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09/30/11
391 LESSON 01 10 2011 Donapaka Sutta King Pasenadi Goes on a Diet
Filed under: General
Posted by: @ 9:47 pm

391 LESSON 01 10 2011


Donapaka Sutta King Pasenadi Goes on a Diet


FREE ONLINE eNālandā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY


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BUDDHIST GOOD NEWS LETTER


Through


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FREE ONLINE CONCENTRATION PRACTICE INSTITUTE FOR
STUDENTS(FOCPIS)-


The Narratives for the Levels of Departmental Curricula- Course
Descriptions-

Unraveling Logic in Buddhist Texts I

SN 3.13


PTS: S i 81


CDB i 176


Donapaka Sutta: King Pasenadi Goes on a Diet


translated from the Pali by


Andrew Olendzki


© 2005–2011


Alternate translation: Walshe


Once when the Buddha was living at Savatthi,
King Pasenadi of Kosala ate a whole bucketful of food, and then approached the
Buddha, engorged and panting, and sat down to one side. The Buddha, discerning
that King Pasenadi was engorged and panting, took the occasion to utter this
verse:


When a person is constantly mindful, And knows when enough food
has been taken, All their afflictions become more slender — They age more
gradually, protecting their lives.


Now at that time the brahman youth Sudassana
was standing nearby, and King Pasenadi of Kosala addressed him: “Come now,
my dear Sudassana, and having thoroughly mastered this verse in the presence of
the Buddha, recite it whenever food is brought to me. And I will set up for you
a permanent offering of a hundred kahaapanas every day.” “So
be it, your majesty,” the brahman youth Sudassana replied to the king.


Then King Pasenadi of Kosala gradually settled
down to [eating] no more than a cup-full of rice. At a later time, when his
body had become quite slim, King Pasenadi stroked his limbs with his hand and
took the occasion to utter this utterance:


Indeed the Buddha has shown me Compassion in two different ways:
For my welfare right here and now, and also for in the future.


Translator’s note


Who would have thought weight-loss could be so
easy! In this brief exchange the Buddha is suggesting that over-eating is the
root of obesity, which hastens the aging process and threatens one’s life, and
that this only occurs when mindfulness is weak or absent. If we eat slowly and
with a great deal of attention, it can more easily become apparent (if we are
truthful with ourselves) when an adequate amount of food has been consumed.
Interestingly, he seems to be saying that wisdom will provide what is needed to
refrain from further eating, rather than the modern conventional view that it
requires will-power or self restraint.


Always one to play on words, the Buddha says
that all our afflictions (literally, all our unpleasant feelings), and not just
our bodies, will “become more slender.” Perhaps this is what Pasenadi
is referring to when he says the Buddha’s teaching has not only helped him slim
down his body (the immediate benefit), but the general increase of mindfulness
and diminishing of greed will help with all aspects of the spiritual life (and
thus with his rebirth in the future).


The commentary to this text informs us that
the king did not engage Sudassana to utter the verse throughout the entire
meal, but only once he had started eating. The idea is not to cultivate an
aversion to food, for food itself is not an evil. As with so much else in the
Buddha’s teaching, it is a matter of understanding cause and effect, and of
using food skillfully as a tool for awakening rather than allowing oneself to
be caught by the latent tendencies of attachment, aversion and confusion that
might be evoked by our relationship to food.


Notice the language of the last line of the
Buddha’s verse. The word for life (aayu) is the same one as in the
Indian medical tradition of Ayurveda (=knowledge of life), and is regarded as
something that can be squandered or carefully guarded. When approached with
care, the preservation of life also slows down the aging process. The image is
not one of conquering illness or death (for this comes only from full
awakening), but of treating the precious resource of one’s own vitality with
wisdom.

FREE ONLINE CONCENTRATION PRACTICE INSTITUTE FOR
STUDENTS(FOCPIS)


DOB 550 Unraveling Logic in Buddhist Texts I - 1 credit


Delivery Mode: Residential


Course Description:


This course prepares
students to understand the logical arguments found in classic


Buddhist texts and oral
teachings, focusing on applying the principles of logic and


Tibetan-style debate. It
offers a methodical training in the underlying structure of debate


as found in texts,
building on skills acquired in Clear Thinking class. We will formulate


reasonings and track a
debate in a text. Of the three types of reasons, the emphasis will


be on understanding
reasons of nature.


Prerequisites: DOB 501, DOB 502


comments (0)
390 LESSON 30 09 2011 Anuradha Sutta: To Anuradha-FREE ONLINE eNālandā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY & BUDDHIST GOOD NEWS LETTER Through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org FREE ONLINE CONCENTRATION PRACTICE INSTITUTE FOR STUDENTS(FOCPIS)- The Narratives for the Levels of Departmental Curricula- Course Descriptions- Mind and its World IV: Vaibhāshika and Sautrāntika Philosophical Traditions Prabuddhanagar, Panchsheel Nagar, Bhimnagar : UP gets three new districts-Maya suspends MLA Haji Yaqoob from BSP -Mayawati sends quota reminder to PM -Poor condition of highways in UP: Maya sends letter to PM -Mayawati to launch election campaign
Filed under: General
Posted by: @ 12:52 am

390 LESSON 30 09 2011

Anuradha
Sutta: To Anuradha

FREE ONLINE eNālandā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY

&

BUDDHIST GOOD NEWS LETTER

Through

http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org

FREE ONLINE CONCENTRATION PRACTICE INSTITUTE FOR
STUDENTS(FOCPIS)-

The Narratives for the Levels of Departmental Curricula- Course
Descriptions-

Mind and its World IV: Vaibhāshika and Sautrāntika Philosophical
Traditions

Prabuddhanagar,
Panchsheel Nagar, Bhimnagar : UP gets three new districts

Maya suspends MLA Haji Yaqoob from BSP

Mayawati sends quota reminder to PM

Poor condition of highways in UP:
Maya sends letter to PM

Mayawati to launch election
campaign

Maya to sell development plank in
UP


Chief
Electoral Office asked BSP to identify Booth Level Agents (BLAs) to take up Special
Campaign for Roll Revision process on 9th, 16th and 23rd
October, 2011 under the aegis of Booth Level Officers (BLOs). On these Special
campaign dates, the BLO will go through the voters rolls with BLAs of BSP of
the State and identify correction etc. Now we must select One agent per booth
of 44,497 for the purpose and submit to Kar.BSO HO to hand over the same to CEO
Karnataka.

feedbackeci@gmail.com

ceokarnataka@gmail.com, karnatakabsp@yahoo.com,bspkar1891@rediffmail.com

Respected
Sir,

Sub:whether voters are automatically added to the rolls
when they reach legal voting age or not?


“Superintendence, direction and control of the electoral rolls, and for
the conduct of, all elections to Parliament and to the Legislature of every
State and of elections to the offices of President and Vice-President
  held under this constitution1***shall be
vested in a Commission (referred to in this Constitution as the Election
Commission).”

In some countries, including most developed
countries, registration is the responsibility of the government, either local
or national.

Even in countries where registration is the individual’s responsibility, many
reformers, seeking to maximize voter turnout, have pushed for wider
availability of the required forms.


Same day registration is also known as
Election Day Registration. Nine states in the US do not require advance registration,
instead allowing voters to register when they arrive at the polls or, in the
case of North Dakota, eliminating the registration step altogether. Five of
these states rank highest in the nation in voter turnout.


Laws requiring individual voters to register,
as opposed to having the government register people automatically, have a
strong
correlation
with lower numbers of people
turning out to vote
where voting is voluntary. This lower turnout is especially concentrated among
low-income voters and young voters — i.e., those least likely to vote no matter
what the registration requirements.
[1]
Because of this, such laws are often controversial. Some advocate for their
abolition, while others argue that the laws should be reformed, for instance: allowing
voters to register on the day of the election. This tactic, called
Election Day Registration,
has been adopted by several
U.S. states:
Connecticut,
Idaho,
Iowa, Maine,
Minnesota,
Montana,
New Hampshire,
Wisconsin
and
Wyoming.


I wish to know in India whether voters are automatically added to the rolls when they reach
legal voting age or not?



Your Early reply is solicited

With Kind Regards,

Your’s Sincerly
J.Chandrasekharan


SN
22.86

PTS:
S
iii 116

CDB
i 936

Anuradha
Sutta: To Anuradha

translated
from the Pali by

Thanissaro
Bhikkhu

©
2004–2011

Alternate
translation:
Walshe

This
sutta is identical to
SN 44.2.

I have
heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying near Vesali,
in the Great Wood, at the Hall of the Gabled Pavilion. At
that time Ven. Anuradha was staying not far from the
Blessed One in a wilderness hut.

Then a
large number of wandering sectarians went to Ven. Anuradha and on arrival
exchanged courteous greetings with him. After an exchange of friendly greetings
& courtesies, they sat to one side. As they were sitting there, they said
to Ven. Anuradha, “Friend Anuradha, the Tathagata — the supreme man, the
superlative man, attainer of the superlative attainment — being described, is
described with [one of] these four positions: The Tathagata exists after death,
does not exist after death, both does & does not exist after death, neither
exists nor does not exist after death.”

When
this was said, Ven. Anuradha said to the wandering sectarians, “Friends,
the Tathagata — the supreme man, the superlative man, attainer of the
superlative attainment — being described, is described otherwise than with
these four positions: The Tathagata exists after death, does not exist after
death, both does & does not exist after death, neither exists nor does not
exist after death.”

When
this was said, the wandering sectarians said to Ven. Anuradha, “This monk
is either a newcomer, not long gone forth, or else an elder who is foolish
& inexperienced.” So the wandering sectarians, addressing Ven.
Anuradha as they would a newcomer or a fool, got up from their seats and left.

Then
not long after the wandering sectarians had left, this thought occurred to Ven.
Anuradha: “If I am questioned again by those wandering sectarians, how
will I answer in such a way that will I speak in line with what the Blessed One
has said, will not misrepresent the Blessed One with what is unfactual, will
answer in line with the Dhamma, so that no one whose thinking is in line with
the Dhamma will have grounds for criticizing me?”

Then
Ven. Anuradha went to the Blessed One and on arrival, having bowed down to the
Blessed One, sat to one side. As he was sitting there he said to the Blessed
One: “Just now I was staying not far from the Blessed One in a wilderness
hut. Then a large number of wandering sectarians came and… said to me,
‘Friend Anuradha, the Tathagata — the supreme man, the superlative man, attainer
of the superlative attainment — being described, is described with [one of]
these four positions: The Tathagata exists after death, does not exist after
death, both does & does not exist after death, neither exists nor does not
exist after death.’

“When
this was said, I said to them, ‘Friends, the Tathagata — the supreme man, the
superlative man, attainer of the superlative attainment — being described, is
described otherwise than with these four positions: The Tathagata exists after
death, does not exist after death, both does & does not exist after death,
neither exists nor does not exist after death.’

“When
this was said, the wandering sectarians said to me, ‘This monk is either a
newcomer, not long gone forth, or else an elder who is foolish & inexperienced.’
So, addressing me as they would a newcomer or a fool, they got up from their
seats and left.

“Then
not long after the wandering sectarians had left, this thought occurred to me:
‘If I am questioned again by those wandering sectarians, how will I answer in
such a way that will I speak in line with what the Blessed One has said, will
not misrepresent the Blessed One with what is unfactual, will answer in line
with the Dhamma, and no one whose thinking is in line with the Dhamma will have
grounds for criticizing me?’”

“What
do you think, Anuradha: Is form constant or inconstant?”

“Inconstant,
lord.”

“And
is that which is inconstant easeful or stressful?”

“Stressful,
lord.”

“And
is it proper to regard what is inconstant, stressful, subject to change as:
‘This is mine. This is my self. This is what I am’?”

“No,
lord.”

“Is
feeling constant or inconstant?”

“Inconstant,
lord.”…

“Is
perception constant or inconstant?”

“Inconstant,
lord.”…

“Are
fabrications constant or inconstant?”

“Inconstant,
lord.”…

“Is
consciousness constant or inconstant?

“Inconstant,
lord.”

“And
is that which is inconstant easeful or stressful?”

“Stressful,
lord.”

“And
is it proper to regard what is inconstant, stressful, subject to change as:
‘This is mine. This is my self. This is what I am’?”

“No,
lord.”

“What
do you think, Anuradha: Do you regard form as the Tathagata?”

“No,
lord.”

“Do
you regard feeling as the Tathagata?”

“No,
lord.”

“Do
you regard perception as the Tathagata?”

“No,
lord.”

“Do
you regard fabrications as the Tathagata?”

“No,
lord.”

“Do
you regard consciousness as the Tathagata?”

“No,
lord.”

“What
do you think, Anuradha: Do you regard the Tathagata as being in form?…
Elsewhere than form?… In feeling?… Elsewhere than feeling?… In
perception?… Elsewhere than perception?… In fabrications?… Elsewhere than
fabrications?… In consciousness?… Elsewhere than consciousness?”

“No,
lord.”

“What
do you think: Do you regard the Tathagata as
form-feeling-perception-fabrications-consciousness?”

“No,
lord.”

“Do
you regard the Tathagata as that which is without form, without feeling,
without perception, without fabrications, without consciousness?”

“No,
lord.”

“And
so, Anuradha — when you can’t pin down the Tathagata as a truth or reality even
in the present life — is it proper for you to declare, ‘Friends, the Tathagata
— the supreme man, the superlative man, attainer of the superlative attainment
— being described, is described otherwise than with these four positions: The
Tathagata exists after death, does not exist after death, both does & does
not exist after death, neither exists nor does not exist after death’?”

“No,
lord.”

“Very
good, Anuradha. Very good. Both formerly & now, it is only
stress that I describe, and the cessation of stress.”

See also:
The suttas in the
Avyakata
Samyutta
.

DOB 530 Mind and
its World IV: Vaibhāshika and Sautrāntika Philosophical

Traditions - 2 credits

 

Delivery
Mode: Residential & Online

Course
Description:

 

This
course is a systematic study of the foundational schools of Buddhist
philosophy.

Vaibhāshika
and Sautrāntika tenets are valued for their presentation of a contemplative

world-view
of radical impermanence, without needing to postulate neither a personal

identity
nor any principle of divine creation. Only momentary entities are able to
perform

functions;
since concepts are not able to perform functions like their referent objects,
they

are
nominally classified as “permanent” and relegated to the realm of
near non-existence.

Prerequisites:
DOB 501, DOB 502

1.1.2
Foundation Curriculum: Logic



[mfc_mumbai]
Prabuddhanagar, Panchsheel Nagar, Bhimnagar : UP gets three new districts

Prabuddhanagar,
Panchsheel Nagar, Bhimnagar : UP gets three new districts


On the first day of her statewide tour, Chief Minister Mayawati on Wednesday
announced the creation of three more districts — Prabuddhanagar, Panchsheel
Nagar and Bhimnagar — and reiterated her old demand for dividing Uttar Pradesh
into smaller states.


Prabuddhanagar comprises
Muzaffarnagar’s Shamli and Kairana tehsils, and Panchsheel Nagar consists of Ghaziabad’s Hapur, Garhmukteshwar and
Dhaulana tehsils.


Carved out of Moradabad district,
Bhimnagar
includes Sambhal, Chandausi and Gunnaur tehsils. After these additions, UP will
have 75 districts.


She also announced her government’s decision to upgrade Dhaulana as a new
tehsil.


The Chief Minister began her state-wide tour by visiting Shamli in
Muzaffarnagar, Hapur in Ghaziabad and Sambhal in Moradabad and announced her
decision to make these places the headquarters of the newly created districts.


She said there would be no change in the name of Hapur town.


Mayawati also used the opportunity to play her old card, demanding division of
Uttar Pradesh into three separate states — Pashchimanchal, Purvanchal and
Bundelkhand.


The Chief Minister had earlier written letters to Prime Minister Manmohan Singh,
demanding creation of three separate states.


She told the gathering at all three places that she has always favoured the
creation of three separate states by dividing the state and underlined the need
for the reconstitution of Uttar Pradesh for this purpose.


The CM said the creation of separate states is the Centre’s domain, adding both
the Congress and BJP did not take any step in this regard during their tenures.


Reiterating her demand for reservation to Muslims and poor among upper castes
as well as inclusion of Jats in the central list of other backward classes,
Mayawati said she favoured an increase in the quota of OBCs and SCs. She also
demanded reservation for these communities in the judiciary and private
sectors.


Justifying her decision to create smaller districts, she said: “The idea of
smaller units was propagated by leaders like Bhim Rao Ambedkar and Jyotirao
Phule.”


She also said smaller administrative units help maintain law and order, besides
ensuring development.


Mayawati said she took the decision after she surveyed the state of development
in all existing 72 districts of the state.


“It was found that the Ghaziabad district was far too big for administrative
efficiency. The rural areas of Hapur were not benefiting in terms of
development, so this decision has been taken.” She said the move would allow
the Ghaziabad Development Authority to concentrate on a smaller area, mostly
urban and industrial.


Coming down hard on the central government, the Chief Minister said the Centre
had not been cooperating with the BSP’s efforts to develop Uttar Pradesh.


“We asked for a economic package of Rs 8,000 crore in 2007 but that request was
turned down. In spite of that, the state government has carried out a lot of
development activities.”


Mayawati also inspected police stations and tehsil offices. “During her visit
to the Hapur police station, she expressed her unhappiness for not keeping the
premises clean,” a government statement said.


The statement said the CM took a serious view of the absence of mobile numbers
of complainants in the tehsil register. At Shambhal and Shamli, she reviewed
the implementation of various government schemes.


Insiders said the CM has started giving special focus to western UP where the
BSP is facing trouble in the wake of land acquisition. “Her decision to upgrade
Shambhal as Bhimnagar district would help her woo Muslim voters. This is a
politically right decision before the 2012 Assembly elections,” a source in the
BSP said.


Sources in the government said she would visit Kanpur, Auraiya and Ramabai
Nagar on September 30.


Hapur residents were elated. Harish Yadav, who was part of the Hapur Sangharsh
Samiti, said, “We have been making this demand for a separate district since
1976. Now that it has come true, maybe the region will get some attention. It
has been ignored for far too long.”


New DMs in new districts


The state government on Wednesday posted District Magistrates in the three
newly created districts of Uttar Pradesh.


Pragyan Ram Mishra has been posted as DM of Bhimnagar, Ajay Kumar Singh is DM
of Prabuddhanagar and Saurabh Babu has been made the DM of Panchsheel Nagar.


The government has also transferred three other IAS officers. Nitishwar Kumar
has been made Managing Director of Madhyanchal Vidyut Board, Raj Shekhar is DM
of Jalaun and Sunita Chaturvedi is DM of Balrampur.



With
Regards

Sandip Patil
 
Mumbai, 8149645674

Maya suspends MLA Haji Yaqoob from BSP

HT Correspondent, Hindustan Times

Lucknow, September 26, 2011

The chief minister Mayawati on Monday suspended one more BSP MLA Haji Yaqoob Quereshi from the party. Quereshi, who represented Meerut assembly segment, has been charged with anti-party activities. As a part of cleansing exercise the chief minister has so far suspended one dozen MLAs from the party.

Mayawati has issued instructions to the party leaders that Quereshi should not be allowed to attend any party programme. Quereshi, who had won on the symbol of United Democratic Front (UDF) in 2007, had merged his party in the BSP on June 3, 2007.

Announcing his suspension from the party, state unit chief Swami Prasad Maurya said Quereshi, because of his objectionable statements had been controversial right from the beginning.

However the axe has now fallen on him for his comments against the 
Sikh community during the foundation laying ceremony of modern slaughterhouse in Meerut recently. Maurya said his comments had caused resentment in the Sikh community in the state. Quereshi was not available for comment.

The BSP has so far taken action against a dozen MLAs for their 
anti-party and criminal activities. The chief minister had also suspended Mafiosi-turned MP from Jaunpur Dhananjay Singh last week for meeting former SP leader Amar Singh in Tihar Jail in Delhi.

The chief minister had also denied BSP ticket to MLA from Hastinapur Yogendra Verma on Sunday.

The suspended MLAs are Shekhar Tiwari, who is in jail in connection with murder of an engineer in Auraiyya, Anand Sen also in jail in a murder case, Purshottan Naresh Dwevidi, (in jail) charged with raping a girl in Banda, Farid Mahfooz Kidwai, Krishna Kumar Singh alias Satish Verma (both left party to join SP), Awadhpal Yadav suspended after Lokayukta report, Bhagwan Sharma alias Guddu Pandit accused of his criminal activities, Dashrath Prasad Chauhan and Ashok Singh Chandel also accused of his criminal activities. There are possibilities of action against some more BSP MLAs. Kidwai has now been expelled from the membership of the House under anti-defection
law.

Maurya said the BSP had full respect for all religions. He said the BSP had taken serious note of statement of Quereshi against the community. As a part of continued crackdown on Dhananjay Singh, the government has also withdrawn Y category security to him. The government had provided 11 constables for his security. Now he has
just one constable.

Singh said he had been provided Y category on the recommendation of 
central government. He said there was threat to his life.

Mayawati sends quota reminder to PM

Express news service Posted online: Tue Sep 27 2011, 03:28 hrs

Lucknow : In yet another letter to Prime Minister Manmohan Singh,

Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Mayawati has reminded him of her earlier demands for giving reservation to Muslims and upper castes, besides including Jats in the central OBC list.

In her letter on Monday, Mayawati demanded an increase in the existing quota of 27 per cent for OBCs and then urged him to accommodate Muslims and Jats in it.

Besides, she has also suggested an increase in the existing quota for 
Schedules Castes to pave the way for the entry of some OBCs in it.

Mayawati favoured reservation for Jats and Muslims within the OBC quota in accordance with their population, but only after an increase in the existing quota.

In her letter, Mayawati also reiterated her demand for giving reservation to the poor among the upper castes.

Elaborating on the need to write another letter to the Prime Minister,
Mayawati said the issue was very sensitive.

Referring to the Sachar Committee’s reports, she underlined the need
to give opportunities to minorities, particularly Muslims, for their
progress in every field such as jobs and education.

She also reminded the PM of her earlier demands like reservation for
OBC and SCs/STs in private sectors and the judiciary. She said there must be serious efforts for covering the poor among the upper castes under the reservation policy.

According to government statement, the Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister
requested the Centre to include OBC castes such as Kahara, Kashyap,Kewat, Mallah, Nishad, Bind, Kumhar, Prajapati, Dhiver, Bhar, Rajbhar,Batham, Turaha, Gond, Lonia-Chauhan, Pal and Baghel in the SC/ST list after increasing the existing quota.

Poor condition of highways in UP:
Maya sends letter to PM

Ashish Tripathi, TNN | Sep 27, 2011, 08.17PM IST

LUCKNOW: UP chief minister Mayawati has shot off two letters to prime minister Manmohan Singh. While the first one is to draw the attention of Singh towards the poor conditions of national highways passing through UP, the other one is about short supply of fertilisers.

A DVD with footage of pot holed roads has been attached with the letter to make prime minister have an idea of reality. So far, Mayawati has written six letters to the prime minister in last one week. The four letters earlier were on providing reservations to Muslims, Jats, the poor among the upper caste and implementing quota in private sector.

In the first letter, Mayawati has informed the prime minister that the conditions of the highways have turned from bad to worse following heavy rains during the monsoon. Interestingly, in first of its kind endeavour, the chief minister has also attached a DVD having footage of pathetic condition of the national highways (93, 119, 74, 72A, 73,
76, 76E, 75E, 7, 19, 232, 91A, 92 and 97) passing through UP.

Mayawati has requested prime minister to pay immediate attention towards the problem because bad condition of roads is also leading to loss of human life due to accidents. The condition of the roads, she said, is also affecting the development of the state. She has reminded the prime minister of the letter written by the UP government to the
Union minister of national highways and transport, regarding release of funds for repair of national highways. As many as 43 national highways pass through UP. The total length of the highways is 6681 km, of which 3178 km comes under the state public works department.

Mayawati has also reminded the prime minister that Rs 900 crore were sanctioned for the repair and construction of national highways in the financial year 2010-11. However, only Rs 50.50 have been released so far. Further, she said for the financial year 2011-12, Rs 737 crore were earmarked. However, money has not been released despite the fact
that the state government has sent an estimate of Rs 683.64 crore for renovation of highways. “After seeing the DVD you will come to know about the reality and the urgency required to tackle the situation,”she has stated in the letter.

The second letter is about inadequate supply of fertilisers to UP. In her letter, Mayawati has said that UP government has requested for 67 lakh metric tonne of fertilisers (40 lakh metric tonne of urea, 12 lakh metric tonne of DAP, 0.50 lakh metric tonne of MAP, 1 lakh metric tonne of DAP light, 8.50 lakh metric tonne of NPK, 2,50 lakh metric
tonne of MOP and 2.50 lakh metric tonne of SSP) from the Central government. However, the Centre has provided only 53.15 lakh metric tonne of fertilisers (33 lakh metric tonne of urea, 9.15 lak metric tonne DAP, six lakh metric tonne NPK, 2,50 lakh metric tonne MOP and 2.50 lakh metric tonne of SSP) so far.

Mayawati has also reminded the prime minister that UP was awarded best performing state for bumper crops in 2010-11 financial year. The BSP government took a number of measures, including better electricity supply, availability of seeds and fertilisers and better procurement for increasing income of the farmers, to boost agriculture production
in the state. In order to sustain high productivity, state government will have to provide good quality fertilisers to the farmers. However, despite several requests, the Central government is not cooperating with the state government, Mayawati has complained in the letter.

Interestingly, after coming to power Maya has written over 100 letters to PM on different issues demanding funds for development of the state. However, none of her demands have been met by the Congress led UPA government. The recent letters are being seen as chief minister’s attempt to show people in the election year that highways are in bad
shape because of the Congress led UPA government. The move also aims to take out the sting from the Congress allegations on lack of development in the state under Maya rule. This is the fifth letter of Mayawati to Singh in last one week.

Mayawati to launch election
campaign

NDTV Correspondent, Updated: September 28, 2011 12:13 IST

Lucknow: Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Mayawati will launch her election campaign for the 2012 Assembly elections today.

The state government is expected to announce three new districts to be carved out of Muzaffarnagar, Ghaziabad and Moradabad. Shamli, Hapur
and Sambhal also may get district status.

The Chief Minister is also likely to begin her state-wide tour from today to collect feedback about the development works and law and
order situation in the state.

Maya to sell development plank in
UP

Age Corespondent

New Delhi

UP chief minister and BSP supremo Mayawati is gearing up  for the 2012 state Assembly elections and is seeking to sell the development plank in the western UP region to consolidate non-jat voters in favour of her party.

Ms Mayawati will be setting off on a whirlwind tour of the western UP to impress upon the people benefits of three new districts in the
region. The BSP supremo is scheduled to visit Hapur, Shaymli and Sambhal, all three new districts, on Wednesday to drive home the point
that the government would be much nearer to them than earlier.

The BSP had won a large number of Assembly seats from the western UP in the 2007 Assembly elections by winning support
of the SC/STs and Muslims.


“The BSP is banking on the core support base (SC/STs) in the region. The state government under the leadership of Ms Mayawati has taken
several initiatives to make administrative responsive to the needs of the people along with setting up a dedicated police set up specifically for the region,” said a BSP functionary.

The party leaders said that the BSP supremo would be reaching out to people in the region more frequently.

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09/28/11
388 & 389 LESSONS 28 & 29 09 2011 Arittha Sutta To Arittha & Yamaka Sutta To Yamaka-FREE ONLINE eNālandā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY & BUDDHIST GOOD NEWS LETTER Through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org FREE ONLINE CONCENTRATION PRACTICE INSTITUTE FOR STUDENTS(FOCPIS)- The Narratives for the Levels of Departmental Curricula- Course Descriptions- Mind and its World III: Modes of Engagement
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388 & 389 LESSONS 28 & 29 09 2011 Arittha
Sutta To Arittha
& Yamaka Sutta To Yamaka

388 LESSON 28 09 2011

Arittha
Sutta To Arittha

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Mind and its World III: Modes of Engagement


AN 4.36

PTS: A
ii 37

Dona Sutta: With Dona

translated from the Pali by

Thanissaro Bhikkhu

©
2005–2011

On one occasion the Blessed One was traveling
along the road between Ukkattha and Setabya,
and Dona the brahman was also traveling along the road between Ukkattha and
Setabya. Dona the brahman saw, in the Blessed One’s footprints, wheels with
1,000 spokes, together with rims and hubs, complete in all their features. On
seeing them, the thought occurred to him, “How amazing! How astounding!
These are not the footprints of a human being!”

Then the Blessed One, leaving the road, went
to sit at the root of a certain tree — his legs crossed, his body erect, with
mindfulness established to the fore. Then Dona, following the Blessed One’s
footprints, saw him sitting at the root of the tree: confident, inspiring
confidence, his senses calmed, his mind calmed, having attained the utmost
control & tranquility, tamed, guarded, his senses restrained, a naga.[1]

On seeing him, he went to him and said, “Master, are you a deva?”[2]

“No, brahman, I am not a deva.”

“Are you a gandhabba?”

“No…”

“… a yakkha?”

“No…”

“… a human being?”

“No, brahman, I am not a human
being.”

“When asked, ‘Are you a deva?’ you
answer, ‘No, brahman, I am not a deva.’ When asked, ‘Are you a gandhabba?’ you
answer, ‘No, brahman, I am not a gandhabba.’ When asked, ‘Are you a yakkha?’
you answer, ‘No, brahman, I am not a yakkha.’ When asked, ‘Are you a human
being?’ you answer, ‘No, brahman, I am not a human being.’ Then what sort of
being are you?”

“Brahman, the fermentations by which — if
they were not abandoned — I would be a deva: Those are abandoned by me, their
root destroyed, made like a palmyra stump, deprived of the conditions of
development, not destined for future arising. The fermentations by which — if
they were not abandoned — I would be a gandhabba… a yakkha… a human being:
Those are abandoned by me, their root destroyed, made like a palmyra stump,
deprived of the conditions of development, not destined for future arising.

“Just like a red, blue, or white lotus —
born in the water, grown in the water, rising up above the water — stands
unsmeared by the water, in the same way I — born in the world, grown in the
world, having overcome the world — live unsmeared by the world. Remember me,
brahman, as ‘awakened.’

“The fermentations by which I would go to a deva-state, or become
a gandhabba in the sky, or go to a yakkha-state & human-state: Those have
been destroyed by me, ruined, their stems removed. Like a blue lotus, rising
up, unsmeared by water, unsmeared am I by the world, and so, brahman, I’m
awake.”

Notes

1.

“Naga” is a term used to
describe a great being, such as an elephant or a great, magical serpent.
Buddhists adopted the term as an epithet for the Buddha and his arahant
disciples.

2.

Dona phrases his question in the
future tense, which has led to a great deal of discussion as to what this
entire dialogue means: Is he asking what the Buddha will be in a future life,
or is he asking what he is right now? The context of the discussion seems to
demand the second alternative — Dona wants to know what kind of being would
have such amazing footprints, and the Buddha’s image of the lotus describes his
present state — but the grammar of Dona’s questions would seem to demand the
first. However, A. K. Warder, in his Introduction to Pali (p. 55), notes
that the future tense is often used to express perplexity, surprise, or wonder
about something in the present: “What might this be?” “What on
earth is this?” This seems to be the sense of Dona’s questions here. His
earlier statement — “These are not the footprints of a human being” —
is also phrased in the future tense, and the mood of wonder extends throughout
his conversation with the Buddha.

It’s also possible that the Buddha’s answers to Dona’s questions
— which, like the questions, are put in the future tense — are a form of
word-play, in which the Buddha is using the future tense in both its meanings,
to refer both to his present and to his future state.

The Buddha’s refusal to identify himself as a human being
relates to a point made throughout the Canon, that an awakened person cannot be
defined in any way at all. On this point, see
MN 72, SN 22.85, SN 22.86, and the article, “A Verb for Nirvana.” Because a mind with clinging
is “located” by its clinging, an awakened person takes no place in
any world: this is why he/she is unsmeared by the world (loka), like the
lotus unsmeared by water.

389 LESSON 29 09 2011

Yamaka Sutta To Yamaka

SN 22.85

Yamaka Sutta

To Yamaka

Translated from the Pali by

Thanissaro Bhikkhu

I have heard that on one
occasion Ven. Sariputta was staying near Savatthi at Jeta’s Grove, Anathapindika’s monastery. Now, at that time this evil
supposition had arisen to Ven. Yamaka: “As I
understand the Teaching explained by the Blessed One, a monk with no more
(mental) effluents, on the break-up of the body, is annihilated, perishes,
& does not exist after death.” A large number of monks heard,
“They say that this evil supposition has arisen to Ven. Yamaka: ‘As I
understand the Teaching explained by the Blessed One, a monk with no more
effluents, on the break-up of the body, is annihilated, perishes, & does
not exist after death.’” So they went to Ven. Yamaka and on arrival
exchanged courteous greetings. After an exchange of friendly greetings &
courtesies, they sat to one side. As they were sitting there, they said to Ven.
Yamaka, “Is it true, friend Yamaka, that this evil supposition has arisen
to you: ‘As I understand the Teaching explained by the Blessed One, a monk with
no more effluents, on the break-up of the body, is annihilated, perishes, &
does not exist after death.’

“Yes, friends. As I
understand the Teaching explained by the Blessed One, a monk with no more
effluents, on the break-up of the body, is annihilated, perishes, & does
not exist after death.”

“Don’t say that, friend
Yamaka. Don’t misrepresent the Blessed One. It’s not good to misrepresent the
Blessed One, for the Blessed One would not say, ‘A monk with no more effluents,
on the break-up of the body, is annihilated, perishes, & does not exist
after death.’”

But even though Ven. Yamaka
was thus rebuked by those monks, he — from stubbornness & attachment —
maintained his adherence to that evil supposition: ‘As I understand the
Teaching explained by the Blessed One, a monk with no more effluents, on the break-up
of the body, is annihilated, perishes, & does not exist after death.’

When those monks could not pry
Ven. Yamaka loose from his evil supposition, they got up from their seats and
went to Ven. Sariputta. On arrival they said to him: “Friend Sariputta,
this evil supposition has arisen to Ven. Yamaka: ‘As I understand the Teaching
explained by the Blessed One, a monk with no more effluents, on the break-up of
the body, is annihilated, perishes, & does not exist after death.’ It would
be good if you would go to Ven. Yamaka out of sympathy for his sake.”

Ven. Sariputta consented by
remaining silent.

Then in the evening Ven.
Sariputta left his seclusion, went to Ven. Yamaka, and on arrival exchanged
courteous greetings. After an exchange of friendly greetings & courtesies,
he sat to one side. As he was sitting there, he said to Ven. Yamaka, “Is
it true, my friend Yamaka, that this evil supposition has arisen to you: ‘As I
understand the Teaching explained by the Blessed One, a monk with no more
effluents, on the break-up of the body, is annihilated, perishes, & does
not exist after death.’

“Yes, my friend
Sariputta. As I understand the Teaching explained by the Blessed One, a monk
with no more effluents, on the break-up of the body, is annihilated, perishes,
& does not exist after death.”

“What do you think, my
friend Yamaka: Is form constant or inconstant?”

“Inconstant, my
friend.”

“And is that which is
inconstant easeful or stressful?”

“Stressful, my
friend.”

“And is it proper to
regard what is inconstant, stressful, subject to change as: ‘This is mine. This
is my self. This is what I am’?”

“No, my friend.”

“Is feeling constant or
inconstant?”

“Inconstant, my
friend.”…

“Is perception constant
or inconstant?”

“Inconstant, my
friend.”…

“Are fabrications
constant or inconstant?”

“Inconstant, my
friend.”…

“Is consciousness
constant or inconstant?

“Inconstant, my
friend.”

“And is that which is
inconstant easeful or stressful?”

“Stressful, my
friend.”

“And is it proper to
regard what is inconstant, stressful, subject to change as: ‘This is mine. This
is my self. This is what I am’?”

“No, my friend.”

“What do you think: Do
you regard form as the Tathagata?”

“No, my friend.”

“Do you regard feeling as
the Tathagata?”

“No, my friend.”

“Do you regard perception
as the Tathagata?”

“No, my friend.”

“Do you regard
fabrications as the Tathagata?”

“No, my friend.”

“Do you regard
consciousness as the Tathagata?”

“No, my friend.”

“What do you think: Do
you regard the Tathagata as being in form?… Elsewhere than form?… In
feeling?… Elsewhere than feeling?… In perception?… Elsewhere than
perception?… In fabrications?… Elsewhere than fabrications?… In
consciousness?… Elsewhere than consciousness?”

“No, my friend.”

“What do you think: Do
you regard the Tathagata as
form-feeling-perception-fabrications-consciousness?”

“No, my friend.”

“Do you regard the
Tathagata as that which is without form, without feeling, without perception,
without fabrications, without consciousness?”

“No, my friend.”

“And so, my friend Yamaka
— when you can’t pin down the Tathagata as a truth or reality even in the
present life — is it proper for you to declare, ‘As I understand the Teaching
explained by the Blessed One, a monk with no more effluents, on the break-up of
the body, is annihilated, perishes, & does not exist after death’?”

“Previously, my friend
Sariputta, I did foolishly hold that evil supposition. But now, having heard
your explanation of the Dhamma, I have abandoned that evil supposition, and
have broken through to the Dhamma.”

“Then, friend Yamaka, how
would you answer if you are thus asked: A monk, a worthy one, with no more
mental effluents: what is he on the break-up of the body, after death?”

“Thus asked, I would
answer, ‘Form is inconstant… Feeling… Perception… Fabrications…
Consciousness is inconstant. That which is inconstant is stressful. That which
is stressful has ceased and gone to its end.”

“Very good, my friend
Yamaka. Very good. In that case I will give you an analogy for the sake of
taking your understanding of this point even further. Suppose there were a householder or householder’s son — rich,
wealthy, with many possessions — who was thoroughly well-guarded. Then suppose
there came along a certain man, desiring what was not his benefit, desiring
what was not his welfare, desiring his loss of security, desiring to kill him.
The thought would occur to this man: ‘It would not be easy to kill this person
by force. What if I were to sneak in and then kill him?’

“So he would go to the
householder or householder’s son and say, ‘May you take me on as a servant,
lord.’ With that, the householder or householder’s son would take the man on as
a servant.

“Having been taken on as
a servant, the man would rise in the morning before his master, go to bed in
the evening only after his master, doing whatever his master ordered, always
acting to please him, speaking politely to him. Then the householder or
householder’s son would come to regard him as a friend & companion, and
would fall into his trust. When the man realizes, ‘This householder or
householder’s son trusts me,’ then encountering him in a solitary place, he
would kill him with a sharp knife.

“Now what do you think,
my friend Yamaka? When that man went to the householder or householder’s son
and said, ‘May you take me on as a servant, lord’: wasn’t he even then a
murderer? And yet although he was a murderer, the householder or householder’s
son did not know him as ‘my murderer.’ And when, taken on as a servant, he
would rise in the morning before his master, go to bed in the evening only
after his master, doing whatever his master ordered, always acting to please
him, speaking politely to him: wasn’t he even then a murderer? And yet although
he was a murderer, the householder or householder’s son did not know him as ‘my
murderer.’ And when he encountered him in a solitary place and killed him with
a sharp knife: wasn’t he even then a murderer? And yet although he was a
murderer, the householder or householder’s son did not know him as ‘my
murderer.’”

“Yes, my friend.”

“In the same way, an
uninstructed, run-of-the-mill person — who has no regard for noble ones, is not
well-versed or disciplined in their Dhamma; who has no regard for men of
integrity, is not well-versed or disciplined in their Dhamma — assumes form
(the body) to be the self, or the self as possessing form, or form as in the
self, or the self as in form.

“He assumes feeling to be
the self…

“He assumes perception to
be the self…

“He assumes (mental)
fabrications to be the self…

“He assumes consciousness
to be the self, or the self as possessing consciousness, or consciousness as in
the self, or the self as in consciousness.

“He does not discern
inconstant form, as it actually is present, as ‘inconstant form.’ He does not discern
inconstant feeling, as it actually is present, as ‘inconstant feeling.’ He does
not discern inconstant perception… He does not discern inconstant
fabrications… He does not discern inconstant consciousness, as it actually is
present, as ‘inconstant consciousness.’

“He does not discern
stressful form, as it actually is present, as ’stressful form.’ He does not
discern stressful feeling… He does not discern stressful perception… He
does not discern stressful fabrications… He does not discern stressful
consciousness, as it actually is present, as ’stressful consciousness.’

“He does not discern
not-self form, as it actually is present, as ‘not-self form.’ He does not
discern not-self feeling… He does not discern not-self perception… He does not
discern not-self fabrications… He does not discern not-self consciousness, as
it actually is present, as ‘not-self consciousness.’

“He does not discern
fabricated form, as it actually is present, as ‘fabricated form.’ He does not
discern fabricated feeling… He does not discern fabricated perception… He
does not discern fabricated fabrications… He does not discern fabricated
consciousness, as it actually is present, as ‘fabricated consciousness.’

“He does not discern
murderous form, as it actually is present, as ‘murderous form.’ He does not
discern murderous feeling… He does not discern murderous perception… He
does not discern murderous fabrications… He does not discern murderous
consciousness, as it actually is present, as ‘murderous consciousness.’

“He gets attached to
form, clings to form, & determines it to be ‘my self.’ He gets attached to
feeling… He gets attached to perception… He gets attached to
fabrications… He gets attached to consciousness, clings to consciousness,
& determines it to be ‘my self.’ These five
clinging-aggregates — attached to, clung to — lead to his long-term loss &
suffering.

“Now, the
well-instructed, disciple of the noble ones — who has regard for noble ones, is
well-versed & disciplined in their Dhamma; who has regard for men of
integrity, is well-versed & disciplined in their Dhamma — does not assume
form to be the self, or the self as possessing form, or form as in the self, or
the self as in form.

“He does not assume
feeling to be the self…

“He does not assume
perception to be the self…

“He does not assume
fabrications to be the self…

“He does not assume
consciousness to be the self, or the self as possessing consciousness, or
consciousness as in the self, or the self as in consciousness.

“He discerns inconstant
form, as it actually is present, as ‘inconstant form.’ He discerns inconstant
feeling… He discerns inconstant perception… He discerns inconstant
fabrications… He discerns inconstant consciousness, as it actually is
present, as ‘inconstant consciousness.’

“He discerns stressful
form, as it actually is present, as ’stressful form.’ He discerns stressful
feeling… He discerns stressful perception… He discerns stressful
fabrications… He discerns stressful consciousness, as it actually is present,
as ’stressful consciousness.’

“He discerns not-self
form, as it actually is present, as ‘not-self form.’ He discerns not-self
feeling… He discerns not-self perception… He discerns not-self
fabrications… He discerns not-self consciousness, as it actually is present,
as ‘not-self consciousness.’

“He discerns fabricated
form, as it actually is present, as ‘fabricated form.’ He discerns fabricated
feeling… He discerns fabricated perception… He discerns fabricated
fabrications… He discerns fabricated consciousness, as it actually is
present, as ‘fabricated consciousness.’

“He discerns murderous
form, as it actually is present, as ‘murderous form.’ He discerns murderous
feeling… He discerns murderous perception… He discerns murderous
fabrications… He discerns murderous consciousness, as it actually is present,
as ‘murderous consciousness.’

“He does not get attached
to form, does not cling to form, does not determine it to be ‘my self.’ He does
not get attached to feeling… He does not get attached to perception… He
does not get attached to fabrications… He does not get attached to
consciousness, does not cling to consciousness, does not determine it to be ‘my
self.’ These five clinging-aggregates — not attached to, not clung to — lead to
his long-term happiness & well-being.”

Even so, my friend Sariputta, are those who have people like you
as their fellows in the holy life, teaching them, admonishing them out of
sympathy, desiring their welfare. For now that I have heard this explanation of
the Dhamma from you, my mind — through lack of clinging/sustenance — has been
released from the effluents.”

DOB 520 Mind and its World III: Modes of Engagement - 2 credits

 

Delivery Mode: Residential & Online

 

Course Description:

 

This course provides the practitioner with the
tools for delineating conceptual and non-conceptual types of mind in
meditation. This teaching, codified as the modes of engagement of mind, is
coming from the tradition of Pramāna, or Buddhist epistemology.

 

We will contemplate the minds apprehending
generalities and particulars, inclusive and eliminative engagers, objects and
means of expression, connection and contradiction.

 

Prerequisites: DOB 501, DOB 502

POLITICS
IS SACRED WITH HIGHLY PROMISING BEST MERITORIOUS GOVERNENCE OF UP CM MS
MAYAWATI JI

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Information & Public Relations Department, U.P.



Hon’ble C. M. greets people on Agrasen Jayanti

 

Lucknow: 27 September 2011

 

The Hon’ble Chief Minister of Uttar Pradesh, Ms. Mayawati ji has
greeted the people of the State on the occasion of Maharaja Agrasen Jayanti.

 

Hon’ble Chief Minister said that Maharaja Agrasen gave the
message of Sarv Samaj’s welfare by strengthening social harmony and unity. In
the present context, this message has become more relevant, she added.

 

Ms. Mayawati ji while extending her greetings to Vaishya
Community especially said this community played an important role in the economic
and social progress of the Country. She expressed the hope that this community
would actively participate in the development process of the country in future
as well.


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09/27/11
387 LESSON 27 09 2011 Arittha Sutta To Arittha FREE ONLINE eNālandā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY & BUDDHIST GOOD NEWS LETTER Through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org FREE ONLINE CONCENTRATION PRACTICE INSTITUTE FOR STUDENTS(FOCPIS)- The Narratives for the Levels of Departmental Curricula- Course Descriptions- Mind and its World II: Mental Events & Causality
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387 LESSON 27 09 2011

Arittha Sutta To Arittha

FREE ONLINE eNālandā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY

&

BUDDHIST
GOOD NEWS LETTER

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Kindly forward this to your friends after  Practicing

SN 54.6

PTS: S v 314

CDB ii
1768

Arittha
Sutta: To Arittha

(On
Mindfulness of Breathing)

translated
from the Pali by

Thanissaro
Bhikkhu

© 2006–2011

At Savatthi. There the Blessed One said, “Monks, do you
develop mindfulness of in-&-out breathing?”

When this was said, Ven. Arittha replied to the Blessed One, “I
develop mindfulness of in-&-out breathing, lord.”

“But how do you develop mindfulness of in-&-out
breathing, Arittha?”

“Having abandoned sensual desire for past sensual
pleasures, lord, having done away with sensual desire for future sensual
pleasures, and having thoroughly subdued perceptions of irritation with regard
to internal & external events, I breathe in mindfully and breathe out
mindfully.”[1]

“There is that mindfulness of in-&-out breathing,
Arittha. I don’t say that there isn’t. But as to how mindfulness of
in-&-out breathing is brought in detail to its culmination, listen and pay
close attention. I will speak.”

“As you say, lord,” Ven. Arittha responded to the
Blessed One.

The Blessed One said, “And how, Arittha, is mindfulness of
in-&-out breathing brought in detail to its culmination? There is the case
where a monk, having gone to the wilderness, to the shade of a tree, or to an
empty building, sits down folding his legs crosswise, holding his body erect,
and setting mindfulness to the fore.[2]

Always mindful, he breathes in; mindful he breathes out.

“[1] Breathing in long, he discerns, ‘I am breathing in
long’; or breathing out long, he discerns, ‘I am breathing out long.’ [2] Or
breathing in short, he discerns, ‘I am breathing in short’; or breathing out
short, he discerns, ‘I am breathing out short.’ [3] He trains himself, ‘I will
breathe in sensitive to the entire body.’[3]

He trains himself, ‘I will breathe out sensitive to the entire body.’ [4] He
trains himself, ‘I will breathe in calming bodily fabrication.’[4]
He trains himself, ‘I will breathe out calming bodily fabrication.’

“[5] He trains himself, ‘I will breathe in sensitive to
rapture.’ He trains himself, ‘I will breathe out sensitive to rapture.’ [6] He
trains himself, ‘I will breathe in sensitive to pleasure.’ He trains himself,
‘I will breathe out sensitive to pleasure.’ [7] He trains himself, ‘I will
breathe in sensitive to mental fabrication.’[5]

He trains himself, ‘I will breathe out sensitive to mental fabrication.’ [8] He
trains himself, ‘I will breathe in calming mental fabrication.’ He trains
himself, ‘I will breathe out calming mental fabrication.’

“[9] He trains himself, ‘I will breathe in sensitive to the
mind.’ He trains himself, ‘I will breathe out sensitive to the mind.’ [10] He
trains himself, ‘I will breathe in satisfying the mind.’ He trains himself, ‘I
will breathe out satisfying the mind.’ [11] He trains himself, ‘I will breathe
in steadying the mind.’ He trains himself, ‘I will breathe out steadying the
mind.’ [12] He trains himself, ‘I will breathe in releasing the mind.’ He
trains himself, ‘I will breathe out releasing the mind.’[6]

“[13] He trains himself, ‘I will breathe in focusing on
inconstancy.’ He trains himself, ‘I will breathe out focusing on inconstancy.’
[14] He trains himself, ‘I will breathe in focusing on dispassion.’[7]

He trains himself, ‘I will breathe out focusing on dispassion.’ [15] He trains
himself, ‘I will breathe in focusing on cessation.’ He trains himself, ‘I will
breathe out focusing on cessation.’ [16] He trains himself, ‘I will breathe in
focusing on relinquishment.’ He trains himself, ‘I will breathe out focusing on
relinquishment.’

“This, Arittha, is how mindfulness of in-&-out
breathing is brought in detail to its culmination.”

Notes

1.

The Commentary reads this statement as indicating that
Arittha has attained the third level of Awakening, non-return, but it is also
possible to interpret the statement on a more mundane level: Arittha is simply
practicing mindfulness in the present moment, having temporarily subdued desire
for past and future sensual pleasures, and having temporarily subdued any
thought of irritation with regard to the present.

2.

To the fore (parimukham): The Abhidhamma takes an
etymological approach to this term, defining it as around (pari-) the
mouth (mukham). In the Vinaya, however, it is used in a context
(Cv.V.27.4) where it undoubtedly means the front of the chest. There is also
the possibility that the term could be used idiomatically as “to the
front,” which is how I have translated it here.

3.

The commentaries insist that “body” here means the
breath, but this is unlikely in this context, for the next step — without
further explanation — refers to the breath as “bodily fabrication.”
If the Buddha were using two different terms to refer to the breath in such
close proximity, he would have been careful to signal that he was redefining
his terms (as he does below, when explaining that the first four steps in
breath meditation correspond to the practice of focusing on the body in and of
itself as a frame of reference). The step of breathing in and out sensitive to
the entire body relates to the many similes in the suttas depicting jhana as a
state of whole-body awareness (see
MN 119).

4.

“In-&-out breaths are bodily; these are things tied
up with the body. That’s why in-&-out breaths are bodily
fabrications.” —
MN 44.

5.

“Perceptions & feelings are mental; these are
things tied up with the mind. That’s why perceptions & feelings are mental
fabrications.” —
MN 44.

6.

AN 9.34 shows how the mind,
step by step, is temporarily released from burdensome mental states of greater
and greater refinement as it advances through the stages of jhana.

7.

Lit., “fading.”

MN 118

DOB 510 Mind
and its World II: Mental Events & Causality
-
2 credits

 

Delivery
Mode: Residential & Online

 

Course
Description:

 

This
course begins with the analysis of mind and its functions, or mental events,
followed

by
a detailed phenomenological account of causes and results from Abhidharma and
the

presentation
of the twelve links of dependent origination which is Buddha’s response to

the
perennial questions of where we come from, where we are now and where we are

heading.

Prerequisites:
DOB 501, DOB 502

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Descriptions
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Buddhist Studies-
1.1
Foundation Curriculum-

Analytical Meditation I- Mind and its World I: Valid Cognition
-

 

 

SN 54.8

PTS: S v 316

CDB ii 1770

Dipa Sutta: The Lamp

translated from the Pali
by

Thanissaro Bhikkhu

© 2006–2011

“Monks, concentration through mindfulness of in-&-out
breathing, when developed & pursued, is of great fruit, of great benefit.
And how is concentration through mindfulness of in-&-out breathing
developed & pursued so as to be of great fruit, of great benefit?

 ”There is the case where a monk, having gone to the
wilderness, to the shade of a tree, or to an empty building, sits down folding
his legs crosswise, holding his body erect, and setting mindfulness to the
fore.[1]

Always mindful, he breathes in; mindful he breathes out.

“[1] Breathing in long, he discerns, ‘I am breathing in
long’; or breathing out long, he discerns, ‘I am breathing out long.’ [2] Or
breathing in short, he discerns, ‘I am breathing in short’; or breathing out
short, he discerns, ‘I am breathing out short.’ [3] He trains himself, ‘I will
breathe in sensitive to the entire body.’[2]

He trains himself, ‘I will breathe out sensitive to the entire body.’ [4] He
trains himself, ‘I will breathe in calming bodily fabrication.’[3]
He trains himself, ‘I will breathe out calming the bodily fabrication.’

“[5] He trains himself, ‘I will breathe in sensitive to
rapture.’ He trains himself, ‘I will breathe out sensitive to rapture.’ [6] He
trains himself, ‘I will breathe in sensitive to pleasure.’ He trains himself,
‘I will breathe out sensitive to pleasure.’ [7] He trains himself, ‘I will
breathe in sensitive to mental fabrication.’[4]

He trains himself, ‘I will breathe out sensitive to mental fabrication.’ [8] He
trains himself, ‘I will breathe in calming mental fabrication.’ He trains
himself, ‘I will breathe out calming mental fabrication.’

“[9] He trains himself, ‘I will breathe in sensitive to the
mind.’ He trains himself, ‘I will breathe out sensitive to the mind.’ [10] He
trains himself, ‘I will breathe in gladdening the mind.’ He trains himself, ‘I
will breathe out gladdening the mind.’ [11] He trains himself, ‘I will breathe
in steadying the mind.’ He trains himself, ‘I will breathe out steadying the
mind. [12] He trains himself, ‘I will breathe in releasing the mind.’ He trains
himself, ‘I will breathe out releasing the mind.’[5]

“[13] He trains himself, ‘I will breathe in focusing on
inconstancy.’ He trains himself, ‘I will breathe out focusing on inconstancy.’
[14] He trains himself, ‘I will breathe in focusing on dispassion.’[6]

He trains himself, ‘I will breathe out focusing on dispassion.’ [15] He trains
himself, ‘I will breathe in focusing on cessation.’ He trains himself, ‘I will
breathe out focusing on cessation.’ [16] He trains himself, ‘I will breathe in
focusing on relinquishment.’ He trains himself, ‘I will breathe out focusing on
relinquishment.’

“This is how concentration through mindfulness of
in-&-out breathing is developed & pursued so as to be of great fruit,
of great benefit.

“I, too, monks, before my awakening, when I was an
unawakened bodhisatta, frequently remained with this abiding. When I frequently
remained with this abiding, neither my body was fatigued nor were my eyes, and
my mind, through lack of clinging/sustenance, was released from fermentations.

“So if a monk should wish: ‘May neither my body be fatigued
nor my eyes, and may my mind, through lack of clinging/sustenance, be released
from fermentations,’ then he should attend carefully to this same concentration
through mindfulness of in-&-out breathing.

“If a monk should wish: ‘May my memories & resolves
related to the household life be abandoned,’ then he should attend carefully to
this same concentration through mindfulness of in-&-out breathing.

“If a monk should wish: ‘May I remain percipient of
loathsomeness in the presence of what is not loathsome,’ then he should attend
carefully to this same concentration through mindfulness of in-&-out
breathing.

 ”If a monk should wish: ‘May I remain percipient of
unloathsomeness in the presence of what is loathsome,’ then he should attend
carefully to this same concentration through mindfulness of in-&-out
breathing.

 ”If a monk should wish: ‘May I remain percipient of
loathsomeness in the presence of what is not loathsome & what is,’ then he
should attend carefully to this same concentration through mindfulness of
in-&-out breathing.

 ”If a monk should wish: ‘May I remain percipient of
unloathsomeness in the presence of what is loathsome & what is not,’ then
he should attend carefully to this same concentration through mindfulness of
in-&-out breathing.

 ”If a monk should wish: ‘May I — in the presence of
what is loathsome & what is not — cutting myself off from both — remain
equanimous, mindful, & alert,’ then he should attend carefully to this same
concentration through mindfulness of in-&-out breathing.

“If a monk should wish: ‘May I — quite secluded from
sensuality, secluded from unskillful qualities — enter & remain in the
first jhana: rapture & pleasure born from seclusion, accompanied by
directed thought & evaluation,’ then he should attend carefully to this
same concentration through mindfulness of in-&-out breathing.

“If a monk should wish: ‘May I, with the stilling of
directed thoughts & evaluations, enter & remain in the second jhana:
rapture & pleasure born of concentration, unification of awareness free
from directed thought & evaluation — internal assurance,’ then he should
attend carefully to this same concentration through mindfulness of in-&-out
breathing.

“If a monk should wish: ‘May I, with the fading of rapture,
remain equnimous, mindful, & alert, sense pleasure with the body, and enter
& remain in the third jhana, of which the noble ones declare,
“Equanimous & mindful, he has a pleasant abiding,”‘ then he
should attend carefully to this same concentration through mindfulness of
in-&-out breathing.

“If a monk should wish: ‘May I, with the abandoning of
pleasure & stress — as with the earlier disappearance of joys &
distresses — enter & remain in the fourth jhana: purity of equanimity &
mindfulness, neither-pleasure-nor-pain,’ then he should attend carefully to
this same concentration through mindfulness of in-&-out breathing.

“If a monk should wish: ‘May I, with the complete
transcending of perceptions of (physical) form, with the disappearance of
perceptions of resistance, and not heeding perceptions of diversity,
(perceiving,) ‘Infinite space,’ enter & remain in the dimension of the
infinitude of space,’ then he should attend carefully to this same
concentration through mindfulness of in-&-out breathing.

“If a monk should wish: ‘May I, with the complete
transcending of the dimension of the infinitude of space, (perceiving,)
‘Infinite consciousness,’ enter & remain in the dimension of the infinitude
of consciousness,’ then he should attend carefully to this same concentration
through mindfulness of in-&-out breathing.

“If a monk should wish: ‘May I, with the complete
transcending of the dimension of the infinitude of consciousness, (perceiving,)
‘There is nothing,’ enter & remain in the dimension of nothingness,’ then
he should attend carefully to this same concentration through mindfulness of
in-&-out breathing.

“If a monk should wish: ‘May I, with the complete
transcending of the dimension of nothingness, enter & remain in the
dimension of neither perception nor non-perception,’ then he should attend
carefully to this same concentration through mindfulness of in-&-out
breathing.

“If a monk should wish: ‘May I, with the complete
transcending of the dimension of neither perception nor non-perception, enter
& remain in the cessation of perception & feeling,’ then he should
attend carefully to this same concentration through mindfulness of in-&-out
breathing.

“When concentration through mindfulness of in-&-out
breathing is thus developed, thus pursued, then if he senses a feeling of
pleasure, he discerns that it is inconstant, not grasped at, not relished. If
he senses a feeling of pain, he discerns that it is inconstant, not grasped at,
not relished. If he senses a feeling of neither-pleasure-nor-pain, he discerns
that it is inconstant, not grasped at, not relished. If he senses a feeling of
pleasure, he senses it disjoined from it. If he senses a feeling of pain, he
senses it disjoined from it. If he senses a feeling of
neither-pleasure-nor-pain, he senses it disjoined from it. When sensing a feeling
limited to the body, he discerns that ‘I am sensing a feeling limited to the
body.’ When sensing a feeling limited to life, he discerns that ‘I am sensing a
feeling limited to life.’ He discerns that ‘With the break-up of the body,
after the termination of life, everything that is experienced, not being
relished, will grow cold right here.’

“Just as an oil lamp burns in
dependence on oil & wick; and from the termination of the oil & wick —
and from not being provided any other sustenance — it goes out unnourished; in
the same way, when sensing a feeling limited to the body, he discerns that ‘I
am sensing a feeling limited to the body.’ When sensing a feeling limited to
life, he discerns that ‘I am sensing a feeling limited to life.’ He discerns
that ‘With the break-up of the body, after the termination of life, everything
that is sensed, not being relished, will grow cold right here.’”

Notes

1.

To the fore (parimukham):
The Abhidhamma takes an etymological approach to this term, defining it as
around (pari-) the mouth (mukham). In the Vinaya, however, it is
used in a context (Cv.V.27.4) where it undoubtedly means the front of the
chest. There is also the possibility that the term could be used idiomatically
as “to the front,” which is how I have translated it here.

2.

The commentaries insist that
“body” here means the breath, but this is unlikely in this context,
for the next step — without further explanation — refers to the breath as
“bodily fabrication.” If the Buddha were using two different terms to
refer to the breath in such close proximity, he would have been careful to
signal that he was redefining his terms (as he does below, when explaining that
the first four steps in breath meditation correspond to the practice of
focusing on the body in and of itself as a frame of reference). The step of
breathing in and out sensitive to the entire body relates to the many similes
in the suttas depicting jhana as a state of whole-body awareness (see MN 119).

3.

“In-&-out breaths are
bodily; these are things tied up with the body. That’s why in-&-out breaths
are bodily fabrications.” — MN 44.

4.

“Perceptions & feelings
are mental; these are things tied up with the mind. That’s why perceptions
& feelings are mental fabrications.” — MN 44.

5.

AN
9.34
shows how the mind, step by step, is temporarily released from
burdensome mental states of greater and greater refinement as it advances
through the stages of jhana.

6.

Lit., “fading.”

MN 118;

 SN
54.6
.

 

Course Descriptions

1. Department of
Buddhist Studies

1.1 Foundation Curriculum

DOB 500 Analytical Meditation I

Delivery Mode: Residential

Course Description:

This course is a systematic training in the progressive stages
of analytical
vipashyanā, or

insight meditation. We will begin with the yoga focusing on
non-conceptual images,

followed by gradual guided instructions on the yoga focusing on
conceptual images which

transform the conceptual mind and apply them in our personal
practice. This course is

taken with each Foundation course and included in the credit
hours of those courses. It is

cross-listed with BUD 600 and BUD 680.

1.1.1 Foundation Curriculum: The Core

BUD 501 Mind and its World I: Valid Cognition - 2 credits

Delivery Mode: Residential & Online

Course Description:

This course explores the criteria of a valid cognition and its
various classifications, based

on the teachings of the Pramāna tradition, or Buddhist
epistemology. We will analyze our

consciousness and determine to what degree it is in agreement
with its observed object

or not; when our mind is direct or not; what the difference is
between non-mistaken, nondeceiving,

conceptual and non-conceptual types of awareness.

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Department of Arts

 

 


Mv 10.2.3-20

PTS: Horner vol. 4, pp.
489-498

Dighavu-kumara Vatthu:
The Story of Prince Dighavu

by

Thanissaro Bhikkhu

© 1997–2011

Once, monks, in Varanasi, Brahmadatta was the king of Kasi — rich,
prosperous, with many possessions, many troops, many vehicles, many
territories, with fully-stocked armories & granaries. Dighiti
was the king of Kosala — poor, not very prosperous, with few
possessions, few troops, few vehicles, few territories, with poorly-stocked
armories & granaries. So Brahmadatta the king of Kasi, raising a fourfold
army, marched against Dighiti the king of Kosala. Dighiti the king of Kosala
heard, “Brahmadatta the king of Kasi, they say, has raised a fourfold army
and is marching against me.” Then the thought occurred to him, “King
Brahmadatta is rich, prosperous… with fully-stocked armories & granaries,
whereas I am poor… with poorly-stocked armories & granaries. I am not
competent to stand against even one attack by him. Why don’t I slip out of the
city beforehand?” So, taking his chief consort, he slipped out of the city
beforehand. Then King Brahmadatta, conquering the troops, vehicles, lands,
armories, & granaries of King Dighiti, lived in lordship over them.

Meanwhile, King Dighiti had set out for Varanasi together with
his consort and, traveling by stages, arrived there. There he lived with her on
the outskirts of Varanasi in a potter’s house, disguised as a wanderer. Not
long afterwards, she became pregnant. She had a pregnancy wish of this sort:
she wanted to see a fourfold army, armed & arrayed, standing on a parade
ground at dawn, and to drink the water used for washing the swords. She said to
King Dighiti, “Your majesty, I am pregnant, and I have a pregnancy wish of
this sort: I want to see a fourfold army, armed & arrayed, standing on a
parade ground at dawn, and to drink the water used for washing the
swords.” He said, “My queen, where is there for us — fallen on hard
times — a fourfold army, armed & arrayed, standing on a parade ground, and
water used for washing the swords?”

“If I don’t get this, your majesty, I will die.”

Now at that time the brahman adviser to King Brahmadatta was a
friend of King Dighiti. So King Dighiti went to him and, on arrival, said,
“A lady friend of yours, old friend, is pregnant, and she has a pregnancy
wish of this sort: she wants to see a fourfold army, armed & arrayed,
standing on a parade ground at dawn, and to drink the water used for washing
the swords.”

“In that case, let me see her.”

So King Dighiti’s consort went to King Brahmadatta’s brahman
adviser. When he saw her coming from afar, he rose from his seat, arranged his
robe over one shoulder and, with his hands raised in salutation to her,
exclaimed three times, “Surely the king of Kosala has come to your womb! Surely
the king of Kosala has come to your womb! Don’t be worried, my queen. You will
get to see a fourfold army, armed & arrayed, standing on a parade ground at
dawn, and to drink the water used for washing the swords.”

Then he went to King Brahmadatta and, on arrival, said to him,
“Your majesty, signs have appeared such that tomorrow at dawn a fourfold
army, armed & arrayed, should stand on a parade ground and that the swords
should be washed.”

So King Brahmadatta ordered his people, “I say, then: Do as
the brahman adviser says.” Thus King Dighiti’s chief consort got to see a
fourfold army, armed & arrayed, standing on a parade ground at dawn, and
got to drink the water used for washing the swords. Then, with the maturing of
the fetus, she gave birth to a son, whom they named Dighavu
(LongLife). Not long afterwards, Prince Dighavu reached the age of discretion.
The thought occurred to King Dighiti, “This King Brahmadatta of Kasi has
done us great harm. He has seized our troops, vehicles, lands, armories, &
granaries. If he finds out about us, he will have all three of us killed. Why
don’t I send Prince Dighavu to live outside of the city?” So Prince
Dighavu, having gone to live outside of the city, learned all the crafts.

Now at that time King Dighiti’s barber had gone over to King
Brahmadatta. He saw King Dighiti, together with his consort, living on the
outskirts of Varanasi in a potter’s house, disguised as a wanderer. On seeing
them, he went to King Brahmadatta and, on arrival, said to him, “Your majesty,
King Dighiti of Kosala, together with his consort, is living on the outskirts
of Varanasi in a potter’s house, disguised as a wanderer.”

So King Brahmadatta ordered his people, “I say then: go
fetch King Dighiti together with his consort.”

Responding, “As you say, your majesty,” they went and
fetched King Dighiti together with his consort.

Then King Brahmadatta ordered his people, “I say then:
having bound King Dighiti & his consort with a stout rope with their arms
pinned tightly against their backs, and having shaved them bald, march them to
a harsh-sounding drum from street to street, crossroads to crossroads, evict
them out the south gate of the city and there, to the south of the city, cut
them into four pieces and bury them in holes placed in the four directions.”

Responding, “As you say, your majesty,” the king’s
people bound King Dighiti & his consort with a stout rope, pinning their
arms tightly against their backs, shaved them bald, and marched them to a
harsh-sounding drum from street to street, crossroads to crossroads.

Then the thought occurred to Prince Dighavu, “It’s been a
long time since I saw my mother & father. What if I were to go see
them?” So he entered Varanasi and saw his mother & father bound with a
stout rope, their arms pinned tightly against their backs, their heads shaven
bald, being marched to a harsh-sounding drum from street to street, crossroads
to crossroads. So he went to them. King Dighiti saw Prince Dighavu coming from
afar, and on seeing him, said, “Don’t, my dear Dighavu, be far-sighted.
Don’t be near-sighted. For vengeance is not settled through vengeance.
Vengeance is settled through non-vengeance.”

When this was said, the people said to him, “This King
Dighiti has gone crazy. He’s talking nonsense. Who is Dighavu? Why is he
saying, ‘Don’t, my dear Dighavu, be far-sighted. Don’t be near-sighted. For
vengeance is not settled through vengeance. Vengeance is settled through
non-vengeance’?”

“I’m not crazy or talking nonsense. He who knows will
understand.” Then a second time… a third time he said, “Don’t, my
dear Dighavu, be far-sighted. Don’t be near-sighted. For vengeance is not
settled through vengeance. Vengeance is settled through non-vengeance.”

A third time, the people said to him, “This King Dighiti
has gone crazy. He’s talking nonsense. Who is Dighavu? Why is he saying,
‘Don’t, my dear Dighavu, be far-sighted. Don’t be near-sighted. For vengeance
is not settled through vengeance. Vengeance is settled through
non-vengeance’?”

“I’m not crazy or talking nonsense. He who knows will
understand.”

Then the king’s people, having marched King Dighiti together
with his chief consort to a harsh-sounding drum from street to street,
crossroads to crossroads, evicted them out the south gate of the city and
there, to the south of the city, cut them into four pieces, buried them in
holes placed in the four directions, stationed guards, and left.

Then Prince Dighavu, having entered Varanasi, brought out some
liquor and got the guards to drink it. When they had fallen down drunk, he
collected sticks, made a pyre, raised the bodies of his mother & father
onto the pyre, set fire to it, and then circumambulated it three times with his
hands raised in salutation.

Now at that time, King Brahmadatta had gone up to the terrace on
top of his palace. He saw Prince Dighavu circumambulating the pyre three times
with his hands raised in salutation, and on seeing him, the thought occurred to
him, “Doubtlessly this person is a relative or blood-kinsman of King
Dighiti. Ah, how unfortunate for me, for there is no one who will tell me what
this means!”

Then Prince Dighavu, having gone into the wilderness and having
cried & wept as much as he needed to, dried his tears and entered Varanasi.
Going to an elephant stable next to the king’s palace, he said to the chief
elephant trainer, “Teacher, I want to learn this craft.”

“In that case, young man, you may learn it.”

Then, rising in the last watch of the night, Prince Dighavu sang
in a sweet voice and played the lute in the elephant stable. King Brahmadatta,
also rising in the last watch of the night, heard the sweet-voiced singing
& lute-playing in the elephant stable. On hearing it, he asked his people,
“I say: Who was that, rising in the last watch of the night, singing in a
sweet voice and playing a lute in the elephant stable?”

“Your majesty, a young man — the student of such-and-such
an elephant trainer, rising in the last watch of the night, was singing in a
sweet voice and playing a lute in the elephant stable.”

“I say then: go fetch that young man.”

Responding, “As you say, your majesty,” they went and
fetched Prince Dighavu.

Then King Brahmadatta said to Prince Dighavu, “I say: Was
that you rising in the last watch of the night, singing in a sweet voice and
playing a lute in the elephant stable?”

“Yes, your majesty.”

“I say then, my young man: sing and play the lute.”

Responding, “As you say, your majesty,” and seeking to
win favor, Prince Dighavu sang with a sweet voice and played the lute.

Then King Brahmadatta said to him, “I say: You, my young
man, are to stay and attend to me.”

“As you say, your majesty,” Prince Dighavu replied.
Then he rose in the morning before King Brahmadatta, went to bed in the evening
after him, did whatever the king ordered, always acting to please him, speaking
politely to him. And it was not long before King Brahmadatta placed the prince
close to him in a position of trust.

Then one day King Brahmadatta said to Prince Dighavu, “I
say then, my young man: harness the chariot. I’m going hunting.”

Responding, “As you say, your majesty,” Prince Dighavu
harnessed the chariot and then said to King Brahmadatta, “Your chariot is
harnessed, your majesty. Now is the time for you to do as you see fit.”

Then King Brahmadatta mounted the chariot, and Prince Dighavu
drove it. He drove it in such a way that the king’s entourage went one way, and
the chariot another. Then, after they had gone far, King Brahmadatta said to
Prince Dighavu, “I say then, my young man: unharness the chariot. I’m
tired. I’m going to lie down.”

Responding, “As you say, your majesty,” Prince Dighavu
unharnessed the chariot and sat down cross-legged on the ground. Then King
Brahmadatta lay down, placing his head on Prince Dighavu’s lap. As he was
tired, he went to sleep right away. Then the thought occurred to Prince
Dighavu: “This King Brahmadatta of Kasi has done us great harm. He has seized
our troops, vehicles, lands, armories, & granaries. And it was because of
him that my mother & father were killed. Now is my chance to wreak
vengeance!” He drew his sword from his scabbard. But then he thought,
“My father told me, as he was about to die, ‘Don’t, my dear Dighavu, be
far-sighted. Don’t be near-sighted. For vengeance is not settled through
vengeance. Vengeance is settled through non-vengeance.’ It would not be proper
for me to transgress my father’s words.” So he put his sword back in its
scabbard. A second time… A third time the thought occurred to Prince Dighavu:
“This King Brahmadatta of Kasi has done us great harm. He has seized our
troops, vehicles, lands, armories, & granaries. And it was because of him
that my mother & father were killed. Now is my chance to wreak
vengeance!” He drew his sword from his scabbard. But then he thought,
“My father told me, as he was about to die, ‘Don’t, my dear Dighavu, be
far-sighted. Don’t be near-sighted. For vengeance is not settled through
vengeance. Vengeance is settled through non-vengeance.’ It would not be proper
for me to transgress my father’s words.” So once again he put his sword
back in its scabbard.

Then King Brahmadatta suddenly got up — frightened, agitated,
unnerved, alarmed. Prince Dighavu said to him, “Your majesty, why have you
gotten up suddenly — frightened, agitated, unnerved, & alarmed?”

“I say, my young man: Just now as I was dreaming, Prince
Dighavu — son of Dighiti, king of Kasi — struck me down with a sword.”
Then Prince Dighavu, grabbing King Brahmadatta by the head with his left hand,
and drawing his sword from its scabbard with his right, said, “I, your
majesty, am that very Prince Dighavu, son of Dighiti, king of Kasi. You have
done us great harm. You have seized our troops, vehicles, lands, armories,
& granaries. And it was because of you that my mother & father were
killed. Now is my chance to wreak vengeance!”

So King Brahmadatta, dropping his head down to Prince Dighavu’s
feet, said, “Grant me my life, my dear Dighavu! Grant me my life, my dear
Dighavu!”

“Who am I that I would dare grant life to your majesty? It
is your majesty who should grant life to me!”

“In that case, my dear Dighavu, you grant me my life and I
grant you your life.”

Then King Brahmadatta and Prince Dighavu granted one another
their lives and, taking one another by the hands, swore an oath to do one
another no harm.

Then King Brahmadatta said to Prince Dighavu, “In that
case, my dear Dighavu, harness the chariot. We will go on.”

Responding, “As you say, your majesty,” Prince Dighavu
harnessed the chariot and then said to King Brahmadatta, “Your chariot is
harnessed, your majesty. Now is the time for you to do as you see fit.”

Then King Brahmadatta mounted the chariot, and Prince Dighavu
drove it. He drove it in such a way that it was not long before they met up
with the king’s entourage.

Then King Brahmadatta, having entered Varanasi, had his
ministers & councilors convened and said to them, “I say, then. If you
were to see Prince Dighavu, the son of Dighiti, the king of Kasi, what would
you do to him?”

Different ministers said, “We would cut of his hands, your
majesty” — “We would cut off his feet, your majesty” — “We
would cut off his hands & feet, your majesty” — “We would cut off
his ears, your majesty” — “We would cut off his nose, your
majesty” — “We would cut off his ears & nose, your majesty”
— “We would cut off his head, your majesty.”

Then the king said, “This, I say, is Prince Dighavu, the
son of Dighiti, the king of Kasi. You are not allowed to do anything to him. It
was by him that my life was granted to me, and it was by me that his life was
granted to him.”

Then King Brahmadatta said to Prince Dighavu, “What your
father said to you as he was about to die — ‘Don’t, my dear Dighavu, be
far-sighted. Don’t be near-sighted. For vengeance is not settled through
vengeance. Vengeance is settled through non-vengeance’ — in reference to what
did he say that?”

“What my father said to me as he was about to die — ‘Don’t
be far-sighted’ — ‘Don’t bear vengeance for a long time’ is what he was saying
to me as he was about to die. And what he said to me as he was about to die —
‘Don’t be near-sighted’ — ‘Don’t be quick to break with a friend’ is what he
was saying to me as he was about to die. And what he said to me as he was about
to die — ‘For vengeance is not settled through vengeance. Vengeance is settled
through non-vengeance’ — My mother & father were killed by your majesty. If
I were to deprive your majesty of life, those who hope for your majesty’s well-being
would deprive me of life. And those who hope for my well-being would deprive
them of life. And in that way vengeance would not be settled by vengeance. But
now I have been granted my life by your majesty, and your majesty has been
granted your life by me. And in this way vengeance has been settled by
non-vengeance. That is what my father was saying to me as he was about to
die.”

Then King Brahmadatta said, “Isn’t it amazing! Isn’t it
astounding! How wise this Prince Dighavu is, in that he can understand in full
the meaning of what his father said in brief!” So he returned his father’s
troops, vehicles, lands, armories, & granaries, and gave him his daughter
in marriage.

Such, monks, is the forbearance & gentleness of kings who
wield the scepter, who wield the sword. So now let your light shine forth, so
that you — who have gone forth in such a well-taught Dhamma & Discipline —
will be their equal in forbearance & gentleness.

4. Department of Arts

Department of Arts (ART) at
Nitartha Institute is based on the Science of Arts and Crafts, one

of the five traditional sciences
taught at Nālandā University. It currently offers non-credit

courses.

4.1 Traditional Arts

Traditional arts curriculum
currently features two non-credit courses: Lüjong and Songs of

Realization.

ART 500 Lüjong - non-credit

ART 510 Songs of Realization -
non-credit

4.2 Visual Arts

The future visual arts curriculum
will offer courses in Thangka painting, a Tibetan visual arts

discipline; Ikebana, the Japanese
contemplative art of flower arrangement, and others.

 

comments (0)
09/22/11
383 LESSON 23 09 2011 Dighanaka Sutta To LongNails FREE ONLINE eNālandā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY and BUDDHIST GOOD NEWS LETTER Through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org- Hon’ble CM directs officers to formulate strategy to effectively control corruption in government services- Hon’ble CM directs officers to implement Janhit Guarantee Law effectively and take stringent action against officers not providing services within stipulated time frame- All DMs asked to visit one tehsil one village every week and SDMs asked to visit five villages every month FREE ONLINE CONCENTRATION PRACTICE INSTITUTE FOR STUDENTS(FOCPIS)- The Narratives for the Levels of Departmental Curricula-1. Department of Buddhist Studies-3. Department of Healing-Mandala of the Medicine Buddha-Upright conduct (Mangala Sutta 4d)- Social Awakening Seminar- Speaker: Dr Suresh Mane, senior leader and constitutional expert
Filed under: General
Posted by: @ 9:03 pm

383 LESSON 23 09  2011 Dighanaka
Sutta To LongNails  FREE ONLINE
eNālandā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY and
 
BUDDHIST GOOD NEWS LETTER Through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org- Hon’ble CM directs officers to formulate strategy to effectively control corruption in government
services
- Hon’ble CM directs officers
to implement Janhit Guarantee
Law effectively and take stringent action against officers not providing services within stipulated time
frame
- All DMs asked to visit one
tehsil one village every
week and SDMs asked to visit five villages every month FREE ONLINE
CONCENTRATION PRACTICE INSTITUTE FOR STUDENTS(FOCPIS)-
The Narratives for the Levels
of Departmental Curricula-1. Department of Buddhist Studies-3. Department of
Healing
-Mandala of the Medicine
Buddha-
Upright conduct (Mangala
Sutta 4d)
-
Social Awakening Seminar- Speaker: Dr Suresh Mane, senior leader and
constitutional expert

MN 74

PTS: M i 497

Dighanaka Sutta: To
LongNails

translated from the Pali
by

Thanissaro Bhikkhu

© 2007–2011

I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying
near Rajagaha on Vulture’s Peak Mountain, in the Boar’s
Cave. Then LongNails the wanderer[1]

went to the Blessed One and, on arrival, exchanged courteous greetings with
him. After an exchange of friendly greetings & courtesies, he stood to one
side. As he was standing there, he said to the Blessed One, “Master
Gotama, I am of the view, of the opinion, that ‘All is not pleasing to
me.’”

“But even this view of yours, Aggivessana
— ‘All is not pleasing to me’ — is even that not pleasing to you?’”

“Even if this view of mine were pleasing to me, Master
Gotama, it would still be the same, it would still be the same.”

“Well, Aggivessana, there are more than many in the world
who say, ‘It would still be the same, it would still be the same,’ yet they
both do not abandon that view and they cling to another view. There are fewer
than few in the world who say, ‘It would still be the same, it would still be
the same,’ and they both abandon that view and do not cling to another view.

“There are some brahmans & contemplatives who are of
the view, of the opinion, that ‘All is pleasing to me.’ There are some brahmans
& contemplatives who are of the view, of the opinion, that ‘All is not
pleasing to me.’ There are some brahmans & contemplatives who are of the
view, of the opinion, that ‘A part is pleasing to me; a part is not pleasing to
me.’

“With regard to those brahmans & contemplatives who are
of the view, of the opinion, that ‘All is pleasing to me’: That view of theirs
is close to being impassioned, close to bondage, close to delighting, close to
holding, close to clinging. With regard to those brahmans & contemplatives
who are of the view, of the opinion, that ‘All is not pleasing to me’: That
view of theirs is close to not being impassioned, close to non-bondage, close
to not-delighting, close to not-holding, close to not-clinging.”

When this was said, LongNails the wanderer said to the Blessed
One, “Master Gotama commends my viewpoint. Master Gotama recommends my
viewpoint.”

“With regard to those brahmans & contemplatives who are
of the view, of the opinion that ‘A part is pleasing to me; a part is not
pleasing to me’: Whatever is pleasing to them, their view is close to being
impassioned, close to bondage, close to delighting, close to holding, close to
clinging. Whatever is not pleasing to them, their view is close to not being
impassioned, close to non-bondage, close to not-delighting, close to
not-holding, close to not-clinging.

“With regard to those brahmans & contemplatives who are
of the view, of the opinion, ‘All is pleasing to me’: A wise person among them
considers that ‘If I were to grasp and insist firmly on this view of mine that
“All is pleasing to me,” and to state that “Only this is true,
all else is worthless,” I would clash with two — the brahman or contemplative
who is of the view, of the opinion that “All is not pleasing to me”
and the brahman or contemplative who is of the view, of the opinion that
“A part is pleasing to me; a part is not pleasing to me.” I would
clash with these two. Where there is a clash, there is dispute. Where there is
a dispute, quarreling. Where there is quarreling, annoyance. Where there is
annoyance, frustration.’ Envisioning for himself clash, dispute, quarreling,
annoyance, frustration, he both abandons that view and does not cling to
another view. Thus there is the abandoning of these views; thus there is the
relinquishing of these views.

“With regard to those brahmans & contemplatives who are
of the view, of the opinion that ‘All is not pleasing to me’: A wise person
among them considers that ‘If I were to grasp and insist firmly on this view of
mine that “All is not pleasing to me,” and to state that “Only
this is true, all else is worthless,” I would clash with two — the brahman
or contemplative who is of the view, of the opinion that “All is pleasing
to me” and the brahman or contemplative who is of the view, of the opinion
that “A part is pleasing to me; a part is not pleasing to me.” I
would clash with these two. Where there is a clash, there is dispute. Where
there is a dispute, quarreling. Where there is quarreling, annoyance. Where
there is annoyance, frustration.’ Envisioning for himself clash, dispute,
quarreling, annoyance, frustration, he both abandons that view and does not
cling to another view. Thus there is the abandoning of these views; thus there
is the relinquishing of these views.

“With regard to those brahmans & contemplatives who are
of the view, of the opinion that ‘A part is pleasing to me; a part is not
pleasing to me’: A wise person among them considers that ‘If I were to grasp and
insist firmly on this view of mine that “A part is pleasing to me; a part
is not pleasing to me,” and to state that “Only this is true, all
else is worthless,” I would clash with two — the brahman or contemplative
who is of the view, of the opinion that “All is pleasing to me” and
the brahman or contemplative who is of the view, of the opinion that “All
is not pleasing to me.” I would clash with these two. Where there is a
clash, there is dispute. Where there is a dispute, quarreling. Where there is
quarreling, annoyance. Where there is annoyance, frustration.’ Envisioning for
himself clash, dispute, quarreling, annoyance, frustration, he both abandons
that view and does not cling to another view. Thus there is the abandoning of
these views; thus there is the relinquishing of these views.

“Now, Aggivessana, this body — endowed with form, composed
of the four primary elements, born from mother & father, nourished with
rice & porridge, subject to inconstancy, rubbing, pressing, dissolution,
and dispersion — should be envisioned as inconstant, stressful, a disease, a
cancer, an arrow, painful, an affliction, alien, a disintegration, an
emptiness, not-self. In one who envisions the body as inconstant, stressful, a
disease, a cancer, an arrow, painful, an affliction, alien, a disintegration,
an emptiness, not-self, any desire for the body, attraction to the body,
following after the body is abandoned.

“There are these three kinds of feeling: a pleasant
feeling, a painful feeling, and neither-pleasant-nor-painful feeling. On the
occasion when one feels a pleasant feeling, one does not feel either a painful
feeling or a neither-pleasant-nor-painful feeling. One feels only a pleasant
feeling on that occasion. On the occasion when one feels a painful feeling, one
does not feel either a pleasant feeling or a neither-pleasant-nor-painful
feeling. One feels only a painful feeling on that occasion. On the occasion
when one feels a neither-pleasant-nor-painful feeling feeling, one does not
feel either a pleasant feeling or a painful feeling. One feels only a
neither-pleasant-nor-painful feeling on that occasion.

“A pleasant feeling is inconstant, fabricated, dependently
co-arisen, subject to ending, subject to vanishing, fading, ceasing. A painful
feeling is also inconstant, fabricated, dependently co-arisen, subject to
ending, subject to vanishing, fading, ceasing. A neither-pleasant-nor-painful
feeling is also inconstant, fabricated, dependently co-arisen, subject to
ending, subject to vanishing, fading, ceasing.

“Seeing this, an instructed disciple of the noble ones
grows disenchanted with pleasant feeling, disenchanted with painful feeling,
disenchanted with neither-pleasant-nor-painful feeling. Disenchanted, he grows
dispassionate. From dispassion, he is released. With release, there is the
knowledge, ‘Released.’ He discerns, ‘Birth is ended, the holy life fulfilled,
the task done. There is nothing further for this world.’ A monk whose mind is
thus released does not take sides with anyone, does not dispute with anyone. He
words things by means of what is said in the world but without grasping at
it.”

Now at that time Ven. Sariputta was sitting[2]
behind the Blessed One, fanning him. The thought occurred to him, “Indeed,
it seems that the Blessed One speaks to us of the abandoning of each of these
mental qualities through direct knowledge.[3]
Indeed, it seems that the One Well-gone speaks to us of the relinquishing of
each of these mental qualities through direct knowledge.”[4]
As Ven. Sariputta was reflecting thus, his mind was released from fermentations
through not-clinging. While in LongNails the wanderer there arose the dustless,
stainless Dhamma eye: “Whatever is subject to origination is all subject
to cessation.”

Then LongNails the wanderer — having seen
the Dhamma, having attained the Dhamma, having known the Dhamma, having
fathomed the Dhamma, having crossed over and beyond uncertainty, having no more
perplexity, having gained fearlessness, having becoming independent of others
with regard to the Teacher’s message — said to the Blessed One:
“Magnificent, Master Gotama! Magnificent! Just as if he were to place
upright what was overturned, to reveal what was hidden, to show the way to one
who was lost, or to carry a lamp into the dark so that those with eyes could
see forms, in the same way has Master Gotama — through many lines of reasoning
— made the Dhamma clear. I go to Master Gotama for refuge, to the Dhamma, and
to the Community of monks. May Master Gotama remember me as a lay follower who
has gone to him for refuge, from this day forward, for life.”[5]

Notes

1

The
Commentary states that LongNails (Dighanakha) was a nephew of Ven. Sariputta.

2.

Following
the Thai edition of the Canon. The Burmese and PTS editions say that Ven. Sariputta
was standing.

3.

The Pali
word no in this sentence can mean either “indeed” or “to
us.”

4.

Compare
this account of Ven. Sariputta’s awakening with the account given in
MN 111.

5.

The
Commentary states that after delivering this discourse the Buddha returned to
the Bamboo Grove outside of Rajagaha and met with 1,250 arahant disciples to
deliver the Ovada Patimokkha — the event commemorated every year on Magha Puja.

Provenance:

©2007 Thanissaro
Bhikkhu.

Transcribed from a file
provided by the translator. This

Press Information Bureau

(C.M. Information Campus)

Information & Public Relations Department,
U.P.

 

Hon’ble CM directs officers to formulate strategy to
effectively control corruption in government services

 

Hon’ble CM directs officers to implement Janhit
Guarantee Law effectively and take stringent action against officers

not providing services within stipulated time
frame

 

All DMs asked to visit one tehsil one village
every week and SDMs asked to visit five villages every month

 

Lucknow : September 20, 2011

 

Giving comprehensive instructions to the Cabinet
Secretary Mr. Shashank Shekhar Singh to formulate strategy to control
corruption rampant in government services, the Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister
Hon’ble Ms. Mayawati said that all the DMs and Divisional Commissioners should
be apprised of it in a detailed manner at the state level review meeting being
held here today. She said that all the officers should strictly ensure
compliance of her orders.

 

Elaborating upon the directives of the Hon’ble
Chief Minister, the Cabinet Secretary, during the review meeting, said that she
had asked the Divisional Commissioners and DMs to ensure effective
implementation of Janhit Guarantee Law and to provide all the services
identified under it to the people in a stipulated time frame.

 

The Hon’ble Chief Minister said that the state
government had enforced Uttar Pradesh Janhit Guarantee Law with a view to
empowering people. With the implementation of this law, the people had now got
legal guarantee of getting identified services in a time bound manner. She said
that the state government had identified such services of public interest under
Janhit Guarantee Law, which were of prime need for the people belonging to
weaker

and poor sections of the society.

 

The Chief Minister said that as many as 13
services had been notified under the Uttar Pradesh Janhit Guarantee Law. She
has directed the officers to broaden the scope of this Act and increase the
numbers of the services and mainly include the services related to transport
department. She has also directed all the DMs and Commissioners to ensure wide
publicity of the provisions of this Act, so that the people could get its
benefit. She said that under the provisions of the Act, the responsibility of
the officers, unable to provide time bound services, would be fixed and a fine
would also be imposed

on the defaulter for showing indifference. Under
it, arrangement had been made to impose fine on the erring officer and the same
would be paid to the applicant under fixed procedure. She directed the DMs to
punish officers

showing laxity in the implementation of the Act.

 

The Hon’ble Chief Minister directed the officers
to remain present on all working days from 10 am to 12 noon to solve people’s
problems in time bound manner. She also directed them to note the name,
address, mobile no. and brief details of problem/complaint of complainant in
register and make arrangements to inform the complainant immediately after
solving the problem.

 

She directed the senior officers to make random
checking of disposal of complaint/problem through mobile no. She said that
Government/Directorate level officers should also ensure random checking,
during their field visits.

 

The Hon’ble Chief Minister has directed all the
district magistrates to make inspection of a village of any tehsil of district
every week and SDMs to visit five villages every month. She also said that SDMs
should hold open meetings to solve people’s problems. They should also make the
people aware about all the programmes being run by the State Government. They
should get the entire proceedings video recorded. She hoped that this would be
a good

beginning against corruption.

The Hon’ble Chief Minister has also directed the
officers to fix the time

limit for the decisions regarding pending
vigilance charge sheet related cases in

all the departments and take departmental action
in time bound manner. She

said that screening should be done for compulsory
retirement against

employees having careless and indifferent approach
towards government

works. Besides, intelligence information should be
gathered for the officers to

get them trapped red handed for their corrupt
activities. She has authorised the

districts magistrates for this job.

The Hon’ble Chief Minister said that her
government was committed to

remove corruption at every level. No
officer/employee engaged in corruption

would be spared and action would be taken in
accordance with law, she added.

*******

FREE ONLINE CONCENTRATION
PRACTICE INSTITUTE FOR STUDENTS(FOCPIS)

 

3. Department of Healing

 

Department of Healing (DOH) at FOCPIS is based on
the Science of Healing, one of

the five traditional sciences
taught at Nālandā University. It currently offers 3 credits.


Mandala of the Medicine Buddha




Palace of Buddha Bhaisajyaguru, Master of Remedies

Large image (183 kb)






This is the first painting in the series of medical training
paintings that provide illustrations for the basic Tibetan medical text,
the “Blue Beryl” tantras. In this painting, Bhaisajyaguru, the Medicine
Buddha, indirectly teaches the science of healing to his followers. The
dieties in the upper section are representations of the lineage of medical
teachings, including the 5th Dalai Lama, the eight Buddhas of Medicine,
and several medical scholars.

This central palace of the Mandala of the Medicine Buddha
is the site where the science of medicine is taught. Shakyamuni Buddha,
as Bhaisajyaguru, the Medicine Buddha, sits on a throne engraved with gems
at the center of the palace, at the center of Sudarsana, the city of medicine.
In attendence are gods of the devaloka, hermit scholars, Hindu dieties,
and Buddhist followers, including bodhisattvas and devout students. While
holding his seat on the central throne, Bhaisajyaguru also manifests as
the four sibling hermit scholars who instruct all types of students at
the same time. 

Each class of students receives teachings appropriate
to their own level of understanding of the fundamental nature of reality
and the lives of beings.


The Dharmapala Centre School of Thangka
Painting site in Germany offers another
version of this painting,
which includes detailed descriptions of various
aspects of the painting and eighteen pages of enlarged details with descriptive
text.  Several other Medical
Thangkas
are offered as well.




 

A very different, quite beautiful image of a Medicine
Buddha Mandala
is available from a Web site in Finland. The Dharmapala
Centre School of Thangka Painting site in Germany offers another
version,
with two pages of pages of enlarged details.


Upright
conduct (Mangala Sutta 4d)

lynnjkelly |
September 21, 2011 at 11:42 pm | Categories: General, Mangala Sutta |
URL: http://wp.me/pJfQo-nJ

The support of mother and father,
The welfare of spouse and children,
Engaging in unconflicting livelihood;
This is the greatest blessing.

Selfless giving, and living by the Dhamma,
Looking after relatives and friends,
And blameless actions;
This is the greatest blessing.

Part of becoming a pillar of society is conducting ourselves in
exemplary ways everywhere - at home, at work, in public, in any setting. The
Buddha once said that it is difficult for people to really know each other. He
said that we must live together (he was probably referring to monks living in
community) for a long time, not a short time. We must observe a person’s
behavior in a full range of situations, repeatedly, before we can judge her
character. This was the standard he asked to be judged by as well.

There was probably only one Buddha, so let’s not aspire to
perfection immediately, but let’s do take his life as an example. Because his
words and deeds were based on a thorough (ultimate) understanding of causes and
results, and because he had uprooted any inclination within himself towards
greed, hatred and delusion, there was an unparalleled integrity to his actions.

We also have some degree (perhaps a great degree) of integrity.
We try to do the right thing, to behave ethically in every situation. It is
possible, however, that certain factors may make us forget our intentions. If
we are fearful or feel set aside or disrespected, we might react unskilfully.
Only when we are tested do we find out how deep our wisdom goes.

I reported to a friend recently that now at last, perhaps having
mellowed with age, I’m more interested in understanding than I am in being
right. I’ve got a pretty good idea of how temporary and slippery “being
right” can be, and how it often creates unnecessary friction between
people. If we are able to set aside our need to be in charge, to have the final
say, etc., the picture may clarify and we may see what is needed in the situation.
We may be able to shift the conversation from argument to some sort of
communion.

What does it mean to live “by the Dhamma”? To be
truthful, kind, trustworthy, compassionate, and to refrain from harming others
and ourselves. It’s all the stuff we’ve been talking about, but (in this
instance) in the forum of public life. We are who we are, and others, if they
are looking, will know us as we are. How do you want to be known?

Subject: Social Awakening Seminar

 

Dear Friends


                   
We are all aware of the recent happenings in the past few days/months. The
Established and ruling class is trying its best to alter and gradually finish
one of the best constitutions given by none other than Dr Ambedkar. The recent
unconstitutional methods like fasts be it relay or unto death are just a small
means towards a larger game plan which pose a serious threat to the
marginalized,  deprived and backward classes of India. The reservation
policy has benefitted only a fraction of sc/st/obc’s. The majority amongst them
are still devoid of basic human rights. The PIL for creamy layer amongst SC’s
is one of the dangerous steps instigated by the ruling class to divide and
rule.


The adhoc acquisition of land by state in the name of development is a threat
to farmers who often fall prey to short term benefits. Dr Ambedkar along with
farmer leaders in the konkan and thane region has taken the cause of Agri/Koli
castes and the bill for abolition of khoti system was passed in 1958. Inspite
of the law, the upper castes never handed over the ownership of agricultural
land to the farmers. A Pantheon of Baba’s/ Swami’s and Guru’s has completely
hijacked the minds and lives of the backward castes who have forgotten their
original savior’s.


       A long term strategy is required to counter
all this rather than simply reacting to a particular happening.


 Come, Join us and be a part of ‘Social Awakening Seminar’ on Sunday, the
25th September-2011, at Milestone Hall, Shilpchowk, Kharghar. Navi Mumbai.


Time:  5.00 P.M


Speaker: Dr Suresh Mane, senior leader and constitutional expert


Topic:   Present Developments, the Gimmicks of Established class
& Understanding the Constitutional setup.


Mr Rajaram Patil, President, Shetkari Prabodhini, Raigad


Topic: Farmers Movement in Konkan Region, Nana Patil and Role of Dr Ambedkar .


 Homage shall be paid to late Dr Datta Patil, Farmers leader in the konkan
region whose father Narayan Nagu Patil worked closely with Dr Ambedkar for
agri/koli farmer’s cause who form majority in the konkan/navi Mumbai region. .


 Your presence is solicited to create awareness, alert fellow citizens and
share your views.


 SINPACT FOUNDATION, KHARGHAR AND SHETKARI PRABODHINI, RAIGAD

comments (0)
09/21/11
382 LESSON 22 09 2011 Kusita Arambhavatthu Sutta The Grounds for Laziness and the Arousal of Energy FREE ONLINE eNālandā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY and BUDDHIST GOOD NEWS LETTER Through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org- FREE ONLINE CONCENTRATION PRACTICE INSTITUTE FOR STUDENTS(FOCPIS)- The Narratives for the Levels of Departmental Curricula-1. Department of Buddhist Studies-2. Department of Languages
Filed under: General
Posted by: @ 9:40 pm

382 LESSON 22 09  2011 Kusita Arambhavatthu Sutta The Grounds
for Laziness and the Arousal of Energy  FREE
ONLINE
eNālandā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY and
 
BUDDHIST GOOD NEWS LETTER Through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org-
FREE ONLINE CONCENTRATION PRACTICE INSTITUTE FOR STUDENTS(FOCPIS)-
The Narratives for the Levels of Departmental Curricula-1.
Department of Buddhist Studies-2. Department of Languages


AN 8.80

PTS: A iv 332

Kusita-Arambhavatthu
Sutta: The Grounds for Laziness & the Arousal of Energy

translated from the Pali
by

Thanissaro Bhikkhu

© 1997–2011

“Monks, there are these eight grounds for
laziness
. Which eight?

“There is the case where a monk has some work to do. The
thought occurs to him: ‘I will have to do this work. But when I have done this
work, my body will be tired. Why don’t I lie down?’ So he lies down. He doesn’t
make an effort for the attaining of the as-yet-unattained, the reaching of the
as-yet-unreached, the realization of the as-yet-unrealized. This is the first
grounds for laziness.

“Then there is the case where a monk has done some work.
The thought occurs to him: ‘I have done some work. Now that I have done work,
my body is tired. Why don’t I lie down?’ So he lies down. He doesn’t make an
effort for the attaining of the as-yet-unattained, the reaching of the
as-yet-unreached, the realization of the as-yet-unrealized. This is the second
grounds for laziness.

“Then there is the case where a monk has to go on a
journey. The thought occurs to him: ‘I will have to go on this journey. But
when I have gone on the journey, my body will be tired. Why don’t I lie down?’
So he lies down. He doesn’t make an effort for the attaining of the
as-yet-unattained, the reaching of the as-yet-unreached, the realization of the
as-yet-unrealized. This is the third grounds for laziness.

“Then there is the case where a monk has gone on a journey.
The thought occurs to him: ‘I have gone on a journey. Now that I have gone on a
journey, my body is tired. Why don’t I lie down?’ So he lies down. He doesn’t
make an effort for the attaining of the as-yet-unattained, the reaching of the
as-yet-unreached, the realization of the as-yet-unrealized. This is the fourth
grounds for laziness.

“Then there is the case where a monk, having gone for alms
in a village or town, does not get as much coarse or refined food as he needs
to fill himself up. The thought occurs to him: ‘I, having gone for alms in a
village or town, have not gotten as much coarse or refined food as I need to
fill myself up. This body of mine is tired & unsuitable for work. Why don’t
I lie down?’ So he lies down. He doesn’t make an effort for the attaining of
the as-yet-unattained, the reaching of the as-yet-unreached, the realization of
the as-yet-unrealized. This is the fifth grounds for laziness.

“Then there is the case where a monk, having gone for alms
in a village or town, does get as much coarse or refined food as he needs to
fill himself up. The thought occurs to him: ‘I, having gone for alms in a
village or town, have gotten as much coarse or refined food as I need to fill
myself up. This body of mine is heavy & unsuitable for work, as if I were
many months pregnant. Why don’t I lie down?’ So he lies down. He doesn’t make
an effort for the attaining of the as-yet-unattained, the reaching of the
as-yet-unreached, the realization of the as-yet-unrealized. This is the sixth
grounds for laziness.

“Then there is the case where a monk comes down with a
slight illness. The thought occurs to him: ‘I have come down with a slight
illness. There’s a need to lie down.’ So he lies down. He doesn’t make an
effort for the attaining of the as-yet-unattained, the reaching of the
as-yet-unreached, the realization of the as-yet-unrealized. This is the seventh
grounds for laziness.

“Then there is the case where a monk has recovered from his
illness, not long after his recovery. The thought occurs to him: ‘I have recovered
from my illness. It’s not long after my recovery. This body of mine is weak
& unsuitable for work. Why don’t I lie down?’ So he lies down. He doesn’t
make an effort for the attaining of the as-yet-unattained, the reaching of the
as-yet-unreached, the realization of the as-yet-unrealized. This is the eighth
grounds for laziness.

“These are the eight grounds for laziness.

“There are these eight grounds for the arousal of energy.
Which eight?

“There is the case where a monk has some work to do. The
thought occurs to him: ‘I will have to do this work. But when I am doing this
work, it will not be easy to attend to the Buddha’s message. Why don’t I make
an effort beforehand for the attaining of the as-yet-unattained, the reaching
of the as-yet-unreached, the realization of the as-yet-unrealized?’ So he makes
an effort for the attaining of the as-yet-unattained, the reaching of the
as-yet-unreached, the realization of the as-yet-unrealized. This is the first
grounds for the arousal of energy.

“Then there is the case where a monk has done some work.
The thought occurs to him: ‘I have done some work. While I was doing work, I
couldn’t attend to the Buddha’s message. Why don’t I make an effort for the
attaining of the as-yet-unattained, the reaching of the as-yet-unreached, the
realization of the as-yet-unrealized?’ So he makes an effort for the attaining
of the as-yet-unattained, the reaching of the as-yet-unreached, the realization
of the as-yet-unrealized. This is the second grounds for the arousal of energy.

“Then there is the case where a monk has to go on a
journey. The thought occurs to him: ‘I will have to go on this journey. But
when I am going on the journey, it will not be easy to attend to the Buddha’s
message. Why don’t I make an effort beforehand for the attaining of the
as-yet-unattained, the reaching of the as-yet-unreached, the realization of the
as-yet-unrealized?’ So he makes an effort for the attaining of the
as-yet-unattained, the reaching of the as-yet-unreached, the realization of the
as-yet-unrealized. This is the third grounds for the arousal of energy.

“Then there is the case where a monk has gone on a journey.
The thought occurs to him: ‘I have gone on a journey. While I was going on the
journey, I couldn’t attend to the Buddha’s message. Why don’t I make an effort
for the attaining of the as-yet-unattained, the reaching of the
as-yet-unreached, the realization of the as-yet-unrealized?’ So he makes an
effort for the attaining of the as-yet-unattained, the reaching of the
as-yet-unreached, the realization of the as-yet-unrealized. This is the fourth
grounds for the arousal of energy.

“Then there is the case where a monk, having gone for alms
in a village or town, does not get as much coarse or refined food as he needs
to fill himself up. The thought occurs to him: ‘I, having gone for alms in a
village or town, have not gotten as much coarse or refined food as I need to
fill myself up. This body of mine is light & suitable for work. Why don’t I
make an effort for the attaining of the as-yet-unattained, the reaching of the
as-yet-unreached, the realization of the as-yet-unrealized?’ So he makes an
effort for the attaining of the as-yet-unattained, the reaching of the
as-yet-unreached, the realization of the as-yet-unrealized. This is the fifth grounds
for the arousal of energy.

“Then there is the case where a monk, having gone for alms
in a village or town, does get as much coarse or refined food as he needs to
fill himself up. The thought occurs to him: ‘I, having gone for alms in a
village or town, have gotten as much coarse or refined food as I need to fill
myself up. This body of mine is light & suitable for work. Why don’t I make
an effort for the attaining of the as-yet-unattained, the reaching of the
as-yet-unreached, the realization of the as-yet-unrealized?’[1]

So he makes an effort for the attaining of the as-yet-unattained, the reaching
of the as-yet-unreached, the realization of the as-yet-unrealized. This is the
sixth grounds for the arousal of energy.

“Then there is the case where a monk comes down with a
slight illness. The thought occurs to him: ‘I have come down with a slight
illness. Now, there’s the possibility that it could get worse. Why don’t I make
an effort beforehand for the attaining of the as-yet-unattained, the reaching
of the as-yet-unreached, the realization of the as-yet-unrealized?’ So he makes
an effort for the attaining of the as-yet-unattained, the reaching of the
as-yet-unreached, the realization of the as-yet-unrealized. This is the seventh
grounds for the arousal of energy.

“Then there is the case where a monk has recovered from his
illness, not long after his recovery. The thought occurs to him: ‘I have
recovered from my illness. It’s not long after my recovery. Now, there’s the
possibility that the illness could come back. Why don’t I make an effort
beforehand for the attaining of the as-yet-unattained, the reaching of the
as-yet-unreached, the realization of the as-yet-unrealized?’ So he makes an
effort for the attaining of the as-yet-unattained, the reaching of the as-yet-unreached,
the realization of the as-yet-unrealized. This is the eighth grounds for the
arousal of energy.

“These are the eight grounds for the arousal of
energy.”

Note

1.

Apparently,
this monk, even though receiving a lot of food, didn’t fill himself up. When
the work is meditation, a light body is seen as suitable for work.

2. Department of Languages

 

Department of Languages (LAN) at
FOCPIS
is based on the Science of Languages,

one of the five traditional
sciences taught at Nālandā University. The language curriculum

consists of graduated study of
Tibetan language and currently offers 8 credits. The number

of credits will gradually expand with
the further development of our language program.

Sanskrit language studies will be
added to the curriculum in the future.

 

2.1 Tibetan Language Curriculum

 

Tibetan language program offers
eight courses in literary and colloquial Tibetan. The future

curriculum will also include
advanced literary translation courses and advanced colloquial

courses.

 

DOL 510 Literary Tibetan I - 1
credit

DOL 511 Colloquial Tibetan I - 1
credit

DOL 520 Literary Tibetan II - 1
credit

DOL 521Colloquial Tibetan II - 1
credit

DOL 530 Literary Tibetan III - 1
credit

DOL 531 Colloquial Tibetan III - 1
credit

DOL 540 Literary Tibetan IV - 1
credit

DOL 541 Colloquial Tibetan IV - 1
credit

2.2 Sanskrit Language Curriculum

 

The future Sanskrit language
program will offer eight courses in literary Sanskrit, followed by

advanced literary translation
courses.

 

comments (0)
09/20/11
381 LESSON 21 09 2011 Ina Sutta Debt FREE ONLINE eNālandā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY and BUDDHIST GOOD NEWS LETTER Through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org- FREE ONLINE CONCENTRATION PRACTICE INSTITUTE FOR STUDENTS(FOCPIS)- The Narratives for the Levels of Departmental Curricula-1. Department of Buddhist Studies-1.3 Advanced Curriculum- Drawing attention of the Hon’ble Prime Minister towards the commitment of her government for the uplift of OBCs of the state, the Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Hon’ble Ms. Mayawati ji has requested the Central Government to include Jat caste/community in the Central list of other backward classes (OBCs). Towards “Prabuddha Bharat” (Awakened India)
Filed under: General
Posted by: @ 9:18 pm

381 LESSON 21 09  2011 Ina Sutta Debt
 
FREE ONLINE eNālandā Research
and Practice UNIVERSITY and
  BUDDHIST
GOOD NEWS LETTER
Through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org-
FREE ONLINE CONCENTRATION PRACTICE INSTITUTE FOR STUDENTS(FOCPIS)-
The Narratives for the Levels of Departmental Curricula-1.
Department of Buddhist Studies-1.3 Advanced Curriculum-
Drawing
attention of the Hon’ble Prime Minister towards the commitment of her
government for the uplift of OBCs of the state, the Uttar Pradesh Chief
Minister Hon’ble Ms. Mayawati ji has requested the Central Government to include
Jat caste/community in the Central list of other backward classes (OBCs).
Towards “Prabuddha Bharat” (Awakened
India)

Drawing attention of the PM towards the commitment
of her govt for the uplift of OBCs of the state, the UP CM
 Ms. Mayawati ji has requested the Central Govt
to include Jat caste  in the Central list
of OBCs.

 

U P C M Ms.Mayawati ji has requested the PM to include
Jat caste/community in the Central list OBCs. As her govt. was committed 4 d
uplift of OBC of UP.

 

AN 6.45

PTS: A iii 351

Ina Sutta: Debt

translated from the Pali
by

Thanissaro Bhikkhu

© 1998–2011

“Monks, for one who partakes of sensuality, poverty is
suffering in the world.”

“Yes, lord.”

“And a poor, destitute, penniless person gets into debt.
For one who partakes of sensuality, getting into debt is suffering in the
world.”

“Yes, lord.”

“And a poor, destitute, penniless person, having gotten
into debt, owes interest payments. For one who partakes of sensuality, interest
payment is suffering in the world.”

“Yes, lord.”

“And when a poor, destitute, penniless person owing
interest payments does not pay interest on time, they serve him notice. For one
who partakes of sensuality, being served notice is suffering in the
world.”

“Yes, lord.”

“And when a poor, destitute, penniless person, being served
notice, does not pay, they hound him. For one who partakes of sensuality, being
hounded is suffering in the world.”

“Yes, lord.”

“And when a poor, destitute, penniless person, being
hounded, does not pay, he is put into bondage. For one who partakes of
sensuality, bondage is suffering in the world.”

“Yes, lord.”

“Thus, monks, poverty is suffering in the world for one who
partakes of sensuality. Getting into debt is suffering in the world for one who
partakes of sensuality. Interest payment is suffering in the world for one who
partakes of sensuality. Being served notice is suffering in the world for one
who partakes of sensuality. Being hounded is suffering in the world for one who
partakes of sensuality. Bondage is suffering in the world for one who partakes
of sensuality.

“In the same way, monks, whoever has no conviction with
regard to skillful mental qualities, no sense of conscience with regard to
skillful mental qualities, no sense of concern with regard to skillful mental
qualities, no persistence with regard to skillful mental qualities, no
discernment with regard to skillful mental qualities is, in the discipline of a
noble one, said to be poor, destitute, & penniless.

“He — poor, destitute, & penniless, having no
conviction with regard to skillful mental qualities, no sense of conscience…
no sense of concern… no persistence… no discernment with regard to skillful
mental qualities — engages in misconduct by way of the body, misconduct by way
of speech, misconduct by way of the mind. For him, I tell you, this is getting
into debt.

“For the purpose of concealing his bodily misconduct, he
formulates evil desires: He desires, ‘May they not know about me.’ He resolves,
‘May they not know about me.’ He speaks, [thinking,] ‘May they not know about
me.’ He makes an effort with his body, [thinking,] ‘May they not know about
me.’ For the purpose of concealing his verbal misconduct… For the purpose of
concealing his mental misconduct, he formulates evil desires: He desires, ‘May
they not know about me.’ He resolves, ‘May they not know about me.’ He speaks,
[thinking,] ‘May they not know about me.’ He makes an effort with his body,
[thinking,] ‘May they not know about me.’ For him, I tell you, this is interest
payment.

“And then his well-behaved companions in the holy life say
about him, ‘This venerable one acts in this way, behaves in this way.’ For him,
I tell you, this is being served notice.

“And then, when he has gone to the wilderness, to the foot
of a tree, or to an empty dwelling, he is beset with evil, unskillful thoughts
accompanied by remorse. For him, I tell you, this is being hounded.

“He — poor, destitute, & penniless, having engaged in
misconduct by way of the body, misconduct by way of speech, & misconduct by
way of the mind — on the break-up of the body, after death, is bound by the
bond of hell or the bond of the animal womb. And I can imagine no one other
bond so tormenting, so painful, so obstructive to the unexcelled rest from
bondage, as the bond of hell or the bond of the animal womb.”

Poverty is called
suffering in the world; so, too, is getting into debt. A poor person, in debt,
partaking of sensuality, suffers hardship. Then they hound him and put him into
bondage: the painful bond for one longing to gain sensual pleasures. Now,
anyone with no conviction in the discipline of a noble one — no sense of
conscience, no sense of concern — contemplating evil actions, doing wrong by
way of body, wrong by way of speech, & wrong by way of the mind, wants:
‘May they not know about me.’ He creeps along in body, speech, or mind, piling
up evil actions, here & there, again & again. He, with evil actions,
his wisdom weak, knowing his own wrong-doing, is a poor person, in debt.
Partaking of sensuality, he suffers hardship. Then they hound him — painful
mental resolves born of remorse — at home or in the wilderness. He, with evil
actions, his wisdom weak, knowing his own wrong-doing, goes to an animal womb
or is bound in hell: the painful bond from which the enlightened are freed. But
one with confidence, living at home, making gifts of his belongings,
righteously-gained, wins both goals: advantage in the here-&-now, &
happiness in the world beyond. The liberality of this householder piles up
merit. Now, anyone with conviction firmly established in the discipline of a
noble one — with a sense of conscience, a sense of concern, discerning &
restrained by virtue — is, in the discipline of a noble one, said to be living
in ease. Gaining a pleasure not of the flesh, he determines on equanimity:
abandoning the five hindrances — persistence constantly aroused — entering the
jhanas: unified, mindful, & wise. Knowing this as it actually is in the
total ending of all fetters, through everywhere not-clinging, his mind is
rightly released. In him, Such, rightly released, there is the knowledge, in
the total ending of the fetters of becoming: ‘My release is unshakable.’ That
is the highest knowledge that, the happiness unexcelled. Sorrowless, dustless,
at rest, that is release from debt.

 

AN 8.80

 

1.3 Advanced Curriculum

 

With the firm basis in the Buddhist
philosophical views acquired in the foundation and

intermediate levels,
FOCPIS
advanced curriculum represents the actual study of the
principal

Indian shāstras, or
treatises with authoritative commentaries by leading Kagyü and Nyingma

masters. It is aligned with each of
the three turnings of the wheel of Dharma and currently

offers 32 credits. The number of
credits associated with courses will increase with the further

development of the advanced
curriculum. Currently the advanced courses have 2 or 4 credit.

When the development phase is
complete and the Advanced Curriculum is offered yearround,

these courses will be 5 or 10
credits each, respectively, which will include analytical

meditation, debate, and discussion
groups. During the development phase, as many of the 2

or 4 credit hour courses are being
taught as are needed to teach the related texts. The

Tantra curriculum will be added in
the near future.

 

DOB 680 Analytical Meditation III

 

1.3.1 Advanced Curriculum: First Turning

 

The four courses of the
FOCPIS
advanced curriculum first turning present an in-depth study

of two treatises: Abhidharmakosha
by Vasubandhu and Pramānavārttika by
Dharmakīrti,

which constitute the cornerstone of
the
shedra studies. Completing all four
advanced

curriculum first turning courses
earns the
FOCPIS Advanced Curriculum First

Turning Certificate of Completion.

 

DOB 681Abhidharmakosha: Bestowing
the Fulfillment of Accomplishment and Happiness

I - 2 credits

 

DOB 682 Abhidharmakosha: Bestowing
the Fulfillment of Accomplishment and

Happiness II - 2 credits

 

DOB 690 Pramānavārttika: The Ocean
of the Texts on Reasoning I - 2 credits

 

DOB 691 Pramānavārttika: The Ocean
of the Texts on Reasoning II - 2 credits

 

1.3.2 Advanced Curriculum: Second Turning

 

The eight courses of the FOCPIS advanced
curriculum second turning present an in-depth

study of two seminal Mahāyāna
treatises of the
shedra studies: Madhyamakāvatāra
by

Chandrakīrti and Abhisamayālamkāra
by Maitreya. Completing all eight advanced curriculum

second turning courses earns the FOCPIS Advanced
Curriculum Second Turning

 

DOB Certificate of Completion.

 

700 Madhyamakāvatāra: The
Chariot of the Takpo Kagyü Siddhas I - 2 credits

 

DOB 701 Madhyamakāvatāra: The
Chariot of the Takpo Kagyü Siddhas II - 2 credits

DOB 702 Madhyamakāvatāra: The
Chariot of the Takpo Kagyü Siddhas III - 2 credits

DOB 703 Madhyamakāvatāra: The
Chariot of the Takpo Kagyü Siddhas IV - 2 credits

DOB 710 Abhisamayālamkāra: The Noble
One Resting at Ease I - 2 credits

DOB 711 Abhisamayālamkāra: The Noble
One Resting at Ease II - 2 credits

DOB 712 Abhisamayālamkāra: The Noble
One Resting at Ease III - 2 credits

DOB 713 Abhisamayālamkāra: The Noble
One Resting at Ease IV - 2 credits

 

1.3.3 Advanced Curriculum: Third Turning

 

FOCPIS advanced
curriculum third turning consists of an in-depth study of three treatises by

Maitreya: Madhyāntavibhāga, Dharmadharmatāvibhāga
and the Uttaratantra. Completing all

three advanced curriculum third
turning courses earns the
FOCPIS Advanced

Curriculum Third Turning
Certificate of Completion.

 

DOB 760 Madhyāntavibhāga: The
Distinction between the Middle and Extremes - 2

credits

 

DOB 770 Dharmadharmatāvibhāga: The
Distinction between Phenomena and the Nature

 

DOB of Phenomena - 2 credits

 

780 Sūtras of the Third Turning
& the
Uttaratantra: The Lion’s Roar of
Irreversibility -

4 credits

 

1.3.4 Advanced Curriculum: Tantra

 

The future Tantra curriculum at
Nitartha Institute will be based on the rich tradition of tantric

studies in the Kagyü lineage,
drawing from the commentary on the
Hevajra Tantra by

Jamgön Kongtrül Lodrö Thaye
(1813-1899) and
Zabmo Nangdön, the Profound Inner

Reality, one of the most complete
elucidations of the Buddhist teachings of the completion

stage practices of the Anuttarayogatantra, by the
Third Karmapa, Rangjung Dorje (1284-

1339), and its commentary by Jamgön
Kongtrül Lodrö Thaye. This level of curriculum will

also include the study of the
Mahāmudrā view. Mahāmudrā is regarded to be at the pinnacle

of the meditational systems of
Tibetan Buddhism. One of the most systematic and

authoritative presentations of this
meditation on the nature of mind is found in
The

Moonbeams of Mahāmudrā by Dakpo
Tashi Namgyal (1511–1587).
FOCPIS students will

enter Tantric studies only after
the completion of all the preceding levels of the curriculum

and with the permission from The
Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche.

 

Press Information Bureau

(C.M. Information Campus)

Information & Public Relations Department,
U.P.

 

Hon’ble C.M. demands from Central Government to
include Jat Caste in Central list of OBC

 

Hon’ble C.M. writes letter to Prime Minister

 

Lucknow : September 19 , 2011

 

Drawing attention of the Hon’ble Prime Minister
towards the commitment of her government for the uplift of OBCs of the state, the
Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Hon’ble Ms. Mayawati ji has requested the Central
Government to include Jat caste/community in the Central list of other backward
classes (OBCs). She has sent a letter to the Prime Minister in this connection
in which she said that maximum people of Jat community earned their living
mainly from agriculture and allied activities. Owing to decline in the agricultural
land holding, the financial condition of the families had weakened. Moreover,
they were educationally backward as well. Their children also lagged behind in
the field of school education. This community did not have proper
representation in the Central Services also. Keeping this in view, the state
government had included Jat Community in the list of OBC on 10 March 2000.

 

In her letter written to the Prime Minister, the
Hon’ble Chief Minister ji said that in the Central list of OBCs, under the
state list of Rajasthan, the Jat caste (leaving aside Dholpur and Bharatpur districts)
had been included through notification dated 27 October 1999. Since, the state
of Rajasthan was an adjoining state of Uttar Pradesh and the socio-economic
condition of the Jat caste of both the states was similar, so it was a solid
basis to include U.P.’s Jat caste into the Central list of OBC.

 

The Hon’ble Chief Minister ji also said that it
was her firm belief that if change had to be brought about in the condition of

the Jat Community, opportunities in the field of
education, employment including other sectors would have to be provided to them
for their progress. Her government was committed to extend full co-operation in
it, she added.

Dear
brothers and sisters in the Sangha,

Jai
Bhim!!

Kindly
find below the information related to the forthcoming conference on
“Towards Prabuddha Bharat”. 

Kindly
encourage people outside Maharashtra in your contact to participate in
it. 

For
further details and registration, contact the people mentioned below.

With
metta,

Mangesh

Towards
“Prabuddha Bharat” (Awakened India)

Prabuddha Bharat stands for  awakened India. Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar envisioned
an Awakened India. He also started a publication titled as “Prabuddha Bharat”
in Marathi language. His social philosophy was based on liberty, equality and
fraternity , which he said, was rooted into Buddha Dhamma. Since mass
conversion in 1956, millions of people have become Buddhists. The movement
though initially was concentrated in Maharashtra, it has been now spreading all
over India.

There are unprecedented changes in the
social movement in India, and Buddhism has become an important dimension of
fight against caste system and practice of untouchability. Dr. Babasaheb
Ambedkar preferred Buddhism in place of ideologies like Marxism, thus it’s
spelling out very large role for Buddhism in Modern India.

Prabuddha Bharat Network is conceived
after an attempt to bring together Buddhists throughout India based on training
in Nagarjuna Training Institute in Nagpur. The Nagarjuna Training Institute
also held the National Conference of Buddhists in 2006.

In order to initiate and develop the
network of Buddhist individuals and organizations throughout India, a two-day
conference will be held in Nagaloka, Nagpur on October 7-8, 2011. The two day
conference is hoping to bring Buddhist followers of Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar who
are committed to the realization of Prabuddha Bharat.

 

The lodging and boarding will be provided
by Nagaloka. Please confirm your participation on
9823460581/08237290046/07893451710 or send us an email on mangesh.dahiwale@gmail.com/p.m.rangari@gmail.com/jaibhim@gmail.com

comments (0)
09/19/11
380 LESSON 20 09 2011 Vera Sutta Animosity FREE ONLINE eNālandā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY and BUDDHIST GOOD NEWS LETTER Through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org- FREE ONLINE CONCENTRATION PRACTICE INSTITUTE FOR STUDENTS(FOCPIS)- The Narratives for the Levels of Departmental Curricula-1. Department of Buddhist Studies-1.2 Intermediate Curriculum
Filed under: General
Posted by: @ 10:08 pm

380 LESSON 20 09  2011
Vera Sutta Animosity FREE ONLINE eNālandā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY and  BUDDHIST GOOD NEWS LETTER Through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org-
FREE ONLINE CONCENTRATION PRACTICE INSTITUTE FOR STUDENTS(FOCPIS)-
The Narratives for the Levels of Departmental Curricula-1.
Department of Buddhist Studies-1.2 Intermediate Curriculum



1              `UP
CM Ms MayawatiJi writes to PM Dr.Manmohan Singh asking centre 2 provide
reservation to minorities with an amendment 2 d Constitution.UP govt.will
cooperate.

2              UP
CM Ms. Mayawati ji has greeted the craftsmen and engrs on Vishwakarma Jayanti
saying  technical experts had an impt role
in the all-round dev of the  society

 

Pl send the above messages through SMS

 

 

AN 10.92

PTS: A v 182

Vera Sutta: Animosity

translated from the Pali
by

Thanissaro Bhikkhu

© 2000–2011

Then Anathapindika the householder
went to the Blessed One and, on arrival, having bowed down to the Blessed One,
sat to one side. As he was sitting there, the Blessed One said to him,
“When, for a disciple of the noble ones, five forms of fear &
animosity are stilled; when he is endowed with the four factors of
stream-entry; and when, through discernment, he has rightly seen & rightly
ferreted out the noble method, then if he wants he may state about himself:
‘Hell is ended; animal wombs are ended; the state of the hungry shades is
ended; states of deprivation, destitution, the bad bourns are ended! I am a
stream-winner, steadfast, never again destined for states of woe, headed for
self-awakening!’

“Now, which five forms of fear
& animosity
are stilled?

“When a person takes life, then with the taking of life as
a requisite condition, he produces fear & animosity in the here & now,
produces fear & animosity in future lives, experiences mental concomitants
of pain & despair; but when he refrains from taking life, he neither
produces fear & animosity in the here & now nor does he produce fear
& animosity in future lives, nor does he experience mental concomitants of
pain & despair: for one who refrains from taking life, that fear &
animosity is thus stilled.

“When a person steals… engages in illicit sex… tells
lies…

“When a person drinks distilled & fermented drinks that
cause heedlessness, then with the drinking of distilled & fermented drinks
that cause heedlessness as a requisite condition, he produces fear &
animosity in the here & now, produces fear & animosity in future lives,
experiences mental concomitants of pain & despair; but when he refrains
from drinking distilled & fermented drinks that cause heedlessness, he
neither produces fear & animosity in the here & now nor does he produce
fear & animosity in future lives, nor does he experience mental
concomitants of pain & despair: for one who refrains from drinking
distilled & fermented drinks that cause heedlessness, that fear &
animosity is thus stilled.

“These are the five forms of fear & animosity that are
stilled.

And which are the four
factors of stream-entry with which he is endowed?

“There is the case where the disciple of the noble ones is
endowed with verified confidence in the Awakened One: ‘Indeed, the Blessed One
is worthy & rightly self-awakened, consummate in knowledge & conduct,
well-gone, an expert with regard to the world, unexcelled as a trainer for
those people fit to be tamed, the Teacher of divine & human beings,
awakened, blessed.’

“He is endowed with verified confidence in the Dhamma: ‘The
Dhamma is well-expounded by the Blessed One, to be seen here & now,
timeless, inviting verification, pertinent, to be realized by the wise for
themselves.’

“He is endowed with verified confidence in the Sangha: ‘The
Sangha of the Blessed One’s disciples who have practiced well… who have
practiced straight-forwardly… who have practiced methodically… who have
practiced masterfully — in other words, the four pairs, the eight individuals [1]

— they are the Sangha of the Blessed One’s disciples: worthy of gifts, worthy
of hospitality, worthy of offerings, worthy of respect, the incomparable field
of merit for the world.’

“He is endowed with virtues that are appealing to the noble
ones: untorn, unbroken, unspotted, unsplattered, liberating, praised by the
wise, untarnished, leading to concentration.

“These are the four factors of stream-entry with which he
is endowed.

“And which is the noble method that he has rightly seen
& rightly ferreted out through discernment?

“There is the case where a disciple of the noble ones
notices: When this is, that is. From the arising of this comes the arising of
that. When this isn’t, that isn’t. From the cessation of this comes the
cessation of that.

“In other words: From ignorance as a requisite condition
come fabrications. From fabrications as a requisite condition comes
consciousness. From consciousness as a requisite condition comes
name-&-form. From name-&-form as a requisite condition come the six
sense media. From the six sense media as a requisite condition comes contact.
From contact as a requisite condition comes feeling. From feeling as a
requisite condition comes craving. From craving as a requisite condition comes
clinging/sustenance. From clinging/sustenance as a requisite condition comes
becoming. From becoming as a requisite condition comes birth. From birth as a
requisite condition, then aging & death, sorrow, lamentation, pain,
distress, & despair come into play. Such is the origination of this entire
mass of stress & suffering.

“Now from the remainderless fading & cessation of that
very ignorance comes the cessation of fabrications. From the cessation of
fabrications comes the cessation of consciousness. From the cessation of
consciousness comes the cessation of name-&-form. From the cessation of
name-&-form comes the cessation of the six sense media. From the cessation
of the six sense media comes the cessation of contact. From the cessation of
contact comes the cessation of feeling. From the cessation of feeling comes the
cessation of craving. From the cessation of craving comes the cessation of
clinging/sustenance. From the cessation of clinging/sustenance comes the
cessation of becoming. From the cessation of becoming comes the cessation of
birth. From the cessation of birth, then aging & death, sorrow,
lamentation, pain, distress, & despair all cease. Such is the cessation of
this entire mass of stress & suffering.

“This is the noble method that he has rightly seen &
rightly ferreted out through discernment.

“When, for a disciple of the noble ones, these five forms
of fear & animosity are stilled; when he is endowed with these four factors
of stream-entry; and when, through discernment, he has rightly seen &
rightly ferreted out this noble method, then if he wants he may state about
himself: ‘Hell is ended; animal wombs are ended; the state of the hungry shades
is ended; states of deprivation, destitution, the bad bourns are ended! I am a
stream-winner, steadfast, never again destined for states of woe, headed for
self-awakening!’”

Note

1.

The four
pairs are (1) the person on the path to stream-entry, the person experiencing
the fruit of stream-entry; (2) the person on the path to once-returning, the
person experiencing the fruit of once-returning; (3) the person on the path to
non-returning, the person experiencing the fruit of non-returning; (4) the
person on the path to arahantship, the person experiencing the fruit of
arahantship. The eight individuals are the eight types forming these four
pairs.

See also: AN 5.179; “Stream-entry” (Study Guide).

 

AN 6.45

AN 8.80

[The
Buddhist Circle] Loss of Buddha Gaya Law Case

FROM:

·        
vinaya
rakkhita

TO:

·        
buddhistcircle@yahoogroups.com

CC:

·        
bodhisattva
group

·        
Loss
of Buddha Gaya Law Case (1906)

·        
In 1905 the great legal
battle between the Anagarika Dharmapala and the Mahant entered its final phase,
and for four years the whole Buddhist world watched the sordid proceedings drag
on to a conclusion as shameful to the Government of India and orthodox Hinduism
as it was bitter, humiliating and outrageous to the feelings of the Buddhists.
The offensive was of course taken by the Mahant, who at the instigation of the
Commissioner of Patna filed a suit against Sumangala Thera, who all these years
had been taking care of the image, and Dharmapala, for a declaration that he
was the sole owner of the Burmese Rest House, and for the ejection of the
defendants and the removal of the image. The Government of India was also made
a party to the suit inasmuch as it had refused to order the removal of the
image in 1896.

·        
“The sub-judge who decided
the suit,” says a Maha Bodhi publication, “in the first instance held that the
Rest House had been built by the Mahant for convenience of the Burmese
Buddhists who had been allowed to stop in it, that the defendants were not
entitled to make it their permanent abode and to place the image in it and
ordered their ejection with the Image.” Dharmapala not unnaturally appealed
against this infamous decision to the High Court, which varied the decree of
the sub-judge, holding that inasmuch as the building had been intended for the
use of Buddhists in general, the defendants were not entitled to make it their
permanent abode or to install any image there. They found that the Rest House
had been erected with money at least part of which had been donated by the
Burmese. The Mahant’s position was found to be that he held possession of the
building and had the control and superintendence of it subject to the right to
use it in the customary manner, if any such right be shown to have existed; but
no decision was given on this question of right as in this suit it did not
arise.

·        




·        
Two decades of struggle to
regain the lost rights of the Buddhists thus ended in total failure, and the
sinister collaboration between political and religions imperialism at last
succeeded in depriving the followers of the Buddha of any foothold in their own
most sacred shrine. One stands aghast at the enormity of the wrong done by a
powerful Government to the largest religious community on earth; one beholds
with amazement the brazen impudence with which a mercenary Hindu Mahant is
permitted to pollute and desecrate the holy of holies of the Buddhist world.
Nor is the position at present very much better, even though nearly fifty years
have passed since Dharmapala was ejected from the Rest House, and even though
an independent government has meanwhile arisen bearing on its enfranchised brow
the symbols of Buddhist India. Buddha Gaya languishes in the hands of a
predominantly Hindu Managing Committee, and the Buddhists continue to be
deprived of all effective control over their own most sacred shrine. 

 

FREE ONLINE
CONCENTRATION PRACTICE INSTITUTE FOR STUDENTS(FOCPIS)

1.2 Intermediate Curriculum

 

FOCPIS intermediate
curriculum continues to lay the ground for in-depth study of the great

Indian treatises ad their
commentaries by the Kagyü and Nyingma masters. It currently

consists of the core curriculum and
offers 8 credits. The number of credits associated with

each course will increase with the
further development of the intermediate curriculum. The

intermediate debate curriculum will
be added in the near future.

DOB 600 Analytical Meditation II

 

1.2.1 Intermediate Curriculum: The Core

 

The core of intermediate curriculum
consists of four courses summarizing the ground, path

and fruition of the Mahāyāna:
Chittamātra, Madhyamaka, Paths and Bhūmis as well as

Buddha Nature. Completing all four
intermediate core courses earns the
FOCPIS

Intermediate Curriculum Certificate
of Completion.

 

DOB 601 Chittamātra Philosophical
Tradition: Appearances are Mere Mind - 2 credits

DOB 610 Madhyamaka Philosophical
Tradition: Not Even a Middle - 2 credits

DOB 620 Paths and Bhūmis: The Path
to Enlightenment - 2 credits

DOB 630 Buddha Nature: Luminous Heart
of the Tathāgata - 2 credits

 

1.2.2 Intermediate Debate

 

The four courses of intermediate
debate will consist of debating the views of the four

Buddhist philosophical traditions:
Vaibhāshika, Sautrāntika Chittamātra and Madhyamaka,

first within the boundaries of
individual systems, as well as between them and will enact

great debates the tradition has
preserved.

 

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09/18/11
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376 LESSON 16 09 2011 Adiya Sutta Benefits to be Obtained from Wealth FREE ONLINE eNālandā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY & BUDDHIST GOOD NEWS LETTER Through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org- FREE ONLINE CONCENTRATION PRACTICE INSTITUTE FOR STUDENTS(FOCPIS)- Erode Venkata Ramasamy (ஈரோடு வேங்கட இராமசாமி )Jayanti on 17-09-2011
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376  LESSON 16 09  2011 Adiya
Sutta Benefits to be Obtained from Wealth
FREE ONLINE
eNālandā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY & BUDDHIST GOOD NEWS LETTER
Through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org- FREE ONLINE CONCENTRATION
PRACTICE INSTITUTE FOR STUDENTS(FOCPIS)-

Erode Venkata Ramasamy
 (
ஈரோடு வேங்கட இராமசாமி )Jayanti on 17-09-2011

Erode Venkata Ramasamy  (ஈரோடு வேங்கட இராமசாமி )Jayanti Celebration on 17-09-2011 at BSP Head Ofice at 11:00 AM


AN 5.41

PTS: A iii 45

Adiya Sutta: Benefits to
be Obtained (from Wealth)

translated from the Pali
by

Thanissaro Bhikkhu

© 1997–2011

Then Anathapindika the householder went to
the Blessed One and, on arrival, having bowed down to him, sat to one side. As
he was sitting there the Blessed One said to him: “There are these five
benefits that can be obtained from wealth. Which five?

“There is the case where the disciple of the noble ones —
using the wealth earned through his efforts & enterprise, amassed through
the strength of his arm, and piled up through the sweat of his brow, righteous
wealth righteously gained — provides himself with pleasure & satisfaction,
and maintains that pleasure rightly. He provides his mother & father with
pleasure & satisfaction, and maintains that pleasure rightly. He provides
his children, his wife, his slaves, servants, & assistants with pleasure
& satisfaction, and maintains that pleasure rightly. This is the first
benefit that can be obtained from wealth.

“Furthermore, the disciple of the noble ones — using the
wealth earned through his efforts & enterprise, amassed through the
strength of his arm, and piled up through the sweat of his brow, righteous
wealth righteously gained — provides his friends & associates with pleasure
& satisfaction, and maintains that pleasure rightly. This is the second
benefit that can be obtained from wealth.

“Furthermore, the disciple of the noble ones — using the
wealth earned through his efforts & enterprise, amassed through the
strength of his arm, and piled up through the sweat of his brow, righteous
wealth righteously gained — wards off from calamities coming from fire, flood,
kings, thieves, or hateful heirs, and keeps himself safe. This is the third
benefit that can be obtained from wealth.

“Furthermore, the disciple of the noble ones — using the
wealth earned through his efforts & enterprise, amassed through the
strength of his arm, and piled up through the sweat of his brow, righteous
wealth righteously gained — performs the five oblations: to relatives, guests,
the dead, kings, & devas. This is the fourth benefit that can be obtained
from wealth.

“Furthermore, the disciple of the noble ones — using the
wealth earned through his efforts & enterprise, amassed through the
strength of his arm, and piled up through the sweat of his brow, righteous
wealth righteously gained — institutes offerings of supreme aim, heavenly,
resulting in happiness, leading to heaven, given to priests & contemplatives
who abstain from intoxication & heedlessness, who endure all things with
patience & humility, each taming himself, each restraining himself, each
taking himself to Unbinding. This is the fifth benefit that can be obtained
from wealth.

“If it so happens that, when a disciple of the noble ones
obtains these five benefits from wealth, his wealth goes to depletion, the
thought occurs to him, ‘Even though my wealth has gone to depletion, I have
obtained the five benefits that can be obtained from wealth,’ and he feels no
remorse. If it so happens that, when a disciple of the noble ones obtains these
five benefits from wealth, his wealth increases, the thought occurs to him, ‘I
have obtained the five benefits that can be obtained from wealth, and my wealth
has increased,’ and he feels no remorse. So he feels no remorse in either
case.”

‘My wealth has been
enjoyed, my dependents supported, protected from calamities by me. I have given
supreme offerings & performed the five oblations. I have provided for the
virtuous, the restrained, followers of the holy life. For whatever aim a wise
householder would desire wealth, that aim I have attained. I have done what
will not lead to future distress.’ When this is recollected by a mortal, a
person established in the Dhamma of the Noble Ones, he is praised in this life
and, after death, rejoices in heaven.

3. Department of Healing

DOH 500 Science of Healing - 3
credits

 


TIBETAN MEDICINE, A « SCIENCE
OF HEALING» CLOSELY RELATED TO BUDDHISM, by Fernand Meyer, Senior Research
Fellow at EPHE, Chair of ‘Sciences and civilization of the Tibetan world’ ;
Inalco ; UPR 299

Author :

Fernand Meyer

Article date :
31-12-2008

 



 


Detail
of a canvas painting illustrating someone taking their pulse. Copy of an
original Tibetan iconography of the end oh the 17th century.

 

Fernand MEYER
Senior Research Fellow
Ecoles Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Paris.

TIBETAN MEDICINE
A « SCIENCE OF HEALING» CLOSELY RELATED TO BUDDHISM


Among Asian traditional medicines based on a written corpus, Tibetan medicine
was the latest  to attain noticeable recognition outside its cultural
area. Research on Tibetan “science of healing” (gso-ba rig-pa) in
fact developed only from the middle of the 20th century, especially with the
influx of refugees towards the South, escaping from the army of the young
Chinese People’s Republic, which had taken control of the Tibetan plateau. At
the same time, teachings imparted throughout the world by religious leaders
of the Diaspora, Tibetan defense groups’ activism, promotion of alternative
medicines, development of tourism in regions of Tibetan culture, and a
certain craze for media coverage have publicized among the general public the
existence and possibly the resources of this medicine to different extents.
Finally, since a few decades, Tibetan medicine has undergone an increasing
institutionalization in many regions of its traditional geographic area,
where it is now confronted everywhere with local avatars of the globalized
biomedicine. NGOs implicated it in primary health or even environmental
protection programs at the local level, and in some cases it was integrated
into national health systems in different forms.

While we restrict our subject here to the scholarly system of Tibetan
medicine, one should however emphasize that a majority of native health
practices depended – and still depends in many remote areas – on ways that
are not strictly medical: popular therapeutic practices, formal acts aiming
to accumulate merits (donation to the poor or religious institutions, freeing
an animal destined to be slaughtered, patronage of the recitation of
religious texts for example), visits to  sacred places and pilgrimages,
blessings of great religious figures, wearing protective charms, resorting to
divinatory and astrological calculations, rituals of exorcism, longevity or
recovery, diagnostic or cure done by a medium possessed by a god.

The development of Tibet’s scholarly medical system was intimately linked to
its culture, and therefore to Buddhism that has strongly influenced all its
aspects. Buddhism in fact shows close affinities to medicine at several
levels. As a doctrine and path to salvation, recovery from illnesses has
quite naturally imposed itself as a metaphor for the ultimate liberation from
being enslaved to the endless cycle of re-births. Besides, and more
fundamentally, the problem of suffering has always remained at the heart of
its Soteriology. Finally, this affinity of Buddhism to medicine was further
strengthened, in the beginning of our era, with the doctrinal development of
Mahayana and its new idea of Bodhisattva, “Being dedicated to
Enlightenment”, for which healing of the battered bodies is both the opportunity
for cultivating the perfections of compassion and generosity, and a skilful
means of converting the beings. Medical science itself was from then on open
to being part of the syllabus for Buddhist studies, especially in the
monasteries. Around the same time, the Buddhist pantheon developed with
figures having therapeutic connotation. Among these, the Buddha, Master of
Medicine, (Bhaisajyaguru) was worshipped with great devotion in Central Asia,
then in the Far-East, and later in Tibet.

Classical Tibetan historiography places the origins of the medical tradition
in the 7th century, when Tibet, at the time unified for the first time to the
extent of being an empire, came in contact with ancient neighboring
civilizations: India, China, Central Asia and the Iranian world. Having
acquired a style of writing borrowed from India, it could gradually
assimilate a great many texts (especially Buddhist), including medical books.
The variety of influences, particularly Indian and Chinese, probably even
Greco-Arab, which according to the Tibetan historiographers would have marked
the origins of their medicine, is corroborated by ancient Tibetan documents
and by traces of these influences that can be found in the medical treatises
that are still used today. Through the centuries, some of these influences
were abandoned, while others were integrated, with the heritage of native
therapies, into a coherent whole of knowledge and specialized practices. The
treatise called The Fourfold Tantra (rGyud-bzhi) became the corpus of
reference for all the Tibetan practitioners, in a vast medical literature
that is still little known.

Medical teaching, texts as well as oral instructions and practical
techniques, was imparted for centuries, often together with religious teachings,
not in specific institutions, but from master to disciple, often in a
monastic setting, or from father to son along family lineages. Traditionally,
this teaching was not sanctioned by formal degrees, and the medical practice
did not require any recognition, by any civil or religious authority, which
would have required a standard level of theoretical knowledge or technical
expertise. Moreover, the Tibetan practitioners have never constituted a
well-defined socio-professional group, and many had other main functions,
particularly religious. It’s only at the end of the 17th century that the
first monastic establishment especially devoted to medical teaching was
founded, on the Iron Hill (Lcags-po-ri) near Lhasa. Later it served as a
model for establishing some other similar establishments in Eastern Tibet, at
Beijing and in Mongolia. Finally, Tibetan medical science gained a renewed
impetus when the Tibetan Astro-Medical Institute (sMan-rtsis-khang) was
founded by the Thirteenth Dalaï Lama in 1916, with a lesser clerical
orientation, in the very heart of Lhasa. Nevertheless, parallel to these
centers of institutionalized medical teachings, sanctioned by examinations,
medical tradition continued to be imparted, like in the past, outside all
official control, by individual practitioners, in family lineages or not, at
inevitably very varied levels of knowledge and practices. Some women had thus
access to medical teaching, generally with their father. 

Tibetan science of healing, as it is presented in its reference treatise, The
Fourfold Tantra supposed to have been taught by the Buddha Master of
Medicine, has nothing of an empiric medicine. On the contrary it was
consciously developed as a sophisticated system of which all the parts,
whether they come under empirical experience or theoretical speculation, are
integrated into a coherent whole subjected to epistemological rules and
formal logic, based on a limited number of natural laws.

For Tibetan medicine, like for the Indian ayurvedhic medicine, from which it has
borrowed the basic theoretical essentials concerning physiology, pathology
and therapy, the living body is made up of an organic substrate on which
three humoral fluids, pneuma, bile and phlegm ensure the different vital
functions. These humours, blood and other organic fluids flow through the
body in channels forming a network.  While the humours endow the body
with life and health as long as they remain in harmony, the state of the
illness is nothing but the pathological symptoms of these very humours in an
imbalanced state, under the influence of food, lifestyle, seasons etc.
Medical diagnosis is conceived as the outcome of a process of logical
inference during which the doctor should ideally compare clinical signs
obtained by questioning, palpation of pulses and visual examination,
especially of the tongue and urine. In fact, diagnostic examination is often
limited to taking the pulses, according to a technique that was, obviously,
borrowed from China.

The treatment requires four types of therapies supposed to get more and more
drastic in the following order: healthy lifestyle, dietetics, remedies and
external therapeutic procedures. Generally it involves setting excessive
humours against qualities that are opposite to them and if the need arises to
discharge them from the body. Among the tangible qualities attributed to food
items and drugs, their flavors and their hot or cold nature are particularly
taken into account. The remedies combine the elements of a very rich materia
medica, in varied preparations (mainly powders, decoctions or pills) where
products of plant origin predominate to a great extent. The external
therapeutic procedures include moxibustion with relatively frequent use,
possibly fomentations and medicinal baths, unction, bleeding and small
surgery.

Since three decades, Tibetan medicine has experienced major transformations
in all the settings where it was traditionally practiced, as much in the
Tibetan regions of China, as in the Himalayan regions or in the diaspora. In
China, it was a victim of major upheavals that followed the Dalaï Lama’s
escape into exile, in 1959, then of extreme political violence of the
Cultural Revolution. With the period of relative liberalization that started
around 1980, Tibetan medicine however appeared as one of the cultural
heritage elements to have best survived, in spite of everything. It owes this
no doubt to several factors: traditional medicine having recognition in China
itself, its availability at a low cost locally, its pragmatic orientation with
a rational side set to be encouraged at the expense of its religious aspects,
and its aptitude, easily controllable, to serve as an emblematic image of a
Chinese politics wanting to be anxious in promoting both the well-being and
cultural heritage of the Tibetans. Tibetan medicine has thus been integrated
into the health system of the Tibetan regions of China at the expense of an
evolution that has borrowed some traits from biomedical model: 
institutional education sanctioned by degrees, - and therefore, evolution
towards a relative standardization of knowledge and practices -,
secularization, professionalization, more exclusive focus on the somatic
nature of illnesses to the detriment of their psycho-affective or social
aspects, more impersonal consultation of patients in a formal context of a
small clinic, a dispensary or hospital, re-evaluation of some notions or
practices with reference to modern science, practitioners giving up on
preparing medicines to make way for pharmaceutical companies with more and
more commercial goals, recourse to certain diagnostic or therapeutic
biomedical techniques. Some of these tendencies also mark, in varying
degrees, the evolution of Tibetan medicine outside Chinese borders under the
influence of so-called development programs, local process for government
integration, or even at the behest of the exile community. Finally, Tibetan
medicine, which is also being subjected to identity issues, is present today
on the globalized market of alternative medicines. The concerned practitioners
have found a way of adjusting themselves to this by shifts in their
statements and practices and which is are in turn echoed in their native
settings.

Bibliography
F. Meyer, Tibetan medicine. gSo-Ba Rig-Pa, Paris: CNRS Editions, 2007
(re-edition)
Y. Parfionovitch, F. Meyer, G. Dorje, Tibetan Medical  Paintings,
London:  Serindia Publications, 1992 (2 vols)
L. Pordié (éd.), Tibetan Medicine in the Contemporary World. Global Politics
of Medical Knowledge and Practice, London and New York,  Routledge, 
2008

Fernand  Meyer
Is Senior Research Fellow at Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Historical and
Philological Sciences Section, Chair of “Sciences and civilization of
the Tibetan world “. Professor at INALCO.
 Member, UPR 299 du CNRS, “Milieux, sociétés et cultures en
Himalaya”.
Contact : 
fmeyer@ vjf.cnrs.fr

Erode
Venkata Ramasamy
 ஈரோடு வேங்கட இராமசாமி ) (17 September
1879 – 24 December 1973), affectionately called by his followers as
Periyar (
பெரியார்)

Uttar Pradesh Chief
Minister Mayawati was out to fulfil another of her pet projects — a memorial in
the name of noted Tamil social reformer E V Ramaswamy Naicker, the founder of
the Dravida Kazhagam.

Naicker, known as
Periyar or ‘elder one’, founded the ‘Self-Respect Movement’ way back in the
mid-1920s in Tamil Nadu and also launched a major drive against untouchability.
He was also a staunch atheist and has been one of the main icons of Mayawati’s
Bahujan Samaj Party (BSP).

Fed up with the
untouchability and the religious fundamentalism, Periyar E.V. Ramasamy left the
Congress in 1925 and formed the Self Respect Movement which was later
transformed into a liberation movement named Dravidar Kazhagam (DK) in 1944.

Uttar Pradesh Chief
Minister Mayawati has got the Lucknow University executive council to take a
decision to set up a Periyar Memorial on the campus. The social reformer had
visited the university in 1957.

Significantly, none
other than Vinay Katiyar, then state Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) president,
had raised opposition against Mayawati’s earlier proposal to install a statue
of Periyar. Katiyar had thundered: “If Periyar’s statue is installed in
Lucknow, that would mark the end of the Mayawati government in Uttar Pradesh.”

BJP member Lalji Tandon,
said that Periyar has been termed as an idol of the BSP and his name was taken
in the budget speech which is against the religious fundamentalism .

‘’Periyar’s main agenda
was to finish untouchability in Southern parts of the country and now with BSP
highlighting Periyar ideology will certainly hit the religious fundamentalism community
herein Uttar Pradesh’, he said.

However, the statement
of BJP members was opposed by the treasury bench with higher education minister
Rakesh Dhar Tripathi saying that BSP has honoured the brahmins and for this
reason he was sitting in the front row of the house. He further alleged that
instead BJP was anti-brahmin as it had never made any Chief Minister from the
community in the state.

UP CM Ms Mayawati was honouring
all the community leaders as it followed the policy of Sarvajan Hitay Sarvajan
Sukhay, i.e., Welfare and happiness of all communities.

Contributions of downtrodden
communities leaders like
 Periyar E. V.
Ramaswami along with Mahatma Jyotiba Phule, Chhatrapati Shahuji Maharaj,
Narayana Guru and have been immense in the fight against the obnoxious
untouchability system  and Women’s right,
but the struggle of Baba Saheb Dr. Bhimrao Ambedkar, who was born in Scheduled
Caste community said that there must be  reservation for backward communities through
the constitution and that of Manyawar Kanshi Ram Ji and UP CM Ms Mayawati later
proved to be greatly effective and pregnant with far-reaching consequences.

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09/15/11
375 LESSON 15 09 2011 Siha Sutta To General Siha On GenerosityFREE ONLINE eNālandā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY & BUDDHIST GOOD NEWS LETTER Through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org- FREE ONLINE CONCENTRATION PRACTICE INSTITUTE FOR STUDENTS(FOCPIS)- Theology- The Levels of FOCPIS Curriculum-2. Department of Languages-Literary PALI -FREE ONLINE CONCENTRATION PRACTICE INSTITUTE FOR STUDENTS (FOCPIS)-A Guide to Learning the Pali Language
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375  LESSON 15 09  2011 Siha Sutta To General
Siha On Generosity
FREE ONLINE eNālandā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY & BUDDHIST GOOD NEWS LETTER Through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org- FREE ONLINE CONCENTRATION PRACTICE
INSTITUTE FOR STUDENTS(FOCPIS)- Theology- The Levels of FOCPIS Curriculum-2.
Department of Languages-
Literary PALI-FREE ONLINE
CONCENTRATION PRACTICE INSTITUTE FOR STUDENTS(FOCPIS-A Guide to Learning the Pali Language

AN 5.34

PTS: A iii 38

Siha Sutta: To General
Siha (On Generosity)

translated from the Pali
by

Thanissaro Bhikkhu

© 1997–2011

I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying
near Vesali, in the Great Forest, at the Gabled Pavilion.
Then General Siha went to the Blessed One and, on arrival,
having bowed down to him, sat to one side. As he was sitting there he said to
the Blessed One: “Is it possible, lord, to point out a fruit of generosity
visible in the here & now?”

“It is possible, Siha. One who gives, who is a master of
giving, is dear & charming to people at large. And the fact that who is
generous, a master of giving, is dear & charming to people at large: this
is a fruit of generosity visible in the here & now.

“Furthermore, good people, people of integrity, admire one
who gives, who is a master of giving. And the fact that good people, people of
integrity, admire one who gives, who is a master of giving: this, too, is a
fruit of generosity visible in the here & now.

“Furthermore, the fine reputation of one who gives, who is
a master of giving, is spread far & wide. And the fact that the fine
reputation of one who gives, who is a master of giving, is spread far &
wide: this, too, is a fruit of generosity visible in the here & now.

“Furthermore, when one who gives, who is a master of
giving, approaches any assembly of people — noble warriors, brahmans,
householders, or contemplatives — he/she does so confidently & without
embarrassment. And the fact that when one who gives, who is a master of giving,
approaches any assembly of people — noble warriors, brahmans, householders, or
contemplatives — he/she does so confidently & without embarrassment: this,
too, is a fruit of generosity visible in the here & now.

“Furthermore, at the break-up of the body, after death, one
who gives, who is a master of giving, reappears in a good destination, the
heavenly world. And the fact that at the break-up of the body, after death, one
who gives, who is a master of giving, reappears in a good destination, the
heavenly world: this is a fruit of generosity in the next life.”

When this was said, General Siha said to the Blessed One:
“As for the four fruits of generosity visible in the here & now that
have been pointed out by the Blessed One, it’s not the case that I go by
conviction in the Blessed One with regard to them. I know them, too. I am one
who gives, a master of giving, dear & charming to people at large. I am one
who gives, a master of giving; good people, people of integrity, admire me. I
am one who gives, a master of giving, and my fine reputation is spread far
& wide: ‘Siha is generous, a doer, a supporter of the Sangha.’ I am one who
gives, a master of giving, and when I approach any assembly of people — noble
warriors, brahmans, householders, or contemplatives — I do so confidently &
without embarrassment.

“But when the Blessed One says to me, ‘At the break-up of
the body, after death, one who gives, who is a master of giving, reappears in a
good destination, the heavenly world,’ that I do not know. That is where I go
by conviction in the Blessed One.”

“So it is, Siha. So it is. At the break-up of the body,
after death, one who gives, who is a master of giving, reappears in a good
destination, the heavenly world.”

One who gives is dear.
People at large admire him. He gains honor. His status grows. He enters an
assembly unembarrassed. He is confident — the man unmiserly. Therefore the wise
give gifts. Seeking bliss, they would subdue the stain of miserliness.
Established in the three-fold heavenly world, they enjoy themselves long in
fellowship with the devas. Having made the opportunity for themselves, having
done what is skillful, then when they fall from here they fare on,
self-radiant, in Nandana.[1]

There they delight, enjoy, are joyful, replete with the five sensuality
strands. Having followed the words of the sage who is Such, they enjoy
themselves in heaven — disciples of the One Well-gone.