‘Noble Truths’ here in our body. In other words, we
study birth, aging, illness, and death, all of which lie in this single
heap of elements (dhatu) without ever leaving it. Birth is an
affair of these elements. Growing up or growing old, it’s old right
here. When there’s illness, it manages to be ill right here, in one
part or another. When death comes, it dies right here. So we have to
study right here — where else would we study? We have to study and know
the things that involve us directly before we study anything else. We
have to study them comprehensively and to completion — studying our own
birth, our aging, our illness and pain, and completing our study of our own death. That’s when we’ll be wise — wise to all the events around us.

People who know the Dhamma through practicing so that they are wise to the events that occur to themselves, do not flinch in the face of any of the conventional realities of the world at all.
This is how it is when we study the Dhamma, when we know and see the
Dhamma in the area of the heart — in other words, when we know rightly
and well. ‘Mindfulness and discernment that are wise all around
themselves’ are wise in this way, not wise simply from being able to remember.
They have to be wise in curing doubt, in curing the recalcitrance of
the heart, as well as in curing their own attachments and false
assumptions so as to leave only a nature that is pure and simple.
That’s when we’ll be really at ease, really relieved.

Let the khandhas be khandhas
pure and simple in their own way, without our messing with them,
without our struggling with them for power, without our forcing or
coercing them to be like this or like that. The khandhas are then khandhas,
the mind is then the mind, each with its own separate reality, each not
infringing on the others as it used to. Each performs its own duties.
This is called khandhas pure and simple, the mind pure and
simple, without any conventional realities adulterating them. What
knows is what knows, the elements are elements, the khandhas are khandhas.

Whatever
things may break apart, let them break apart. We have already known
them clearly with our discernment. We have no doubts. We’ve known them
in advance, even before they die, so when death comes, what doubts can
we have? — especially now that they display the truth of their nature
for us to see clearly. This is called studying the Dhamma, practicing
the Dhamma. To study and practice this way is to follow the same way
that sages have practiced and known before us.

All of these conditions are matters of conventional reality — matters of the elements, the khandhas, or the sense media (ayatana). The four khandhas, the five khandhas,
whatever, are individual conditions, individual conditions that are
separated in line with conventions. Discernment is also a condition;
and mindfulness, another condition — conditions of the heart — but
they’re Dhamma, means of curing the mind that is clouded and obscured,
means of washing away the things that cloud and obscure it, until
radiance appears through the power of the discernment that cleanses the
heart. Once the heart is radiant, in the next step it becomes pure.

Why
is it pure? Because all impurities have fallen away from it. The
various misconstruings that are an affair of defilement are all gone
from the heart, so the heart is pure. This pure heart means that we
have completed our study of ourselves, in line with the statement of
the teaching:

vusitam brahmacariyam katam karaniyam:

‘The task of the religion is done, the holy life is complete, there is no further task to be done.’

When
the tasks we have had to do — abandoning and striving — are done to
completion, we know right here, because delusion lay right here in the
heart. We study and practice simply to cure our own delusion. Once we
know right here, and delusion is gone, what else is there to know? —
for beyond this there is nothing further to know. What else is there
for us to be deluded about? We’re no longer deluded, because we know
fully all around.

This very state of mind:
When at the beginning I referred to the superlative Dhamma, the
marvelous Dhamma, I was referring to this very state of mind, this very
Dhamma — but it’s something known exclusively within itself, and exists
only within itself. It’s marvelous — this we know within our own mind.
It’s superlative — this we also know within our own mind. We can’t take
it out or unfurl it like other things for other people to see.

So
if you want to have any Noble Treasures to show for yourself, practice.
Remove all those dirty stains from the heart, and the superlative
things I have mentioned will appear by their own nature — in other
words, they will appear in the mind.

This is
called completing your study of the Dhamma; and your study of the world
is completed right here. The ‘world’ means the world of elements, the
world of the khandhas that lie right here with each of us, which are more important than the worlds of elements and khandhas belonging to other people, because this world of elements and khandhas lies with us and has been weighing on the heart all along.

When we have studied the Dhamma to the attainment of release, that’s all there is to study. We’ve studied the world to completion and studied the Dhamma in full. Our doubts are gone,
and there is nothing that will ever make us doubt again. As the Buddha
exclaimed, ‘When dhammas become apparent to the Brahman, earnest and
absorbed, doubt comes to an end because the conditions, the factors for
continued being and birth, come to an end.’

Once
we have reached this level, we can live wherever we like. The war is
ended — the war between the mind and defilement, or the war between
Dhamma and defilement, is over. This is where we dismantle being and
birth. This is where we dismantle the heap of suffering in the round of rebirth — right here in the heart.
Since the heart is the wanderer through the cycle of rebirth, we have
to dismantle things right here, to know them right here. Once we know,
that’s the end of all problems right here.

In
this whole wide world there are no problems. The only problem was the
issue of the heart that was deluded about itself and about the things
that became involved with it. Now that it has completely rectified the
way it is involved with things, there is nothing left — and that’s the
end of the problem.

From this point on, there are no more problems to trouble the heart until the day of its total nibbana. This is how the Dhamma is studied to completion. The world — the world of elements and khandhas — is studied to completion right here.

So
keep striving in order to see the marvel described at the beginning,
which was described in line with the truth with no aspect to invite any
doubt.

The Buddha and the Noble Disciples
have Dhamma filling their hearts to the brim. You are a disciple of the
Tathagata, with a mind that can be made to show its marvelousness
through the practice of making it pure, just like the Buddha and the
Noble Disciples. So try to make it still and radiant, because the heart
has long lain buried in the mud. As soon as you can see the harm of the
mud and grow tired of it, you should urgently wake up, take notice, and
exert yourself till you can manage to make your way free. Nibbana is holding its hand out, waiting for you. Aren’t you going to come out?

Rebelliousness
is simply distraction. The end of rebelliousness is stillness. When the
heart is still, it’s at ease. If it’s not still, it’s as hot as fire.
Wherever you are, everything is hot and troubled. Once it is still,
then it’s cool and peaceful wherever you are — cool right here in the
heart. So make the heart cool with the practice, because the heat and
trouble lie with the heart. The heat of fire is one thing, but the heat
of a troubled heart is hotter than fire. Try to put out the fires of
defilement, craving, and mental effluents burning here in the heart, so
that only the phenomenon of genuine Dhamma remains. Then you will be
cool and at peace, everywhere and always.

Jambudvipa, that is the Great Prabuddha Bharath

Aryan tribes from the northwest infiltrated onto the Indian subcontinent

about 1500 B.C.; their merger with the earlier Dravidian inhabitants

created the classical Indian culture. The Maurya Empire of the 4th

and 3rd centuries B.C. - which reached its zenith under ASHOKA –

united much of South Asia. The Golden Age ushered in by the Gupta

dynasty (4th to 6th centuries A.D.) saw a flowering of Indian science,

art, and culture. Arab incursions starting in the 8th century and

Turkic in the 12th were followed by those of European traders,

beginning in the late 15th century. By the 19th century, Britain

had assumed political control of virtually all Indian lands. Indian

armed forces in the British army played a vital role in both World Wars.

Nonviolent resistance to British colonialism led by Mohandas GANDHI

and Jawaharlal NEHRU brought independence in 1947. The subcontinent

was divided into the secular state of India and the smaller Muslim

state of Pakistan. A third war between the two countries in 1971

resulted in East Pakistan becoming the separate nation of Bangladesh.

India’s nuclear weapons testing in 1998 caused Pakistan to conduct

its own tests that same year. The dispute between the countries

over the state of Kashmir is ongoing, but discussions and

confidence-building measures have led to decreased tensions

since 2002. Despite impressive gains in economic investment

and output, India faces pressing problems such as significant

overpopulation, environmental degradation, extensive poverty,

and ethnic and religious strife.








Mayawati the true heir of Kanshi Ram

Coming October 9 was observed as
the second Parinirvana Day of Kanshi Ram, the founder of BAMSEF, DS4
and most importantly, Bahujan Samaj Party, which rules Uttar Pradesh
today..

KANSHI
RAM was born on March 15, 1934, in a village in Ropar district
of Punjab. Despite his Original Inhabitant of Jambudvipa, that is the
Great Prabuddha Bharath roots, he earned a bachelor’s degree in
science from the Government College at Ropar. Soon after, he was hired
by Survey of India through a quota system for Original Inhabitants of
Jambudvipa, that is the Great Prabuddha Bharath. In 1965, than
working in the nation’s defence ministry, he quit his job after
becoming involved in a caste discrimination case.
Thereafter,
the uplift of Original Inhabitants of Jambudvipa, that is the Great
Prabuddha Bharath and creation of Bahujan Samaj Party (BSP) in Uttar
Pradesh,
India’s most populous state, was the dream project of the Original
Inhabitant of Jambudvipa, that is the Great Prabuddha Bharath leader.
He succeeded in his project and the emergence of BSP, signalled a
tectonic shift away from the supremacy of the Congress Party, which
ruled India almost without interruption, since Independence in 1947.

It
was a great victory for the Original Inhabitant of Jambudvipa, that is
the Great Prabuddha Bharath leader, that his political prodigy,
Mayawati, took over as the state’s chief minister - the first Original
Inhabitant of Jambudvipa, that is the Great Prabuddha Bharath
woman to lead a government at any level in India.

Mayawati, who, held that post for less than a year in 2001,
managed a 2/3rd majority in assembly to form a stable government in UP
after a decade
Interestingly, Kanshi Ram had declared
that he will accept Dhamma on October 14, 2006. Unfortunately, he
passed away earlier.

Mayawati hits back, accuses Sonia of farce


LISTEN, SONIA: UP Chief Minister Mayawati accuses Congress chief of votebank politics.


Lucknow:
UP Chief Minister Mayawati on Wednesday accused the Congress of
defaming her and stalling her government’s development plans—the latest
round of acrimony between her and Congress chief Sonia Gandhi.

“The
Congress has opposed our development schemes such as Ganga Expressway
from Noida to Ballia,” said Mayawati at a press conference in Lucknow
to answer Sonia’s allegation.

The
Congress chief alleged on Tuesday the UP Government tried to block her
rally in Rai Bareli and took back land allotted for a rail coach
factory because it was not interested in the state’s development. “If
need be, I am also prepared to go to jail,” Sonia had said when asked
whether she would support a ‘jail bharo agitation’ by the Congress.

Mayawati shot back by saying: “Sonia did drama at Rae Bareli and went back to Delhi. We did not stop her from doing a rally.”

“The
UPA Government has not given any financial assistance to us. The
Congress has raised the issue of rail coach factory at Rae Bareli to
defame my government,” she said.

Mayawati calls Rae Bareli rally to expose Congress

Atiq Khan

She
dubs Sonia’s ‘ready-to-go-to-jail’ statement a political drama

LUCKNOW: With Chief Minister Mayawati — irked at UPA chairperson
Sonia Gandhi’s accusation that the Uttar Pradesh government is creating
hurdles to the development process — calling a ‘maha rally’ in Rae
Bareli, the face-off between the Congress and the BSP regime has
deepened.

The rally, whose date is to be announced soon, is to expose the
Congress and the UPA government’s record of development in the State.
More specifically, on the issue of how many jobs have been created in
Rae Bareli and Sultanpur (Amethi) since the Congress-led UPA came to
power at the Centre in 2004. Ms. Mayawati dubbed Ms. Gandhi’s
statement, made at Lalganj on Tuesday, that she was ready to go to jail a political drama, and said had the BSP been like other parties the
Congress president’s rally and roadshow in Dadri would not have been
allowed. And had the Congress violated the ban (prohibitory orders
under Section 144 of the Cr.PC) at Lalganj, she would have fulfilled
Ms. Gandhi’s desire to go to jail.

The Chief Minister defended her government’s action canceling
allotment of land for a rail coach factory there. She deputed her
Principal Secretary Net Ram to conduct an inquiry into the objections
raised by farmers and the land dispute pertaining to the rail coach
unit. After he submitted his report, within three days, the Cabinet
would take a final decision on the rail coach factory land, Ms.
Mayawati said. It would have been better had the rail factory been
planned in the drought-hit Bundelkhand region. The manner in which
development projects were allotted to Rae Bareli and Amethi
(represented by Ms. Gandhi and her son Rahul Gandhi in the Lok Sabha)
by the UPA government seemed to suggest that there was no other Lok
Sabha constituency in the State. Rae Bareli was to the Congress what
Safai (the former Chief Minister Mulayam Singh’s village) was to the
Samajwadi Party, Ms. Mayawati said.

If the UPA government sent a proposal to set up 50-60 factories in
other parts of the State, land would be made readily available, she
told a press conference here. Dismissing the allegation that her
government was stalling the development process, she said that
according to official records 20 factories had been established in Rae
Bareli (since the time of Indira Gandhi); of these only nine were
functioning and the others closed down. An extent of 192 acres of land
was locked up in the closed units.

Of the 16 units set up in Sultanpur, seven applied for closure and
the others were functioning, she said adding 862 acres turned
wasteland.

As for the UPA chairperson’s description of Rae Bareli and Amethi as the karmabhumi
of the Gandhi family and her home, Ms. Mayawati invited intellectuals
and the media for a discourse on what the Congress had for the
development of the two constituencies in the last 60 years.

Only a few Congressmen benefited from the development process and no
benefit accrued to Dalits, the OBCs and the minorities, she alleged,
blaming the Congress leadership for poverty and unemployment in the
area.

Also, the Congress stalled development, launching an agitation against the Ganga Expressway and Yamuna Expressway projects.

Nor did the Centre take any decision on the Rs. 80,000-crore special package sought by the State, the Chief Minister said.



‘I could have fulfilled Sonia’s wish of going to jail’

Lucknow, October 15: The war of words over the
Rae Bareli coach factory land hotted up on Wednesday with Chief
Minister Mayawati on Wednesday hitting back at Sonia Gandhi accusing
her of enacting a ‘drama of going to jail’ and worrying only about Rae
Bareli and Amethi and not Uttar Pradesh.

“Congress is worried only about Rae Bareli but I
am worried about the whole of Uttar Pradesh,” she said, while
countering Gandhi’s charges after her government cancelled a land
allotment for the railway coach factory.

The Chief Minister said, “if we wanted to display
the power of the state administration, then we would not have allowed
her (Gandhi) to conduct a road show in Rae Bareli and would have
arrested her.”

But “we had only asked her not to hold a public
rally in Lalganj following tension there. The prohibitory orders were
not imposed anywhere else in the district,” she said.

Mayawati announced a ‘maharally’ to apprise people about the ‘impediments created by the Centre’ in developmental schemes.

On alleged protests by farmers on the acquisition
of their land for the factory, Mayawati said that she had constituted a
committee under Principal Secretary Netram to inquire into objections
of the farmers that will submit its report to the government within
three days.

“Cabinet will decide on the issue later on”,
Mayawati said, claiming that the land allotment was not approved by the
Cabinet due to a ‘goof-up’ by officials of previous regime.

Taking a pot-shot at the Congress chief for
terming Rae Bareli and Amethi as ‘karmbhoomi of Firoze, Indira and
Rajiv Gandhi and now that of her and Rahul’, Mayawati asked as to how
many jobs ‘have been given to people of Rae Bareli in past 44 years of
Congress rule in Uttar Pradesh and 48 years of rule at the Centre.’

“The bhoomipujan for the project is a mere drama
for taking political mileage ahead of Lok Sabha elections,” the BSP
supremo said.

“Like Saifai was entire state for Samajwadi Party,
Raebareli and Amethi are the entire state for Congress. There are
already a number of factories in the district, Congress should think
beyond Rae Bareli and avoid regional imbalance,” Mayawati said.

“Despite this the state government is giving
maximum electricity to Rae Bareli as compared to other districts,” she
said, adding unlike Congress, ‘BSP is not doing politics on issues of
development’.

Mayawati alleged that only the Congress party
people were benefiting in Rae Bareli while ‘the common people mostly Original Inhabitants of Jambudvipa, that is the Great Prabuddha Bharath and minorities are still living in pitiable condition in
Gandhi’s karmabhoomi’.

She alleged that the Congress had put impediments in schemes like Ganga and Yamuna expressways.

“This project in Rae Bareli and a similar project
at Bihar were launched simultaneously by Railways Minister Lalu Prasad
Yadav. While the work has started in Bihar, nothing except false
propaganda was initiated by the Congress here.”

She advised Congress to set up 50 factories in the
backward Purvanchal (eastern Uttar Pradesh) and Bundelkhand regions and
said the state would provide land in these areas on priority basis.


BSP says no to pre-poll deal in M.P.

Indore: Rejecting possibility of any pre-poll alliance, Uttar
Pradesh Chief Minister Mayawati-led Bahujan Samaj Party on Wednesday
said that it will contest the coming Assembly election in Madhya
Pradesh all alone.

The party has two MLAs in the present 230-member State Assembly,
though it is confident to win clear majority in the coming election
scheduled to be held on November 25.

Welcoming the announcement of poll dates by the Election
Commission, BSP state chief Narmada Prasad Ahirwar said the people of
the State are upset with both the Congress and the BJP.

People have been suffering due to rising prices caused by the wrong
policies of the ruling Congress at Centre while the BJP Government in
the State has failed to fulfil its promise to ensure law and order and
basic facilities such as roads, water and electricity, Mr. Ahirwar told
PTI. He added that the party will fight the election on its own and
will come up with surprising result. — PTI

Maya returns fire

Responding to Congress president Sonia Gandhi’s assertion that she
was “ready to go to jail” for the sake of development, Uttar Pradesh
Chief Minister Mayawati retorted on Wednesday that she could well “have
enabled Sonia to achieve her ambition” but had chosen not to do so. She
had instead “allowed her to have her road show in Rae Bareli”.

Mayawati implied that since large numbers of people came out to
greet Sonia during her visit to Rae Bareli on Tuesday, despite
prohibitory orders under Section 144 being in force, her administration
could well have arrested Sonia for instigating them to break the law.

Addressing a crowded press conference, the chief minister added that
she would soon hold a rally in Rae Bareli to counter Sonia’s charges
that she was stalling development in the region and in the state. She
did not specify the date of the rally.

She claimed Sonia and Rahul Gandhi had done nothing for their
respective constituencies, Rae Bareli and Amethi. “Except dirty
politics the Gandhis have done nothing for development,” she said.
“Congress
workers brought their president to Rae Bareli who did a drama of going
to jail without any reason and returned to Delhi yesterday.”

Mayawati’s remarks are the latest in the round of charges and
counter charges between the Congress-led Centre and the BSP in the
state, which started after her government cancelled the allotment of
land for a rail coach factory at Lalganj in Rae Bareli district. The
state government had said the decision was taken on the basis of a
report that said land acquisition for the factory could lead to unrest
in the area.

Mayawati has now directed Principal Secretary Netram to look into
the complaints of Rae Bareli farmers that led to the decision. She said
land was allotted without Cabinet’s nod.

Netram will submit his report in three days. It might come handy for
the government to deal with the case in the high court, which has
ordered status quo on the site. The next hearing is on October 22.

Mayawati said development in Rae Bareli could not be the benchmark
for the development of the state. If Sonia was so concerned about UP,
she added, she should take the rail factory to Bundelkhand or
Poorvanchal, both extremely  backward areas, and help in balanced
development of the state.


BSP says no to alliance for assembly polls in MP
Indore, Oct 15 (PTI)
Rejecting possibility of any pre-poll alliance, Uttar Pradesh Chief
Minister Mayawati-led Bahujan Samajwadi Party today said that it will
contest the coming assembly election in Madhya Pradesh all alone.
The party has two MLAs in the present 230-member state assembly, though
it is confident to win clear majority in the coming election scheduled
to be held on November 25.

Welcoming the announcement of poll dates by the Election
Commission, BSP state chief Narmada Prasad Ahirwar said the people of
the state have become annoyed with both the Congress and the BJP.

People have been suffering due to rising prices caused by the
wrong policies of the ruling Congress at Centre while the BJP
government in the state has failed to fulfil its promise to ensure law
and order and basic facilities such as roads, water and electricity,
Ahirwar told PTI.

Asked whether the BSP would forge any third front against the the
Congress and the BJP, Ahirwar said, the party will fight the election
on its own and will come up with surprising result to form government.

He said, the party has already announced its candidates for 130
constituencies and list of the rest contestants will be announced soon.

Ahirwar claimed that several leaders, who are dissatisfied with
Congress are knocking BSP’s door. The party is ready to welcome such
leaders, he added. PTI

Nodal centres to promote science in rural Uttar Pradesh

Lucknow, Oct 15 (IANS) The National Botanical Research Institute
(NBRI) and the Central Drug Research Institute (CDRI) will jointly set
up nodal centres in Uttar Pradesh schools to promote science and
scientific thinking among rural students.”The move intends to spread
science awareness in rural students, who at times do not get enough
opportunities to learn science,” NBRI director Rakesh Tuli said
Wednesday.

Initially, the nodal centres will be set up in villages in Lucknow
and its adjoining districts. In the first phase, we include only 10
schools in our programme, he added.

Tuli said: “At the centres, students will get science literature,
magazines that will enable them to understand and apply scientific
principles in everyday life. Moreover, at regular intervals, science
talk shows, exhibitions and other events would also be organised.”

CDRI and NBRI have also sought assistance from the Bangalore-based
Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research and the Indian
National Science Academy for the smooth functioning of the nodal
centres.

CM seeks probe into Delhi encounter

Lucknow, October 13 Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister
Mayawati is seeking a probe in Jamia Nagar encounter and
announcing several schemes for the community during the BSP convention
on the “Problems of Muslim community: its causes and solutions” on
Monday. Prominent Muslim clerics, who attended the meeting, however,
raised issues like lack of legal defense for terror suspects, arrest of
innocent Muslims, growing sense of insecurity in the
community and harassment of Muslims in Azamgarh.

Mayawati told the gathering that she has written a
letter to the Prime Minister requesting him to resolve the controversy
over the Jamia Nagar encounter. “Doubts among the Muslim community over
the incident must be removed,” she said.

The chief minister said the Muslim Community was
feeling a sense of insecurity in the country. “No action will be taken
against anyone in Uttar Pradesh without concrete evidence
regarding involvement in terror cases,” said the BSP chief.

She also attacked the Congress over the nuclear deal and its failure to act on the Sachar Committee report. 

Shia cleric Kalbe Jawwad said: “While the killers
of Mahatama Gandhi and Indira Gandhi could defend their cases, it
seemed Muslims have no right to live and they can’t even contest their
cases.” The cleric advocated constitution of a committee comprising
non-government Muslims (Gair Sarkari Musalman) to look into the cases
of terrorism. He demanded adequate representation of Muslims in police
force and making Urdu compulsory up to high school. 
He also said he
wished to see Mayawati as Prime Minister of the country.

The Naib Imam of Lucknow’s Aishgah Idgah and All
India Muslim Personal Law Board Member Khalid Rashid Farangi Mahali
said innocent Muslims are being taken into custody in the name of
terrorism and Madrasas are seen with suspicion. He asked the government
to deploy honest officers in Azamgarh. Referring to Gorakhpur MP Yogi
Aditya Nath, he said Muslims in various parts of Eastern UP are living
under fear and Islam has nothing to do with terrorism.

Blaming the Centre for terrorism in the country,
Mayawati said the root cause of terrorism was the failure of the
Central government to secure borders of the country. The CM also
announced the constitution of a special cell headed by BSP general
secretary Satish Chandra Mishra to review the progress of the schemes
announced by her government for minorities.

She announced to set up an Arabic-Persian
University and a Unani Directorate in Lucknow soon and said her
government has already earmarked Rs 10 crore for this.

She also announced various government measures
including launching of employment scheme for minorities, setting up of
a Rs 4 crore coaching centre for IAS and IPS aspirants from the
minority community in Lucknow, opening of 964 primary schools, 1,212
high schools, 58 government secondary schools and appointment of Urdu
teachers in Muslims-dominated districts. The government has also
decided to increase the annual grant for Urdu Academy from Rs 1.5 crore
to Rs 3 crore.

Five injured in Kanpur blast, police deny terror angle


KANPUR:
At least five people were injured in a minor explosion here Tuesday evening,
with the Uttar Pradesh police saying it was seemingly caused

by firecrackers and
was not a terror attack.



The
explosion took place outside a liquor vend in Colonelganj locality under the
Bajaria police station of the city around 7 pm, police officials
said.



Police said it seemed
that a man had purchased firecrackers ahead of the Diwali festival and left
these in a bag on his bicycle. Apparently, the firecrackers went off
accidentally, injuring five people including three children, senior
superintendent of police HR Sharma
said.



However, another police
officer did not rule out some criminals being behind the incident. “The bombs
were crude and it appears that some criminal element was carrying them for some
crime,” additional director general of police (Crime, Law and Order) Brijlal
said.



“We are probing the
incident and hope to nab the culprit soon,” he added. Senior police officials
rushed to the spot, Sharma said. “The injured are undergoing treatment in the
Ursla government hospital,” he
said.



“Some mischief mongers
are linking the incident to terrorist activities. Public should not pay heed to
such rumors,” added Sharma Kanpur is about 90 km from Lucknow.
Sashikanth —

In
these final three weeks, our opponents are signaling they will do
whatever they can to distract voters and distort the truth, so we need
to redouble our efforts.

The negative ads and smears seem to
grow by the day. The most effective way to respond is by reaching out
to more people than ever before with the truth — the stakes in this
election are too high not to.

We need to grow this movement by 100,000 new donors before Friday.

By promising to match the contribution of a new supporter, you will
encourage them to give for the first time. This is your last
opportunity to partner with a fellow supporter and make your donation
go twice as far.

Dear Sashikanth,

If your family isn’t already supporting Barack, it’s time for you to have “The Talk.”


With so many rumors and misperceptions out there, it’s incredibly
important that you sit down with parents or other family members. Tell
them who Barack is, what he stands for, and why you’re supporting him.


You may be the only person who can convince them.

But it can be difficult to bring up the subject, so here are a few tips:

For more resources, and to share your story about talking to family members, go to:

http://my.barackobama.com/thetalk


Earlier this year, as one national leader after another announced
support for Barack, there was a common refrain — they said their kids
persuaded them that Barack was the right candidate to bring about real
change.



Family members talking to one another about Barack is one of the ways
this movement has grown so large. Even if your parents are already
convinced, talk to your grandparents, aunts, uncles, and cousins.


There are only 25 days until Election Day. So have The Talk, and do it soon. Then tell us how it went, and what advice you would offer fellow supporters.

Thanks for all that you’re doing,

Obama for America


——– Suggested email ———

Hi,

I’ve been thinking a lot about the election and how important it is to our family.

I’ve decided to support Barack Obama, and wanted to let you know why.


There are many rumors floating around out there, so here’s some
information about Barack’s positions on things I know are important to
you:


– Economy: http://my.barackobama.com/EconomyFlyer


Health Care: http://my.barackobama.com/HealthcareFlyer


– Education:
http://my.barackobama.com/EducationFlyer


This is probably going to be the most important election in my
lifetime, and it’s something I strongly believe in. So let’s talk about
it. Ask me anything.


Sashikanth –

I thought the differences between John McCain and me were pretty clear tonight.

I will fight for the middle class every day, and — once again — Senator McCain didn’t mention the middle class a single time during the debate.

If you agree that we need to cut taxes for 95% of working families, reduce health care costs, and end the war in Iraq responsibly, then I need your help right now.

And if you heard John McCain push more of the same discredited
policies, including tax cuts for the wealthy and giant corporations,
tax increases on health care, and continuing to spend $10 billion a
month in Iraq, then now is the time to act.

Four weeks from tonight, we’ll know which of us will be the next president.

The time to make a difference in this election is running out — will you make a donation of $25 or more right now?

https://donate.barackobama.com/townhall

Thank you,

Barack

Thanks.

Dear Sashikanth,

Write a letter to the editor



With less than a month to go before
Election Day, undecided voters across the country are choosing which candidate to support.



We’re asking you to play an important role in making sure voters know that
Barack Obama and Joe Biden will bring the change we need on issues facing service members, veterans, and military families.



Use our Letter to the Editor tool to write a letter to your local paper.



We’ve made it easy. We provide you with a list of local papers, and
some important background on the issues to help you get started.



We’ll even send the letters to the papers for you.



John McCain and
the lobbyists on his campaign staff want to make this election about
personalities and trivialities, rather than the issues that matter in
people’s lives.



Instead of talking about our economic crisis, the wars in
Iraq and Afghanistan, or helping out the middle class, they are trying to distract voters from the issues.



We need you to help us keep the conversation on track, and remind
everyone that this is about change versus four more years of the same.



Write a
letter to the editor of your local paper today:



http://my.barackobama.com/vetsletter



With your help, together we can change America for the better.



Thank you,



Veterans and Military Families for Obama

Sashikanth —

I
was in North Carolina with Barack yesterday — getting ready for
tonight’s debate — and I took a break to record a short strategy
update for you.


Yesterday, millions of Americans learned the details about John McCain, his political patron Charles Keating, and their role in the last major financial crisis and taxpayer-financed bailout of our time.


The truth makes it even clearer why a senior McCain adviser admitted to
a reporter, “If we keep talking about the economic crisis, we’re going
to lose.”


But it’s not enough to merely inform voters — we’ve got to turn them out to vote.



You live in a key
battleground state where the race is neck-and-neck, so you can make a huge difference right in your own community.


Watch
our latest strategy update video and consider giving a day of your time
to help turn out the vote in the crucial four days leading up to the
election:



VIDEO: Give Barack A Day


While we’re focused on persuading and turning out voters, John McCain
has given up talking about the issues that are central to this election
– especially the economy. Instead, he’s running the most negative
presidential campaign in modern history.


In the past few days, we’ve seen the beginning of a major offensive
that McCain is about to launch, filled with distortions, personal
attacks, and flat-out lies about Barack.


But you can help
fight back by getting involved at the grassroots level — knocking on
doors, making phone calls, and talking to
undecided voters about what really matters in this election.

Commit at least one day to make sure Barack gets the votes we need to win:

http://my.barackobama.com/giveadayvid

Thanks for everything you’re doing,

David

David Plouffe
Campaign Manager

Obama for America


P.S. — Don’t forget to tune in to the debate tonight at 9:00 p.m.
Eastern. And make sure your friends and family watch Barack talk about
the change we need in this country.

Jagatheesan –

Want a look inside our strategy to win the battleground states?

I recorded a video on my laptop yesterday to brief you on the plan –
including details that haven’t been shared publicly before.

Our fight in the battleground states is going to be tougher than a lot of you may think. Take Florida, where George Bush won by just 381,000 votes in 2004. The campaign we’re running there is going to cost more than $39 million.

That can only come from supporters like you — unlike John McCain, we don’t take money from Washington lobbyists or special interest PACs.

To reach our goal, we need 50,000 new donors by Friday at midnight.

And if you make your first online donation today, your gift
will go twice as far. A previous donor has promised to match every
dollar you donate.

A
matched donation of $5 becomes $10, a donation of $25 becomes $50, and
a donation of $50 will become $100. Watch the video and double your
impact today.


Make a matched donation

This race has come down to a matter of weeks, and it could pivot on a few tremendously important swing states.

Supporters like you are strengthening this campaign in amazing ways — voter registration efforts, organizing in your communities, and bringing folks into the political process like never before.

Barack and Joe can’t win this without you.

Make a donation of $5 or more right now to provide the resources we’ll need to make victory a reality:

https://donate.barackobama.com/match

This campaign is committed to winning in every state we can. But it’s
the support of folks like you that will decide this election.

Thanks for everything you’re doing,

David

David Plouffe
Campaign Manager

Obama for America


Jagatheesan –

The economy hit a new low this week, and in every part of the country, people like you are feeling it.

The recent financial disasters — from the collapse of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to the historic drop in the stock market
– are not just a string of bad luck. They are the result of years of
bad decisions made in favor of big corporate special interests instead
of America’s working families.

More than 600,000 Americans have lost their jobs since January. Home foreclosures are skyrocketing, and home values are plunging. Gas prices are at an all-time high, and we’re still spending more than $10 billion every month on a war in Iraq that should never have been waged.

John McCain’s campaign is doing everything it can to focus attention on
false personal attacks and distractions — but there’s too much at
stake for that kind of politics.

I need your help to get the conversation back on track.

I recorded a two-minute TV ad about our economy and my plan to solve this crisis. Please watch the ad and share it with everyone you know:


Watch the video and share it with your friends

For eight years, Bush-McCain economic policies have favored reckless deregulation and huge tax loopholes for big corporations. Now, as these corporations crumble, American taxpayers are facing costly bailouts.

More of the same failed ideas are not going to solve our economic problems.

I’m calling for a $1,000 tax break for middle-class families — not
just because they need help dealing with the rising costs of gas, food,
and health care, but also because our economy needs to be reinvigorated
from the bottom up, not the top down.

I’m proposing a second stimulus package to save over one million jobs and provide immediate relief to struggling families.

And I’ll end the “anything goes” culture on Wall Street
with real regulation. We can see clearly that our economy is stronger
when we protect investments and pensions, and avoid devastating
bankruptcies and bailouts.

This is no ordinary time, and it shouldn’t be an ordinary election. Help keep the discussion focused on the issues.

Please watch the video and share it with your friends today:

http://my.barackobama.com/economyvideo

Thanks for helping to bring the change this country needs,

Barack

Dear Jagatheesan –



This movement for change is growing in every corner of the country, and our unprecedented
voter registration effort is a huge part of our success.



You know how important it is that every voice is heard. In the last
eight years, veterans and military families have faced an uphill
struggle to get necessary medical care and to expand programs like the
G.I. Bill.



We can’t afford four more years of the same — neither can the tens of
thousands of soldiers who will return home in the next presidential
administration.



Now is the time to make sure your voice will be heard, and your vote is counted. In most states, registration is required and
absentee ballots must be requested weeks before Election Day, November 4th.



Our team has put together a resource called the
Overseas Vote Foundation.
It’s specially designed to assist active duty members of the armed
services, veterans, military families, and Americans living overseas.


Find specific deadlines in your state, register to vote, apply
for an absentee or federal write-in ballot, and find answers to any
questions you might have about the voting process at the
Overseas Vote Foundation.



It only takes a moment to make sure your voice is heard in this election. Visit the Overseas Vote Foundation site today:



http://my.barackobama.com/VetOVF



Registering to vote is one of the most important things you can do to bring about the change this country needs.



Please forward this email and share these resources with friends,
family and others to make sure they are registered and getting absentee
ballots in on time to be counted.



Thanks,



Veterans and Military Families for Obama



P.S. — You can look up information about deadlines and ballot information for your state here:



http://my.barackobama.com/OVFstateinfo


Hi,

Bennett S. in Queensbury, NY just made a donation to match yours!

Bennett S. in Queensbury, NY might choose to write you a personal message (over 90% of people do).   If they do, you’ll receive a separate email with that message in a moment.

Want to make another matching donation to double someone else’s impact? You can do it right now:

http://my.barackobama.com/page/match/pledge/semmatch

Thank you!

Dear Sashikanth,


Thank you for your generous donation of $5.00.

Want to make another matching donation?

Many people have asked whether it’s possible to have multiple matching donations active at the same time — the answer is yes.

If you make multiple matching donations, you’ll be able to bring that many more new people into the process.

Make another matching donation now by visiting:
https://donate.barackobama.com/page/contribute/sempledge

Obama for America
http://www.barackobama.com

Dear Sashikanth,

Vote early for Barack
Voting is one of our most important responsibilities as citizens, and
as Ohioans we know the stakes this year could not be higher.


But you don’t have to wait for November 4th to vote for
change. Early voting has begun in Ohio and I urge you to cast your vote
for
Barack Obama today.


Even if you haven’t voted before and are not registered to
vote, you can still register and cast your ballot, in one stop. But
One-Stop Early Voting ends on Monday, October 6th. So there is not much
time.



Find your early vote location and vote today.


Every day, I see another example of the toll that George
Bush’s failed policies are taking on Ohio’s workers, our families, and
our businesses. And I know that you feel it, too.



Ohioans deserve real leadership in Washington. It is time for a change.


The most important thing you can do to bring the change we
need is go to your county’s early vote location today, and vote for
Barack.


This election is going to be close in Ohio. Every single vote
will make a difference, so please tell your friends and family about
this special opportunity, and bring them to the polls, too.



Find your early vote location:



http://oh.barackobama.com/OHevlocations



Thanks for taking this important step to continue turning around our state.



Sincerely,



Governor Ted Strickland

Dear Sashikanth,

When Barack came to Ohio this week, he made a very important stop.

In Holland, a town outside of Toledo, Barack went door-to-door and talked with undecided voters
about the issues that Ohio families are facing — everything from
health care to the credit crisis to the struggles of the auto industry.

He went canvassing because he knows that real change comes
from the bottom up, through people talking face-to-face with their
friends and neighbors. That’s why we need your help this weekend.

With early voting
already underway here in Ohio, it’s never been more important to reach
out to the people in your community to tell them more about Barack –
who he is and where he stands on the issues that really matter.

Watch this video of Barack canvassing in Ohio and sign up to volunteer in your area this weekend.

Watch the video and sign up to volunteer

John McCain’s campaign has been flooding the airwaves with ads that
are nearly 100% negative. It’s clear their plan is to distort Barack’s
record and distract people from the issues.


But talking with the people you know — friends, family,
neighbors, and co-workers — is hands-down the most effective way to
drown out the attacks with the truth, and persuade undecided voters to
support Barack.


From the very beginning, this campaign has been based on the
power of grassroots organizing. Take this opportunity to show how
powerful it really is, and sign up today for a weekend canvass:



http://oh.barackobama.com/ohweeklywalks



John McCain can run all the negative ads he wants, but this is what helps us win.



Thanks for all that you do,



Jeremy



Jeremy Bird


General Election Director


Ohio Campaign for Change



P.S. — Here in Ohio, you don’t have to wait until
Election Day to make your voice heard. Find your Early Vote location and cast your ballot for Barack today:

Dear Friend,

Thank you for contacting Senator Barack Obama and Obama for America.

Barack is gratified by the overwhelming response to his candidacy, and
we appreciate hearing from you. Please note, though, that we are now
replying only to emails sent through our webform. You may resend your
message through the webform here:

http://my.barackobama.com/page/content/contact/

We also encourage you to submit your policy ideas through the My Policy
feature of our website, here:

www.BarackObama.com/issues

We have also created the Answer Center, an easy-to-search database of
questions and answers that lets you find information on a wide range of
subjects from volunteering to policy positions. Try it out here:

http://answercenter.barackobama.com

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‘Congress hatching political conspiracy against BSP’-The Marvel of the Dhamma-This day of October, Is the day for Indian Buddhists to remember. -Mayawati the true heir of Kanshi Ram-Bahujan Samaj Party chief and Uttar Pradesh (UP) chief minister Mayawati announced on Monday a number of initiatives for the community, including the setting up of an Arabic-Persian university-BSP releases its 2nd list of candidates for Rajasthan polls-The UP state government, through its counsel, told the court that it will not take back possession of the land from the railway.-Parties back Somnath’s decision to call off London trip -SAARC digital library being set up
Filed under: General
Posted by: @ 7:47 am



‘Congress hatching political conspiracy against BSP’


Mayawati
Mayawati
Lucknow: Uttar Pradesh
Chief Minister Mayawati has accused Congress chief Sonia Gandhi of
?hatching a political conspiracy? against the Bahujan Samaj Party (BSP)
over the withdrawal of land in Rae Bareli for a rail coach factory. “It
is a calculated move by the Congress party ahead of the Lok Sabha
elections. Sonia Gandhi and her party are misguiding people by
projecting that BSP is against development,” Mayawati said at a press
conference on Wednesday.
“If the Congress really wants development in the true sense, why is the
party not taking up any development projects in Bundelkhand and eastern
Uttar Pradesh?” The Mayawati government on Saturday night withdrew the land
allotted for the rail coach factory project of the central government
in Rae Bareli, which is the parliamentary constituency of Sonia Gandhi.
Mayawati said in order to gain political mileage, the Congress could
not think of development outside Rae Bareli and Amethi, the latter
being the constituency of Sonia’s Gandhi’s son Rahul. (IANS)

Bahujan Samaj Party chief and Uttar Pradesh (UP)
chief minister Mayawati announced on Monday a number of initiatives for
the community, including the setting up of an Arabic-Persian university

Announces
several sops; holds Congress, SP responsible for their plight


Arabi-Farsi university to be set up in Lucknow

964 primary, 1,212 secondary schools to be set up




Photo: Subir Roy




Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Mayawati exchanging greetings with
the Muslim religious leaders during a party convention in Lucknow on
Monday.

LUCKNOW: Announcing several sops for Muslims, Uttar Pradesh Chief
Minister Mayawati on Monday emphasised that the future of the minority
community was secure only under the Bahujan Samaj Party rule. She held
the Congress and the Samajwadi Party squarely responsible for the
plight of the Muslims and appealed to them to support the BSP (in the
next Lok Sabha polls) for the solution of their problems.

The BSP leader assured the Muslims that they would be given adequate
representation in Parliament and in the State Assembly in accordance
with their population. The rule at the Centre would ensure prosperity
for the Muslims and other sections of society, she said.

Addressing the BSP national convention on the problems of the
Muslims in the country, their causes and solutions at the CMS
auditorium here, the Chief Minister announced that an Arabi-Farsi
university would be set up in Lucknow and 100 new madarsas would be
taken up for grants in the current financial year. While the number of
aided madarsas in the State would go up to 460, Rs.10 crore had been
allocated for setting up the Arabi-Farsi university, the Chief Minister
said.

Other measures announced by her included 964 new primary and 1,212
secondary schools in Muslim-dominated areas with 100 new schools
exclusively for girl students, 58 government secondary schools to be
set up in 22 districts, a Unani Directorate, a Rs.4-crore coaching
centre in Lucknow for Muslim youth desirous of entering IAS and IPS,
and the Kanshi Ram Self-Employment Scheme for the educated youth.

A grant of Rs.2 crore was announced for improving the financial
health of the Waqf Boards and promotion of Urdu language. The annual
grant for the UP Urdu Academy was increased from Rs.1.5 crore to 3
crore.

A special cell was constituted by the Chief Minister for reviewing
the decisions. The cell will be headed by the UP Advisory Council
chairman, Satish Chandra Mishra. A monthly progress report would be
submitted to Ms. Mayawati by Mr. Mishra.

Referring to the Batla House encounter in Delhi, Ms. Mayawati said
the onus was on the Centre to remove doubts among the Muslims that the
encounter was fake. She slammed attempts to tarnish the entire
community in the wake of recent terrorist attacks and said innocent
Muslims should not be hounded and solid evidence should be produced
before taking action.

Stating that the Muslims were feeling insulted and insecure, the
Chief Minister attacked the political parties who were trying to gain
political mileage. She said she had written to the Prime Minister on
October 10 demanding action against the guilty in the recent incidents
in Orissa and Karnataka.

She said the socio-economic and educational backwardness of the
Muslims and the insecurity of their lives and property was a fall-out
of vote bank politics of the Congress and the SP. Communal riots in the
rest of the country and in UP had occurred only under the Congress and
SP rule, she charged, and slammed the BJP for seeking political gains
from the Ram Janmabhumi/Babri Masjid issue and the recent violence in
Orissa and Karnataka.

In his address, the Vice-Chairman of the All India Muslim Personal
Law Board, Maulana Kalbe Sadiq, underlined the need for unity among the
Muslims and said they would have to emerge as a “power house”. He said
they should understand their responsibilities and exhorted them stop
being dependent on others.

Naib Imam of Aishbagh Idgah in Lucknow and AIMPLB member Maulana
Khalid Rasheed Firangi Mahali demanded constitution of an
anti-terrorism committee and Muslim Development Board.

The convention was attended by several other ulemas and representatives from different parts of the State and the country.




Bahujan Samaj Party chief and Uttar Pradesh (UP) chief
minister Mayawati announced on Monday a number of initiatives for the
community, including the setting up of an Arabic-Persian university.


The measures she announced include a Rs2 crore grant to the
Waqf Board that manages religious and community properties, establishment of a
Unani medicine directorate, relaxing the income ceiling for being eligible for
minority scholarships from Rs18,700 to Rs1 lakh; Rs4 crore for a coaching
institute for civil service aspirants from the community and filling up of
vacancies of Urdu language teachers. Urdu will now be taught in 964 primary and
1,212 higher secondary schools and two new schools for girls will be opened.

Muslims are an important political constituency in UP. According
to census 2001 data cited in the Sachar committee report, Muslims
constitute 13.4% of India’s population, growing at an average 2.7% a
year between 1961 and 2001. Majority of them live in four states—UP,
West Bengal, Bihar and Maharashtra. UP has the largest concentration,
accounting for a little over one-fifth (22%). The state sends 80
members to the Lok Sabha. At present, BSP holds 17 seats and SP holds
37.

“(The) purpose of the rally is to inform Muslims what
other parties have done for them so far, (and) discuss the current
problems the community faces and what the BSP can do for them.
Responsible Muslims from all over the state were invited for this
purpose,” said Munquad Ali, BSP member of Rajya Sabha, the upper house
of Parliament.
Traditionally, the Muslim vote has favoured
the Congress and lately, the Samajwadi Party. However, the proximity of
the United Progressive Alliance (UPA) with the US, the perceived
profiling of the community in the wake of terror strikes and the police
encounter in Delhi leading to the death of two youth have left the
community uneasy.
Sensing an opportunity, Mayawati has
stepped up her appeal to the community, especially after her publicized
association with the Left immediately after they withdrew support to
the UPA.
Syed Waseem Ahmad, senior reader of political
science at the Aligarh Muslim University, says the BSP’s strategy may
yield “around 15-20% of the Muslim vote”.


Indian Muslim leaders slam government on crackdown

Posted on 15 October 2008


NEW DELHI: Hundreds
of Islamic leaders in India demanded on Tuesday that the government
protect their community from persecution, saying Muslims were being
unfairly targeted in a police crackdown after bombings across the
country. Communal politics has surfaced as an issue ahead of a general
election due in early 2009, with attacks on Christians and bombings
polarising a secular government and Hindu-nationalist opposition.

“Today, with the injustice and harassment, Islam and Muslims in this
country are under threat,” said Maulana Syed Ahmed Bukhari, influential
leader of the Jama Masjid mosque, the largest in north India. “We have
been quiet for a long time, but we cannot take this anymore. We too
have rights.”

Bukhari said neither the ruling Congress nor the opposition
Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) were a suitable option for the minority
Muslims, who make up 13 percent of India’s 1.1 billion-plus population.
“They think we only have these two options,” he said, addressing a
crowd of Muslim leaders and others on the lawns of the Jama Masjid, a
17th century mosque built by Mughal kings.

“But water will find its way, it will find its own level.” Bombings
by suspected militants have killed hundreds of people in recent months,
and Muslim leaders accuse the police of indiscriminate arrests of young
Muslim men who have been labelled as terrorists and paraded before the
media.

DIFFICULT BALANCING ACT: In the last election in
2004, Congress came to power partly due to a secular backlash against
the incumbent BJP-led government, especially after the Gujarat riots in
2002 when more than 2,000 Muslims were massacred by Hindu mobs.

India’s election commission said on Tuesday it would hold five state
elections in November and December that would gauge the political
climate before next year’s general election.

But the Congress party, labouring with economic woes, has been
losing ground to the BJP, which is calling for harsher anti-terrorism
measures, in state elections over the last year, and cannot be trusted
to do justice to Muslims, Bukhari said. “Muslims should unite, leaving
aside ideological and sectional differences,” he said.

The government held on Monday a meeting of the National Integration
Council, a panel of public figures, to discuss communal tension, the
first time the group has met since 2005.

 The Bahujan Samaj Party is keen to reach out to the Muslim vote bank in the run up to the national elections.

Thailand News and Asia News Reports

BSP releases its 2nd list of candidates for Rajasthan polls


BSP releases its 2nd list of candidates for Rajasthan polls

IST,PTI

JAIPUR: The Bahujan Samaj Party (BSP) on Monday released its second
list of 33 candidates for the forthcoming assembly polls in Rajasthan,
scheduled to be held later this year.

With this the Rajasthan BSP has announced 190 candidates for the 200
members’ assembly, Dharmveer Singh Ashok, incharge of party affairs in
Rajasthan, told reporters.

“The names for 10 seats will be announced later on,” he said, adding
that the names of sitting two BSP MLAs have also been kept secret.

Former RAS officer Kanshiram Meghwal and Radhyeshyam Tanwar, former
Congress leader, are among the 33 candidates whose names figured in the
second list from Khajuwala and Jhotwara assembly constituencies.

The election dates are yet to be announced and so far no other political party has come up with any list of candidates.


Prohibitory orders issued ahead of Sonia’s Rae Bareli visit

Updated - 14/10/2008 - IANS.

Hours after the Allahabad High Court ordered status quo on a piece of land
where Congress president Sonia Gandhi was to perform a religious ceremony for a
rail coach factory in her Rae Bareli constituency, the Uttar Pradesh government
imposed prohibitory orders to prevent a Congress rally in the area.

The Mayawati-led Bahujan Samaj Party (BSP) government imposed the order
under Section 144 of the Criminal Procedure Code that prevents the gathering of
more than five people in the area.


The Congress maintained that Gandhi would go ahead with the scheduled rally
and ’Bhoomi Pujan’ for the rail coach project.

Additional District Magistrate D.L. Verma, in a statement, said the state
government, “using its discretionary powers, has banned any kind of gathering,
rally or public address” in Rae Bareli with immediate effect.


Meanwhile, the state government, through its counsel, told the court that it
will not take back possession of the land from the railway.


“The government also stated that it will not initiate proceedings of
allotting the land to anyone else or initiate any construction work on the
same,” Khan added.

Parties back Somnath’s decision to call off London trip

New Delhi, Oct 8 (IANS) Political parties across the spectrum have
asked the Ministry of External Affairs (MEA) to look into the matter of
protocol relating to Indian dignitaries going abroad. The move comes
after Lok Sabha Speaker Somnath Chatterjee’s decision to cancel his
trip to London on being told that he would be subjected to a body
search.
“The Lok Sabha speaker is the highest authority we have in parliament
and he must be exempted from practices like body frisking. Our foreign
office should take up the issue and discuss the matter with its
counterparts abroad so that a system is evolved,”
“Chatterjee’s objection to frisking is valid. It is a not a question of
an individual’s dignity that has been offended but the dignity of the
constitutional authority of a country. Countries like Britain and the
US must stop this,”
Several MPs also came out in support of Chatterjee’s decision to call off his proposed trip.

Several MPs also came out in support of Chatterjee’s decision to call off his proposed trip.

“The MEA should look into the
matter urgently. We should work out a system where our dignitaries are
given the same treatment we mete out to others.”

Brajesh Pathak
of the Bahujan Samaj Party also upheld the decision: “The speaker has
done his best to defend the dignity of his office.”

Added CPI
secretary D. Raja: “The speaker must take up the issue with government
to sort it out at the appropriate diplomatic level.”

During his
tenure as speaker, Chatterjee had visited London several times but was
never frisked as he was in the British protocol’s list of people
exempted from a body search.

On Oct 3, the British protocol
department informed the Indian High Commission in London that the
speaker would not be exempt from frisking. It was then that Chatterjee
cancelled his trip saying that it involved the honour of the
constitutional office.

This is the second time that the speaker
has cancelled a foreign trip over this issue. In 2005, he had cancelled
his trip to Australia when the host government told him that he would
be frisked.

SAARC digital library being set up

Allahabad: Even as recession in the developed world casts a shadow
on India’s IT exports, the country is making a mark by setting up a
digital library to preserve the intellectual wealth of neighbouring
SAARC countries.

As a significant step in this direction, India has agreed to a
project for developing a digital library of literary, scientific and
other important works of SAARC member countries.

“We have been given the responsibility of developing the digital
library following a consensus among SAARC member states for promotion
of educational and cultural exchange,” Director of the Indian Institute
of Information Technology-Allahabad, (IIIT-A), M D Tiwari said.


Project

“The IIIT-A was chosen as the resource institution for the project
at a high-level meeting held in New Delhi in which the ministries of
External Affairs, Information Technology and Human Resource Development
discussed the modalities for making the SAARC digital library a
reality,” Mr. Tiwari said.

He said the project was likely to cost a modest Rs.4 crore. -PTI


comments (0)
10/12/08
The Marvel of the Dhamma -Write Down on the Wall was Dr. Ambedkar’s Sign ! Two Thousand Nine ! Will Be Mine ! - Says Ms Mayawati Bahen !
Filed under: General
Posted by: @ 3:34 am

The Marvel of the Dhamma

Image:Ashoka2.jpg

Ashoka Maurya



Map of the Maurya Empire under Ashoka's rule.


Map of the Maurya Empire under Ashoka’s rule.



The Sanchi stupa in Sanchi, Madhya Pradesh established by emperor Ashoka in the third century BC.


The Sanchi stupa in Sanchi, Madhya Pradesh established by emperor Ashoka in the third century BC.


Fragment of the 6th Pillar Edicts of Ashoka (238 BC), in Brahmi, sandstones. British Museum.


Fragment of the 6th Pillar Edicts of Ashoka (238 BC), in Brahmi, sandstones. British Museum.





The Ashoka Chakra, featured on the flag of the Republic of India


Silver punch-mark coins of the Mauryan empire, bear Buddhist symbols such as the Dharmacakra, the elephant (previous form of the Buddha), the tree under which enlightenment happened, and the burial mound where the Buddha died (obverse). 3rd century BC.


Silver punch-mark coins of the Mauryan empire, bear Buddhist symbols such as the Dharmacakra,
the elephant (previous form of the Buddha), the tree under which
enlightenment happened, and the burial mound where the Buddha died
(obverse). 3rd century BC.


Distribution of the Edicts of Ashoka and Ashokan territorial limits.



Distribution of the Edicts of Ashoka and Ashokan territorial limits.[7]


Greek Late Archaic style capital from Patna (Pataliputra), thought to correspond to the reign of Ashoka, 3rd century BC, Patna Museum (click image for references).


Greek Late Archaic style capital from Patna (Pataliputra), thought to correspond to the reign of Ashoka, 3rd century BC, Patna Museum (click image for references).


Bilingual edict (Greek and Aramaic) by king Ashoka, from Kandahar - Afghan National Museum. (Click image for translation).


Bilingual edict (Greek and Aramaic) by king Ashoka, from Kandahar - Afghan National Museum. (Click image for translation).


Buddhist proselytism at the time of king Ashoka (260-218 BC), according to his Edicts.


Buddhist proselytism at the time of king Ashoka (260-218 BC), according to his Edicts.





“The legend of King Asoka, A study and translation of the Asokavadana“, John Strong, Princeton Library of Asian translations.


Ashoka's Major Rock Edict inscription at Girnar



Ashokan Pillar at Vaishali


Ashokan Pillar at Vaishali



This is the famous original sandstone sculpted Lion Capital of Ashoka preserved at Sarnath Museum which was originally erected around 250 BCE atop an Ashoka Pillar at Sarnath. The angle from which this picture has been taken, minus the inverted bell-shaped lotus flower, has been adopted as the National Emblem of India showing the Horse on the left and the Bull on the right of the Ashoka Chakra in the circular base on which the four Indian lions are standing back to back. On the far side there is an Elephant and a Lion instead. The wheel


This is the famous original sandstone sculpted Lion Capital of Ashoka preserved at Sarnath Museum which was originally erected around 250 BCE atop an Ashoka Pillar at Sarnath. The angle from which this picture has been taken, minus the inverted bell-shaped lotus flower, has been adopted as the National Emblem of India showing the Horse on the left and the Bull on the right of the Ashoka Chakra in the circular base on which the four Indian lions
are standing back to back. On the far side there is an Elephant and a
Lion instead. The wheel “Ashoka Chakra” from its base has been placed
onto the center of the National Flag of India.

Those who practice the Dhamma will begin
to know the Dhamma or to gain a feel for the Dhamma in the area of
meditation more markedly than in other areas, and more extensively. For
example, the gratification that comes from being generous is moving in
one way, the gratification that comes from maintaining the precepts is
moving in another way, the feelings of gratification that come from the
different forms of goodness are moving in their own separate ways. This
is called finding gratification in skillfulness.

But
all of these feelings of gratification converge in the practice of
meditation. We begin to feel moved from the moment the mind begins to
grow still, when the heart gathers its currents together to stand
solely on its own. Even though we may not yet obtain a great deal of
stillness from the inward gathering of the mind, we still find
ourselves gratified within, in a way we can clearly sense. If the mind
or the Dhamma were a material object, there wouldn’t be anyone in the
world who wouldn’t respect the religion, because the goodness, the
well-being, and the marvels that arise from the religion and from the
practicing in line with the teachings of the religion are things
desired the world over.

Goodness, well-being,
marvels: These are things the world has always desired from time
immemorial — with a desire that has never lost its taste — and they are
things that will always be desired until the world loses its meaning,
or until people become extinct, having no more sense of good and evil.
That’s when the world will no longer aspire for these great blessings.
The well-being that comes from the marvels — the Dhamma in the area of
its results — is something to which all living beings aspire, simply
that their abilities differ, so that some attain their aspirations,
while others don’t.

But the Dhamma can’t be
displayed for the world to perceive with its senses of sight, hearing,
smell, taste, or touch in the way other things can. Even though there
may be other immaterial phenomena similar to the Dhamma — such as
smells — still they aren’t like the true Dhamma that is touched by the
hearts of those who have practiced it. If the Dhamma could be displayed
like material objects, there is no doubt but that the human world would
have to respect the religion for the sake of that Dhamma. This is
because the Dhamma is something more marvelous than anything else. In
all the three levels of existence, there is no greater marvel than in
the Dhamma.

The Dhamma can appear as a
marvel, conspicuous and clear in the mind. The mind is what knows it —
and only the mind. It can’t be displayed in general like material
objects, as when we take things out to admire or to show off to others.
The Dhamma can’t possibly be displayed like material objects. This is
what makes the world lack interest — and lack the things that could be
hoped from the Dhamma — in a way that is really a shame.

Even
those who want the marvel of the Dhamma don’t know what the marvel is,
or what the profundity of the Dhamma is, because the mind has never had
contact with that profundity. The eye has never had contact with the
marvel. The ear has never obtained any marvel from the current of the
Dhamma, because the Dhamma can’t be displayed as a current of sound as
other things can. This is one obstacle that prevents people from
becoming moved by the Dhamma, that prevents them from fully believing
and fully entrusting themselves to the Dhamma in a way consistent with
the world’s long-felt hunger for well-being and prosperity.

Each
of the Buddhas who has gained Awakening and taught the Dhamma to the
world has had to reflect to the full extent of his intelligence and
ability on the myriad ways of teaching the Dhamma to the world so that
the world could see it as a marvel, inasmuch as the Dhamma can’t be put
in shop windows or in public places. This is because the true Dhamma
lies in the heart and reveals itself only in words and deeds, which
doesn’t excite a gratifying sense of absorption in the same way as
touching the Dhamma directly with the heart.

Because
there is no way to display the Dhamma directly, the Buddhas display it
indirectly through teaching. They point out the causes — the Dhamma of
conduct and practices leading to the Dhamma of results at this or that
point or this or that level; and at the same time they proclaim the
results — the excellence, the marvels of the stages and levels of the
Dhamma that can be touched with the heart, all the way to the highest
marvel, vimutti, the mental release called nibbana within the heart.

Every
Buddha has to devise strategies in teaching the Dhamma so as to bring
that marvel out to the world by using various modes of speech and
conduct — for example, describing the Dhamma and showing the conduct of
the Dhamma as being like this and that — but the actual Dhamma can’t be
shown. It is something known exclusively in the heart, in the way in
which each Buddha and each arahant possesses this marvel. None of the
Buddhas, none of the arahants who possess this marvel are in any way
deficient in this regard.

The marvel lies in
their hearts — simply that they can’t take the marvel that appears
there and display it in the full measure of its wonder. Thus they
devise strategies for displaying it in their actions, which are simply
attributes of the Dhamma, not the actual Dhamma itself. For instance,
the doctrine they teach in the texts is simply an attribute of the
Dhamma. Their act of teaching is also just an attribute of the Dhamma.
The actual Dhamma is when a meditator or a person who listens to their
teachings about the Dhamma follows the Dhamma in practice and touches
it stage by stage within his or her own heart. This is called beginning
to make contact with the actual Dhamma, step by step. However much
contact is made, it gives a sense of gratification felt exclusively
within the heart of the person who has gained that contact through his
or her own practice.

When it comes to
ingenuity in teaching, no one excels the Buddhas. Even so, they reveal
only what they see as appropriate for humanity. They can’t reveal the
actual Dhamma — for example, by taking out the true marvel in their
hearts and unfolding it for the world to see, saying, ‘This is the
marvel of the Tathagata, of each Buddha. Do you see it?’ This can’t be
done, for here we’re talking about the marvel of the purity of a heart
that was previously swamped with defilement like a heap of assorted
excrement, but now has become a pure, unsullied nature, or a pure,
amazing nature because of the practice of constantly and relentlessly
cleansing it. They can’t show that Dhamma to the world, saying, ‘Do you
see this? Look at it. Look at it. Feast your eyes till they’re full and
then strive to make this treasure your own!’ So instead, they teach by
using various strategies for those who practice, describing the path in
full detail, in terms both of causes and of results.

What
they bring out to show is simply the current of their voices, the
breath of their mouths. That’s what they bring out to speak, simply the
breath of their mouths. They can’t bring out the real thing. For
example, when they say, ‘It’s marvelous like this,’ it’s just sound.
The marvelous nature itself can’t be brought out. All they can bring
out is the action of saying, ‘That nature is marvelous,’ so that we can
speculate for ourselves as to what that marvel is like. Even though
this doesn’t remove our doubts, it’s better than if we had never heard
about it at all.

But the basic principle in
making us come to know and see the marvel of the Dhamma is that first
we have to speculate and then we follow with practice. This qualifies
as following the principles of the Dhamma the Buddha taught, and this
is fitting and proper. No matter what the difficulties and hardships
encountered in following the path, we shouldn’t let them form barriers
to our progress, because this is where the path lies. There are no
other byways that can take us easily to the goal. If our practice is
difficult, we have to stick with it. If it’s painful, we have to bear
it, because it’s a duty we have to perform, a burden we have to carry
while working so as to attain our aims.

The
Dhamma of a pure mind is like this: The mind is the Dhamma, the Dhamma
is the mind. We call it a mind only as long as it is still with the
body and khandhas. Only then can we call it a pure mind, the mind of a Buddha, or the mind of an arahant. After it passes from the body and khandhas, there is no conventional reality to which it can be compared, and so we can’t call it anything at all.

No
matter how marvelous that nature, no matter how much it may be ours,
there is no possible way we can use conventional realities to describe
it or to make comparisons, because that Dhamma, that realm of release,
has no conventions against which to measure things or make comparisons.
It’s the same as if we were in outer space: Which way is north, which
way is south, we don’t know. If we’re on Earth, we can say ‘east,’
‘west,’ ‘north,’ and ’south’ because there are things that we can
observe and compare so as to tell which direction lies which way. We
take the Earth as our standard. ‘High’ and ‘low’ depend on the Earth as
their frame of reference. How much higher than this, lower than this,
north of this, south of this: These things we can say.

But
if we’re out in outer space, there is no standard by which we can
measure things, and so we can’t say. Or as when we go up in an
airplane: We can’t tell how fast or how slow we’re going. When we pass
a cloud, we can tell that we’re going fast, but if we depend simply on
our eyesight, we’re sure to think that the speed of the airplane is
nowhere near the speed of a car. We can clearly see how deceptive our
eyesight is in just this way. When we ride in a car, the trees on both
sides of the road look as if they were falling in together down on the
road behind us. Actually, they stay their separate selves. It’s simply
that the car runs past them. Since there are things that we sense, that
lie close enough for comparison, it seems as if the car were going
really fast.

As for the airplane, there’s
nothing to make comparisons with, so it looks as if the plane were
dawdling along, as if it were going slower than a car, even though it’s
actually many times faster.

This is how it is when we compare the mind of an ordinary run-of-the-mill person with the mind of the Buddha. Whatever the Buddha says is good and excellent, we ordinary people tend to say that it’s not.
Whatever we like, no matter how vile, we say that it’s good. We don’t
admit the truth, in the same way as thinking that a car goes faster
than an airplane.

The practice of attending to the mind is something very important. Try to develop mindfulness (sati)
and discernment so that they can keep up with the things that come and
entangle the mind. By and large, the heart itself is the instigator,
creating trouble continually, relentlessly. We then fall for the
preoccupations the heart turns out — and this makes us agitated, upset,
and saddened, all because of the thoughts formed by the heart.

These
come from the heart itself, and the heart itself is what falls for
them, saying that this is this, and that is that, even though the
things it names ‘this’ and ‘that’ merely exist in line with their
nature. They have no meaning in and of themselves, that they are like
‘’this’ or ‘that.’ The mind simply gives them meanings, and then falls
for its own meanings, making itself glad or sad over those things
without end. Thus the stress and suffering that result from
thought-formations have no end, no point of resolution, just as if we
were floating adrift in the middle of the sea waiting to breathe our
last breath.

The Buddhas all reached
Awakening here in this human world because the human world is rich in
the Noble Truths. It’s where they are plain to see. The Noble Truth of
stress (dukkha) lies in the human body. Human beings know about
stress — because they’re smarter than common animals. The Noble Truth
of the origin of stress: This lies in the human heart. The Noble Truth
of the path — the path of practice to cure defilement (kilesa), craving (tanha), and mental effluents (asava),
which are the things that produce stress: This, human beings also know.
What is the path? To put it briefly: virtue, concentration, and
discernment. These things human beings know and can put into practice.
The Noble Truth of the cessation of stress: This, human beings also
know. No matter which of these truths, all human beings know them —
although they may not know how to behave toward them or take interest
in behaving in line with them, in which case there is no way the Dhamma
can help them at all.

The Buddhas thus taught
the Dhamma in the human world, because the human world lies in the
center of all the levels of existence. We have been born in the center
of existence, in the midst of the religion. We should conform correctly
to the central point of the religion, so as to comprehend the
religion’s teachings that lie in the center of our heart.

The
superlative Dhamma lies right here. It doesn’t lie anywhere else. The
mind is what can reach the Dhamma. The mind is what knows all dhammas.
The affairs of the Dhamma, then, do not lie beyond the mind, which is a
fitting vessel for them. Good, evil, pleasure, pain: The mind knows
these things before anything else knows them, so we should develop
mindfulness and discernment to be resourceful, to keep up with the
events that are always becoming involved with the mind in the course of
each day.

If we’re intent on investigating
the origin of stress, which fans out from our various
thought-formations, we will find that it arises without stop. It arises
right here in the mind. It’s fashioned right here. Even though we try
to make it quiet, it won’t be still. Why? Because of the ‘unquietness’,
the thoughts with which the mind disturbs itself, which it forms and
sends out towards its preoccupations (arammana) all the time.
Once the mind sends out its thoughts, it then gathers in stress for
itself. It keeps at it, in and out like this. What goes out is the origin of stress, and what comes back in is stress.
In other words, thoughts form and go out as the origin of stress, and
when the results come back to the heart, they’re stressful. These
things are constantly being manufactured like this all the time.

When
we want the mind to have even just a little bit of calm, we really have
to force it; and even then these things still manage to drive the mind
into forming thoughts whenever we let down our guard. This is how it is
with the origin of stress, which is constantly producing suffering. It
lies in the heart and is always arising. For this reason, we must use
mindfulness and discernment to diagnose and remedy the origin of
stress, to keep an eye out for it, and to snuff it out right there,
without being negligent. Wherever we sit or stand — whatever our
activity — we keep watch over this point, with mindfulness alert to it,
and discernment unraveling it so as to know it constantly for what it
truly is.

All those who practice to remove
defilement practice in this way. In particular, those who are ordained
practice by going into the forest to look for a place conducive to
their striving in order to wipe out this very enemy. Even when they
stay in inhabited areas, or wherever they go, wherever they stay, they
keep their attention focused continually, step by step, on the
persistent effort to remove and demolish the origin of stress, which is
a splinter, a thorn in the heart. Such people are bound to develop more
and more ease and well-being, step by step, in proportion to the
persistence of their striving.

We can see
clearly when the mind is still and settles down: Thought-formations are
still, or don’t exist. Turmoil and disturbances don’t occur. The stress
that would otherwise result doesn’t appear. When the mind is quiet,
stress is also quiet. When thought-formations are quiet, the origin of
stress is also quiet. Stress is also quiet. All that remains at that
moment is a feeling of peace and ease.

The
war between the mind and the defilements causing stress is like this.
We have to keep fighting with persistence. We have to use mindfulness
and discernment, conviction and persistence to contend with the war
that disturbs and ravages the mind, making it stagger and reel within.
The disturbances will then gradually be suppressed. Even when there is
only a moment of quiet, we will come to see the harm of the
thought-formations that are constantly disturbing us. At the same time,
we will see the benefits of mental stillness — that it’s a genuine
pleasure. Whether there is a lot of stillness or a little, pleasure
arises in proportion to the foundation of stillness or the strength of
the stillness, which in the texts is called samadhi, or concentration.

A
mind centered and still is called a mind in concentration, or a mind
gathered in concentration. This is what genuine concentration is like
inside the heart. The names of the various stages of concentration are
everywhere, but actual concentration is inside the heart. The heart is
what gives rise to concentration. It produces it, makes it on its own.
When concentration is still, the mind experiences cool respite and
pleasure. It has its own foundation set firmly and solidly within.

It’s
as if we were under an eave or under the cooling shade of a tree. We’re
comfortable when it rains, we’re comfortable when the sun is out,
because we don’t have to be exposed to the sun and rain. The same holds
true with a mind that has an inner foundation of stillness: It’s not
affected by this preoccupation or that, which would otherwise disturb
and entangle it repeatedly, without respite. This is because stillness
is the heart’s dwelling — ‘concentration,’ which is one level of home
for the heart.

Discernment (pañña) is
ingenuity, sound judgment, evaluating causes and effects within and
without; above, below, and in between — inside the body — all the way
to the currents of the mind that send out thoughts from various angles.
Mindfulness and discernment keep track of these things, investigating
and evaluating them so as to know causes and effects in terms of the
heart’s thought-formations, or in terms of the nature of sankhara within us, until we see the truth of each of these things.

Don’t go investigating these things off target, by being clever with labels and interpretations that go against the truth — because in the investigation of phenomena, we investigate in line with the truth. We don’t resist the truth, for that would simply enhance the defilements causing stress at the very moment we think we’re investigating phenomena so as to remove them.

Birth
we have already experienced. As for old age, we’ve been growing old
from the day of our birth, older and older, step by step. Whatever our
age, that’s how long we’ve been growing old, until we reach the end of
life. When we’re old to the nth degree, we fall apart. In other words,
we’ve been growing old from the moment of birth — older by the day, the
month, the year — older and older continually. We call it ‘growing up’,
but actually it’s growing old.

See? Investigate it for what it really is. This is the great highway — the way of nature. Don’t resist it.
For example, the body is growing old, but we don’t want it to be old.
We want it always to be young. This is called resisting the truth —
which is stress. Even when we try to resist it, we don’t get anywhere.
What do we hope to gain by resisting it and creating stress for
ourselves? Actually, we gain nothing but the stress that comes from
resisting the truth.

Use discernment to
investigate just like this. Whenever pain arises in any part of the
body, if we have medicine to treat it, then we treat it. When the
medicine can take care of it, the body recovers. When the medicine
can’t, it dies. It goes on its own. There’s no need for us to force it
not to die, or to stay alive for so-and-so many years, for that would
be an absurdity. Even if we forced it, it wouldn’t stay. We wouldn’t
get any results and would just be wearing ourselves out in vain. The
body has to follow its own natural principles.

When we investigate in line with its truth this way, we can be at our ease.
Wherever there’s pain, keep aware of it continually in line with its
truth. Whether it hurts a lot or a little, keep aware of its
manifestations until it reaches the ultimate point of pain — the death
of the body — and that’s as far as it goes.

Know it in line with its truth. Don’t resist it. Don’t set up any desires,
because the setting up of desire is a deficiency, a hunger. And hunger,
no matter when or what the sort, is pain: Hunger for sleep is pain,
hunger for food is pain, hunger for water is pain. When was it ever a
good thing?

The hunger, the desires that
arise, wanting things to be like this, wanting them to be like that:
These are all nothing but disturbances, issues that give rise to stress
and pain. This is why the Buddha doesn’t have us resist the truth.

Use your discernment to investigate, to contemplate in line with the natural principles of things as they already are. This is called discernment that doesn’t fly in the face of truth — and the heart can then be at ease.

We
study the four ‘Noble Truths’ here in our body. In other words, we
study birth, aging, illness, and death, all of which lie in this single
heap of elements (dhatu) without ever leaving it. Birth is an
affair of these elements. Growing up or growing old, it’s old right
here. When there’s illness, it manages to be ill right here, in one
part or another. When death comes, it dies right here. So we have to
study right here — where else would we study? We have to study and know
the things that involve us directly before we study anything else. We
have to study them comprehensively and to completion — studying our own
birth, our aging, our illness and pain, and completing our study of our own death. That’s when we’ll be wise — wise to all the events around us.

People who know the Dhamma through practicing so that they are wise to the events that occur to themselves, do not flinch in the face of any of the conventional realities of the world at all.
This is how it is when we study the Dhamma, when we know and see the
Dhamma in the area of the heart — in other words, when we know rightly
and well. ‘Mindfulness and discernment that are wise all around
themselves’ are wise in this way, not wise simply from being able to remember.
They have to be wise in curing doubt, in curing the recalcitrance of
the heart, as well as in curing their own attachments and false
assumptions so as to leave only a nature that is pure and simple.
That’s when we’ll be really at ease, really relieved.

Let the khandhas be khandhas
pure and simple in their own way, without our messing with them,
without our struggling with them for power, without our forcing or
coercing them to be like this or like that. The khandhas are then khandhas,
the mind is then the mind, each with its own separate reality, each not
infringing on the others as it used to. Each performs its own duties.
This is called khandhas pure and simple, the mind pure and
simple, without any conventional realities adulterating them. What
knows is what knows, the elements are elements, the khandhas are khandhas.

Whatever
things may break apart, let them break apart. We have already known
them clearly with our discernment. We have no doubts. We’ve known them
in advance, even before they die, so when death comes, what doubts can
we have? — especially now that they display the truth of their nature
for us to see clearly. This is called studying the Dhamma, practicing
the Dhamma. To study and practice this way is to follow the same way
that sages have practiced and known before us.

All of these conditions are matters of conventional reality — matters of the elements, the khandhas, or the sense media (ayatana). The four khandhas, the five khandhas,
whatever, are individual conditions, individual conditions that are
separated in line with conventions. Discernment is also a condition;
and mindfulness, another condition — conditions of the heart — but
they’re Dhamma, means of curing the mind that is clouded and obscured,
means of washing away the things that cloud and obscure it, until
radiance appears through the power of the discernment that cleanses the
heart. Once the heart is radiant, in the next step it becomes pure.

Why
is it pure? Because all impurities have fallen away from it. The
various misconstruings that are an affair of defilement are all gone
from the heart, so the heart is pure. This pure heart means that we
have completed our study of ourselves, in line with the statement of
the teaching:

vusitam brahmacariyam katam karaniyam:

‘The task of the religion is done, the holy life is complete, there is no further task to be done.’

When
the tasks we have had to do — abandoning and striving — are done to
completion, we know right here, because delusion lay right here in the
heart. We study and practice simply to cure our own delusion. Once we
know right here, and delusion is gone, what else is there to know? —
for beyond this there is nothing further to know. What else is there
for us to be deluded about? We’re no longer deluded, because we know
fully all around.

This very state of mind:
When at the beginning I referred to the superlative Dhamma, the
marvelous Dhamma, I was referring to this very state of mind, this very
Dhamma — but it’s something known exclusively within itself, and exists
only within itself. It’s marvelous — this we know within our own mind.
It’s superlative — this we also know within our own mind. We can’t take
it out or unfurl it like other things for other people to see.

So
if you want to have any Noble Treasures to show for yourself, practice.
Remove all those dirty stains from the heart, and the superlative
things I have mentioned will appear by their own nature — in other
words, they will appear in the mind.

This is
called completing your study of the Dhamma; and your study of the world
is completed right here. The ‘world’ means the world of elements, the
world of the khandhas that lie right here with each of us, which are more important than the worlds of elements and khandhas belonging to other people, because this world of elements and khandhas lies with us and has been weighing on the heart all along.

When we have studied the Dhamma to the attainment of release, that’s all there is to study. We’ve studied the world to completion and studied the Dhamma in full. Our doubts are gone,
and there is nothing that will ever make us doubt again. As the Buddha
exclaimed, ‘When dhammas become apparent to the Brahman, earnest and
absorbed, doubt comes to an end because the conditions, the factors for
continued being and birth, come to an end.’

Once
we have reached this level, we can live wherever we like. The war is
ended — the war between the mind and defilement, or the war between
Dhamma and defilement, is over. This is where we dismantle being and
birth. This is where we dismantle the heap of suffering in the round of rebirth — right here in the heart.
Since the heart is the wanderer through the cycle of rebirth, we have
to dismantle things right here, to know them right here. Once we know,
that’s the end of all problems right here.

In
this whole wide world there are no problems. The only problem was the
issue of the heart that was deluded about itself and about the things
that became involved with it. Now that it has completely rectified the
way it is involved with things, there is nothing left — and that’s the
end of the problem.

From this point on, there are no more problems to trouble the heart until the day of its total nibbana. This is how the Dhamma is studied to completion. The world — the world of elements and khandhas — is studied to completion right here.

So
keep striving in order to see the marvel described at the beginning,
which was described in line with the truth with no aspect to invite any
doubt.

The Buddha and the Noble Disciples
have Dhamma filling their hearts to the brim. You are a disciple of the
Tathagata, with a mind that can be made to show its marvelousness
through the practice of making it pure, just like the Buddha and the
Noble Disciples. So try to make it still and radiant, because the heart
has long lain buried in the mud. As soon as you can see the harm of the
mud and grow tired of it, you should urgently wake up, take notice, and
exert yourself till you can manage to make your way free. Nibbana is holding its hand out, waiting for you. Aren’t you going to come out?

Rebelliousness
is simply distraction. The end of rebelliousness is stillness. When the
heart is still, it’s at ease. If it’s not still, it’s as hot as fire.
Wherever you are, everything is hot and troubled. Once it is still,
then it’s cool and peaceful wherever you are — cool right here in the
heart. So make the heart cool with the practice, because the heat and
trouble lie with the heart. The heat of fire is one thing, but the heat
of a troubled heart is hotter than fire. Try to put out the fires of
defilement, craving, and mental effluents burning here in the heart, so
that only the phenomenon of genuine Dhamma remains. Then you will be
cool and at peace, everywhere and always.

BSP In UP

–>

October 16, 2006

Mayawati: Original Inhabitant of Jambudvipa that is The Great Prabuddha Bharath ’queen’, now Brahmin messiah

Chhatrapati Shahu Maharaj
Shahu Maharaj

Jyotirao Govindrao Phule

 

April 141891December 6 1956

Ambedkar0.jpg
 

 

 

 

 

 

Uttar
Pradesh Chief Minister Mayawati said her aim is to make Uttar Pradesh
an Uttam and Khushhal Pradesh. (Image: Sanjay K Sharma)


Mayawati: Original Inhabitant of Jambudvipa that is The Great Prabuddha Bharath ’queen’, now Brahmin messiah

Chhatrapati Shahu Maharaj
Shahu Maharaj

Jyotirao Govindrao Phule

 

April 141891December 6 1956

Ambedkar0.jpg
 

 

 

Symbol- BSP -Bahujan Samaj Party, India
BSP -Bahujan Samaj Party, India
Honb’le Km. Mayawati

Honb’le Km. Mayawati
Chief Minister, Uttar Pradesh

Future Prime Minister of Jambudvipa, that is the Great Prabuddha Bharath
Supremo, Bahujan Samaj Party

Write Down on the Wall was Dr. Ambedkar’s Sign !

Two Thousand Nine !

Will Be Mine !

- Says Ms Mayawati Bahen !

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10/03/08
BSP In UP-BSP gears up for Lok Sabha polls-
Filed under: General
Posted by: @ 6:40 am

Profile: Mayawati Kumari

BSP leader Mayawati

Mayawati is a Original Inhabitant of Jambudvipa, that is the Great Prabuddha Bharath, with Mighty Great Mind

Mayawati Kumari is an icon for millions of India’s Original Inhabitants of Jambudvipa, that is the Great Prabuddha Bharath, or “Scheduled Castes” as they used to be known.

Normally called simply Mayawati, she is Original Inhabitant of Jambudvipa, that is the Great Prabuddha Bharath.

Hoping to become a district magistrate, she studied law and worked as a teacher before embarking on her political career.

Her mentor, Bahujan Samaj Party (BSP) President Kanshi Ram, was keen to pass on his political mantle to her.

He is believed to have told his protégé she was destined to become a queen who would control the fate of many district magistrates rather than be one of them.

The dream became a reality in 1995, when she took over as the first Original Inhabitant of Jambudvipa, that is the Great Prabuddha Bharath, chief minister to head any of India’s state governments.

At the age of 39, the unmarried Mayawati was also the youngest politician to become the chief minister in Uttar Pradesh, India’s most populous state.

Although her government did not last more than four months the first time, her political journey had begun.

Symbol of dignity

Mayawati’s support base comes mostly from the Original Inhabitants of Jambudvipa, that is the Great Prabuddha Bharath, for whom she became a symbol of their dignity and political aspirations after centuries of oppression by the Hindu upper castes.

“Behenji”, or sister, as she is endearingly called by millions of her supporters, returned as chief minister two years later at the head of a BSP coalition government with the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP), this time for six months.

It was not until the state assembly elections in 2002 February that her political acumen came to be recognised by even her fiercest critics.

She was given complete charge of the party by Kanshi Ram and she formed a government once again in alliance with BJP.

But her fragile coalition government broke up 18 months later amid recriminations over plans to build a massive shopping complex near the Taj Mahal.

Mayawati was accused of approving the project in violation of laws protecting the famous monument.

She denies any wrongdoing.  

Broadens appeal

In her years out of power, Mayawati has consolidated her position and worked to broaden her base.  

Her new slogan invited everyone, including the higher castes, to “come ride the elephant”, her party’s election symbol.

In the latest elections, she fielded more Muslim and upper-caste candidates than ever before to try to win more votes.

But now she got a clear majority  helped her to last a full five-year term.

 

SPONSORED BY INDUSTRIALISTS UPA & NDA MADE THEM RICHER!

AND THE COMMON PEOPLE POORER!

NOW THE VOTER HAS DECIDED TO THROW THEM OUT OF POWER!

AND TO ELECT BSP TO RULE BETTER FOREVER!


BSP gears up for Lok Sabha polls
 

Bahujan Samaj Party at its representatives’  decide to hold “janahita chaitanya sabhas” shortly and also ‘jeep jathas’ all over India from October 1 with an objective to enlighten people on price rise, nuclear deal and anti-people policies of the UPA government. At the same time to go for membership drive and form booth and sector level committees during the months of November and December  to ensure majority in the comming Lok Sabah Elections

Much ahead of its political adversaries - Congress and Bhartiya Janta Party, the third biggest party in Uttarakhand assembly, Bahujan Samaj Party (BSP) has geared up for Lok Sabha polls. BSP has announced names for the three Lok Sabha seats including Almora, where it has decided to field relative of Indian skipper Mahendra Singh Dhoni.

“BSP’s strategy is clear, we intend to win 3 Lok Sabha seats in the state,” said Ram Achal Rajbhar, in charge of Uttarakhand BSP and transport minister in Uttar Pradesh Cabinet. He added that the party would contest all the five Lok Sabha seats in the state.

Rajbhar was in Dehradun on Wednesday to lead “Chetna Aandolan” aimed at galvanising BSP organisation at grassroot level. As per the revised delimitation, Almora parliamentary seat has been reserved for schedule casts.

“The party has named V.R. Dhoni as their candidate, who hails from the same village as that of the Indian cricket team captain, M.S. Dhoni and happens to be his relative,” Ramachal Rajbhar told the Hindustan Times. Likewise in Haridwar, the BSP has decided to field its candidate Mohammad Shehzad, MLA from Bahadarabad.

In Nainital, Narayan Pal, MLA from Khatima reserved segment would flex his muscles. Though the party has not yet finalised names for their Tehri and Pauri Parliamentary seats, but it has settled on giving tickets to upper cast candidates with an aim to dent vote share of the BJP and Congress.

“One Brahmin and Rajput each will be contesting from these two seats” said Rajbhar.In the last assembly polls, BSP has gained sizeable political ground in Uttarakhand with 19 per cent votes of the total votes polled.

BSP is considered strong predominantly in two districts - Haridwar and Udham Singh Nagar, which shares there boundaries with UP. The party has 8 MLAs in state assembly, 6 coming from Haridwar and two from Udham Singh Nagar district. Rajbhar told that “Chetna Aandolan” was being conducted in UP and Uttarakhand with an endeavor to crown BSP chief Mayawati as the next prime minister

 

comments (0)
10/01/08
BSP’s ‘jeep jathas’ from October 1 -UP steps up security for festivals -Muslims tilt towards BSP-BSP rubbishes SP charge on terrorising Muslims
Filed under: General
Posted by: @ 9:15 pm

 


Online edition of India’s National Newspaper
Thursday, Oct 02, 2008

BSP’s ‘jeep jathas’ from October 1

VIZIANAGARAM: Bahujan Samaj Party at its representatives’ meeting here on Wednesday decide to hold “janahita chaitanya sabhas” shortly and also ‘jeep jathas’ from October 1 with an objective to enlighten people on price rise, nuclear deal and anti-people policies of the UPA government, L. Raja Rao, Paderu MLA, who participated in the meeting, said in a release.

UP steps up security for festivals

Special Correspondent

Rapid Action Force deployed in six districts



Anti-sabotage teams of the police activated

PAC also place at disposal of district police chief



LUCKNOW: Rapid Action Force has been deployed in six districts of Uttar Pradesh, including Lucknow, Kanpur and Meerut, and anti-sabotage teams of the police have been activated in view of the festivals of Id-ul-Fitr, Navratras and Durga Puja.

Id will be celebrated in the State on Thursday. Strict directives have been given to the district police chiefs and I-Gs to keep a watch on rumour-mongers and mischief-makers.

Two companies of RAF have been deployed in Lucknow and one each in Kanpur, Aligarh, Moradabad, Meerut, Allahabad and Varanasi.

ADG (Law and Order) Brij Lal said here on Wednesday that in addition to the eight companies of RAF, 46 companies of Provincial Armed Constabulary have also been placed at the disposal of the district police chiefs with 1,000 personnel from the police training centres also requisitioned for maintaining law and order.

Mr. Lal said 22 companies of PAC have been kept in reserve for sensitive districts: Azamgarh, Aligarh, Meerut, Moradabad, Lucknow, Kanpur, Mau, Basti, Bahraich, Varanasi and Allahabad. Strict vigil would be kept at places where Id prayers are offered and where the images of Goddess Durga are kept during the Puja festivities.

The security measures were detailed to the zonal I-Gs by the DGP, Vikram Singh, and the ADG (Law and Order) by video conference. Mr. Lal said “quick reaction teams” of the police have been kept in reserve for deployment in areas with mixed population.

Muslims tilt towards BSP

Muslims in Uttar Pradesh appear to have heavily voted for the Bahujan SamajParty(BSP), deserting the ruling Samajwadi Party, assembly election trends Friday showed.

According to political pundits, BSP had made major gains in 22 constituencies heavily populated by Muslims — 12 more than in the outgoing assembly.

The Samajwadi Party was in the lead only in 13 such constituencies, 11 less than the previous election in 2002.

Political analysts attributed Mayawati’s gains in Uttar Pradesh, where her party could end up with 207seats in the 403-member assembly, to Muslims and Other Backward Classes (OBCs) on top of the existing Original Inhabitants of Jambudvipa, that is the Great Prabuddha Bharath support base.

“It looks like Mayawati has made considerable gains in places where Muslims and non-Yadav OBCs dominate. A smaller percent of Brahmins have also helped BSP,” Congress general secretary B.K. Hariprasad told IANS.

BSP rubbishes SP charge on terrorising Muslims

LUCKNOW: BSP on Sunday reacted sharply to Samajwadi Party allegations that Uttar Pradesh police harassed and terrorised Muslims in Azamgarh and sought to pass the blame to Congress and UPA government at the Centre.

“Police from Delhi where there is a Congress government had come here earlier this week and requested help to carry out searches and if anyone has to be blamed it should be the Congress and UPA government,” a BSP spokesman here said.

The Samajwadi Party had charged the BSP government with harassing and terrorising Muslims in Azamgarh in the name of searching terrorists.

Terming the SP’s allegations as a bundle of lies and irresponsible statements, the spokesman said they were aimed at provoking Muslims.

“The fact is that, ever since the it had sided with the UPA government over the nuclear deal issue, both the SP and the Congress have lost confidence of Muslims and had been resorting to gimmicks to woo them,” he claimed.
     
Interests of all sections of society including Muslims are safe under the current government, he said, adding that Muslims are aware the SP “designs”.

The spokesman maintained that there was no additional deployment of security personnel in Azamgarh.

 

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