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997 LESSON 01-08-2013 THURSDAY FREE ONLINE eNālāndā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY run through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org Universal Welfare Friend - E- GOOD NEWS Off-site Resources Non-English Tipitaka translations [Flag of Traditional and Simplified Chinese] Chinese (Traditional & Simplified)
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Posted by: @ 5:00 pm


997 LESSON 01-08-2013 THURSDAY 

FREE ONLINE  eNālāndā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY 
run through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org 

Universal Welfare Friend -
E- GOOD NEWS 



Off-site Resources
Non-English Tipitaka translations

[Flag of Traditional and Simplified Chinese] Chinese (Traditional & Simplified)

[Flag of Traditional and Simplified Chinese] Chinese (Traditional & Simplified)

The Wings to Awakening: Readings in Theravadan Buddhism in Chinese Translation (Lau, Sinh-Lam)
is a Chinese website (both in Simplified and Traditional Fonts)
dedicated to the study and practice of Theravada Buddhist Teachings. It
is created and maintained by two Theravadan Buddhist practitioners and
at present, all the materials are selected, translated, and organized by
them, of which over the years they have found particularly useful in
their own practice. Includes translations of several Pali suttas.

觉醒之翼——上座部佛教文献选译集


                                                              
[傳統體]

最近译文:

坦尼沙罗尊者: 如何跌倒


坦尼沙罗尊者: 挑战极限——佛教修行道上的欲求与想象

佛法入门:

巴利经典中的佛陀生平(全文)
佛陀的次第说法
巴利经文中僧伽的定义

 


专题选译:
泰系林居禅修传统的教导; 
上座部佛教尊者与学者的文字选译;

上座部佛教的三部大经;
尊者们谈读经

经文选译;  
归依三宝
;  
布施;  
持戒;  
禅定;  
福德
;  
面对病痛与死亡

问答选
;  
布萨历;  
巴利课诵与录音(I)

(II)

                                            
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The
request from all Buddhists and Humanists was to hand over the whole
management to buddhist and not just to change the DM. What is this
mischief to continue keeping Hindus in the management committee. No
where in the world a religious committee of one religion is managed by
other religions members as well. These politicians keep on creating
tensions
among the different communities by such unconstitutional acts.

with metta,
Bhanteji


Non-Hindu can be Mahabodhi management panel’s ex officio chief

Non-Hindu can be Mahabodhi management panel's ex officio chief
The
state assembly passed the amendments to the Act of 1949
which struck off the provision of the state government nominating a
Hindu as chairperson of the committee in case of the DM being a
non-Hindu.
PATNA: A non-Hindu DM of Gaya can now become ex officio chairperson of the Bodh Gaya Temple Management Committee (BTMC).
The state assembly on Tuesday passed the amendments to the Act of 1949
which
struck off the provision of the state government nominating a Hindu as
chairperson of the committee in case of the DM being a non-Hindu.


It changed the 63 years old provision in the Act amended to end dispute between the Hindus and the Buddhists.

Replying to the debate, chief
minister 
Nitish Kumar said
in a secular framework, it was not justified to mention the religion of
a DM in the Act. “An official is a secular government representative.
He does not represent any religion,” Nitish said. He clarified that the
amendment was not aimed at interfering in the religious affairs of the
Buddhists. He accused the BJP of unnecessarily giving it a controversial
colour and comparing it with other religious trusts and boards.


The
CM referred to the discussion the chairman of National Minorities
Commission, Wajahat Habibullah, had with him over this issue. He said it
had been demanded time and again for full Buddhists control over the
Bodh Gaya shrine and the Act was amended to settle that issue. There is
provision of four Buddhists and equal number of Hindus in the committee
with ex officio chairman as its ninth member. At least two cases on the
issue are pending in the Supreme Court, he said.


The Supreme Court had
also been informed through an affidavit that necessary amendments were
being made to the Act. “This has nothing to do with the serial blasts in
Bodh Gaya,” the CM clarified, adding that preparations for the
amendment had been started in April and nothing has been decided in a
haste.


The walkout by the BJP
provoked Nitish who said they did not have the courage to listen to
others. “They are scared because their hollow objections will fall flat
and their own people will not believe them. That is why they ran away,”
he said and added, “Secularism is rooted deep in 
Bihar and the attempts by the BJP to create suspicion and hatred will not succeed.”

Earlier, leader of opposition in the assembly, Nand Kishore Yadav,
opposed the amendment saying there had never been a dispute over the
Hindu DM and wondered how a non-Hindu DM could manage the temple
management. He referred to Hindu Religious Board and Wakf Board saying
there is provision that only a Hindu or a Muslim can be on their
respective boards. He also suggested that amendment could be made to
remove the DM from the chairperson post.


RJD’s Abdul Bari Siddiqui favoured
that the shrine of any religion should be handed over to that religion
and places of worship should not be made controversial. He referred to 
Babri Masjid in this connection and said it would be better if a Buddhist scholar was nominated as the committee chairman.

Sadanand Singh of the Congress and Awadhesh Kumar Rai of the CPI favoured the government amendment.


VOICE OF SARVA SAMAJ SADBHAVAN


Fw: Buddhist not Happy with Bihar Govt. amendment for BTMC [22

[Attachment(s) from vinaya rakkhita included below]

FYI

—– Forwarded Message —–
From: Bhadant Prajnasheel
To: ; Ven. Vinayarakkhita
Sent: Wednesday, 31 July 2013 4:23 PM
Subject: Buddhist not Happy with Bihar Govt. amendment for BTMC


Dear Sir/Madam,

Yesterday Bihar Govt. amended in BodhGaya Temple Act 1949. 
Hindu
Chairman District Magistrate Gaya is changed  by Bihar Government in
amendment in BodhGaya Temple Act 1949. I think this is not amendment its
sum followed Indian Constitution by state Govt. not amendment about
Buddhist S
ecretary
or increase of Buddhist members in management. Secretary was mostly
Hindu. 1949 to 1998 Hindu, 2001 to 2006 Hindu. one person 29 years,
other 12 and two was 6-6 Yrs. Hindus. BodhGaya Saivaite Matth Hindu
Mahantha always life member in BTMC.

I attached 4 pages for publishing Press Notes.

Thanking with Loving- Kindness.

Bhadant Prajnasheel Thero

National General Secretary

BuddhaGaya Mahabodhi Vihara All India Action Committee, Delhi

Mob. 99 3172 5018 Bihar 96 3789 7188 Bihar and 92 1218 5315 Delhi

__._,_.___


Attachment(s) from vinaya rakkhita

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DSCN9452.JPG

DSCN9452.JP


The Times of India



Divide Uttar Pradesh into four states, Mayawati says


Divide Uttar Pradesh into four states, Mayawati says
Mayawati has sought division of Uttar Pradesh into 4 states.

LUCKNOW: The Bahujan Samaj Party demanded splitting of Uttar Pradesh
into four smaller states on Wednesday, a day after the Congress Working
Committee (CWC) urged the government to form a separate state of
Telangana.

“We have always supported smaller states,” BSP chief Mayawati said here at a press conference.

She said Uttar Pradesh should be divided into four smaller states —
Purvanchal, Bundelkhand, Awadh Pradesh and Pashchim Pradesh.

“When this population is divided between four states, development will increase,” she said.

“Ministers in central government who hail from Uttar Pradesh should
build pressure on the central government for formation of these states,”
she added.



After Telangana, demand to divide Uttar Pradesh picks momentum


The decision of the ruling United Progressive Alliance (UPA) on
Telangana has struck the right chords in Uttar Pradesh political
circles.

Now, supporters of former Chief Minister Mayawati  have begun rallying around the
demand for splitting Uttar Pradesh into two, three or even four states.


  • After Telangana, demand to divide Uttar Pradesh picks momentum

After Telangana, demand to divide Uttar Pradesh picks momentum

 BSP
supremo had proposed in the assembly that
the sprawling state be split into four parts.

Many people welcomed her proposal, though the Samajwadi Party leaders opposed the idea.

The
debate continues on whether smaller administrative units open the way
to accelerated economic growth and help bridge communication gap.

At
the local level, BSP leaders see political  and a
broad-basing of the party organisation. “From just one now, the BSP
could rule four states in the future,” says a party leader, echoing a
widespread feeling.


People all over the country see political  and a
broad-basing of the BSP party organisation.

It was Dr B.R. Ambedkar who in 1954 advocated splitting of bigger states into smaller units.

The issue came in sharper focus when Agra lawyers, in
the early 1980s, launched a mass movement for a Allahabad High Court
bench in Agra.

Almost
all political parties have at one point or the other supported the
restructuring of the federal polity on a more scientific line, taking
into account the area and population, says political analyst Rajeev
Saxena.

“The time has come when a comprehensive exercise to redraw
the political map of India should be carried out through a new SRC,”
suggests social scientist Paras Nath Choudhary, former researcher at the
South Asia Institute of Heidelberg University.

“Size does make a
difference. For political reasons, the Congress party has been averse to
splitting bigger states into smaller ones and pointlessly dragging feet
on such demands as is happening in Andhra Pradesh. Earlier the
Uttarakhand movement was unnecessarily prolonged for years,” he added.

With
Telangana now becoming a reality, people in the Taj city are excited
and looking forward to a whole lot of new opportunities, should the
dream for a separate state of West Uttar Pradesh take shape.

“With
the unwieldy size of Uttar Pradesh, Agra region has always got a raw
deal, with all the funds and tax revenues siphoned off to eastern
districts. A new state of West Uttar Pradesh, whatever its name, would
definitely spur growth and also inculcate a sense of pride and
identity,” says Sudhir Gupta, an activist.



Divide Uttar Pradesh into four states, says Mayawati

Lucknow, Jul 31 (IANS): The Bahujan Samaj Party
demanded splitting of Uttar Pradesh into four smaller states Wednesday,
a day after the Congress Working Committee (CWC) urged the government
to form a separate state of Telangana.

“We have always supported smaller states,” BSP chief Mayawati said here at a press conference.

She said Uttar Pradesh should be divided into four smaller states —
Purvanchal, Bundelkhand, Awadh Pradesh and Pashchim Pradesh.

“When this population is divided between four states, development will increase,” she said.

“Ministers in central government who hail from Uttar Pradesh should
build pressure on the central government for formation of these states,”
she added.

Supporters of Mayawati 
have begun rallying around the demand for splitting Uttar Pradesh into
two, three or even four states.

Many people welcomed her proposal, though the Samajwadi Party leaders opposed the idea.

The debate continues on whether smaller administrative units open the
way to accelerated economic growth and help bridge communication gap.

At the local level, BSP leaders see political opportunities and a
broad-basing of the party organisation. “From just one now, the BSP
could rule four states in the future,” says a party leader, echoing a
widespread feeling.

It was Dr B.R. Ambedkar who in 1954 advocated splitting of bigger states into smaller units.

Later, socialists like Dr. Ram Manohar Lohia, Jai Prakash Narain,
Acharya Kripalani and others favoured re-drawing of the administrative
map of India. But, Jawaharlal Nehru, the then prime minister, supported
the States Reorganisation Commission (SRC) recommendation of re-forming
states on linguistic basis.

Choudhary Charan Singh also favoured smaller states. Later, his son
and Rashtriya Lok Dal chief Ajit Singh launched a movement for Harit
Pradesh, comprising 22 districts of western Uttar Pradesh.

Dr K.M. Panikkar, in his dissenting note to the SRC report, however,
opposed linguistic states and favoured formation of a state of west
Uttar Pradesh. For years, socialist leader Hukum Singh Parihar alone
carried on the movement for a Braj Pradesh with Agra as its capital.

During the 1975-77 Emergency, Sanjay Gandhi almost succeeded in
carving out a new state of western Uttar Pradesh with Agra as capital.
The new state was to include parts of Haryana too.

The issue came in sharper focus when Agra lawyers, in the early
1980s, launched a mass movement for a Allahabad High Court bench in
Agra. The union government set up the Jaswant Singh Commission, which
supported the demand.

In the 1990s, Surekha Yadav’s Braj Pradesh Party did a lot of work on this front, but response from public was not enthusiastic.

Almost all political parties have at one point or the other supported
the restructuring of the federal polity on a more scientific line,
taking into account the area and population, says political analyst
Rajeev Saxena.

“The time has come when a comprehensive exercise to redraw the
political map of India should be carried out through a new SRC,”
suggests social scientist Paras Nath Choudhary, former researcher at the
South Asia Institute of Heidelberg University.

“Size does make a difference. For political reasons, the Congress
party has been averse to splitting bigger states into smaller ones and
pointlessly dragging feet on such demands as is happening in Andhra
Pradesh. Earlier the Uttarakhand movement was unnecessarily prolonged
for years,” he added.

With Telangana now becoming a reality, people in the Taj city are
excited and looking forward to a whole lot of new opportunities, should
the dream for a separate state of West Uttar Pradesh take shape.

“With the unwieldy size of Uttar Pradesh, Agra region has always got a
raw deal, with all the funds and tax revenues siphoned off to eastern
districts. A new state of West Uttar Pradesh, whatever its name, would
definitely spur growth and also inculcate a sense of pride and
identity,” says Sudhir Gupta, an activist.



 



‘Uttar Pradesh ungovernable’ Jairam Ramesh favours division

  1. Jagatheesan Chandrasekharan

    Your comment is awaiting moderation.

    Jagatheesan Chandrasekharan

    People all over the country see political and a
    broad-basing of the BSP party organisation as it was Dr B.R. Ambedkar
    who in 1954 advocated splitting of bigger states into smaller units.The
    previous Mayawati government had got a controversial resolution
    passed in the State Assembly on splitting Uttar Pradesh into four
    smaller states as Purvanchal, Bundelkhand, Awadh Pradesh and Pashchimanchal. Mayawati
    said when her party was in power, she had created new divisions, zones,
    districts and tehsils so that better administration could be provided
    to the people of the state, which is the most populous state in the
    country. Purely from an administrative point of view, a state of over 200
    million people, 72 districts, over 800 blocks… It’s just not
    governable.”It is unfortunate that the
    central government kept it pending since then, but with Telangana
    becoming a reality, BSP demands that on the principle of one
    language-one state, the Centre, besides reorganising larger states,
    should also complete the process of division of Uttar Pradesh into four
    states, besides (formation of) Gorkhakland and Vidarbha,” she said. Size
    does make a difference. For political reasons, the Congress
    party has been averse to splitting bigger states into smaller ones and
    pointlessly dragging feet on such demands as is happening in Andhra
    Pradesh. Earlier the Uttarakhand movement was unnecessarily prolonged
    for years.”When this population is divided between four states, development will increase,” she said.

DNA logo

After Telangana, clamour for reorganisation of Uttar Pradesh

Jagatheesan Chandrasekharan


Jagatheesan Chandrasekharan

People all over the country see political and a
broad-basing
of the BSP party organisation as it was Dr B.R. Ambedkar who in 1954
advocated splitting of bigger states into smaller units.The previous
Mayawati government had got a controversial resolution
passed in the State Assembly on splitting Uttar Pradesh into four
smaller states as Purvanchal, Bundelkhand, Awadh Pradesh and Pashchimanchal. Mayawati
said when her party was in power, she had created new divisions, zones,
districts and tehsils so that better administration could be provided
to the people of the state, which is the most populous state in the
country. Purely from an administrative point of view, a state of over 200
million people, 72 districts, over 800 blocks… It’s just not
governable.”It is unfortunate that the
central government kept it pending since then, but with Telangana
becoming a reality, BSP demands that on the principle of one
language-one state, the Centre, besides reorganising larger states,
should also complete the process of division of Uttar Pradesh into four
states,
besides (formation of) Gorkhakland and Vidarbha,” she said. Size does
make a difference. For political reasons, the Congress
party has been averse to splitting bigger states into smaller ones and
pointlessly dragging feet on such demands as is happening in Andhra
Pradesh. Earlier the Uttarakhand movement was unnecessarily prolonged
for years.”When this population is divided between four states, development will increase,” she said.

It is most unfortunate that some people like ugly pagals

nipun jain (rewari),Ashok Prabhu (Margao,Goa.),Optimus (Chennai) ,

shishir
(usa),mishratuhin (delhi),Indian (india),rightening face patriot
(india),Mahendra Gaur (Jaipur) ,arora v (uk) ,Ranjit Mishra (Brahmapur)
,mehulshroff (Mumbai) ,Seng Kally () ,Ceej (Pune) ,Praveen Kumar Dubey
(mumbai) Sudheer (Bangalore) ,misery Ramsubramani Harihara Iyer () ,mad
(India) ,PS! (Bharat) ,Easwar Venkatraman (Mumbai) ,stupid Akash behera
(Uttarpradesh),begging bowl Baby Mohan (Bangalore) ,fool anil sharma
(Mumbai) , separate country Sumit Kumar (Gurgaon) ,looting.rober, goonda
flemingo2008 () ,Goat Buffalo vikatasiromani (Location) ,Indian,
Mexico,vashal,Rajesh,Mangalore,Dubai /Udupi, Rammohan Kamath,Anil
Misquith, Abu Dhabi,Dinesh Poojary, Kundapura/Bengaluru,CYRIL
MASCARENHAS, KIREM/MIRA ROAD/DUBAI,Raj_Talkray, Telangana,R.Bhandarkar,
M’lore,ashley, Muscat,James, Abu Dhabi,Ismail Shaikh,
Moodbidri/Dubai,Manda Budhi, Kudla,Krishna, Mangalore,Adi, Kinnigoli/Old
Hyderabad,Amin Bhoja, Patte / Riyadh,HENRY MISQUITH, Bahrain,Aloka
Nath, Bengaluru,Kicked out Jossey Saldanha, Mumbai, Rajesh Shetty,
Mlore-Shj,Ismail Shaikh, Moodbidri/Dubai,Dinesh Poojary,
Kundapura/Bengaluru,rahul jaiswal,brajesh narayan, s300,sam,suresh
kamat, chirag ranjan, pradeep kumar,optimus,anupmanu,sandeep
shah,rsm,asimc, venkateshwar, skumar became mad as soon as Mayawati an
untouchable made some sensible statement. This is because of the age old
traditional hatred, anger, jealousy and evil thoughts propagated by RSS
and BJP against non RSS/BJP crooked leaders. They must become broad
minded like the people of US who elected Obama for the second time. If
it happens here to make Mayawati as PM then mental asylums may not be
required so that they could lead a sane life by shedding hatred.


comments (0)
07/30/13
996 LESSON 31-07-2013 WEDNESDAY FREE ONLINE eNālāndā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY run through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org Universal Welfare Friend - E- GOOD NEWS Off-site Resources Non-English Tipitaka translations Budisme en català
Filed under: General
Posted by: @ 4:59 pm




996 LESSON 31-07-2013 WEDNESDAY 

FREE ONLINE  eNālāndā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY 
run through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org 

Universal Welfare Friend -
E- GOOD NEWS 



Off-site Resources
Non-English Tipitaka translations


Budisme en català

http://u4uvoice.in/news/politics/divide-uttar-pradesh-into-four-states-says-mayawati/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=divide-uttar-pradesh-into-four-states-says-mayawati

Divide Uttar Pradesh into four states, says Mayawati
http://www.ndtv.com/topic/india
http://www.ndtv.com/article/india/telangana-on-track-now-mayawati-wants-4-way-uttar-pradesh-split-399335

Latest News


Telangana on track, now Mayawati wants 4-way Uttar Pradesh split



Telangana on track, now Mayawati wants 4-way Uttar Pradesh split

Lucknow: Hours
after the Congress set the ball rolling for the creation of a new
Telangana state, Bahujan Samajwadi Party (BSP) chief Mayawati has
reiterated that the large state of Uttar Pradesh should be split into
smaller states to facilitate better governance.

Ms Mayawati, who
is a former Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister, is a vocal champion of carving
the state into four - Purvanchal, Bundelkhand, Awadh and Western Uttar
Pradesh.
Her government, which preceded the current Samajwadi party
government headed by Akhilesh Yadav, had passed a resolution in the
Uttar Pradesh assembly for this.

The Samajwadi Party, however, opposes splitting the state.

“Central ministers from Uttar Pradesh should pressurize the Centre for the division of the state,” Ms Mayawati said today.

She also supported the demand for separate statehood for Gorkhaland in Bengal and Vidarbha in Maharashtra.

Those
demands have drawn new energy from the Congress Working Committee’s
endorsement yesterday of the decision to bifurcate Andhra Pradesh to
create India’s 29th state, Telangana.

Congress MP Vilas
Muttemwar, who is a member of the Congress Working Committee, has
written to party president Sonia Gandhi to press for the creation of
Vidarbha. And in Bengal, moves to create Telangana have sparked off
fresh protests in favour of Gorkhaland.

http://www.ndtv.com/article/india/mayawati-lends-support-to-congress-food-security-bill-in-principle-397711


Mayawati lends support to Congress’ Food Security Bill, in principle

Mayawati lends support to Congress' Food Security Bill, in principle

Lucknow: Bahujan
Samaj Party chief Mayawati has lent her support to the Food Security
Bill, saying she supports the legislation in ‘principle’. However, the
former Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister added that she is not in favour of
the Centre’s decision of bringing the scheme into effect through an
ordinance.


“We are in favour of the food security bill in
principle. We are not against it. Poor people should get food at
subsidised rates. But the manner in which it has been brought through an
ordinance, that is not right. Had the government brought the bill in
Parliament and a debate would have happened, then it would have been
better. However, better late than never,” Mayawati said today.

Earlier
this month, the government rushed through an ordinance that has to be
now ratified within six weeks of its tabling in Parliament. Mayawati’s
support to be bill in Parliament may be crucial for the government.





http://news.rediff.com/commentary/2013/jul/31/liveupdates.htm



Live! So it begins… Mayawati demands UP be split into four states

12:17  So it begins… Mayawati demands UP be split into four states:
 BSP chief Mayawati holds a quickie press conference primarily
welcoming the decision on the creation of the Telangana state. “The BSP
always advocates the splitting of states and governance units. I
reiterate my proposal to split UP into four different states —
Purvanchal, Bundelkhand, Awadh Pradesh and Paschim Pradesh. But for that
that to happen Mulayam Singh Yadav should be asked to leave UP,” she
said.

Opponents to the creation of Telangana have stated that
giving in will ensure the demands for other states to be split up as
well.

http://news.indiaonline.in/Divide-Uttar-Pradesh-into-four-states-says-Mayawati-46500

Logo

July 31, 2013

00

Lucknow: The Bahujan Samaj Party demanded splitting of Uttar Pradesh into four smaller states Wednesday, a day after the Congress Working Committee (CWC) urged the government to form a separate state of Telangana.

“We have always supported smaller states,” BSP chief Mayawati said here at a press conference.

She said Uttar Pradesh should be divided into four smaller states —
Purvanchal, Bundelkhand, Awadh Pradesh and Pashchim Pradesh.

“When this population is divided between four states, development will increase,” she said.

“Ministers in central government who hail from Uttar Pradesh should
build pressure on the central government for formation of these states,”
she added.
(IANS)

- See more at: http://news.indiaonline.in/Divide-Uttar-Pradesh-into-four-states-says-Mayawati-46500#sthash.tWFJgFYr.dpuf

http://www.newsreporter.in/divide-uttar-pradesh-into-four-states-says-mayawati-439946

logo



Divide Uttar Pradesh into four states, says Mayawati

Lucknow, July 31 : The Bahujan Samaj Party demanded
splitting of Uttar Pradesh into four smaller states Wednesday, a day
after the Congress Working Committee (CWC) urged the government to form a
separate state of Telangana.

“We have always supported smaller states,” BSP chief Mayawati said here at a press conference.

She
said Uttar Pradesh should be divided into four smaller states —
Purvanchal, Bundelkhand, Awadh Pradesh and Pashchim Pradesh.

“When this population is divided between four states, development will increase,” she said.

“Ministers
in central government who hail from Uttar Pradesh should build pressure
on the central government for formation of these states,” she added.

http://www.prokerala.com/news/articles/a395655.html
ProKerala News

Divide Uttar Pradesh into four states, says Mayawati


The Bahujan Samaj Party demanded splitting of Uttar Pradesh into four smaller states Wednesday, a day after the Congress Working Committee (CWC) urged the government to form a separate state of Telangana.

“We have always supported smaller states,” BSP chief Mayawati said here at a press conference.

She said Uttar Pradesh should be divided into four smaller states —
Purvanchal, Bundelkhand, Awadh Pradesh and Pashchim Pradesh.

“When this population is divided between four states, development will increase,” she said.

“Ministers in central government who hail from Uttar Pradesh should
build pressure on the central government for formation of these states,”
she added.


http://livetvchannelsfree.com/ddnews.html
http://livetvchannelsfree.com/headlinestoday.html


தனித் தெலுங்கானா மாநிலத்திற்கு காங்கிரஸ், ஐ.மு. கூட்டணி ஒப்புதல்!

Comment by Jagatheesan Chandrasekharan


Telangana on track, now Mayawati wants 4-way Uttar Pradesh split

Lucknow: Hours
after the Congress set the ball rolling for the creation of a new
Telangana state, Bahujan Samajwadi Party (BSP) chief Mayawati has
reiterated that the large state of Uttar Pradesh should be split into
smaller states to facilitate better governance.

Ms Mayawati, who
is a former Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister, is a vocal champion of carving
the state into four - Purvanchal, Bundelkhand, Awadh and Western Uttar
Pradesh.
Her government, which preceded the current Samajwadi party
government headed by Akhilesh Yadav, had passed a resolution in the
Uttar Pradesh assembly for this.

The Samajwadi Party, however, opposes splitting the state.

“Central ministers from Uttar Pradesh should pressurize the Centre for the division of the state,” Ms Mayawati said today.

She also supported the demand for separate statehood for Gorkhaland in Bengal and Vidarbha in Maharashtra.

Those
demands have drawn new energy from the Congress Working Committee’s
endorsement yesterday of the decision to bifurcate Andhra Pradesh to
create India’s 29th state, Telangana.

Congress MP Vilas
Muttemwar, who is a member of the Congress Working Committee, has
written to party president Sonia Gandhi to press for the creation of
Vidarbha. And in Bengal, moves to create Telangana have sparked off
fresh protests in favour of Gorkhaland.


BSP Supremo comes down heavily on akhilesh yadav government


statesman news service


Lucknow, 14 July


Bahujan Samaj Party president Mayawati called for a ban on organisations
like the Rashtriya Swayamsewak Sangh, the Vishwa Hindu Parishad and the
Bajrang Dal on grounds that they violated the spirit of the
Constitution by intermixing politics with religion. She appealed to the
Supreme Court to take stern action against such parties as the Congress
and the BJP whose leaders are visiting Faizabad and raking up the Ram
Janmabhoomi issue. This was against the spirit of secular India, she
held.


She made the observation in the light of the recent interim order of the
Lucknow Bench of Allahabad High Court banning caste based rallies.


http://www.dailypioneer.com/state-editions/lucknow/mayawati-asks-partymento-fight-sp-jungle-raj-bring-sarva-samaj-under-bsp-fold.html

The Pioneer



Mayawati asks partymento fight SP ‘jungle raj’ bring sarva samaj under BSP fold

Asking
party workers to bring the sarva samaj under party fold, Bahujan Samaj
Party supremo Mayawati directed the party members to fight  against the
‘jungle raj’ of the Samajwadi Party Government in Uttar Pradesh.

Mayawati
held an Assembly-level meeting of the party leaders here on ednesday
and directed the BSP workers to help people facing the brunt of the SP
Government’s mis-governance.‘’The law and order in the state is very bad
and the BSP leaders should approach the court, if the state Government
refuses to hear them,’’ she suggested.

As
at present the Government has failed to deliver, it is an opportunity
for the BSP to go to the people to seek their support in the Lok Sabha
election with an agenda of development of sarva samaj, she said.Mayawati
said the party leaders should gear up for the Lok Sabha election and
try to connect with people of all communities. The meeting was attended
by all the senior party leaders, including parliamentarians and
legislators. “The leaders should go to their respective districts and
start relief and rescue work in the flood affected areas,” Mayawati
said. During the meeting, Mayawati thanked the leaders for making
the Brahmin Mahasammelan on Sunday in Lucknow a grand success.

DISPENSATION OF AWAKENED ONES WITH AWARENESS is for DUKKHA NIRODHA (End of Suffering) of all SENTIENT & NON-SENTIENT BEINGS


Off-site Resources
Non-English Tipitaka translations

© 2005–2013

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/outsources/foreign.html


Off-site Resources
Non-English Tipitaka translations
http://budismecat.blogspot.in/

diumenge 14 d’abril de 2013

Libres: “A TU Paraules zen plenes de vida” de Kodo Sawaki (Traducció de Ramon Costa i Oró)




Índex:


Pròleg/Introducció: 

“Un bon tirador espifia el centre de la diana”
/1. A tu, que vols començar a fer zazen
/2. A tu, que vols enfortir el teu hara amb zazen
/3. A tu, que et sembla que zazen no t’ha aportat res
/4. A tu, que afirmes que mitjançant zazenhas desenvolupat un millor esperit
/5. A tu, que t’entestes a obtenir el satori
/6. A tu, que et deixes impressionar pel progrés de la ciència i de la cultura
/7. A tu, que dius, que no et pots avenir amb els demés
/8.Venera a Daini!
/9. L’arròs de mil cases en aquest únic bol
/10. La postura del cos s’expressa en totes les activitats de la nostra vida
/11.Treva!
/12. Les ulleres del karma
/13. A tu, que vas a mercadejar amb el teu “satori”
/14. Ens deixem escanyar pel nostre propi ego
/15. Unes instruccions per fer zazen
/Epíleg. Kodo Sawaki Roshi: la seva vida i el seu esperit (de Kushiya Shusoku)
/ANNEXOS:
/A. Fukan Zazen Gi Instruccions universalment recomanades pel zazen (Dôgen)
/B. Gakudô Yôjin Shû Recull dels punts que hem de considerar per la pràctica de la Via (Dôgen)
/C. Els manuals de meditació de Dôgen Zenji (Taizen Abderrahman Costa)


A tu, paraules zen plenes de vida de Kôdô Sawaki / Traductor Abderrahman Taizen Costa i Oró està subjecta a una llicència de Reconeixement-NoComercial-SenseObraDerivada 3.0 No adaptada de Creative Commons





Comprar el llibre: Us enviem el llibre en format PDF;“A tu, paraules zen plenes de vida” com arxiu PDF (299 pàgines) 8.50€




En paper imprimit a Gaya (Índia) (299 pàg.) 14.50€ (enviament per correus a part!).



Per encarregar el llibre digital, ompliu el formulari que veieu més a
baix, indicant a “Comment”, el vostre nom i cognom, i la vostra adressa
electrònica per rebre els arxius. Per rebre el llibre en paper, indiqueu
la vostra adressa postal i el nombre d’exemplars (us comunicaré el cost
de l’enviament).





Un cop rebut el pagament farem l’enviament. Ingrés al compte del BBVA: 0182 3405 11 0201529210.

Podeu llegir el pròleg de l’abat del temple Antaiji, la introducció, el
primer capítol i la biografia de Kôdô Sawaki al blog. Qualsevol
suggeriment per millorar el text és benvingut.
EL BOU BLANC publicacions

Llibres: ” El Sûtra del Cor de la Saviesa Suprema ” de “Ramon Costa i Oró


Reseña de l’editor


El Sûtra del Cor de la Saviesa Suprema és l’essència, el «Cor» de
l’ensenyament del Buddha. Ramon Taizen Costa, el traductor del sûtra i
l’autor de l’assaig, és monjo zen, deixeble de Mestre Taisen Deshimaru, i
actualment es fa càrrec de les activitats de l’ermita zen, Ten Ryu Ji,
Temple del Drac del Cel, a les Garrigues.


Tapa blanda: 120 páginas
Editor: Publicacions de l’Abadia de Montserrat, S.A.; Edición: 1 (18 de febrero de 2009)
Colección: BIB.SERRA D’OR
Idioma: Catalán
ISBN-10: 8498830893
ISBN-13: 978-8498830897


dimarts 6 de novembre de 2012

“Bona pregunta, bona resposta” del Venerable Bhante Dhammika en català (2012)


Traducció al català del llibre “Good question, good answer” del
Venerable Bhante Dhammika. Aquesta obra ha estat traduïda a molts
idiomes diversos.



Descàrrega: “Bona pregunta, bona resposta” del Venerable Bhante Dhammika.



THE GQGA STORY
In August
1987 a group of students from the National University of Singapore’s
Buddhist Society came to Bhante Dhammika with a problem. They said they
were often unable to give satisfactory answers when fellow students
asked them about Buddhism or when evangelicals challenged them. Bhante
asked the students to give him examples of some of the these ‘difficult’
questions and when they did he was dismayed that young, intelligent
Buddhists could be so lacking in confidence and in Dhamma knowledge that
they would be at a loss over such simple questions.

dissabte 15 de setembre de 2012

Cerimònia d’inauguració del Bori centre zen (16/09/2012)

Us convidem a la Cerimònia d’Inauguració del Bori Centre Zen

El Bori Centre Zen és un espai a la ciutat on practicar meditació i
aclarir la ment. Pertany a l’Escola Kwan Um de zen, fundada pel Mestre
Zen Seung Sahn. La Mestra Zen Bon Shim conduirà la cerimònia. Hi ha una
sèrie d’esdeveniments planejats especialment per aquesta ocasió: Xerrada
Dharma, Cerimònia oficial d’inauguració, actuació musical, piscolabis
Siusplau, veniu a compartir amb nosaltres aquesta important data!

LLOC:
BORI CENTRE ZEN
C/DE LES BEATES 8, 3º 2ª
08003 BARCELONA (METRO URQUINAONA)

www.facebook.com/boricentrozen
http://www.kwanumeurope.org/barcelona/
http://www.kwanumeurope.org
http://www.kwanumzen.org/

Albert Parareda Franquesa:”Presentació del llibre Buda.El lotus blau” (14/09/2012)


Ricard Rotllan:”L’ésser humà pot sobreviure sense una religió, però no sense amor i compassió” (31/08/2012)

Als
54 anys, Ricard Rotllan és un dels monjos budistes més coneguts de
Catalunya. El 1979 va iniciar els estudis budistes a Escòcia i ha estat
deixeble del Dalai Lama, que el va ordenar monjo. Col·laborador del
premiat programa de Catalunya Ràdio
L’ofici de viure, Rotllan ha donat a conèixer el mètode budista arreu del país. És també autor de les publicacions Aprenent a estimarMinuts de meditació i Libro práctico del yoga. Des de fa anys imparteix classes al centre cívic de Can Pantiquet. -per Montse Eras

–El budisme cerca la felicitat plena. L’has assolida?

–No, però la tinc garantida.

–Tots els budistes la teniu garantida?
–Sí,
perquè aprenem a crear les causes que com a efecte tenen la felicitat.
Progressivament vas entenent què és allò que no la causa i ho abandones.
Deixes de fer cap mal, cap acció que causi el patiment propi i el dels
altres. Si no tens acomulada cap acció que causi cap mena de sofriment
i, en canvi, acumules riquesa amb bones accions això produeix felicitat.
(…)

http://www.contrapunt.cat/entrevista/17586/lesser-huma-pot-sobreviure-sense-una-religio-pero-no-sense-amor-i-compasio

divendres 23 de març de 2012

Francesc Torralba: “El diàleg entre cristianisme i budisme” (01/03/2012)


 El
diàleg interreligiós és possible si hi ha bona voluntat, disponibilitat
per aprendre, per deconstruir prejudicis i visions tòpiques de l’altre.
No només és possible, sinó que també és una forma de créixer
intel•lectualment, de veure les coses des de l’altra banda, i en aquest
sentit, també suposa un viatge d’iniciació i podríem dir catàrtic
alhora.


És
difícil la tasca d’identificar els punts d’afinitat i les diferències
que hi ha entre dues tradicions de tan ric bagatge històric, filosòfic i
artístic com són el budisme i el cristianisme. A voltes, em sembla que
amb l’afany de construir ponts, hom redueix la grandesa, la personalitat
i la singularitat de cada tradició. Quan així es fa, es perd un món de
riquesa espiritual, un univers que la humanitat ha de saber conservar,
valorar i transmetre a les generacions futures.
 (…)


VOICE OF SARVA SAMAJ SADBHAVAN


The Congress/Marxist party essentially
owns and controls every single mainstream media house in India,
including Hindustan Times, The Times of India, NDTV, CNN-IBN, The Hindu,
Tehelka, Outlook.

We have probably not even scratched
the surface of the network of family and personal relationships through
which the Nehru dynasty has completely dominated and controlled the
entire intellectual, historian and journalist landscape of India. And we
haven’t even talked about the monumental wealth or the blackmailing
secrets. All because the one single dynasty got to rule over India for
60 years uninterrupted. It matters a LOT.

1. Hindustan Times – Shobhna Bhartia, owner and editor-in-chief of Hindustan Times is a Congress MP from Rajya Sabha.

2. Vinod Sharma, HT Political Affairs editor, is essentially a Congress
spokesman on all TV panel discussions, because once his boss’ term gets
over, he will be looking out for her RS seat next.

3. Barkha Dutt and Vir Sanghvi, famous Congress stooges (and intermediaries for UPA allies)
who were exposed in the Radiagate scandal, and are virtual Congress
spokespersons in their capacities as electronic media personalities, are
the ones who write opinion and op-ed columns most frequently (once
every week) on the editorial pages of HT. In return, Barkha and Sanghvi
are rewarded with Padma Shris and other monetary compensation by the
Nehru dynasty or Congress party.

4. NDTV’s promoters are
Prannoy Roy and Radhika Roy. Radhika’s sister Brinda Karat is a famous
CPM leader
(well known for anti-Baba Ramdev views) and Brinda’s husband
Prakash Karat is the CPM Politburo General Secretary (well known for
preferring Congress over BJP). And Prannoy Roy’s first cousin is the
famous far-leftist pro-Maoist-Naxalite pro-Kashmiri-terrorists
“intellectual” Arundhati Suzanna Roy.

5. NDTV’s Barkha Dutt’s reality has already been exposed by me in above section.

6. NDTV’s Sonia Singh is the wife of Uttar Pradesh Congress MP, Union
minister and ex-princely state ruler, Mr. R. P. N. Singh, who is one of
the fastest rising stars in the Congress party. If you remember, Sonia
Singh is a very high-profile anchor on NDTV whose pro-Congress anti-BJP
bias is legendary.

7. NDTV’s Nidhi Razdan (high-profile anchor
of Left Right Centre) is the current girlfriend of J&K CM Omar
Abdullah (after Omar recently divorced his wife of several years and
mother of his two children, Payal). Nidhi Razdan is also famous for her
legendary pro-Congress and anti-BJP bias.

8. CNN-IBN: Rajdeep
Sardesai’s wife and co-promoter of CNN-IBN, Sagarika Ghose, who anchors
Face the Nation and is famous journalist of CNN-IBN (well, her hubby is
the owner-editor-in-chief after all) are famous Congress stooges.

9. Sagarika’s father Bhaskar Ghose was a famous sarkari babu and was
made the chief of Prasar Bharati (Doordarshan) during Indira and Rajiv
regimes. Bhaskar Ghose was well-known for personal loyalty to the Nehru
dynasty, and now his daughter and son-in-law are rewarded with their own
channel to do Congress propaganda.

10. In fact Sagarika’s
extended family even consists of her aunts Ruma Pal (former Supreme
Court justice and a close friend of the Nehru family) and Arundhati
Ghose (former diplomat and Indian ambassador to various countries,
predictably, under Congress regimes).

11. Let’s now come to
another famous CNN-IBN media personality who also writes columns
frequently for Hindustan Times — Karan Thapar. What you may not know is
that the Nehru family itself is related, through blood and marriages, to
the high-profile Thapar family. India’s Army chief during the 1962
debacle against China, Gen. P. N. Thapar, is brother-in-law of Nayantara
Sehgal, the daughter of Vijaylakshmi Pandit and niece of Jawaharlal
Nehru. Gen. Thapar’s son is pro-Congress journalist Karan Thapar. Gen.
Thapar’s sister is Romila Thapar, a famous “top” typical JNU Nehruvian
communist ideologue historian, who gets to write our textbooks and
pollute them with pro-Congress Marxist propaganda.

12. The
Hindu – The paper that has “special correspondents” reporting anti-Modi
articles – N. Ram, owner and editor-in-chief (till February 2012) of The
Hindu, was once a vice president of the Students Federation of India.
SFI is the students’ wing of the CPM.

13. P. Sainath of the The
Hindu (acclaimed journalist well known for his, again, unsurprisingly,
typical left-wing Nehruvian communism ideology), is the nephew of
Congress politician V. Shankar Giri and the grandson of V. V. Giri,
ex-President of India and famous Congress politician. Giri was
especially known to be one of the first few staunch loyalists of Indira,
and whom Indira fielded for President elections against her own party’s
Neelam Sanjeeva Reddy, and who ultimately became the cause of the first
high-profile split in the Indian National Congress into Congress (O)
and Congress (I) — almost all the pre-independence regional stalwarts
split away to join Congress (O) or form their own state parties, and the
rest including Giri (all the loyalists of the Nehru family staying on
with Indira).

14. Or even what about little known News24 Hindi
media channel? Owned by ex-journalist and editor Rajiv Shukla, famous
Congress MP in Rajya Sabha, Union minister, industrialist, BCCI vice
president and IPL chairman.

15. Or even what about little known
Lokmat (and IBN Lokmat) that is Marathi newspaper (and channel) in
Maharashtra? Owner and editors-in-chief are the brothers Vijay Darda
(Congress MP) and Rajendra Darda (Congress MLA in Maharashtra, and
minister in state govt).

16. Or even the other bigger and
smaller media houses, such as The Times of India and Indian Express,
where the Nehru dynasty has managed to infiltrate its loyalists such as
Dileep Padgaonkar and Shekhar Gupta, who are essentially paid stooges of
the Congress party.

17 Vinod Mehta - Outlook editor has been well known to take anti BJP stand


The Congress (in fact just the one single family — the Nehru dynasty)
has been in power for 56 of the last 65 years of independence. This
matters a LOT. Personal relationships have been built, blackmail-worthy
secrets have been spied, monumental wealth has been accumulated … all by
the one single Nehru dynasty (and its family-business-cum-political-
party
aka Congress) that helps it maintain its tight irongrip over not just
the entire Indian mainstream media, but also deep into our bureaucracy,
our governmental institutions, and even our journalism and mass media
colleges and grad schools.

We have probably not even scratched
the surface of the network of family and personal relationships through
which the Nehru dynasty has completely dominated and controlled the
entire intellectual, historian and journalist landscape of India. And we
haven’t even talked about the monumental wealth or the blackmailing
secrets. All because the one single dynasty got to rule over India for
60 years uninterrupted. It matters a LOT.

The typical JNU
Nehruvian communist left-libbers ideologues have really perpetrated some
kind of stranglehold on India’s journalism, media and intellectual
space.

Almost all opposition (or even centre-right ideologues)
journalists have been slowly thrown out of their jobs due to pressure
from the Congress and the Nehru family.

Even the great
venerable Ramnath Goenka, frustrated and broken by repeated I-T raids
and ED investigations ultimately had to fire Arun Shourie twice from the
Indian Express, which was once the best Indian newspaper in the 1970s
and 80s. That was the team — Goenka the owner, Shourie the editor, and
S. Gurumurthy the fearless journalist, that brought political
heavyweights like Indira Gandhi down on her knees and even took on
corporate honchos like Dhirubhai Ambani. (Ramnath Goenka inspired the
Mithun Chakraborty character and S. Gurumurthy inspired the R. Madhavan
character in the Ambani biopic “Guru”.)

But very few
centre-right ideologues are left in India’s media space today, that too
in minor publications like The Pioneer. Almost all the mainstream media
houses have been thoroughly infiltrated and coerced into towing the
Congress’ line, sometimes just through ideology and relationships, and
not even money power.

The Congress/Marxist party essentially
owns and controls every single mainstream media house in India,
including Hindustan Times, The Times of India, NDTV, CNN-IBN, The Hindu,
Tehelka, Outlook.

comments (0)
07/29/13
995 LESSON 30-07-2013 TUESDAY FREE ONLINE eNālāndā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY run through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org Universal Welfare Friend - E- GOOD NEWS DISPENSATION OF AWAKENED ONES WITH AWARENESS is for DUKKHA NIRODHA (End of Suffering) of all SENTIENT & NON-SENTIENT BEINGS
Filed under: General
Posted by: @ 4:58 pm

995 LESSON 30-07-2013 TUESDAY 

FREE ONLINE  eNālāndā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY 
run through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org 

Universal Welfare Friend -
E- GOOD NEWS 

DISPENSATION OF AWAKENED ONES WITH AWARENESS is for DUKKHA NIRODHA (End of Suffering) of all SENTIENT & NON-SENTIENT BEINGS




Loving kindness, peace and universal compassion
The Middle Path - avoiding extremes, emptiness
Blessings of practice - achievement, wisdom, virtue, fortune and dignity
Purity of Dharma - it leads to liberation, outside of time or space
The Buddha’s Teaching - wisdom

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http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/2013-07-28/india/40848465_1_buddha-shrine-shrine-management-committee-mahabodhi

Mahabodhi temple serial blasts: NIA in a fix over Sasai’s quizzing


Surai Sasai

Bhadant Nagarjun Surai Sasai
Surai Sasai 1.JPG

Surai Sasai (2009 June 7) at Tokyo
Born 30th August 1935
Japan
Other names Bhadant Sasai
Political movement Dalit Buddhist movement
Religion Buddhism, Humanism

Bhadant Nagarjun Arya Surai Sasai born (Minoru Sasai) popularly known as Sasai is a Japanese-born Buddhist bhikkhu (monk) who later chose India as his working destination. Susai came to India in 1966 and met Nichidatsu Fujii,
whom he helped with the Peace Pagoda at Rajgir. He fell out with Fuji,
however, and started home, but, by his own account, was stopped by a
dream in which a figure resembling Nagarjuna appeared and said, “Go to Nagpur”. In Nagpur, he met Wamanrao Godbole, the person who had organized the conversion ceremony for Dr. Ambedkar
in 1956. Sasai claims that when he saw a photograph of Dr. Ambedkar at
Godbole’s home, he realized that it was Ambedkar who had appeared in his
dream. At first, Nagpur folk considered Surai Sasai very strange. Then
he began to greet them with “Jai Bhim
(victory to Ambedkar) and to build viharas. In 1987 a court case to
deport him on the grounds that he had overstayed his visa was dismissed,
and he was granted Indian citizenship, upon which he automatically lost
his Japanese citizenship. Sasai is one of the main leaders of the
campaign to free the Mahabodhi Temple at Bodh Gaya from Hindu control.



Disciples

He has hundreds of thousands lay disciples and hundreds of ordained
monks, novice disciples. His most active disciples are: 1) Ven. Bhikkhu
Abhaya Putra, 2) Bhante Bodhi Dhamma ( Dhammaji), 3) Ven. Prajnasheela
Bhikkhu, and 4) Ken Bodhi, Among 4 of them two were trained as Theravada
monks and rest two are Mahayana monks. Bodhi Dhamma is working in South
India teaching Zen while Prajnasheela works in center India. Abhaya
Putra in engaged with creating Theravadian monks for India.

VOICE OF SARVA SAMAJ SADBHAVAN

The CM  suspected a controversy by Opposition Parties in Bihar. Hence RSS/BJP must be quizzed first as these Blasts too has a Pattern, just like the Previous Sanghi Terrorists executed Blasts. The NIA must also exhume history as desired by Dr. Ambedkar to know the real history of this country, to find out how many Hindu temples are built over the foundations of Buddhist Shrines for example in Kanchipuram, Tirupathi etc. Buddhists have not done anything like that then why should Sashi who is Bhadant Nagarjun Arya Surai Sasai born (Minoru Sasai) popularly known as Sasai is a Japanese-born Buddhist bhikkhu (monk) who later chose India as his working destination. Susai came to India in 1966 and met Nichidatsu Fujii, whom he helped with the Peace Pagoda at Rajgir. He fell out with Fuji, however, and started home, but, by his own account, was stopped by a dream in which a figure resembling Nagarjuna appeared and said, “Go to Nagpur”. In Nagpur, he met Wamanrao Godbole, the person who had organized the conversion ceremony for Dr. Ambedkar in 1956. Sasai claims that when he saw a photograph of Dr. Ambedkar at Godbole’s home, he realized that it was Ambedkar who had appeared in his dream. At first, Nagpur folk considered Surai Sasai very strange. Then he began to greet them with “Jai Bhim” (victory to Ambedkar) and to build viharas. In 1987 a court case to deport him on the grounds that he had overstayed his visa was dismissed, and he was granted Indian citizenship, upon which he automatically lost his Japanese citizenship. Sasai is one of the main leaders of the campaign to free the Mahabodhi Temple at Bodh Gaya from Hindu control.

Disciples

He has hundreds of thousands lay disciples and hundreds of ordained monks, novice disciples. His most active disciples are: 1) Ven. Bhikkhu Abhaya Putra, 2) Bhante Bodhi Dhamma ( Dhammaji), 3) Ven. Prajnasheela Bhikkhu, and 4) Ken Bodhi, Among 4 of them two were trained as Theravada monks and rest two are Mahayana monks. Bodhi Dhamma is working in South India teaching Zen while Prajnasheela works in center India. Abhaya Putra in engaged with creating Theravadian monks for India be quizzed.

Home

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1st Floor,
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Harvills Howthorn,
Hill Top,
West Bromwich. B70 0UH
Tel: + (44) 121 502 4304
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Kindly cover programs related to acquiring MASTER KEY as desired by Dr.Ambedkar and Kanshiramji to unlock all doors of development and progress as laid down in the Constitution by distributing the wealth of the country equally among all sections of the society and to attain Eternal Bliss as Final Goal with the policy of Sarva Samaj Sasdbhavana of BSP.

with Kind Regards

and Lots of Metta

Jagatheesan Chandrasekharan

Cullavagga
 
 
 
 
 

Parivara
 
 
 
 
 

Patimokkha
1
Patimokkha
Pali
http://www.metta.lk/tipitaka/1Vinaya-Pitaka/6Patimokkha/index.html

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Table of Contents 
  

Editor’s Preface
Editor’s Preface
The readings for this edition of the Bhikkhupàtimokkhapàëi are substantially a transliteration of the text of the rules as they appear in Pàràjikapàëi & Pàcittiyapàëi, which constitute the first two volumes in the Buddha Jayanti Tripitaka Series (Vols I & I(I)).1 The Pàtimokkha is not printed there as a separate item but is embedded within the Suttavibhaïgha, which contains, wherever appropriate, the origin stories, the various recensions the rules went through, the final rule, the permutations, the exceptions, and a word commentary on the rule itself.
The BJT editors were somewhat inconsistent in providing titles for the rules, and in certain cases omitted them altogether. The deficiency in this regard has been made up from the ChS edition as printed on the Chaññha Saïgàyana CD-ROM (Version 3). In the original edition there were many cases where the text was inconsistent in its use of punctuation and layout. Here an attempt has been made to present a more standardized version of the text in this regard, but these sort of changes have not been noted. Other changes and corrections made by the present editor that affect the substance of the text have been recorded in the notes.
This work has been produced in order to assist in making known the teachings of the Buddha, please remember that many people have contributed their time and energy to this gift of the Dhamma. Anyone with similar aims who wishes to use the document or its database is welcome to do so. If you use this document in any way please make an acknowledgement to the Sri Lanka Tipitaka Project.
âràdhanà     (Nidànuddeso)
1a: âràdhanà 1
(Spoken by the senior monk)
Pubbakaraõapubbakiccàni samàpetvà imissa nisinnassa bhikkhusaïghassa anumatiyà Pàtimokkhaü uddesituü ajjhesanaü karomi.
 
1b: Okàsakammaü
(Spoken by the recitor)
Okàsa me bhante thero dethu Vinayakathaü kathetuü.
 
2: Pubbakiccaü
(Spoken by the recitor)
Sammajjanã padãpo ca ~ udakaü àsanena ca
uposathassa etàni ~ pubbakaraõan-ti vuccati.
Chandapàrisuddhi-utukkhànaü bhikkhugaõanà ca ovàdo
uposathassa etàni pubbakiccan-ti vuccati.
Uposatho yàvatikà ca bhikkhå
kammapattà sabhàgàpattiyo
na vijjanti vajjanãyà ca puggalà
tasmiü na honti pattakallan-ti vuccati.
Pubbakaraõapubbakiccàni samàpetvà desitàppikassa samaggassa bhikkhusaïghassa anumatiyà pàtimokkhaü uddisitum-àràdhanaü karoma.
 
[BJT Vol 3, Page 250] [\x 250/]
(Nidànuddeso) 2
 
Suõàtu me bhante saïgha, yadi saïghassa3 pattakallaü, saïgho uposathaü kareyya pàtimokkhaü uddiseyya. Kiü saïghassa pubbakiccaü? Pàrisuddhiü àyasmanto àrocetha Pàtimokkhaü uddisissàmi. Taü sabbeva santà sàdhukaü suõoma manasikaroma.
Yassa siyà àpatti, so àvãkareyya. Asantiyà àpattiyà, tuõhã bhavitabbaü. Tuõhã bhàvena kho panàyasmante parisuddhà-ti vedissàmi. Yathà kho pana paccekapuññhassa veyyàkaraõaü hoti, evam-evaü evaråpàya parisàya yàvatatiyaü anusàvitaü hoti. Yo pana bhikkhu yàvatatiyaü anusàviyamàne saramàno santiü àpattiü nàvãkareyya, sampajànamusàvàdassa hoti. Sampajànamusàvàdo kho panàyasmanto antaràyiko dhammo vutto Bhagavatà. Tasmà saramànena bhikkhunà àpannena visuddhàpekkhena santã àpatti àvãkàtabbà. âvãkatà hissa phàsu hoti.
Nidànaü niññhitaü
 
(Pàràjikuddeso)
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 028] [\x 028/]
Tatrime cattàro pàràjikà dhammà uddesaü àgacchanti. 5
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 056] [\x 056/]
Pàr 1: (Methunadhammasikkhàpadaü 6):
Yo pana bhikkhu bhikkhånaü sikkhàsàjãvasamàpanno sikkhaü apaccakkhàya dubbalyaü anàvãkatvà methunaü dhammaü pañiseveyya, antamaso tiracchànagatàya pi - pàràjiko hoti, asaüvàso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 104] [\x 104/]
Pàr 2: (Adinnàdànasikkhàpadaü):
Yo pana bhikkhu gàmà và ara¤¤à và adinnaü theyyasankhàtaü àdiyeyya. Yathàråpe adinnàdàne ràjàno coraü gahetvà haneyyuü và bandheyyuü và pabbàjeyyuü và: ßCorosi, bàlosi, måëhosi, thenosã-ti!û. Tathàråpaü bhikkhu adinnaü àdiyamàno - ayam-pi pàràjiko hoti, asaüvàso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 160] [\x 160/]
Pàr 3: (Manussaviggahasikkhàpadaü):
Yo pana bhikkhu sa¤cicca manussaviggahaü jãvità voropeyya, satthahàrakaü vàssa pariyeseyya, maraõavaõõaü và saüvaõõeyya, maraõàya và samàdapeyya: ßAmbho purisa kiü tuyhiminà pàpakena dujjãvitena? Matante jãvità seyyo ti!û Iti cittamano cittasaïkappo anekapariyàyena maraõavaõõaü và saüvaõõeyya, maraõàya và samàdapeyya - ayam-pi pàràjiko hoti, asaüvàso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 200] [\x 200/]
Pàr 4: (Uttarimanussadhammasikkhàpadaü):
Yo pana bhikkhu anabhijànaü uttarimanussadhammaü attåpanàyikaü alam-ariya¤àõadassanaü samudàcareyya: ßIti jànàmi, iti passàmã-ti!û Tato aparena samayena samanuggàhiyamàno và asamanuggàhiyamàno và àpanno visuddhàpekkho evaü vadeyya: ßAjànam-evàhaü àvuso avacaü: jànàmi; apassaü: passàmi; tucchaü musà vilapin-tiû, a¤¤atra adhimànà - ayam-pi pàràjiko hoti, asaüvàso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 254] [\x 254/]
Uddiññhà kho àyasmanto cattàro pàràjikà dhammà. Yesaü bhikkhu a¤¤ataraü và a¤¤ataraü và àpajjitvà na labhati bhikkhåhi 7 saddhiü saüvàsaü. Yathà pure, tathà pacchà, pàràjiko hoti, asaüvàso.
Tatthàyasmante pucchàmi: kaccittha 8 parisuddhà?
Dutiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Tatiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Parisuddhetthàyasmanto, tasmà tuõhã, 9 evam-etaü dhàrayàmi.
Pàràjikaü niññhitaü
 
(Saïghàdisesuddeso)
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 256] [\x 256/]
Ime kho panàyasmanto terasa saïghàdisesà dhammà uddesaü àgacchanti.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 260] [\x 260/]
Sd 1: Sukkavisaññhisikkhàpadaü: 10
Sa¤cetanikà sukkavisaññhi, a¤¤atra supinantà, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 294] [\x 294/]
Sd 2: Kàyasaüsaggasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu otiõõo vipariõatena cittena màtugàmena saddhiü kàyasaüsaggaü samàpajjeyya, hatthagàhaü và veõigàhaü và a¤¤atarassa và a¤¤atarassa và aïgassa paràmasanaü, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 320] [\x 320/]
Sd 3: Duññhullavàcàsikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu otiõõo vipariõatena cittena màtugàmaü duññhullàhi vàcàhi obhàseyya. Yathà taü yuvà yuvatiü methunåpasaühitàhi, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 332] [\x 332/]
Sd 4: Antakàmapàricariyasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu otiõõo vipariõatena cittena màtugàmassa santike attakàmapàricariyàya vaõõaü bhàseyya: ßEtad-aggaü bhagini pàricariyànaü yà màdisaü sãlavantaü kalyàõadhammaü brahmacàriü etena dhammena paricareyyàû-ti, methunåpasaühitena, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 344] [\x 344/]
Sd 5: Sa¤carittasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu sa¤carittaü samàpajjeyya, itthiyà và purisamatiü, purisassa và itthimatiü, jàyattane và jàrattane và, antamaso taïkhaõikàya pi, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 382] [\x 382/]
Sd 6: Kuñikàrasikkhàpadaü:
Sa¤¤àcikàya pana bhikkhunà kuñiü kàrayamànena assàmikaü attuddesaü pamàõikà kàretabbà. Tatridaü pamàõaü: dãghaso dvàdasa vidatthiyo Sugatavidatthiyà tiriyaü sattantarà. Bhikkhå abhinetabbà vatthudesanàya, tehi bhikkhåhi vatthuü desetabbaü anàrambhaü saparikkamanaü. Sàrambhe ce bhikkhu vatthusmiü aparikkamane sa¤¤àcikàya kuñiü kàreyya, bhikkhå và anabhineyya vatthudesanàya, pamàõaü và atikkàmeyya, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 406] [\x 406/]
Sd 7: Vihàrakàrasikkhàpadaü:
Mahallakaü pana bhikkhunà vihàraü kàrayamànena sassàmikaü attuddesaü bhikkhå abhinetabbà vatthudesanàya. Tehi bhikkhåhi vatthuü desetabbaü anàrambhaü saparikkamanaü. Sàrambhe ce bhikkhu vatthusmiü aparikkamane mahallakaü vihàraü kàreyya, bhikkhå và anabhineyya vatthudesanàya, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 424] [\x 424/]
Sd 8: Pañhamaduññhadosasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu bhikkhuü duññho doso appatãto amålakena pàràjikena dhammena anuddhaüseyya: ßAppeva nàma naü imamhà brahmacariyà càveyyan-ti.û. Tato aparena samayena samanuggàhiyamàno và asamanuggàhiyamàno và, amålaka¤-ceva taü adhikaraõaü hoti, bhikkhu ca dosaü patiññhàti, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 436] [\x 436/]
Sd 9: Dutiyaduññhadosasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu bhikkhuü duññho doso appatãto a¤¤abhàgiyassa adhikaraõassa ki¤ci desaü lesamattaü upàdàya pàràjikena dhammena anuddhaüseyya: ßAppeva nàma naü imamhà brahmacariyà càveyyan-ti.û Tato aparena samayena samanuggàhiyamàno và asamanuggàhiyamàno và, a¤¤abhàgiya¤-ceva taü adhikaraõaü hoti, koci deso lesamatto upàdinno, bhikkhu ca dosaü patiññhàti, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 452] [\x 452/]
Sd 10: Pañhamasaïghabhedasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu samaggassa saïghassa bhedàya parakkameyya bhedanasaüvattanikaü và adhikaraõaü samàdàya paggayha tiññheyya. So bhikkhu bhikkhåhi evam-assa vacanãyo: ßMà àyasmà samaggassa saïghassa bhedàya parakkami bhedanasaüvattanikaü và adhikaraõaü samàdàya paggayha aññhàsi. Sametàyasmà saïghena, samaggo hi saïgho sammodamàno avivadamàno ekuddeso phàsu viharatãû-ti. Eva¤-ca so bhikkhu bhikkhåhi vuccamàno tatheva paggaõheyya, so bhikkhu bhikkhåhi yàvatatiyaü samanubhàsitabbo tassa pañinissaggàya. Yàvatatiya¤-ce samanubhàsiyamàno taü pañinissajeyya, 11 iccetaü kusalaü. No ce pañinissajeyya, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 456] [\x 456/]
Sd 11: Dutiyasaïghabhedasikkhàpadaü:
Tasseva kho pana bhikkhussa bhikkhå honti anuvattakà vaggavàdakà, eko và dve và tayo và, te evaü vadeyyuü: ßMà àyasmanto etaü bhikkhuü ki¤ci avacuttha, dhammavàdã ceso bhikkhu, vinayavàdã ceso bhikkhu, amhàka¤-ceso bhikkhu; chanda¤-ca, ruci¤-ca àdàya voharati, jànàti no bhàsati, amhàkam-petaü khamatãû-ti. Te bhikkhå bhikkhåhi evam-assu vacanãyà: ßMà àyasmanto evaü avacuttha. Na ceso bhikkhu dhammavàdã, na ceso bhikkhu vinayavàdã. Mà àyasmantànam-pi saïghabhedo ruccittha. Sametàyasmantànaü saïghena, samaggo hi saïgho sammodamàno avivadamàno ekuddeso phàsu viharatãû-ti. Eva¤-ca te bhikkhå bhikkhåhi vuccamànà tatheva paggaõheyyuü, te bhikkhå bhikkhåhi yàvatatiyaü samanubhàsitabbà tassa pañinissaggàya. Yàvatatiya¤-ce samanubhàsiyamànà taü pañinissajeyyuü, iccetaü kusalaü. No ce pañinissajeyyuü, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 462] [\x 462/]
Sd 12: Dubbacasikkhàpadaü:
Bhikkhu paneva dubbacajàtiko hoti. Uddesapariyàpannesu sikkhàpadesu bhikkhåhi sahadhammikaü vuccamàno attànaü avacanãyaü karoti: ßMà maü àyasmanto ki¤ci avacuttha, kalyàõaü và pàpakaü và. Aham-pàyasmante na ki¤ci vakkhàmi, kalyàõaü và pàpakaü và. Viramathàyasmanto mama vacanàyàû-ti. So bhikkhu bhikkhåhi evam-assa vacanãyo: ßMà àyasmà attànaü avacanãyaü akàsi. Vacanãyam-evàyasmà attànaü karotu. âyasmà pi bhikkhå vadetu sahadhammena, bhikkhå pi àyasmantaü vakkhanti sahadhammena. Evaü saüvaddhà hi tassa Bhagavato parisà, yadidaü a¤¤am-a¤¤avacanena a¤¤am-a¤¤avuññhàpanenàû-ti. Eva¤-ca so bhikkhu bhikkhåhi vuccamàno tatheva paggaõheyya, so bhikkhu bhikkhåhi yàvatatiyaü samanubhàsitabbo tassa pañinissaggàya. Yàvatatiya¤-ce samanubhàsiyamàno taü pañinissajeyya iccetaü kusalaü. No ce pañinissajeyya, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 476] [\x 476/]
Sd 13: Kuladåsakasikkhàpadaü:
Bhikkhu paneva a¤¤ataraü gàmaü và nigamaü và upanissàya viharati kuladåsako pàpasamàcàro. Tassa kho pàpakà samàcàrà dissanti ceva suyyanti ca. Kulàni ca tena duññhàni dissanti ceva suyyanti ca. So bhikkhu bhikkhåhi evam-assa vacanãyo: ßâyasmà kho kuladåsako pàpasamàcàro. âyasmato kho pàpakà samàcàrà dissanti ceva suyyanti ca. Kulàni càyasmatà duññhàni dissanti ceva suyyanti ca. Pakkamatàyasmà imamhà àvàsà. Alan-te idha vàsenàû-ti. Eva¤-ca so bhikkhu bhikkhåhi vuccamàno te bhikkhå evaü vadeyya: ßChandagàmino ca bhikkhå, dosagàmino ca bhikkhå, mohagàmino ca bhikkhå, bhayagàmino ca bhikkhå. Tàdisikàya àpattiyà ekaccaü pabbàjenti, ekaccaü na pabbàjentãû-ti. So bhikkhu bhikkhåhi evam-assa vacanãyo: ßMà àyasmà evaü avaca, na ca bhikkhå chandagàmino, na ca bhikkhå dosagàmino, na ca bhikkhå mohagàmino, na ca bhikkhå bhayagàmino. âyasmà kho kuladåsako pàpasamàcàro. âyasmato kho pàpakà samàcàrà dissanti ceva suyyanti ca. Kulàni càyasmatà duññhàni dissanti ceva suyyanti ca. Pakkamatàyasmà imamhà àvàsà. Alan-te idha vàsenàû-ti. Eva¤-ca so bhikkhu bhikkhåhi vuccamàno tatheva paggaõheyya, so bhikkhu bhikkhåhi yàvatatiyaü samanubhàsitabbo tassa pañinissaggàya. Yàvatatiya¤-ce samanubhàsiyamàno taü pañinissajeyya iccetaü kusalaü. No ce pañinissajeyya, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 482] [\x 482/]
Uddiññhà kho àyasmanto terasa saïghàdisesà dhammà, nava pañhamàpattikà cattàro yàvatatiyakà. Yesaü bhikkhu a¤¤ataraü và a¤¤ataraü và àpajjitvà, yàvatihaü jànaü pañicchàdeti, tàvatihaü tena bhikkhunà akàmà parivatthabbaü. Parivutthaparivàsena bhikkhunà uttarichàrattaü bhikkhumànattàya pañipajjitabbaü. Ciõõamànatto bhikkhu: yattha siyà vãsatigaõo bhikkhusaïgho, tattha so bhikkhu abbhetabbo. Ekena pi ce åno vãsatigaõo bhikkhusaïgho taü bhikkhuü abbheyya, so ca bhikkhu anabbhito, te ca bhikkhå gàrayhà. Ayaü tattha sàmãci.
Tatthàyasmante pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Dutiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Tatiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Parisuddhetthàyasmanto, tasmà tuõhã, evam-etaü dhàrayàmi.
Saïghàdiseso niññhito
 
(Aniyatuddeso)
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 484] [\x 484/]
Ime kho panàyasmanto dve aniyatà dhammà uddesaü àgacchanti.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 486] [\x 486/]
Aniy 1: Pañhama-aniyatasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu màtugàmena saddhiü eko ekàya raho pañicchanne àsane alaïkammaniye nisajjaü kappeyya. Tam-enaü saddheyyavacasà upàsikà disvà tiõõaü dhammànaü a¤¤atarena vadeyya: pàràjikena và saïghàdisesena và pàcittiyena và. Nisajjaü bhikkhu pañijànamàno tiõõaü dhammànaü a¤¤atarena kàretabbo: pàràjikena và saïghàdisesena và pàcittiyena và. Yena và sà saddheyyavacasà upàsikà vadeyya, tena so bhikkhu kàretabbo. Ayaü dhammo aniyato.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 492] [\x 492/]
Aniy 2: Dutiya-aniyatasikkhàpadaü:
Na heva kho pana pañicchannaü àsanaü hoti nàlaïkammaniyaü. Ala¤-ca kho hoti màtugàmaü duññhullàhi vàcàhi obhàsituü. Yo pana bhikkhu tathàråpe àsane màtugàmena saddhiü eko ekàya raho nisajjaü kappeyya. Tam-enaü saddheyyavacasà upàsikà disvà dvinnaü dhammànaü a¤¤atarena vadeyya saïghàdisesena và pàcittiyena và. Nisajjaü bhikkhu pañijànamàno dvinnaü dhammànaü a¤¤atarena kàretabbo saïghàdisesena và pàcittiyena và. Yena và sà saddheyyavacasà upàsikà vadeyya, tena so bhikkhu kàretabbo. Ayam-pi dhammo aniyato.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 496] [\x 496/]
Uddiññhà kho àyasmanto dve aniyatà dhammà.
Tatthàyasmante pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Dutiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Tatiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Parisuddhetthàyasmanto, tasmà tuõhã, evam-etaü dhàrayàmi.
Aniyato niññhito
 
(Nissaggiyapàcittiyà)
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 498] [\x 498/]
Ime kho panàyasmanto tiüsa nissaggiyà pàcittiyà dhammà uddesaü àgacchanti.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 500] [\x 500/]
NP 1: Pañhamakañhinasikkhàpadaü:
Niññhitacãvarasmiü bhikkhunà ubbhatasmiü kañhine, dasàhaparamaü atirekacãvaraü dhàretabbaü. Taü atikkàmayato, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 504] [\x 504/]
NP 2: Dutiyakañhinasikkhàpadaü:
Niññhitacãvarasmiü bhikkhunà ubbhatasmiü kañhine, ekarattam-pi ce bhikkhu ticãvarena vippavaseyya, a¤¤atra bhikkhusammutiyà, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 512] [\x 512/]
NP 3: Tatiyakañhinasikkhàpadaü:
Niññhitacãvarasmiü bhikkhunà ubbhatasmiü kañhine, bhikkhuno paneva akàlacãvaraü uppajjeyya. âkaïkhamànena bhikkhunà pañiggahetabbaü, pañiggahetvà khippam-eva kàretabbaü. No cassa pàripåri, màsaparamaü tena bhikkhunà taü cãvaraü nikkhipitabbaü ånassa pàripåriyà, satiyà paccàsàya. Tato ce uttariü nikkhipeyya, satiyà pi paccàsàya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 518] [\x 518/]
NP 4: Puràõacãvarasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu a¤¤àtikàya bhikkhuniyà puràõacãvaraü dhovàpeyya và rajàpeyya và àkoñàpeyya và, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 524] [\x 524/]
NP 5: Cãvarapañiggahaõasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu a¤¤àtikàya bhikkhuniyà hatthato cãvaraü pañiggaõheyya, a¤¤atra pàrivaññakà, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 530] [\x 530/]
NP 6: A¤¤àtakavi¤¤attisikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu a¤¤àtakaü gahapatiü và gahapatàniü và cãvaraü vi¤¤àpeyya, a¤¤atra samayà, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
Tatthàyaü samayo: acchinnacãvaro và hoti bhikkhu naññhacãvaro và - ayaü tattha samayo.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 534] [\x 534/]
NP 7: Tatuttarisikkhàpadaü:
Ta¤-ce a¤¤àtako gahapati và gahapatànã và bahåhi cãvarehi abhihaññhuü pavàreyya, santaruttaraparamaü tena bhikkhunà tato cãvaraü sàditabbaü. Tato ce uttariü 12 sàdiyeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 536] [\x 536/]
NP 8: Pañhama-upakkhañasikkhàpadaü:
Bhikkhuü paneva uddissa a¤¤àtakassa gahapatissa và gahapatàniyà và cãvaracetàpannaü 13 upakkhañaü hoti: ßIminà cãvaracetàpannena cãvaraü cetàpetvà itthannàmaü bhikkhuü cãvarena acchàdessàmãû-ti. Tatra ce so bhikkhu pubbe appavàrito upasaïkamitvà cãvare vikappaü àpajjeyya: ßSàdhu vata maü àyasmà iminà cãvaracetàpannena evaråpaü và evaråpaü và cãvaraü cetàpetvà acchàdehãû-ti. Kalyàõakamyataü upàdàya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 542] [\x 542/]
NP 9: Dutiya-upakkhañasikkhàpadaü:
Bhikkhuü paneva uddissa ubhinnaü a¤¤àtakànaü gahapatãnaü và gahapatànãnaü và paccekacãvaracetàpannà upakkhañà honti: ßImehi mayaü paccekacãvaracetàpannehi paccekacãvaràni cetàpetvà itthannàmaü bhikkhuü cãvarehi acchàdessàmàû-ti. Tatra ce so bhikkhu pubbe appavàrito upasaïkamitvà cãvare vikappaü àpajjeyya: ßSàdhu vata maü àyasmanto imehi paccekacãvaracetàpannehi evaråpaü và evaråpaü và cãvaraü cetàpetvà acchàdetha ubho va santà ekenàû-ti. Kalyàõakamyataü upàdàya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 548] [\x 548/]
NP 10: Ràjasikkhàpadaü:
Bhikkhuü paneva uddissa ràjà và ràjabhoggo và bràhmaõo và gahapatiko và dåtena cãvaracetàpannaü pahiõeyya: ßIminà cãvaracetàpanena cãvaraü cetàpetvà itthannàmaü bhikkhuü cãvarena acchàdehãû-ti. So ce dåto taü bhikkhuü upasaïkamitvà evaü vadeyya: ßIdaü kho bhante àyasmantaü uddissa cãvaracetàpannaü àbhataü, pañiggaõhàtu 14 àyasmà cãvaracetàpannanû-ti. Tena bhikkhunà so dåto evam-assa vacanãyo: ßNa kho mayaü àvuso cãvaracetàpannaü pañiggaõhàma cãvara¤-ca kho mayaü pañiggaõhàma kàlena kappiyanû-ti. So ce dåto taü bhikkhuü evaü vadeyya: ßAtthi panàyasmato koci veyyàvacakaroû ti. ßCãvaratthikena bhikkhave bhikkhunà veyyàvaccakaro niddisitabbo àràmiko và upàsako và: ßEso kho àvuso bhikkhånaü veyyàvaccakaroû ti. So ce dåto taü veyyàvaccakaraü sa¤¤àpetvà taü bhikkhuü upasaïkamitvà evaü vadeyya: ßYaü kho bhante àyasmà veyyàvaccakaraü niddisi, sa¤¤atto so mayà. Upasaïkamatu àyasmà kàlena, cãvarena taü acchàdessatãû-ti. Cãvaratthikena bhikkhave bhikkhunà veyyàvaccakaro upasaïkamitvà dvattikkhattuü codetabbo sàretabbo: ßAttho me àvuso cãvarenàû-ti. Dvattikkhattuü codayamàno sàrayamàno taü cãvaraü abhinipphàdeyya, iccetaü kusalaü. No ce abhinipphàdeyya, catukkhattuü pa¤cakkhattuü chakkhattuü paramaü tuõhãbhåtena uddissa ñhàtabbaü. Catukkhattuü pa¤cakkhattuü chakkhattuü paramaü tuõhãbhåto uddissa tiññhamàno taü cãvaraü abhinipphàdeyya, iccetaü kusalaü. Tato ce uttariü vàyamamàno taü cãvaraü abhinipphàdeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
No ce abhinipphàdeyya, yatassa cãvaracetàpannaü àbhataü tattha sàmaü và gantabbaü dåto và pàhetabbo: ßYaü kho tumhe àyasmanto bhikkhuü uddissa cãvaracetàpannaü pahiõittha, na taü tassa bhikkhuno ki¤ci atthaü anubhoti, yu¤jantàyasmanto sakaü, mà vo sakaü vinassàû-ti. Ayaü tattha sàmãci.
Cãvaravaggo pañhamo

 
[BJT Vol I, Page 554] [\x 554/]
NP 11: Kosiyasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu Kosiyamissakaü santhataü kàràpeyya, nissaggiyaü 15 pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 556] [\x 556/]
NP 12: Suddhakàëakasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu suddhakàëakànaü eëakalomànaü santhataü kàràpeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 560] [\x 560/]
NP 13: Dvebhàgasikkhàpadaü:
Navaü pana bhikkhunà santhataü kàrayamànena dve bhàgà suddhakàëakànaü eëakalomànaü àdàtabbà, tatiyaü odàtànaü catutthaü gocariyànaü. Anàdà ce bhikkhu dve bhàge suddhakàëakànaü eëakalomànaü tatiyaü odàtànaü catutthaü gocariyànaü navaü santhataü kàràpeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 564] [\x 564/]
NP 14: Chabbassisikkhàpadaü:
Navaü pana bhikkhunà santhataü kàràpetvà chabbassàni dhàretabbaü. Orena ce channaü vassànaü taü santhataü vissajjetvà và avissajjetvà và a¤¤aü navaü santhataü kàràpeyya, a¤¤atra bhikkhusammutiyà, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 570] [\x 570/]
NP 15: Nisãdanasanthatasikkhàpadaü:
Nisãdanasanthataü pana bhikkhunà kàrayamànena puràõasanthatassa sàmantà Sugatavidatthã àdàtabbà dubbaõõakaraõàya, ànàda ce bhikkhu puràõasanthatassa sàmantà Sugatavidatthiü navaü nisãdanasanthataü kàràpeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 572] [\x 572/]
NP 16: Eëakalomasikkhàpadaü:
Bhikkhuno paneva addhànamaggappañipannassa eëakalomàni uppajjeyyuü. âkaïkhamànena bhikkhunà pañiggahetabbàni. Pañiggahetvà tiyojanaparamaü sahatthà haritabbàni, asante hàrake. Tato ce uttariü hareyya asante pi hàrake, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 576] [\x 576/]
NP 17: Eëakalomadhovàpanasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu a¤¤àtikàya bhikkhuniyà eëakalomàni dhovàpeyya và rajàpeyya và vijañàpeyya và, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 580] [\x 580/]
NP 18: Råpiyasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu jàtaråparajataü uggaõheyya và uggaõhàpeyya và upanikkhittaü và sàdiyeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 584] [\x 584/]
NP 19: Råpiyasaüvohàrasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu nànappakàrakaü råpiyasaüvohàraü samàpajjeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 590] [\x 590/]
NP 20: Kayavikkayasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu nànappakàrakaü kayavikkayaü samàpajjeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
Kosiyavaggo dutiyo
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 594] [\x 594/]
NP 21: Pattasikkhàpadaü:
Dasàhaparamaü atirekapatto dhàretabbo. Taü atikkàmayato, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 600] [\x 600/]
NP 22: ænapa¤cabandhanasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu ånapa¤cabandhanena pattena a¤¤aü navaü pattaü cetàpeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
Tena bhikkhunà so patto bhikkhuparisàya nissajitabbo. Yo ca tassà bhikkhuparisàya pattapariyanto, so tassa bhikkhuno padàtabbo: ßAyaü te bhikkhu patto, yàva bhedanàya dhàretabboû ti. Ayaü tattha sàmãci.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 610] [\x 610/]
NP 23: Bhesajjasikkhàpadaü:
Yàni kho pana tàni gilànànaü bhikkhånaü pañisàyanãyàni bhesajjàni, seyyathãdaü: sappi, navanãtaü, telaü, madhu, phàõitaü; tàni pañiggahetvà sattàhaparamaü sannidhikàrakaü paribhu¤jitabbàni. Taü atikkàmayato, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 614] [\x 614/]
NP 24: Vassikasàñikasikkhàpadaü:
ßMàso seso gimhànanû-ti: bhikkhunà vassikasàñikacãvaraü pariyesitabbam. ßAddhamàso seso gimhànanû-ti: katvà nivàsetabbaü. ßOrena ce màso seso gimhànanû-ti: vassikasàñikacãvaraü pariyeseyya. ßOrenaddhamàso seso gimhànanû-ti: katvà nivàseyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 618] [\x 618/]
NP 25: Cãvara-acchindanasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu bhikkhussa sàmaü cãvaraü datvà kupito 16 anattamano acchindeyya và acchindàpeyya và, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 620] [\x 620/]
NP 26: Suttavi¤¤attisikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu sàmaü suttaü vi¤¤àpetvà tantavàyehi cãvaraü vàyàpeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 624] [\x 624/]
NP 27: Mahàpesakàrasikkhàpadaü:
Bhikkhuü paneva uddissa a¤¤àtako gahapati và gahapatànã và tantavàyehi cãvaraü vàyàpeyya. Tatra ce so bhikkhu pubbe appavàrito tantavàye upasaïkamitvà cãvare vikappaü àpajjeyya: ßIdaü kho àvuso cãvaraü maü uddissa viyyati àyata¤-ca karotha, vitthata¤-ca, appita¤-ca, suvãta¤-ca, suppavàyita¤-ca, suvilekhita¤-ca, suvitacchita¤-ca karotha; appeva nàma mayam-pi àyasmantànaü ki¤cimattaü anupadajjeyyàmàû-ti. Eva¤-ca so bhikkhu vatvà ki¤cimattaü anupadajjeyya antamaso piõóapàtamattam-pi, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 630] [\x 630/]
NP 28: Accekacãvarasikkhàpadaü:
Dasàhànàgataü kattikatemàsikapuõõamaü, bhikkhuno paneva accekacãvaraü uppajjeyya, accekaü ma¤¤amànena bhikkhunà pañiggahetabbaü. Pañiggahetvà yàva cãvarakàlasamayaü nikkhipitabbaü. Tato ce uttariü nikkhipeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 634] [\x 634/]
NP 29: Sàsaïkhasikkhàpadaü:
Upavassaü kho pana kattikapuõõamaü yàni kho pana tàni àra¤¤akàni senàsanàni sàsaïkasammatàni sappañibhayàni, tathà råpesu bhikkhu senàsanesu viharanto àkaïkhamàno tiõõaü cãvarànaü a¤¤ataraü cãvaraü antaraghare nikkhipeyya. Siyà ca tassa bhikkhuno kocid-eva paccayo tena cãvarena vippavàsàya, chàrattaparamaü tena bhikkhunà tena cãvarena vippavasitabbaü. Tato ce uttariü vippavaseyya, a¤¤atra bhikkhusammutiyà, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 638] [\x 638/]
NP 30: Pariõatasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu jànaü saïghikaü làbhaü pariõataü attano pariõàmeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
Pattavaggo tatiyo
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 640] [\x 640/]
Uddiññhà kho àyasmanto tiüsa nissaggiyà pàcittiyà dhammà.
Tatthàyasmante pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Dutiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Tatiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Parisuddhetthàyasmanto, tasmà tuõhã, evam-etaü dhàrayàmi.
Nissaggiyapàcittiyà niññhità
 
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End Notes
1 Editor’s note: It seems every tradition has its own way of introducing the recital of the Pàtimokkha. Here only two of the simpler ways are included. Either the âràdhanà & Okàsakammaü is recited; or the Pubbakiccaü (but not both).
2 The bracketed headings for the various sections are supplied from the ChS edition of the Bhikkhupàtimokkhapàëi.
3 BJT note: Suõàtu me bhante saïgho, ajja uposatho paõõaraso - PTS
4 The following 5 lines are not in BJT.
5 BJT note: This reading is not seen in some books.
6 The Pàràjika rules in BJT are listed simply as Pañhama-, Dutiya-, Tatiya-, & Catutthapàràjikaü; without further identification. Most of the other rules have mnenomic titles usually connected with the wording of the rule, or the occasion for it (but see the notes to the Pàñidesanãya & Sekhiya rules below). The titles in brackets in this section are taken from the ChS edition of the text.
7 Editor’s note: BJT, Bhikkhuhi here, elsewhere bhikkhåhi.
8 Editor’s note: BJT, Kaccãttha here, elsewhere kaccittha.
9 Editor’s note: BJT, Tuõhi here, elsewhere tuõhã.
10 Editor’s note: this is the end title in BJT, the heading simply reads Pañhamasaïghàdisesà, but all the rest of these training rules are given distinctive titles.
11 BJT note: Pañinissajjeyya - ChS.
12 BJT note: Uttari - ChS
13 BJT note: Cãvaracetàpanaü - Thai.
14 Editor’s note: BJT, patiggaõh- here, but pañigaõh- in NP5 above.
15 Editor’s note: BJT, Nissaggãyaü, printer’s error.
16 Editor’s note: BJT, Kåpito - printer’s error.

Bhikkhupàtimokkhapàëi

1a: âràdhanà 1
(Spoken by the senior monk)
Pubbakaraõapubbakiccàni samàpetvà imissa nisinnassa bhikkhusaïghassa anumatiyà Pàtimokkhaü uddesituü ajjhesanaü karomi.
 
1b: Okàsakammaü
(Spoken by the recitor)
Okàsa me bhante thero dethu Vinayakathaü kathetuü.
 
2: Pubbakiccaü
(Spoken by the recitor)
Sammajjanã padãpo ca ~ udakaü àsanena ca
uposathassa etàni ~ pubbakaraõan-ti vuccati.
Chandapàrisuddhi-utukkhànaü bhikkhugaõanà ca ovàdo
uposathassa etàni pubbakiccan-ti vuccati.
Uposatho yàvatikà ca bhikkhå
kammapattà sabhàgàpattiyo
na vijjanti vajjanãyà ca puggalà
tasmiü na honti pattakallan-ti vuccati.
Pubbakaraõapubbakiccàni samàpetvà desitàppikassa samaggassa bhikkhusaïghassa anumatiyà pàtimokkhaü uddisitum-àràdhanaü karoma.
 
[BJT Vol 3, Page 250] [\x 250/]
(Nidànuddeso) 2
 
Suõàtu me bhante saïgha, yadi saïghassa3 pattakallaü, saïgho uposathaü kareyya pàtimokkhaü uddiseyya. Kiü saïghassa pubbakiccaü? Pàrisuddhiü àyasmanto àrocetha Pàtimokkhaü uddisissàmi. Taü sabbeva santà sàdhukaü suõoma manasikaroma.
Yassa siyà àpatti, so àvãkareyya. Asantiyà àpattiyà, tuõhã bhavitabbaü. Tuõhã bhàvena kho panàyasmante parisuddhà-ti vedissàmi. Yathà kho pana paccekapuññhassa veyyàkaraõaü hoti, evam-evaü evaråpàya parisàya yàvatatiyaü anusàvitaü hoti. Yo pana bhikkhu yàvatatiyaü anusàviyamàne saramàno santiü àpattiü nàvãkareyya, sampajànamusàvàdassa hoti. Sampajànamusàvàdo kho panàyasmanto antaràyiko dhammo vutto Bhagavatà. Tasmà saramànena bhikkhunà àpannena visuddhàpekkhena santã àpatti àvãkàtabbà. âvãkatà hissa phàsu hoti.
Nidànaü niññhitaü
 
(Pàràjikuddeso)
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 028] [\x 028/]
Tatrime cattàro pàràjikà dhammà uddesaü àgacchanti. 5
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 056] [\x 056/]
Pàr 1: (Methunadhammasikkhàpadaü 6):
Yo pana bhikkhu bhikkhånaü sikkhàsàjãvasamàpanno sikkhaü apaccakkhàya dubbalyaü anàvãkatvà methunaü dhammaü pañiseveyya, antamaso tiracchànagatàya pi - pàràjiko hoti, asaüvàso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 104] [\x 104/]
Pàr 2: (Adinnàdànasikkhàpadaü):
Yo pana bhikkhu gàmà và ara¤¤à và adinnaü theyyasankhàtaü àdiyeyya. Yathàråpe adinnàdàne ràjàno coraü gahetvà haneyyuü và bandheyyuü và pabbàjeyyuü và: ßCorosi, bàlosi, måëhosi, thenosã-ti!û. Tathàråpaü bhikkhu adinnaü àdiyamàno - ayam-pi pàràjiko hoti, asaüvàso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 160] [\x 160/]
Pàr 3: (Manussaviggahasikkhàpadaü):
Yo pana bhikkhu sa¤cicca manussaviggahaü jãvità voropeyya, satthahàrakaü vàssa pariyeseyya, maraõavaõõaü và saüvaõõeyya, maraõàya và samàdapeyya: ßAmbho purisa kiü tuyhiminà pàpakena dujjãvitena? Matante jãvità seyyo ti!û Iti cittamano cittasaïkappo anekapariyàyena maraõavaõõaü và saüvaõõeyya, maraõàya và samàdapeyya - ayam-pi pàràjiko hoti, asaüvàso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 200] [\x 200/]
Pàr 4: (Uttarimanussadhammasikkhàpadaü):
Yo pana bhikkhu anabhijànaü uttarimanussadhammaü attåpanàyikaü alam-ariya¤àõadassanaü samudàcareyya: ßIti jànàmi, iti passàmã-ti!û Tato aparena samayena samanuggàhiyamàno và asamanuggàhiyamàno và àpanno visuddhàpekkho evaü vadeyya: ßAjànam-evàhaü àvuso avacaü: jànàmi; apassaü: passàmi; tucchaü musà vilapin-tiû, a¤¤atra adhimànà - ayam-pi pàràjiko hoti, asaüvàso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 254] [\x 254/]
Uddiññhà kho àyasmanto cattàro pàràjikà dhammà. Yesaü bhikkhu a¤¤ataraü và a¤¤ataraü và àpajjitvà na labhati bhikkhåhi 7 saddhiü saüvàsaü. Yathà pure, tathà pacchà, pàràjiko hoti, asaüvàso.
Tatthàyasmante pucchàmi: kaccittha 8 parisuddhà?
Dutiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Tatiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Parisuddhetthàyasmanto, tasmà tuõhã, 9 evam-etaü dhàrayàmi.
Pàràjikaü niññhitaü
 
(Saïghàdisesuddeso)
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 256] [\x 256/]
Ime kho panàyasmanto terasa saïghàdisesà dhammà uddesaü àgacchanti.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 260] [\x 260/]
Sd 1: Sukkavisaññhisikkhàpadaü: 10
Sa¤cetanikà sukkavisaññhi, a¤¤atra supinantà, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 294] [\x 294/]
Sd 2: Kàyasaüsaggasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu otiõõo vipariõatena cittena màtugàmena saddhiü kàyasaüsaggaü samàpajjeyya, hatthagàhaü và veõigàhaü và a¤¤atarassa và a¤¤atarassa và aïgassa paràmasanaü, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 320] [\x 320/]
Sd 3: Duññhullavàcàsikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu otiõõo vipariõatena cittena màtugàmaü duññhullàhi vàcàhi obhàseyya. Yathà taü yuvà yuvatiü methunåpasaühitàhi, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 332] [\x 332/]
Sd 4: Antakàmapàricariyasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu otiõõo vipariõatena cittena màtugàmassa santike attakàmapàricariyàya vaõõaü bhàseyya: ßEtad-aggaü bhagini pàricariyànaü yà màdisaü sãlavantaü kalyàõadhammaü brahmacàriü etena dhammena paricareyyàû-ti, methunåpasaühitena, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 344] [\x 344/]
Sd 5: Sa¤carittasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu sa¤carittaü samàpajjeyya, itthiyà và purisamatiü, purisassa và itthimatiü, jàyattane và jàrattane và, antamaso taïkhaõikàya pi, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 382] [\x 382/]
Sd 6: Kuñikàrasikkhàpadaü:
Sa¤¤àcikàya pana bhikkhunà kuñiü kàrayamànena assàmikaü attuddesaü pamàõikà kàretabbà. Tatridaü pamàõaü: dãghaso dvàdasa vidatthiyo Sugatavidatthiyà tiriyaü sattantarà. Bhikkhå abhinetabbà vatthudesanàya, tehi bhikkhåhi vatthuü desetabbaü anàrambhaü saparikkamanaü. Sàrambhe ce bhikkhu vatthusmiü aparikkamane sa¤¤àcikàya kuñiü kàreyya, bhikkhå và anabhineyya vatthudesanàya, pamàõaü và atikkàmeyya, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 406] [\x 406/]
Sd 7: Vihàrakàrasikkhàpadaü:
Mahallakaü pana bhikkhunà vihàraü kàrayamànena sassàmikaü attuddesaü bhikkhå abhinetabbà vatthudesanàya. Tehi bhikkhåhi vatthuü desetabbaü anàrambhaü saparikkamanaü. Sàrambhe ce bhikkhu vatthusmiü aparikkamane mahallakaü vihàraü kàreyya, bhikkhå và anabhineyya vatthudesanàya, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 424] [\x 424/]
Sd 8: Pañhamaduññhadosasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu bhikkhuü duññho doso appatãto amålakena pàràjikena dhammena anuddhaüseyya: ßAppeva nàma naü imamhà brahmacariyà càveyyan-ti.û. Tato aparena samayena samanuggàhiyamàno và asamanuggàhiyamàno và, amålaka¤-ceva taü adhikaraõaü hoti, bhikkhu ca dosaü patiññhàti, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 436] [\x 436/]
Sd 9: Dutiyaduññhadosasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu bhikkhuü duññho doso appatãto a¤¤abhàgiyassa adhikaraõassa ki¤ci desaü lesamattaü upàdàya pàràjikena dhammena anuddhaüseyya: ßAppeva nàma naü imamhà brahmacariyà càveyyan-ti.û Tato aparena samayena samanuggàhiyamàno và asamanuggàhiyamàno và, a¤¤abhàgiya¤-ceva taü adhikaraõaü hoti, koci deso lesamatto upàdinno, bhikkhu ca dosaü patiññhàti, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 452] [\x 452/]
Sd 10: Pañhamasaïghabhedasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu samaggassa saïghassa bhedàya parakkameyya bhedanasaüvattanikaü và adhikaraõaü samàdàya paggayha tiññheyya. So bhikkhu bhikkhåhi evam-assa vacanãyo: ßMà àyasmà samaggassa saïghassa bhedàya parakkami bhedanasaüvattanikaü và adhikaraõaü samàdàya paggayha aññhàsi. Sametàyasmà saïghena, samaggo hi saïgho sammodamàno avivadamàno ekuddeso phàsu viharatãû-ti. Eva¤-ca so bhikkhu bhikkhåhi vuccamàno tatheva paggaõheyya, so bhikkhu bhikkhåhi yàvatatiyaü samanubhàsitabbo tassa pañinissaggàya. Yàvatatiya¤-ce samanubhàsiyamàno taü pañinissajeyya, 11 iccetaü kusalaü. No ce pañinissajeyya, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 456] [\x 456/]
Sd 11: Dutiyasaïghabhedasikkhàpadaü:
Tasseva kho pana bhikkhussa bhikkhå honti anuvattakà vaggavàdakà, eko và dve và tayo và, te evaü vadeyyuü: ßMà àyasmanto etaü bhikkhuü ki¤ci avacuttha, dhammavàdã ceso bhikkhu, vinayavàdã ceso bhikkhu, amhàka¤-ceso bhikkhu; chanda¤-ca, ruci¤-ca àdàya voharati, jànàti no bhàsati, amhàkam-petaü khamatãû-ti. Te bhikkhå bhikkhåhi evam-assu vacanãyà: ßMà àyasmanto evaü avacuttha. Na ceso bhikkhu dhammavàdã, na ceso bhikkhu vinayavàdã. Mà àyasmantànam-pi saïghabhedo ruccittha. Sametàyasmantànaü saïghena, samaggo hi saïgho sammodamàno avivadamàno ekuddeso phàsu viharatãû-ti. Eva¤-ca te bhikkhå bhikkhåhi vuccamànà tatheva paggaõheyyuü, te bhikkhå bhikkhåhi yàvatatiyaü samanubhàsitabbà tassa pañinissaggàya. Yàvatatiya¤-ce samanubhàsiyamànà taü pañinissajeyyuü, iccetaü kusalaü. No ce pañinissajeyyuü, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 462] [\x 462/]
Sd 12: Dubbacasikkhàpadaü:
Bhikkhu paneva dubbacajàtiko hoti. Uddesapariyàpannesu sikkhàpadesu bhikkhåhi sahadhammikaü vuccamàno attànaü avacanãyaü karoti: ßMà maü àyasmanto ki¤ci avacuttha, kalyàõaü và pàpakaü và. Aham-pàyasmante na ki¤ci vakkhàmi, kalyàõaü và pàpakaü và. Viramathàyasmanto mama vacanàyàû-ti. So bhikkhu bhikkhåhi evam-assa vacanãyo: ßMà àyasmà attànaü avacanãyaü akàsi. Vacanãyam-evàyasmà attànaü karotu. âyasmà pi bhikkhå vadetu sahadhammena, bhikkhå pi àyasmantaü vakkhanti sahadhammena. Evaü saüvaddhà hi tassa Bhagavato parisà, yadidaü a¤¤am-a¤¤avacanena a¤¤am-a¤¤avuññhàpanenàû-ti. Eva¤-ca so bhikkhu bhikkhåhi vuccamàno tatheva paggaõheyya, so bhikkhu bhikkhåhi yàvatatiyaü samanubhàsitabbo tassa pañinissaggàya. Yàvatatiya¤-ce samanubhàsiyamàno taü pañinissajeyya iccetaü kusalaü. No ce pañinissajeyya, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 476] [\x 476/]
Sd 13: Kuladåsakasikkhàpadaü:
Bhikkhu paneva a¤¤ataraü gàmaü và nigamaü và upanissàya viharati kuladåsako pàpasamàcàro. Tassa kho pàpakà samàcàrà dissanti ceva suyyanti ca. Kulàni ca tena duññhàni dissanti ceva suyyanti ca. So bhikkhu bhikkhåhi evam-assa vacanãyo: ßâyasmà kho kuladåsako pàpasamàcàro. âyasmato kho pàpakà samàcàrà dissanti ceva suyyanti ca. Kulàni càyasmatà duññhàni dissanti ceva suyyanti ca. Pakkamatàyasmà imamhà àvàsà. Alan-te idha vàsenàû-ti. Eva¤-ca so bhikkhu bhikkhåhi vuccamàno te bhikkhå evaü vadeyya: ßChandagàmino ca bhikkhå, dosagàmino ca bhikkhå, mohagàmino ca bhikkhå, bhayagàmino ca bhikkhå. Tàdisikàya àpattiyà ekaccaü pabbàjenti, ekaccaü na pabbàjentãû-ti. So bhikkhu bhikkhåhi evam-assa vacanãyo: ßMà àyasmà evaü avaca, na ca bhikkhå chandagàmino, na ca bhikkhå dosagàmino, na ca bhikkhå mohagàmino, na ca bhikkhå bhayagàmino. âyasmà kho kuladåsako pàpasamàcàro. âyasmato kho pàpakà samàcàrà dissanti ceva suyyanti ca. Kulàni càyasmatà duññhàni dissanti ceva suyyanti ca. Pakkamatàyasmà imamhà àvàsà. Alan-te idha vàsenàû-ti. Eva¤-ca so bhikkhu bhikkhåhi vuccamàno tatheva paggaõheyya, so bhikkhu bhikkhåhi yàvatatiyaü samanubhàsitabbo tassa pañinissaggàya. Yàvatatiya¤-ce samanubhàsiyamàno taü pañinissajeyya iccetaü kusalaü. No ce pañinissajeyya, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 482] [\x 482/]
Uddiññhà kho àyasmanto terasa saïghàdisesà dhammà, nava pañhamàpattikà cattàro yàvatatiyakà. Yesaü bhikkhu a¤¤ataraü và a¤¤ataraü và àpajjitvà, yàvatihaü jànaü pañicchàdeti, tàvatihaü tena bhikkhunà akàmà parivatthabbaü. Parivutthaparivàsena bhikkhunà uttarichàrattaü bhikkhumànattàya pañipajjitabbaü. Ciõõamànatto bhikkhu: yattha siyà vãsatigaõo bhikkhusaïgho, tattha so bhikkhu abbhetabbo. Ekena pi ce åno vãsatigaõo bhikkhusaïgho taü bhikkhuü abbheyya, so ca bhikkhu anabbhito, te ca bhikkhå gàrayhà. Ayaü tattha sàmãci.
Tatthàyasmante pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Dutiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Tatiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Parisuddhetthàyasmanto, tasmà tuõhã, evam-etaü dhàrayàmi.
Saïghàdiseso niññhito
 
(Aniyatuddeso)
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 484] [\x 484/]
Ime kho panàyasmanto dve aniyatà dhammà uddesaü àgacchanti.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 486] [\x 486/]
Aniy 1: Pañhama-aniyatasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu màtugàmena saddhiü eko ekàya raho pañicchanne àsane alaïkammaniye nisajjaü kappeyya. Tam-enaü saddheyyavacasà upàsikà disvà tiõõaü dhammànaü a¤¤atarena vadeyya: pàràjikena và saïghàdisesena và pàcittiyena và. Nisajjaü bhikkhu pañijànamàno tiõõaü dhammànaü a¤¤atarena kàretabbo: pàràjikena và saïghàdisesena và pàcittiyena và. Yena và sà saddheyyavacasà upàsikà vadeyya, tena so bhikkhu kàretabbo. Ayaü dhammo aniyato.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 492] [\x 492/]
Aniy 2: Dutiya-aniyatasikkhàpadaü:
Na heva kho pana pañicchannaü àsanaü hoti nàlaïkammaniyaü. Ala¤-ca kho hoti màtugàmaü duññhullàhi vàcàhi obhàsituü. Yo pana bhikkhu tathàråpe àsane màtugàmena saddhiü eko ekàya raho nisajjaü kappeyya. Tam-enaü saddheyyavacasà upàsikà disvà dvinnaü dhammànaü a¤¤atarena vadeyya saïghàdisesena và pàcittiyena và. Nisajjaü bhikkhu pañijànamàno dvinnaü dhammànaü a¤¤atarena kàretabbo saïghàdisesena và pàcittiyena và. Yena và sà saddheyyavacasà upàsikà vadeyya, tena so bhikkhu kàretabbo. Ayam-pi dhammo aniyato.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 496] [\x 496/]
Uddiññhà kho àyasmanto dve aniyatà dhammà.
Tatthàyasmante pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Dutiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Tatiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Parisuddhetthàyasmanto, tasmà tuõhã, evam-etaü dhàrayàmi.
Aniyato niññhito
 
(Nissaggiyapàcittiyà)
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 498] [\x 498/]
Ime kho panàyasmanto tiüsa nissaggiyà pàcittiyà dhammà uddesaü àgacchanti.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 500] [\x 500/]
NP 1: Pañhamakañhinasikkhàpadaü:
Niññhitacãvarasmiü bhikkhunà ubbhatasmiü kañhine, dasàhaparamaü atirekacãvaraü dhàretabbaü. Taü atikkàmayato, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 504] [\x 504/]
NP 2: Dutiyakañhinasikkhàpadaü:
Niññhitacãvarasmiü bhikkhunà ubbhatasmiü kañhine, ekarattam-pi ce bhikkhu ticãvarena vippavaseyya, a¤¤atra bhikkhusammutiyà, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 512] [\x 512/]
NP 3: Tatiyakañhinasikkhàpadaü:
Niññhitacãvarasmiü bhikkhunà ubbhatasmiü kañhine, bhikkhuno paneva akàlacãvaraü uppajjeyya. âkaïkhamànena bhikkhunà pañiggahetabbaü, pañiggahetvà khippam-eva kàretabbaü. No cassa pàripåri, màsaparamaü tena bhikkhunà taü cãvaraü nikkhipitabbaü ånassa pàripåriyà, satiyà paccàsàya. Tato ce uttariü nikkhipeyya, satiyà pi paccàsàya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 518] [\x 518/]
NP 4: Puràõacãvarasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu a¤¤àtikàya bhikkhuniyà puràõacãvaraü dhovàpeyya và rajàpeyya và àkoñàpeyya và, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 524] [\x 524/]
NP 5: Cãvarapañiggahaõasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu a¤¤àtikàya bhikkhuniyà hatthato cãvaraü pañiggaõheyya, a¤¤atra pàrivaññakà, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 530] [\x 530/]
NP 6: A¤¤àtakavi¤¤attisikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu a¤¤àtakaü gahapatiü và gahapatàniü và cãvaraü vi¤¤àpeyya, a¤¤atra samayà, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
Tatthàyaü samayo: acchinnacãvaro và hoti bhikkhu naññhacãvaro và - ayaü tattha samayo.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 534] [\x 534/]
NP 7: Tatuttarisikkhàpadaü:
Ta¤-ce a¤¤àtako gahapati và gahapatànã và bahåhi cãvarehi abhihaññhuü pavàreyya, santaruttaraparamaü tena bhikkhunà tato cãvaraü sàditabbaü. Tato ce uttariü 12 sàdiyeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 536] [\x 536/]
NP 8: Pañhama-upakkhañasikkhàpadaü:
Bhikkhuü paneva uddissa a¤¤àtakassa gahapatissa và gahapatàniyà và cãvaracetàpannaü 13 upakkhañaü hoti: ßIminà cãvaracetàpannena cãvaraü cetàpetvà itthannàmaü bhikkhuü cãvarena acchàdessàmãû-ti. Tatra ce so bhikkhu pubbe appavàrito upasaïkamitvà cãvare vikappaü àpajjeyya: ßSàdhu vata maü àyasmà iminà cãvaracetàpannena evaråpaü và evaråpaü và cãvaraü cetàpetvà acchàdehãû-ti. Kalyàõakamyataü upàdàya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 542] [\x 542/]
NP 9: Dutiya-upakkhañasikkhàpadaü:
Bhikkhuü paneva uddissa ubhinnaü a¤¤àtakànaü gahapatãnaü và gahapatànãnaü và paccekacãvaracetàpannà upakkhañà honti: ßImehi mayaü paccekacãvaracetàpannehi paccekacãvaràni cetàpetvà itthannàmaü bhikkhuü cãvarehi acchàdessàmàû-ti. Tatra ce so bhikkhu pubbe appavàrito upasaïkamitvà cãvare vikappaü àpajjeyya: ßSàdhu vata maü àyasmanto imehi paccekacãvaracetàpannehi evaråpaü và evaråpaü và cãvaraü cetàpetvà acchàdetha ubho va santà ekenàû-ti. Kalyàõakamyataü upàdàya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 548] [\x 548/]
NP 10: Ràjasikkhàpadaü:
Bhikkhuü paneva uddissa ràjà và ràjabhoggo và bràhmaõo và gahapatiko và dåtena cãvaracetàpannaü pahiõeyya: ßIminà cãvaracetàpanena cãvaraü cetàpetvà itthannàmaü bhikkhuü cãvarena acchàdehãû-ti. So ce dåto taü bhikkhuü upasaïkamitvà evaü vadeyya: ßIdaü kho bhante àyasmantaü uddissa cãvaracetàpannaü àbhataü, pañiggaõhàtu 14 àyasmà cãvaracetàpannanû-ti. Tena bhikkhunà so dåto evam-assa vacanãyo: ßNa kho mayaü àvuso cãvaracetàpannaü pañiggaõhàma cãvara¤-ca kho mayaü pañiggaõhàma kàlena kappiyanû-ti. So ce dåto taü bhikkhuü evaü vadeyya: ßAtthi panàyasmato koci veyyàvacakaroû ti. ßCãvaratthikena bhikkhave bhikkhunà veyyàvaccakaro niddisitabbo àràmiko và upàsako và: ßEso kho àvuso bhikkhånaü veyyàvaccakaroû ti. So ce dåto taü veyyàvaccakaraü sa¤¤àpetvà taü bhikkhuü upasaïkamitvà evaü vadeyya: ßYaü kho bhante àyasmà veyyàvaccakaraü niddisi, sa¤¤atto so mayà. Upasaïkamatu àyasmà kàlena, cãvarena taü acchàdessatãû-ti. Cãvaratthikena bhikkhave bhikkhunà veyyàvaccakaro upasaïkamitvà dvattikkhattuü codetabbo sàretabbo: ßAttho me àvuso cãvarenàû-ti. Dvattikkhattuü codayamàno sàrayamàno taü cãvaraü abhinipphàdeyya, iccetaü kusalaü. No ce abhinipphàdeyya, catukkhattuü pa¤cakkhattuü chakkhattuü paramaü tuõhãbhåtena uddissa ñhàtabbaü. Catukkhattuü pa¤cakkhattuü chakkhattuü paramaü tuõhãbhåto uddissa tiññhamàno taü cãvaraü abhinipphàdeyya, iccetaü kusalaü. Tato ce uttariü vàyamamàno taü cãvaraü abhinipphàdeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
No ce abhinipphàdeyya, yatassa cãvaracetàpannaü àbhataü tattha sàmaü và gantabbaü dåto và pàhetabbo: ßYaü kho tumhe àyasmanto bhikkhuü uddissa cãvaracetàpannaü pahiõittha, na taü tassa bhikkhuno ki¤ci atthaü anubhoti, yu¤jantàyasmanto sakaü, mà vo sakaü vinassàû-ti. Ayaü tattha sàmãci.
Cãvaravaggo pañhamo

 
[BJT Vol I, Page 554] [\x 554/]
NP 11: Kosiyasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu Kosiyamissakaü santhataü kàràpeyya, nissaggiyaü 15 pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 556] [\x 556/]
NP 12: Suddhakàëakasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu suddhakàëakànaü eëakalomànaü santhataü kàràpeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 560] [\x 560/]
NP 13: Dvebhàgasikkhàpadaü:
Navaü pana bhikkhunà santhataü kàrayamànena dve bhàgà suddhakàëakànaü eëakalomànaü àdàtabbà, tatiyaü odàtànaü catutthaü gocariyànaü. Anàdà ce bhikkhu dve bhàge suddhakàëakànaü eëakalomànaü tatiyaü odàtànaü catutthaü gocariyànaü navaü santhataü kàràpeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 564] [\x 564/]
NP 14: Chabbassisikkhàpadaü:
Navaü pana bhikkhunà santhataü kàràpetvà chabbassàni dhàretabbaü. Orena ce channaü vassànaü taü santhataü vissajjetvà và avissajjetvà và a¤¤aü navaü santhataü kàràpeyya, a¤¤atra bhikkhusammutiyà, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 570] [\x 570/]
NP 15: Nisãdanasanthatasikkhàpadaü:
Nisãdanasanthataü pana bhikkhunà kàrayamànena puràõasanthatassa sàmantà Sugatavidatthã àdàtabbà dubbaõõakaraõàya, ànàda ce bhikkhu puràõasanthatassa sàmantà Sugatavidatthiü navaü nisãdanasanthataü kàràpeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 572] [\x 572/]
NP 16: Eëakalomasikkhàpadaü:
Bhikkhuno paneva addhànamaggappañipannassa eëakalomàni uppajjeyyuü. âkaïkhamànena bhikkhunà pañiggahetabbàni. Pañiggahetvà tiyojanaparamaü sahatthà haritabbàni, asante hàrake. Tato ce uttariü hareyya asante pi hàrake, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 576] [\x 576/]
NP 17: Eëakalomadhovàpanasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu a¤¤àtikàya bhikkhuniyà eëakalomàni dhovàpeyya và rajàpeyya và vijañàpeyya và, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 580] [\x 580/]
NP 18: Råpiyasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu jàtaråparajataü uggaõheyya và uggaõhàpeyya và upanikkhittaü và sàdiyeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 584] [\x 584/]
NP 19: Råpiyasaüvohàrasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu nànappakàrakaü råpiyasaüvohàraü samàpajjeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 590] [\x 590/]
NP 20: Kayavikkayasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu nànappakàrakaü kayavikkayaü samàpajjeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
Kosiyavaggo dutiyo
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 594] [\x 594/]
NP 21: Pattasikkhàpadaü:
Dasàhaparamaü atirekapatto dhàretabbo. Taü atikkàmayato, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 600] [\x 600/]
NP 22: ænapa¤cabandhanasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu ånapa¤cabandhanena pattena a¤¤aü navaü pattaü cetàpeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
Tena bhikkhunà so patto bhikkhuparisàya nissajitabbo. Yo ca tassà bhikkhuparisàya pattapariyanto, so tassa bhikkhuno padàtabbo: ßAyaü te bhikkhu patto, yàva bhedanàya dhàretabboû ti. Ayaü tattha sàmãci.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 610] [\x 610/]
NP 23: Bhesajjasikkhàpadaü:
Yàni kho pana tàni gilànànaü bhikkhånaü pañisàyanãyàni bhesajjàni, seyyathãdaü: sappi, navanãtaü, telaü, madhu, phàõitaü; tàni pañiggahetvà sattàhaparamaü sannidhikàrakaü paribhu¤jitabbàni. Taü atikkàmayato, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 614] [\x 614/]
NP 24: Vassikasàñikasikkhàpadaü:
ßMàso seso gimhànanû-ti: bhikkhunà vassikasàñikacãvaraü pariyesitabbam. ßAddhamàso seso gimhànanû-ti: katvà nivàsetabbaü. ßOrena ce màso seso gimhànanû-ti: vassikasàñikacãvaraü pariyeseyya. ßOrenaddhamàso seso gimhànanû-ti: katvà nivàseyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 618] [\x 618/]
NP 25: Cãvara-acchindanasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu bhikkhussa sàmaü cãvaraü datvà kupito 16 anattamano acchindeyya và acchindàpeyya và, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 620] [\x 620/]
NP 26: Suttavi¤¤attisikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu sàmaü suttaü vi¤¤àpetvà tantavàyehi cãvaraü vàyàpeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 624] [\x 624/]
NP 27: Mahàpesakàrasikkhàpadaü:
Bhikkhuü paneva uddissa a¤¤àtako gahapati và gahapatànã và tantavàyehi cãvaraü vàyàpeyya. Tatra ce so bhikkhu pubbe appavàrito tantavàye upasaïkamitvà cãvare vikappaü àpajjeyya: ßIdaü kho àvuso cãvaraü maü uddissa viyyati àyata¤-ca karotha, vitthata¤-ca, appita¤-ca, suvãta¤-ca, suppavàyita¤-ca, suvilekhita¤-ca, suvitacchita¤-ca karotha; appeva nàma mayam-pi àyasmantànaü ki¤cimattaü anupadajjeyyàmàû-ti. Eva¤-ca so bhikkhu vatvà ki¤cimattaü anupadajjeyya antamaso piõóapàtamattam-pi, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 630] [\x 630/]
NP 28: Accekacãvarasikkhàpadaü:
Dasàhànàgataü kattikatemàsikapuõõamaü, bhikkhuno paneva accekacãvaraü uppajjeyya, accekaü ma¤¤amànena bhikkhunà pañiggahetabbaü. Pañiggahetvà yàva cãvarakàlasamayaü nikkhipitabbaü. Tato ce uttariü nikkhipeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 634] [\x 634/]
NP 29: Sàsaïkhasikkhàpadaü:
Upavassaü kho pana kattikapuõõamaü yàni kho pana tàni àra¤¤akàni senàsanàni sàsaïkasammatàni sappañibhayàni, tathà råpesu bhikkhu senàsanesu viharanto àkaïkhamàno tiõõaü cãvarànaü a¤¤ataraü cãvaraü antaraghare nikkhipeyya. Siyà ca tassa bhikkhuno kocid-eva paccayo tena cãvarena vippavàsàya, chàrattaparamaü tena bhikkhunà tena cãvarena vippavasitabbaü. Tato ce uttariü vippavaseyya, a¤¤atra bhikkhusammutiyà, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 638] [\x 638/]
NP 30: Pariõatasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu jànaü saïghikaü làbhaü pariõataü attano pariõàmeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
Pattavaggo tatiyo
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 640] [\x 640/]
Uddiññhà kho àyasmanto tiüsa nissaggiyà pàcittiyà dhammà.
Tatthàyasmante pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Dutiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Tatiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Parisuddhetthàyasmanto, tasmà tuõhã, evam-etaü dhàrayàmi.
Nissaggiyapàcittiyà niññhità
 
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End Notes
1 Editor’s note: It seems every tradition has its own way of introducing the recital of the Pàtimokkha. Here only two of the simpler ways are included. Either the âràdhanà & Okàsakammaü is recited; or the Pubbakiccaü (but not both).
2 The bracketed headings for the various sections are supplied from the ChS edition of the Bhikkhupàtimokkhapàëi.
3 BJT note: Suõàtu me bhante saïgho, ajja uposatho paõõaraso - PTS
4 The following 5 lines are not in BJT.
5 BJT note: This reading is not seen in some books.
6 The Pàràjika rules in BJT are listed simply as Pañhama-, Dutiya-, Tatiya-, & Catutthapàràjikaü; without further identification. Most of the other rules have mnenomic titles usually connected with the wording of the rule, or the occasion for it (but see the notes to the Pàñidesanãya & Sekhiya rules below). The titles in brackets in this section are taken from the ChS edition of the text.
7 Editor’s note: BJT, Bhikkhuhi here, elsewhere bhikkhåhi.
8 Editor’s note: BJT, Kaccãttha here, elsewhere kaccittha.
9 Editor’s note: BJT, Tuõhi here, elsewhere tuõhã.
10 Editor’s note: this is the end title in BJT, the heading simply reads Pañhamasaïghàdisesà, but all the rest of these training rules are given distinctive titles.
11 BJT note: Pañinissajjeyya - ChS.
12 BJT note: Uttari - ChS
13 BJT note: Cãvaracetàpanaü - Thai.
14 Editor’s note: BJT, patiggaõh- here, but pañigaõh- in NP5 above.
15 Editor’s note: BJT, Nissaggãyaü, printer’s error.
16 Editor’s note: BJT, Kåpito - printer’s error.

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Bhikkhupàtimokkhapàëi

1a: âràdhanà 1
(Spoken by the senior monk)
Pubbakaraõapubbakiccàni samàpetvà imissa nisinnassa bhikkhusaïghassa anumatiyà Pàtimokkhaü uddesituü ajjhesanaü karomi.
 
1b: Okàsakammaü
(Spoken by the recitor)
Okàsa me bhante thero dethu Vinayakathaü kathetuü.
 
2: Pubbakiccaü
(Spoken by the recitor)
Sammajjanã padãpo ca ~ udakaü àsanena ca
uposathassa etàni ~ pubbakaraõan-ti vuccati.
Chandapàrisuddhi-utukkhànaü bhikkhugaõanà ca ovàdo
uposathassa etàni pubbakiccan-ti vuccati.
Uposatho yàvatikà ca bhikkhå
kammapattà sabhàgàpattiyo
na vijjanti vajjanãyà ca puggalà
tasmiü na honti pattakallan-ti vuccati.
Pubbakaraõapubbakiccàni samàpetvà desitàppikassa samaggassa bhikkhusaïghassa anumatiyà pàtimokkhaü uddisitum-àràdhanaü karoma.
 
[BJT Vol 3, Page 250] [\x 250/]
(Nidànuddeso) 2
 
Suõàtu me bhante saïgha, yadi saïghassa3 pattakallaü, saïgho uposathaü kareyya pàtimokkhaü uddiseyya. Kiü saïghassa pubbakiccaü? Pàrisuddhiü àyasmanto àrocetha Pàtimokkhaü uddisissàmi. Taü sabbeva santà sàdhukaü suõoma manasikaroma.
Yassa siyà àpatti, so àvãkareyya. Asantiyà àpattiyà, tuõhã bhavitabbaü. Tuõhã bhàvena kho panàyasmante parisuddhà-ti vedissàmi. Yathà kho pana paccekapuññhassa veyyàkaraõaü hoti, evam-evaü evaråpàya parisàya yàvatatiyaü anusàvitaü hoti. Yo pana bhikkhu yàvatatiyaü anusàviyamàne saramàno santiü àpattiü nàvãkareyya, sampajànamusàvàdassa hoti. Sampajànamusàvàdo kho panàyasmanto antaràyiko dhammo vutto Bhagavatà. Tasmà saramànena bhikkhunà àpannena visuddhàpekkhena santã àpatti àvãkàtabbà. âvãkatà hissa phàsu hoti.
Nidànaü niññhitaü
 
(Pàràjikuddeso)
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 028] [\x 028/]
Tatrime cattàro pàràjikà dhammà uddesaü àgacchanti. 5
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 056] [\x 056/]
Pàr 1: (Methunadhammasikkhàpadaü 6):
Yo pana bhikkhu bhikkhånaü sikkhàsàjãvasamàpanno sikkhaü apaccakkhàya dubbalyaü anàvãkatvà methunaü dhammaü pañiseveyya, antamaso tiracchànagatàya pi - pàràjiko hoti, asaüvàso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 104] [\x 104/]
Pàr 2: (Adinnàdànasikkhàpadaü):
Yo pana bhikkhu gàmà và ara¤¤à và adinnaü theyyasankhàtaü àdiyeyya. Yathàråpe adinnàdàne ràjàno coraü gahetvà haneyyuü và bandheyyuü và pabbàjeyyuü và: ßCorosi, bàlosi, måëhosi, thenosã-ti!û. Tathàråpaü bhikkhu adinnaü àdiyamàno - ayam-pi pàràjiko hoti, asaüvàso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 160] [\x 160/]
Pàr 3: (Manussaviggahasikkhàpadaü):
Yo pana bhikkhu sa¤cicca manussaviggahaü jãvità voropeyya, satthahàrakaü vàssa pariyeseyya, maraõavaõõaü và saüvaõõeyya, maraõàya và samàdapeyya: ßAmbho purisa kiü tuyhiminà pàpakena dujjãvitena? Matante jãvità seyyo ti!û Iti cittamano cittasaïkappo anekapariyàyena maraõavaõõaü và saüvaõõeyya, maraõàya và samàdapeyya - ayam-pi pàràjiko hoti, asaüvàso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 200] [\x 200/]
Pàr 4: (Uttarimanussadhammasikkhàpadaü):
Yo pana bhikkhu anabhijànaü uttarimanussadhammaü attåpanàyikaü alam-ariya¤àõadassanaü samudàcareyya: ßIti jànàmi, iti passàmã-ti!û Tato aparena samayena samanuggàhiyamàno và asamanuggàhiyamàno và àpanno visuddhàpekkho evaü vadeyya: ßAjànam-evàhaü àvuso avacaü: jànàmi; apassaü: passàmi; tucchaü musà vilapin-tiû, a¤¤atra adhimànà - ayam-pi pàràjiko hoti, asaüvàso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 254] [\x 254/]
Uddiññhà kho àyasmanto cattàro pàràjikà dhammà. Yesaü bhikkhu a¤¤ataraü và a¤¤ataraü và àpajjitvà na labhati bhikkhåhi 7 saddhiü saüvàsaü. Yathà pure, tathà pacchà, pàràjiko hoti, asaüvàso.
Tatthàyasmante pucchàmi: kaccittha 8 parisuddhà?
Dutiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Tatiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Parisuddhetthàyasmanto, tasmà tuõhã, 9 evam-etaü dhàrayàmi.
Pàràjikaü niññhitaü
 
(Saïghàdisesuddeso)
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 256] [\x 256/]
Ime kho panàyasmanto terasa saïghàdisesà dhammà uddesaü àgacchanti.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 260] [\x 260/]
Sd 1: Sukkavisaññhisikkhàpadaü: 10
Sa¤cetanikà sukkavisaññhi, a¤¤atra supinantà, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 294] [\x 294/]
Sd 2: Kàyasaüsaggasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu otiõõo vipariõatena cittena màtugàmena saddhiü kàyasaüsaggaü samàpajjeyya, hatthagàhaü và veõigàhaü và a¤¤atarassa và a¤¤atarassa và aïgassa paràmasanaü, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 320] [\x 320/]
Sd 3: Duññhullavàcàsikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu otiõõo vipariõatena cittena màtugàmaü duññhullàhi vàcàhi obhàseyya. Yathà taü yuvà yuvatiü methunåpasaühitàhi, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 332] [\x 332/]
Sd 4: Antakàmapàricariyasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu otiõõo vipariõatena cittena màtugàmassa santike attakàmapàricariyàya vaõõaü bhàseyya: ßEtad-aggaü bhagini pàricariyànaü yà màdisaü sãlavantaü kalyàõadhammaü brahmacàriü etena dhammena paricareyyàû-ti, methunåpasaühitena, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 344] [\x 344/]
Sd 5: Sa¤carittasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu sa¤carittaü samàpajjeyya, itthiyà và purisamatiü, purisassa và itthimatiü, jàyattane và jàrattane và, antamaso taïkhaõikàya pi, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 382] [\x 382/]
Sd 6: Kuñikàrasikkhàpadaü:
Sa¤¤àcikàya pana bhikkhunà kuñiü kàrayamànena assàmikaü attuddesaü pamàõikà kàretabbà. Tatridaü pamàõaü: dãghaso dvàdasa vidatthiyo Sugatavidatthiyà tiriyaü sattantarà. Bhikkhå abhinetabbà vatthudesanàya, tehi bhikkhåhi vatthuü desetabbaü anàrambhaü saparikkamanaü. Sàrambhe ce bhikkhu vatthusmiü aparikkamane sa¤¤àcikàya kuñiü kàreyya, bhikkhå và anabhineyya vatthudesanàya, pamàõaü và atikkàmeyya, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 406] [\x 406/]
Sd 7: Vihàrakàrasikkhàpadaü:
Mahallakaü pana bhikkhunà vihàraü kàrayamànena sassàmikaü attuddesaü bhikkhå abhinetabbà vatthudesanàya. Tehi bhikkhåhi vatthuü desetabbaü anàrambhaü saparikkamanaü. Sàrambhe ce bhikkhu vatthusmiü aparikkamane mahallakaü vihàraü kàreyya, bhikkhå và anabhineyya vatthudesanàya, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 424] [\x 424/]
Sd 8: Pañhamaduññhadosasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu bhikkhuü duññho doso appatãto amålakena pàràjikena dhammena anuddhaüseyya: ßAppeva nàma naü imamhà brahmacariyà càveyyan-ti.û. Tato aparena samayena samanuggàhiyamàno và asamanuggàhiyamàno và, amålaka¤-ceva taü adhikaraõaü hoti, bhikkhu ca dosaü patiññhàti, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 436] [\x 436/]
Sd 9: Dutiyaduññhadosasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu bhikkhuü duññho doso appatãto a¤¤abhàgiyassa adhikaraõassa ki¤ci desaü lesamattaü upàdàya pàràjikena dhammena anuddhaüseyya: ßAppeva nàma naü imamhà brahmacariyà càveyyan-ti.û Tato aparena samayena samanuggàhiyamàno và asamanuggàhiyamàno và, a¤¤abhàgiya¤-ceva taü adhikaraõaü hoti, koci deso lesamatto upàdinno, bhikkhu ca dosaü patiññhàti, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 452] [\x 452/]
Sd 10: Pañhamasaïghabhedasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu samaggassa saïghassa bhedàya parakkameyya bhedanasaüvattanikaü và adhikaraõaü samàdàya paggayha tiññheyya. So bhikkhu bhikkhåhi evam-assa vacanãyo: ßMà àyasmà samaggassa saïghassa bhedàya parakkami bhedanasaüvattanikaü và adhikaraõaü samàdàya paggayha aññhàsi. Sametàyasmà saïghena, samaggo hi saïgho sammodamàno avivadamàno ekuddeso phàsu viharatãû-ti. Eva¤-ca so bhikkhu bhikkhåhi vuccamàno tatheva paggaõheyya, so bhikkhu bhikkhåhi yàvatatiyaü samanubhàsitabbo tassa pañinissaggàya. Yàvatatiya¤-ce samanubhàsiyamàno taü pañinissajeyya, 11 iccetaü kusalaü. No ce pañinissajeyya, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 456] [\x 456/]
Sd 11: Dutiyasaïghabhedasikkhàpadaü:
Tasseva kho pana bhikkhussa bhikkhå honti anuvattakà vaggavàdakà, eko và dve và tayo và, te evaü vadeyyuü: ßMà àyasmanto etaü bhikkhuü ki¤ci avacuttha, dhammavàdã ceso bhikkhu, vinayavàdã ceso bhikkhu, amhàka¤-ceso bhikkhu; chanda¤-ca, ruci¤-ca àdàya voharati, jànàti no bhàsati, amhàkam-petaü khamatãû-ti. Te bhikkhå bhikkhåhi evam-assu vacanãyà: ßMà àyasmanto evaü avacuttha. Na ceso bhikkhu dhammavàdã, na ceso bhikkhu vinayavàdã. Mà àyasmantànam-pi saïghabhedo ruccittha. Sametàyasmantànaü saïghena, samaggo hi saïgho sammodamàno avivadamàno ekuddeso phàsu viharatãû-ti. Eva¤-ca te bhikkhå bhikkhåhi vuccamànà tatheva paggaõheyyuü, te bhikkhå bhikkhåhi yàvatatiyaü samanubhàsitabbà tassa pañinissaggàya. Yàvatatiya¤-ce samanubhàsiyamànà taü pañinissajeyyuü, iccetaü kusalaü. No ce pañinissajeyyuü, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 462] [\x 462/]
Sd 12: Dubbacasikkhàpadaü:
Bhikkhu paneva dubbacajàtiko hoti. Uddesapariyàpannesu sikkhàpadesu bhikkhåhi sahadhammikaü vuccamàno attànaü avacanãyaü karoti: ßMà maü àyasmanto ki¤ci avacuttha, kalyàõaü và pàpakaü và. Aham-pàyasmante na ki¤ci vakkhàmi, kalyàõaü và pàpakaü và. Viramathàyasmanto mama vacanàyàû-ti. So bhikkhu bhikkhåhi evam-assa vacanãyo: ßMà àyasmà attànaü avacanãyaü akàsi. Vacanãyam-evàyasmà attànaü karotu. âyasmà pi bhikkhå vadetu sahadhammena, bhikkhå pi àyasmantaü vakkhanti sahadhammena. Evaü saüvaddhà hi tassa Bhagavato parisà, yadidaü a¤¤am-a¤¤avacanena a¤¤am-a¤¤avuññhàpanenàû-ti. Eva¤-ca so bhikkhu bhikkhåhi vuccamàno tatheva paggaõheyya, so bhikkhu bhikkhåhi yàvatatiyaü samanubhàsitabbo tassa pañinissaggàya. Yàvatatiya¤-ce samanubhàsiyamàno taü pañinissajeyya iccetaü kusalaü. No ce pañinissajeyya, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 476] [\x 476/]
Sd 13: Kuladåsakasikkhàpadaü:
Bhikkhu paneva a¤¤ataraü gàmaü và nigamaü và upanissàya viharati kuladåsako pàpasamàcàro. Tassa kho pàpakà samàcàrà dissanti ceva suyyanti ca. Kulàni ca tena duññhàni dissanti ceva suyyanti ca. So bhikkhu bhikkhåhi evam-assa vacanãyo: ßâyasmà kho kuladåsako pàpasamàcàro. âyasmato kho pàpakà samàcàrà dissanti ceva suyyanti ca. Kulàni càyasmatà duññhàni dissanti ceva suyyanti ca. Pakkamatàyasmà imamhà àvàsà. Alan-te idha vàsenàû-ti. Eva¤-ca so bhikkhu bhikkhåhi vuccamàno te bhikkhå evaü vadeyya: ßChandagàmino ca bhikkhå, dosagàmino ca bhikkhå, mohagàmino ca bhikkhå, bhayagàmino ca bhikkhå. Tàdisikàya àpattiyà ekaccaü pabbàjenti, ekaccaü na pabbàjentãû-ti. So bhikkhu bhikkhåhi evam-assa vacanãyo: ßMà àyasmà evaü avaca, na ca bhikkhå chandagàmino, na ca bhikkhå dosagàmino, na ca bhikkhå mohagàmino, na ca bhikkhå bhayagàmino. âyasmà kho kuladåsako pàpasamàcàro. âyasmato kho pàpakà samàcàrà dissanti ceva suyyanti ca. Kulàni càyasmatà duññhàni dissanti ceva suyyanti ca. Pakkamatàyasmà imamhà àvàsà. Alan-te idha vàsenàû-ti. Eva¤-ca so bhikkhu bhikkhåhi vuccamàno tatheva paggaõheyya, so bhikkhu bhikkhåhi yàvatatiyaü samanubhàsitabbo tassa pañinissaggàya. Yàvatatiya¤-ce samanubhàsiyamàno taü pañinissajeyya iccetaü kusalaü. No ce pañinissajeyya, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 482] [\x 482/]
Uddiññhà kho àyasmanto terasa saïghàdisesà dhammà, nava pañhamàpattikà cattàro yàvatatiyakà. Yesaü bhikkhu a¤¤ataraü và a¤¤ataraü và àpajjitvà, yàvatihaü jànaü pañicchàdeti, tàvatihaü tena bhikkhunà akàmà parivatthabbaü. Parivutthaparivàsena bhikkhunà uttarichàrattaü bhikkhumànattàya pañipajjitabbaü. Ciõõamànatto bhikkhu: yattha siyà vãsatigaõo bhikkhusaïgho, tattha so bhikkhu abbhetabbo. Ekena pi ce åno vãsatigaõo bhikkhusaïgho taü bhikkhuü abbheyya, so ca bhikkhu anabbhito, te ca bhikkhå gàrayhà. Ayaü tattha sàmãci.
Tatthàyasmante pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Dutiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Tatiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Parisuddhetthàyasmanto, tasmà tuõhã, evam-etaü dhàrayàmi.
Saïghàdiseso niññhito
 
(Aniyatuddeso)
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 484] [\x 484/]
Ime kho panàyasmanto dve aniyatà dhammà uddesaü àgacchanti.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 486] [\x 486/]
Aniy 1: Pañhama-aniyatasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu màtugàmena saddhiü eko ekàya raho pañicchanne àsane alaïkammaniye nisajjaü kappeyya. Tam-enaü saddheyyavacasà upàsikà disvà tiõõaü dhammànaü a¤¤atarena vadeyya: pàràjikena và saïghàdisesena và pàcittiyena và. Nisajjaü bhikkhu pañijànamàno tiõõaü dhammànaü a¤¤atarena kàretabbo: pàràjikena và saïghàdisesena và pàcittiyena và. Yena và sà saddheyyavacasà upàsikà vadeyya, tena so bhikkhu kàretabbo. Ayaü dhammo aniyato.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 492] [\x 492/]
Aniy 2: Dutiya-aniyatasikkhàpadaü:
Na heva kho pana pañicchannaü àsanaü hoti nàlaïkammaniyaü. Ala¤-ca kho hoti màtugàmaü duññhullàhi vàcàhi obhàsituü. Yo pana bhikkhu tathàråpe àsane màtugàmena saddhiü eko ekàya raho nisajjaü kappeyya. Tam-enaü saddheyyavacasà upàsikà disvà dvinnaü dhammànaü a¤¤atarena vadeyya saïghàdisesena và pàcittiyena và. Nisajjaü bhikkhu pañijànamàno dvinnaü dhammànaü a¤¤atarena kàretabbo saïghàdisesena và pàcittiyena và. Yena và sà saddheyyavacasà upàsikà vadeyya, tena so bhikkhu kàretabbo. Ayam-pi dhammo aniyato.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 496] [\x 496/]
Uddiññhà kho àyasmanto dve aniyatà dhammà.
Tatthàyasmante pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Dutiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Tatiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Parisuddhetthàyasmanto, tasmà tuõhã, evam-etaü dhàrayàmi.
Aniyato niññhito
 
(Nissaggiyapàcittiyà)
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 498] [\x 498/]
Ime kho panàyasmanto tiüsa nissaggiyà pàcittiyà dhammà uddesaü àgacchanti.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 500] [\x 500/]
NP 1: Pañhamakañhinasikkhàpadaü:
Niññhitacãvarasmiü bhikkhunà ubbhatasmiü kañhine, dasàhaparamaü atirekacãvaraü dhàretabbaü. Taü atikkàmayato, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 504] [\x 504/]
NP 2: Dutiyakañhinasikkhàpadaü:
Niññhitacãvarasmiü bhikkhunà ubbhatasmiü kañhine, ekarattam-pi ce bhikkhu ticãvarena vippavaseyya, a¤¤atra bhikkhusammutiyà, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 512] [\x 512/]
NP 3: Tatiyakañhinasikkhàpadaü:
Niññhitacãvarasmiü bhikkhunà ubbhatasmiü kañhine, bhikkhuno paneva akàlacãvaraü uppajjeyya. âkaïkhamànena bhikkhunà pañiggahetabbaü, pañiggahetvà khippam-eva kàretabbaü. No cassa pàripåri, màsaparamaü tena bhikkhunà taü cãvaraü nikkhipitabbaü ånassa pàripåriyà, satiyà paccàsàya. Tato ce uttariü nikkhipeyya, satiyà pi paccàsàya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 518] [\x 518/]
NP 4: Puràõacãvarasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu a¤¤àtikàya bhikkhuniyà puràõacãvaraü dhovàpeyya và rajàpeyya và àkoñàpeyya và, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 524] [\x 524/]
NP 5: Cãvarapañiggahaõasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu a¤¤àtikàya bhikkhuniyà hatthato cãvaraü pañiggaõheyya, a¤¤atra pàrivaññakà, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 530] [\x 530/]
NP 6: A¤¤àtakavi¤¤attisikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu a¤¤àtakaü gahapatiü và gahapatàniü và cãvaraü vi¤¤àpeyya, a¤¤atra samayà, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
Tatthàyaü samayo: acchinnacãvaro và hoti bhikkhu naññhacãvaro và - ayaü tattha samayo.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 534] [\x 534/]
NP 7: Tatuttarisikkhàpadaü:
Ta¤-ce a¤¤àtako gahapati và gahapatànã và bahåhi cãvarehi abhihaññhuü pavàreyya, santaruttaraparamaü tena bhikkhunà tato cãvaraü sàditabbaü. Tato ce uttariü 12 sàdiyeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 536] [\x 536/]
NP 8: Pañhama-upakkhañasikkhàpadaü:
Bhikkhuü paneva uddissa a¤¤àtakassa gahapatissa và gahapatàniyà và cãvaracetàpannaü 13 upakkhañaü hoti: ßIminà cãvaracetàpannena cãvaraü cetàpetvà itthannàmaü bhikkhuü cãvarena acchàdessàmãû-ti. Tatra ce so bhikkhu pubbe appavàrito upasaïkamitvà cãvare vikappaü àpajjeyya: ßSàdhu vata maü àyasmà iminà cãvaracetàpannena evaråpaü và evaråpaü và cãvaraü cetàpetvà acchàdehãû-ti. Kalyàõakamyataü upàdàya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 542] [\x 542/]
NP 9: Dutiya-upakkhañasikkhàpadaü:
Bhikkhuü paneva uddissa ubhinnaü a¤¤àtakànaü gahapatãnaü và gahapatànãnaü và paccekacãvaracetàpannà upakkhañà honti: ßImehi mayaü paccekacãvaracetàpannehi paccekacãvaràni cetàpetvà itthannàmaü bhikkhuü cãvarehi acchàdessàmàû-ti. Tatra ce so bhikkhu pubbe appavàrito upasaïkamitvà cãvare vikappaü àpajjeyya: ßSàdhu vata maü àyasmanto imehi paccekacãvaracetàpannehi evaråpaü và evaråpaü và cãvaraü cetàpetvà acchàdetha ubho va santà ekenàû-ti. Kalyàõakamyataü upàdàya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 548] [\x 548/]
NP 10: Ràjasikkhàpadaü:
Bhikkhuü paneva uddissa ràjà và ràjabhoggo và bràhmaõo và gahapatiko và dåtena cãvaracetàpannaü pahiõeyya: ßIminà cãvaracetàpanena cãvaraü cetàpetvà itthannàmaü bhikkhuü cãvarena acchàdehãû-ti. So ce dåto taü bhikkhuü upasaïkamitvà evaü vadeyya: ßIdaü kho bhante àyasmantaü uddissa cãvaracetàpannaü àbhataü, pañiggaõhàtu 14 àyasmà cãvaracetàpannanû-ti. Tena bhikkhunà so dåto evam-assa vacanãyo: ßNa kho mayaü àvuso cãvaracetàpannaü pañiggaõhàma cãvara¤-ca kho mayaü pañiggaõhàma kàlena kappiyanû-ti. So ce dåto taü bhikkhuü evaü vadeyya: ßAtthi panàyasmato koci veyyàvacakaroû ti. ßCãvaratthikena bhikkhave bhikkhunà veyyàvaccakaro niddisitabbo àràmiko và upàsako và: ßEso kho àvuso bhikkhånaü veyyàvaccakaroû ti. So ce dåto taü veyyàvaccakaraü sa¤¤àpetvà taü bhikkhuü upasaïkamitvà evaü vadeyya: ßYaü kho bhante àyasmà veyyàvaccakaraü niddisi, sa¤¤atto so mayà. Upasaïkamatu àyasmà kàlena, cãvarena taü acchàdessatãû-ti. Cãvaratthikena bhikkhave bhikkhunà veyyàvaccakaro upasaïkamitvà dvattikkhattuü codetabbo sàretabbo: ßAttho me àvuso cãvarenàû-ti. Dvattikkhattuü codayamàno sàrayamàno taü cãvaraü abhinipphàdeyya, iccetaü kusalaü. No ce abhinipphàdeyya, catukkhattuü pa¤cakkhattuü chakkhattuü paramaü tuõhãbhåtena uddissa ñhàtabbaü. Catukkhattuü pa¤cakkhattuü chakkhattuü paramaü tuõhãbhåto uddissa tiññhamàno taü cãvaraü abhinipphàdeyya, iccetaü kusalaü. Tato ce uttariü vàyamamàno taü cãvaraü abhinipphàdeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
No ce abhinipphàdeyya, yatassa cãvaracetàpannaü àbhataü tattha sàmaü và gantabbaü dåto và pàhetabbo: ßYaü kho tumhe àyasmanto bhikkhuü uddissa cãvaracetàpannaü pahiõittha, na taü tassa bhikkhuno ki¤ci atthaü anubhoti, yu¤jantàyasmanto sakaü, mà vo sakaü vinassàû-ti. Ayaü tattha sàmãci.
Cãvaravaggo pañhamo

 
[BJT Vol I, Page 554] [\x 554/]
NP 11: Kosiyasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu Kosiyamissakaü santhataü kàràpeyya, nissaggiyaü 15 pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 556] [\x 556/]
NP 12: Suddhakàëakasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu suddhakàëakànaü eëakalomànaü santhataü kàràpeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 560] [\x 560/]
NP 13: Dvebhàgasikkhàpadaü:
Navaü pana bhikkhunà santhataü kàrayamànena dve bhàgà suddhakàëakànaü eëakalomànaü àdàtabbà, tatiyaü odàtànaü catutthaü gocariyànaü. Anàdà ce bhikkhu dve bhàge suddhakàëakànaü eëakalomànaü tatiyaü odàtànaü catutthaü gocariyànaü navaü santhataü kàràpeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 564] [\x 564/]
NP 14: Chabbassisikkhàpadaü:
Navaü pana bhikkhunà santhataü kàràpetvà chabbassàni dhàretabbaü. Orena ce channaü vassànaü taü santhataü vissajjetvà và avissajjetvà và a¤¤aü navaü santhataü kàràpeyya, a¤¤atra bhikkhusammutiyà, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 570] [\x 570/]
NP 15: Nisãdanasanthatasikkhàpadaü:
Nisãdanasanthataü pana bhikkhunà kàrayamànena puràõasanthatassa sàmantà Sugatavidatthã àdàtabbà dubbaõõakaraõàya, ànàda ce bhikkhu puràõasanthatassa sàmantà Sugatavidatthiü navaü nisãdanasanthataü kàràpeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 572] [\x 572/]
NP 16: Eëakalomasikkhàpadaü:
Bhikkhuno paneva addhànamaggappañipannassa eëakalomàni uppajjeyyuü. âkaïkhamànena bhikkhunà pañiggahetabbàni. Pañiggahetvà tiyojanaparamaü sahatthà haritabbàni, asante hàrake. Tato ce uttariü hareyya asante pi hàrake, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 576] [\x 576/]
NP 17: Eëakalomadhovàpanasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu a¤¤àtikàya bhikkhuniyà eëakalomàni dhovàpeyya và rajàpeyya và vijañàpeyya và, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 580] [\x 580/]
NP 18: Råpiyasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu jàtaråparajataü uggaõheyya và uggaõhàpeyya và upanikkhittaü và sàdiyeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 584] [\x 584/]
NP 19: Råpiyasaüvohàrasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu nànappakàrakaü råpiyasaüvohàraü samàpajjeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 590] [\x 590/]
NP 20: Kayavikkayasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu nànappakàrakaü kayavikkayaü samàpajjeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
Kosiyavaggo dutiyo
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 594] [\x 594/]
NP 21: Pattasikkhàpadaü:
Dasàhaparamaü atirekapatto dhàretabbo. Taü atikkàmayato, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 600] [\x 600/]
NP 22: ænapa¤cabandhanasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu ånapa¤cabandhanena pattena a¤¤aü navaü pattaü cetàpeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
Tena bhikkhunà so patto bhikkhuparisàya nissajitabbo. Yo ca tassà bhikkhuparisàya pattapariyanto, so tassa bhikkhuno padàtabbo: ßAyaü te bhikkhu patto, yàva bhedanàya dhàretabboû ti. Ayaü tattha sàmãci.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 610] [\x 610/]
NP 23: Bhesajjasikkhàpadaü:
Yàni kho pana tàni gilànànaü bhikkhånaü pañisàyanãyàni bhesajjàni, seyyathãdaü: sappi, navanãtaü, telaü, madhu, phàõitaü; tàni pañiggahetvà sattàhaparamaü sannidhikàrakaü paribhu¤jitabbàni. Taü atikkàmayato, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 614] [\x 614/]
NP 24: Vassikasàñikasikkhàpadaü:
ßMàso seso gimhànanû-ti: bhikkhunà vassikasàñikacãvaraü pariyesitabbam. ßAddhamàso seso gimhànanû-ti: katvà nivàsetabbaü. ßOrena ce màso seso gimhànanû-ti: vassikasàñikacãvaraü pariyeseyya. ßOrenaddhamàso seso gimhànanû-ti: katvà nivàseyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 618] [\x 618/]
NP 25: Cãvara-acchindanasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu bhikkhussa sàmaü cãvaraü datvà kupito 16 anattamano acchindeyya và acchindàpeyya và, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 620] [\x 620/]
NP 26: Suttavi¤¤attisikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu sàmaü suttaü vi¤¤àpetvà tantavàyehi cãvaraü vàyàpeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 624] [\x 624/]
NP 27: Mahàpesakàrasikkhàpadaü:
Bhikkhuü paneva uddissa a¤¤àtako gahapati và gahapatànã và tantavàyehi cãvaraü vàyàpeyya. Tatra ce so bhikkhu pubbe appavàrito tantavàye upasaïkamitvà cãvare vikappaü àpajjeyya: ßIdaü kho àvuso cãvaraü maü uddissa viyyati àyata¤-ca karotha, vitthata¤-ca, appita¤-ca, suvãta¤-ca, suppavàyita¤-ca, suvilekhita¤-ca, suvitacchita¤-ca karotha; appeva nàma mayam-pi àyasmantànaü ki¤cimattaü anupadajjeyyàmàû-ti. Eva¤-ca so bhikkhu vatvà ki¤cimattaü anupadajjeyya antamaso piõóapàtamattam-pi, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 630] [\x 630/]
NP 28: Accekacãvarasikkhàpadaü:
Dasàhànàgataü kattikatemàsikapuõõamaü, bhikkhuno paneva accekacãvaraü uppajjeyya, accekaü ma¤¤amànena bhikkhunà pañiggahetabbaü. Pañiggahetvà yàva cãvarakàlasamayaü nikkhipitabbaü. Tato ce uttariü nikkhipeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 634] [\x 634/]
NP 29: Sàsaïkhasikkhàpadaü:
Upavassaü kho pana kattikapuõõamaü yàni kho pana tàni àra¤¤akàni senàsanàni sàsaïkasammatàni sappañibhayàni, tathà råpesu bhikkhu senàsanesu viharanto àkaïkhamàno tiõõaü cãvarànaü a¤¤ataraü cãvaraü antaraghare nikkhipeyya. Siyà ca tassa bhikkhuno kocid-eva paccayo tena cãvarena vippavàsàya, chàrattaparamaü tena bhikkhunà tena cãvarena vippavasitabbaü. Tato ce uttariü vippavaseyya, a¤¤atra bhikkhusammutiyà, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 638] [\x 638/]
NP 30: Pariõatasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu jànaü saïghikaü làbhaü pariõataü attano pariõàmeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
Pattavaggo tatiyo
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 640] [\x 640/]
Uddiññhà kho àyasmanto tiüsa nissaggiyà pàcittiyà dhammà.
Tatthàyasmante pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Dutiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Tatiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Parisuddhetthàyasmanto, tasmà tuõhã, evam-etaü dhàrayàmi.
Nissaggiyapàcittiyà niññhità

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End Notes
1 Editor’s note: It seems every tradition has its own way of introducing the recital of the Pàtimokkha. Here only two of the simpler ways are included. Either the âràdhanà & Okàsakammaü is recited; or the Pubbakiccaü (but not both).
2 The bracketed headings for the various sections are supplied from the ChS edition of the Bhikkhupàtimokkhapàëi.
3 BJT note: Suõàtu me bhante saïgho, ajja uposatho paõõaraso - PTS
4 The following 5 lines are not in BJT.
5 BJT note: This reading is not seen in some books.
6 The Pàràjika rules in BJT are listed simply as Pañhama-, Dutiya-, Tatiya-, & Catutthapàràjikaü; without further identification. Most of the other rules have mnenomic titles usually connected with the wording of the rule, or the occasion for it (but see the notes to the Pàñidesanãya & Sekhiya rules below). The titles in brackets in this section are taken from the ChS edition of the text.
7 Editor’s note: BJT, Bhikkhuhi here, elsewhere bhikkhåhi.
8 Editor’s note: BJT, Kaccãttha here, elsewhere kaccittha.
9 Editor’s note: BJT, Tuõhi here, elsewhere tuõhã.
10 Editor’s note: this is the end title in BJT, the heading simply reads Pañhamasaïghàdisesà, but all the rest of these training rules are given distinctive titles.
11 BJT note: Pañinissajjeyya - ChS.
12 BJT note: Uttari - ChS
13 BJT note: Cãvaracetàpanaü - Thai.
14 Editor’s note: BJT, patiggaõh- here, but pañigaõh- in NP5 above.
15 Editor’s note: BJT, Nissaggãyaü, printer’s error.
16 Editor’s note: BJT, Kåpito - printer’s error.
   
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 Bhikkhupàtimokkhapàëi

1a: âràdhanà 1
(Spoken by the senior monk)
Pubbakaraõapubbakiccàni samàpetvà imissa nisinnassa bhikkhusaïghassa anumatiyà Pàtimokkhaü uddesituü ajjhesanaü karomi.
 
1b: Okàsakammaü
(Spoken by the recitor)
Okàsa me bhante thero dethu Vinayakathaü kathetuü.
 
2: Pubbakiccaü
(Spoken by the recitor)
Sammajjanã padãpo ca ~ udakaü àsanena ca
uposathassa etàni ~ pubbakaraõan-ti vuccati.
Chandapàrisuddhi-utukkhànaü bhikkhugaõanà ca ovàdo
uposathassa etàni pubbakiccan-ti vuccati.
Uposatho yàvatikà ca bhikkhå
kammapattà sabhàgàpattiyo
na vijjanti vajjanãyà ca puggalà
tasmiü na honti pattakallan-ti vuccati.
Pubbakaraõapubbakiccàni samàpetvà desitàppikassa samaggassa bhikkhusaïghassa anumatiyà pàtimokkhaü uddisitum-àràdhanaü karoma.
 
[BJT Vol 3, Page 250] [\x 250/]
(Nidànuddeso) 2
 
Suõàtu me bhante saïgha, yadi saïghassa3 pattakallaü, saïgho uposathaü kareyya pàtimokkhaü uddiseyya. Kiü saïghassa pubbakiccaü? Pàrisuddhiü àyasmanto àrocetha Pàtimokkhaü uddisissàmi. Taü sabbeva santà sàdhukaü suõoma manasikaroma.
Yassa siyà àpatti, so àvãkareyya. Asantiyà àpattiyà, tuõhã bhavitabbaü. Tuõhã bhàvena kho panàyasmante parisuddhà-ti vedissàmi. Yathà kho pana paccekapuññhassa veyyàkaraõaü hoti, evam-evaü evaråpàya parisàya yàvatatiyaü anusàvitaü hoti. Yo pana bhikkhu yàvatatiyaü anusàviyamàne saramàno santiü àpattiü nàvãkareyya, sampajànamusàvàdassa hoti. Sampajànamusàvàdo kho panàyasmanto antaràyiko dhammo vutto Bhagavatà. Tasmà saramànena bhikkhunà àpannena visuddhàpekkhena santã àpatti àvãkàtabbà. âvãkatà hissa phàsu hoti.
Nidànaü niññhitaü
 
(Pàràjikuddeso)
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 028] [\x 028/]
Tatrime cattàro pàràjikà dhammà uddesaü àgacchanti. 5
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 056] [\x 056/]
Pàr 1: (Methunadhammasikkhàpadaü 6):
Yo pana bhikkhu bhikkhånaü sikkhàsàjãvasamàpanno sikkhaü apaccakkhàya dubbalyaü anàvãkatvà methunaü dhammaü pañiseveyya, antamaso tiracchànagatàya pi - pàràjiko hoti, asaüvàso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 104] [\x 104/]
Pàr 2: (Adinnàdànasikkhàpadaü):
Yo pana bhikkhu gàmà và ara¤¤à và adinnaü theyyasankhàtaü àdiyeyya. Yathàråpe adinnàdàne ràjàno coraü gahetvà haneyyuü và bandheyyuü và pabbàjeyyuü và: ßCorosi, bàlosi, måëhosi, thenosã-ti!û. Tathàråpaü bhikkhu adinnaü àdiyamàno - ayam-pi pàràjiko hoti, asaüvàso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 160] [\x 160/]
Pàr 3: (Manussaviggahasikkhàpadaü):
Yo pana bhikkhu sa¤cicca manussaviggahaü jãvità voropeyya, satthahàrakaü vàssa pariyeseyya, maraõavaõõaü và saüvaõõeyya, maraõàya và samàdapeyya: ßAmbho purisa kiü tuyhiminà pàpakena dujjãvitena? Matante jãvità seyyo ti!û Iti cittamano cittasaïkappo anekapariyàyena maraõavaõõaü và saüvaõõeyya, maraõàya và samàdapeyya - ayam-pi pàràjiko hoti, asaüvàso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 200] [\x 200/]
Pàr 4: (Uttarimanussadhammasikkhàpadaü):
Yo pana bhikkhu anabhijànaü uttarimanussadhammaü attåpanàyikaü alam-ariya¤àõadassanaü samudàcareyya: ßIti jànàmi, iti passàmã-ti!û Tato aparena samayena samanuggàhiyamàno và asamanuggàhiyamàno và àpanno visuddhàpekkho evaü vadeyya: ßAjànam-evàhaü àvuso avacaü: jànàmi; apassaü: passàmi; tucchaü musà vilapin-tiû, a¤¤atra adhimànà - ayam-pi pàràjiko hoti, asaüvàso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 254] [\x 254/]
Uddiññhà kho àyasmanto cattàro pàràjikà dhammà. Yesaü bhikkhu a¤¤ataraü và a¤¤ataraü và àpajjitvà na labhati bhikkhåhi 7 saddhiü saüvàsaü. Yathà pure, tathà pacchà, pàràjiko hoti, asaüvàso.
Tatthàyasmante pucchàmi: kaccittha 8 parisuddhà?
Dutiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Tatiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Parisuddhetthàyasmanto, tasmà tuõhã, 9 evam-etaü dhàrayàmi.
Pàràjikaü niññhitaü
 
(Saïghàdisesuddeso)
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 256] [\x 256/]
Ime kho panàyasmanto terasa saïghàdisesà dhammà uddesaü àgacchanti.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 260] [\x 260/]
Sd 1: Sukkavisaññhisikkhàpadaü: 10
Sa¤cetanikà sukkavisaññhi, a¤¤atra supinantà, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 294] [\x 294/]
Sd 2: Kàyasaüsaggasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu otiõõo vipariõatena cittena màtugàmena saddhiü kàyasaüsaggaü samàpajjeyya, hatthagàhaü và veõigàhaü và a¤¤atarassa và a¤¤atarassa và aïgassa paràmasanaü, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 320] [\x 320/]
Sd 3: Duññhullavàcàsikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu otiõõo vipariõatena cittena màtugàmaü duññhullàhi vàcàhi obhàseyya. Yathà taü yuvà yuvatiü methunåpasaühitàhi, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 332] [\x 332/]
Sd 4: Antakàmapàricariyasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu otiõõo vipariõatena cittena màtugàmassa santike attakàmapàricariyàya vaõõaü bhàseyya: ßEtad-aggaü bhagini pàricariyànaü yà màdisaü sãlavantaü kalyàõadhammaü brahmacàriü etena dhammena paricareyyàû-ti, methunåpasaühitena, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 344] [\x 344/]
Sd 5: Sa¤carittasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu sa¤carittaü samàpajjeyya, itthiyà và purisamatiü, purisassa và itthimatiü, jàyattane và jàrattane và, antamaso taïkhaõikàya pi, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 382] [\x 382/]
Sd 6: Kuñikàrasikkhàpadaü:
Sa¤¤àcikàya pana bhikkhunà kuñiü kàrayamànena assàmikaü attuddesaü pamàõikà kàretabbà. Tatridaü pamàõaü: dãghaso dvàdasa vidatthiyo Sugatavidatthiyà tiriyaü sattantarà. Bhikkhå abhinetabbà vatthudesanàya, tehi bhikkhåhi vatthuü desetabbaü anàrambhaü saparikkamanaü. Sàrambhe ce bhikkhu vatthusmiü aparikkamane sa¤¤àcikàya kuñiü kàreyya, bhikkhå và anabhineyya vatthudesanàya, pamàõaü và atikkàmeyya, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 406] [\x 406/]
Sd 7: Vihàrakàrasikkhàpadaü:
Mahallakaü pana bhikkhunà vihàraü kàrayamànena sassàmikaü attuddesaü bhikkhå abhinetabbà vatthudesanàya. Tehi bhikkhåhi vatthuü desetabbaü anàrambhaü saparikkamanaü. Sàrambhe ce bhikkhu vatthusmiü aparikkamane mahallakaü vihàraü kàreyya, bhikkhå và anabhineyya vatthudesanàya, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 424] [\x 424/]
Sd 8: Pañhamaduññhadosasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu bhikkhuü duññho doso appatãto amålakena pàràjikena dhammena anuddhaüseyya: ßAppeva nàma naü imamhà brahmacariyà càveyyan-ti.û. Tato aparena samayena samanuggàhiyamàno và asamanuggàhiyamàno và, amålaka¤-ceva taü adhikaraõaü hoti, bhikkhu ca dosaü patiññhàti, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 436] [\x 436/]
Sd 9: Dutiyaduññhadosasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu bhikkhuü duññho doso appatãto a¤¤abhàgiyassa adhikaraõassa ki¤ci desaü lesamattaü upàdàya pàràjikena dhammena anuddhaüseyya: ßAppeva nàma naü imamhà brahmacariyà càveyyan-ti.û Tato aparena samayena samanuggàhiyamàno và asamanuggàhiyamàno và, a¤¤abhàgiya¤-ceva taü adhikaraõaü hoti, koci deso lesamatto upàdinno, bhikkhu ca dosaü patiññhàti, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 452] [\x 452/]
Sd 10: Pañhamasaïghabhedasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu samaggassa saïghassa bhedàya parakkameyya bhedanasaüvattanikaü và adhikaraõaü samàdàya paggayha tiññheyya. So bhikkhu bhikkhåhi evam-assa vacanãyo: ßMà àyasmà samaggassa saïghassa bhedàya parakkami bhedanasaüvattanikaü và adhikaraõaü samàdàya paggayha aññhàsi. Sametàyasmà saïghena, samaggo hi saïgho sammodamàno avivadamàno ekuddeso phàsu viharatãû-ti. Eva¤-ca so bhikkhu bhikkhåhi vuccamàno tatheva paggaõheyya, so bhikkhu bhikkhåhi yàvatatiyaü samanubhàsitabbo tassa pañinissaggàya. Yàvatatiya¤-ce samanubhàsiyamàno taü pañinissajeyya, 11 iccetaü kusalaü. No ce pañinissajeyya, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 456] [\x 456/]
Sd 11: Dutiyasaïghabhedasikkhàpadaü:
Tasseva kho pana bhikkhussa bhikkhå honti anuvattakà vaggavàdakà, eko và dve và tayo và, te evaü vadeyyuü: ßMà àyasmanto etaü bhikkhuü ki¤ci avacuttha, dhammavàdã ceso bhikkhu, vinayavàdã ceso bhikkhu, amhàka¤-ceso bhikkhu; chanda¤-ca, ruci¤-ca àdàya voharati, jànàti no bhàsati, amhàkam-petaü khamatãû-ti. Te bhikkhå bhikkhåhi evam-assu vacanãyà: ßMà àyasmanto evaü avacuttha. Na ceso bhikkhu dhammavàdã, na ceso bhikkhu vinayavàdã. Mà àyasmantànam-pi saïghabhedo ruccittha. Sametàyasmantànaü saïghena, samaggo hi saïgho sammodamàno avivadamàno ekuddeso phàsu viharatãû-ti. Eva¤-ca te bhikkhå bhikkhåhi vuccamànà tatheva paggaõheyyuü, te bhikkhå bhikkhåhi yàvatatiyaü samanubhàsitabbà tassa pañinissaggàya. Yàvatatiya¤-ce samanubhàsiyamànà taü pañinissajeyyuü, iccetaü kusalaü. No ce pañinissajeyyuü, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 462] [\x 462/]
Sd 12: Dubbacasikkhàpadaü:
Bhikkhu paneva dubbacajàtiko hoti. Uddesapariyàpannesu sikkhàpadesu bhikkhåhi sahadhammikaü vuccamàno attànaü avacanãyaü karoti: ßMà maü àyasmanto ki¤ci avacuttha, kalyàõaü và pàpakaü và. Aham-pàyasmante na ki¤ci vakkhàmi, kalyàõaü và pàpakaü và. Viramathàyasmanto mama vacanàyàû-ti. So bhikkhu bhikkhåhi evam-assa vacanãyo: ßMà àyasmà attànaü avacanãyaü akàsi. Vacanãyam-evàyasmà attànaü karotu. âyasmà pi bhikkhå vadetu sahadhammena, bhikkhå pi àyasmantaü vakkhanti sahadhammena. Evaü saüvaddhà hi tassa Bhagavato parisà, yadidaü a¤¤am-a¤¤avacanena a¤¤am-a¤¤avuññhàpanenàû-ti. Eva¤-ca so bhikkhu bhikkhåhi vuccamàno tatheva paggaõheyya, so bhikkhu bhikkhåhi yàvatatiyaü samanubhàsitabbo tassa pañinissaggàya. Yàvatatiya¤-ce samanubhàsiyamàno taü pañinissajeyya iccetaü kusalaü. No ce pañinissajeyya, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 476] [\x 476/]
Sd 13: Kuladåsakasikkhàpadaü:
Bhikkhu paneva a¤¤ataraü gàmaü và nigamaü và upanissàya viharati kuladåsako pàpasamàcàro. Tassa kho pàpakà samàcàrà dissanti ceva suyyanti ca. Kulàni ca tena duññhàni dissanti ceva suyyanti ca. So bhikkhu bhikkhåhi evam-assa vacanãyo: ßâyasmà kho kuladåsako pàpasamàcàro. âyasmato kho pàpakà samàcàrà dissanti ceva suyyanti ca. Kulàni càyasmatà duññhàni dissanti ceva suyyanti ca. Pakkamatàyasmà imamhà àvàsà. Alan-te idha vàsenàû-ti. Eva¤-ca so bhikkhu bhikkhåhi vuccamàno te bhikkhå evaü vadeyya: ßChandagàmino ca bhikkhå, dosagàmino ca bhikkhå, mohagàmino ca bhikkhå, bhayagàmino ca bhikkhå. Tàdisikàya àpattiyà ekaccaü pabbàjenti, ekaccaü na pabbàjentãû-ti. So bhikkhu bhikkhåhi evam-assa vacanãyo: ßMà àyasmà evaü avaca, na ca bhikkhå chandagàmino, na ca bhikkhå dosagàmino, na ca bhikkhå mohagàmino, na ca bhikkhå bhayagàmino. âyasmà kho kuladåsako pàpasamàcàro. âyasmato kho pàpakà samàcàrà dissanti ceva suyyanti ca. Kulàni càyasmatà duññhàni dissanti ceva suyyanti ca. Pakkamatàyasmà imamhà àvàsà. Alan-te idha vàsenàû-ti. Eva¤-ca so bhikkhu bhikkhåhi vuccamàno tatheva paggaõheyya, so bhikkhu bhikkhåhi yàvatatiyaü samanubhàsitabbo tassa pañinissaggàya. Yàvatatiya¤-ce samanubhàsiyamàno taü pañinissajeyya iccetaü kusalaü. No ce pañinissajeyya, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 482] [\x 482/]
Uddiññhà kho àyasmanto terasa saïghàdisesà dhammà, nava pañhamàpattikà cattàro yàvatatiyakà. Yesaü bhikkhu a¤¤ataraü và a¤¤ataraü và àpajjitvà, yàvatihaü jànaü pañicchàdeti, tàvatihaü tena bhikkhunà akàmà parivatthabbaü. Parivutthaparivàsena bhikkhunà uttarichàrattaü bhikkhumànattàya pañipajjitabbaü. Ciõõamànatto bhikkhu: yattha siyà vãsatigaõo bhikkhusaïgho, tattha so bhikkhu abbhetabbo. Ekena pi ce åno vãsatigaõo bhikkhusaïgho taü bhikkhuü abbheyya, so ca bhikkhu anabbhito, te ca bhikkhå gàrayhà. Ayaü tattha sàmãci.
Tatthàyasmante pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Dutiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Tatiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Parisuddhetthàyasmanto, tasmà tuõhã, evam-etaü dhàrayàmi.
Saïghàdiseso niññhito
 
(Aniyatuddeso)
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 484] [\x 484/]
Ime kho panàyasmanto dve aniyatà dhammà uddesaü àgacchanti.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 486] [\x 486/]
Aniy 1: Pañhama-aniyatasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu màtugàmena saddhiü eko ekàya raho pañicchanne àsane alaïkammaniye nisajjaü kappeyya. Tam-enaü saddheyyavacasà upàsikà disvà tiõõaü dhammànaü a¤¤atarena vadeyya: pàràjikena và saïghàdisesena và pàcittiyena và. Nisajjaü bhikkhu pañijànamàno tiõõaü dhammànaü a¤¤atarena kàretabbo: pàràjikena và saïghàdisesena và pàcittiyena và. Yena và sà saddheyyavacasà upàsikà vadeyya, tena so bhikkhu kàretabbo. Ayaü dhammo aniyato.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 492] [\x 492/]
Aniy 2: Dutiya-aniyatasikkhàpadaü:
Na heva kho pana pañicchannaü àsanaü hoti nàlaïkammaniyaü. Ala¤-ca kho hoti màtugàmaü duññhullàhi vàcàhi obhàsituü. Yo pana bhikkhu tathàråpe àsane màtugàmena saddhiü eko ekàya raho nisajjaü kappeyya. Tam-enaü saddheyyavacasà upàsikà disvà dvinnaü dhammànaü a¤¤atarena vadeyya saïghàdisesena và pàcittiyena và. Nisajjaü bhikkhu pañijànamàno dvinnaü dhammànaü a¤¤atarena kàretabbo saïghàdisesena và pàcittiyena và. Yena và sà saddheyyavacasà upàsikà vadeyya, tena so bhikkhu kàretabbo. Ayam-pi dhammo aniyato.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 496] [\x 496/]
Uddiññhà kho àyasmanto dve aniyatà dhammà.
Tatthàyasmante pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Dutiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Tatiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Parisuddhetthàyasmanto, tasmà tuõhã, evam-etaü dhàrayàmi.
Aniyato niññhito
 
(Nissaggiyapàcittiyà)
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 498] [\x 498/]
Ime kho panàyasmanto tiüsa nissaggiyà pàcittiyà dhammà uddesaü àgacchanti.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 500] [\x 500/]
NP 1: Pañhamakañhinasikkhàpadaü:
Niññhitacãvarasmiü bhikkhunà ubbhatasmiü kañhine, dasàhaparamaü atirekacãvaraü dhàretabbaü. Taü atikkàmayato, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 504] [\x 504/]
NP 2: Dutiyakañhinasikkhàpadaü:
Niññhitacãvarasmiü bhikkhunà ubbhatasmiü kañhine, ekarattam-pi ce bhikkhu ticãvarena vippavaseyya, a¤¤atra bhikkhusammutiyà, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 512] [\x 512/]
NP 3: Tatiyakañhinasikkhàpadaü:
Niññhitacãvarasmiü bhikkhunà ubbhatasmiü kañhine, bhikkhuno paneva akàlacãvaraü uppajjeyya. âkaïkhamànena bhikkhunà pañiggahetabbaü, pañiggahetvà khippam-eva kàretabbaü. No cassa pàripåri, màsaparamaü tena bhikkhunà taü cãvaraü nikkhipitabbaü ånassa pàripåriyà, satiyà paccàsàya. Tato ce uttariü nikkhipeyya, satiyà pi paccàsàya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 518] [\x 518/]
NP 4: Puràõacãvarasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu a¤¤àtikàya bhikkhuniyà puràõacãvaraü dhovàpeyya và rajàpeyya và àkoñàpeyya và, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 524] [\x 524/]
NP 5: Cãvarapañiggahaõasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu a¤¤àtikàya bhikkhuniyà hatthato cãvaraü pañiggaõheyya, a¤¤atra pàrivaññakà, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 530] [\x 530/]
NP 6: A¤¤àtakavi¤¤attisikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu a¤¤àtakaü gahapatiü và gahapatàniü và cãvaraü vi¤¤àpeyya, a¤¤atra samayà, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
Tatthàyaü samayo: acchinnacãvaro và hoti bhikkhu naññhacãvaro và - ayaü tattha samayo.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 534] [\x 534/]
NP 7: Tatuttarisikkhàpadaü:
Ta¤-ce a¤¤àtako gahapati và gahapatànã và bahåhi cãvarehi abhihaññhuü pavàreyya, santaruttaraparamaü tena bhikkhunà tato cãvaraü sàditabbaü. Tato ce uttariü 12 sàdiyeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 536] [\x 536/]
NP 8: Pañhama-upakkhañasikkhàpadaü:
Bhikkhuü paneva uddissa a¤¤àtakassa gahapatissa và gahapatàniyà và cãvaracetàpannaü 13 upakkhañaü hoti: ßIminà cãvaracetàpannena cãvaraü cetàpetvà itthannàmaü bhikkhuü cãvarena acchàdessàmãû-ti. Tatra ce so bhikkhu pubbe appavàrito upasaïkamitvà cãvare vikappaü àpajjeyya: ßSàdhu vata maü àyasmà iminà cãvaracetàpannena evaråpaü và evaråpaü và cãvaraü cetàpetvà acchàdehãû-ti. Kalyàõakamyataü upàdàya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 542] [\x 542/]
NP 9: Dutiya-upakkhañasikkhàpadaü:
Bhikkhuü paneva uddissa ubhinnaü a¤¤àtakànaü gahapatãnaü và gahapatànãnaü và paccekacãvaracetàpannà upakkhañà honti: ßImehi mayaü paccekacãvaracetàpannehi paccekacãvaràni cetàpetvà itthannàmaü bhikkhuü cãvarehi acchàdessàmàû-ti. Tatra ce so bhikkhu pubbe appavàrito upasaïkamitvà cãvare vikappaü àpajjeyya: ßSàdhu vata maü àyasmanto imehi paccekacãvaracetàpannehi evaråpaü và evaråpaü và cãvaraü cetàpetvà acchàdetha ubho va santà ekenàû-ti. Kalyàõakamyataü upàdàya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 548] [\x 548/]
NP 10: Ràjasikkhàpadaü:
Bhikkhuü paneva uddissa ràjà và ràjabhoggo và bràhmaõo và gahapatiko và dåtena cãvaracetàpannaü pahiõeyya: ßIminà cãvaracetàpanena cãvaraü cetàpetvà itthannàmaü bhikkhuü cãvarena acchàdehãû-ti. So ce dåto taü bhikkhuü upasaïkamitvà evaü vadeyya: ßIdaü kho bhante àyasmantaü uddissa cãvaracetàpannaü àbhataü, pañiggaõhàtu 14 àyasmà cãvaracetàpannanû-ti. Tena bhikkhunà so dåto evam-assa vacanãyo: ßNa kho mayaü àvuso cãvaracetàpannaü pañiggaõhàma cãvara¤-ca kho mayaü pañiggaõhàma kàlena kappiyanû-ti. So ce dåto taü bhikkhuü evaü vadeyya: ßAtthi panàyasmato koci veyyàvacakaroû ti. ßCãvaratthikena bhikkhave bhikkhunà veyyàvaccakaro niddisitabbo àràmiko và upàsako và: ßEso kho àvuso bhikkhånaü veyyàvaccakaroû ti. So ce dåto taü veyyàvaccakaraü sa¤¤àpetvà taü bhikkhuü upasaïkamitvà evaü vadeyya: ßYaü kho bhante àyasmà veyyàvaccakaraü niddisi, sa¤¤atto so mayà. Upasaïkamatu àyasmà kàlena, cãvarena taü acchàdessatãû-ti. Cãvaratthikena bhikkhave bhikkhunà veyyàvaccakaro upasaïkamitvà dvattikkhattuü codetabbo sàretabbo: ßAttho me àvuso cãvarenàû-ti. Dvattikkhattuü codayamàno sàrayamàno taü cãvaraü abhinipphàdeyya, iccetaü kusalaü. No ce abhinipphàdeyya, catukkhattuü pa¤cakkhattuü chakkhattuü paramaü tuõhãbhåtena uddissa ñhàtabbaü. Catukkhattuü pa¤cakkhattuü chakkhattuü paramaü tuõhãbhåto uddissa tiññhamàno taü cãvaraü abhinipphàdeyya, iccetaü kusalaü. Tato ce uttariü vàyamamàno taü cãvaraü abhinipphàdeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
No ce abhinipphàdeyya, yatassa cãvaracetàpannaü àbhataü tattha sàmaü và gantabbaü dåto và pàhetabbo: ßYaü kho tumhe àyasmanto bhikkhuü uddissa cãvaracetàpannaü pahiõittha, na taü tassa bhikkhuno ki¤ci atthaü anubhoti, yu¤jantàyasmanto sakaü, mà vo sakaü vinassàû-ti. Ayaü tattha sàmãci.
Cãvaravaggo pañhamo

 
[BJT Vol I, Page 554] [\x 554/]
NP 11: Kosiyasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu Kosiyamissakaü santhataü kàràpeyya, nissaggiyaü 15 pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 556] [\x 556/]
NP 12: Suddhakàëakasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu suddhakàëakànaü eëakalomànaü santhataü kàràpeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 560] [\x 560/]
NP 13: Dvebhàgasikkhàpadaü:
Navaü pana bhikkhunà santhataü kàrayamànena dve bhàgà suddhakàëakànaü eëakalomànaü àdàtabbà, tatiyaü odàtànaü catutthaü gocariyànaü. Anàdà ce bhikkhu dve bhàge suddhakàëakànaü eëakalomànaü tatiyaü odàtànaü catutthaü gocariyànaü navaü santhataü kàràpeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 564] [\x 564/]
NP 14: Chabbassisikkhàpadaü:
Navaü pana bhikkhunà santhataü kàràpetvà chabbassàni dhàretabbaü. Orena ce channaü vassànaü taü santhataü vissajjetvà và avissajjetvà và a¤¤aü navaü santhataü kàràpeyya, a¤¤atra bhikkhusammutiyà, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 570] [\x 570/]
NP 15: Nisãdanasanthatasikkhàpadaü:
Nisãdanasanthataü pana bhikkhunà kàrayamànena puràõasanthatassa sàmantà Sugatavidatthã àdàtabbà dubbaõõakaraõàya, ànàda ce bhikkhu puràõasanthatassa sàmantà Sugatavidatthiü navaü nisãdanasanthataü kàràpeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 572] [\x 572/]
NP 16: Eëakalomasikkhàpadaü:
Bhikkhuno paneva addhànamaggappañipannassa eëakalomàni uppajjeyyuü. âkaïkhamànena bhikkhunà pañiggahetabbàni. Pañiggahetvà tiyojanaparamaü sahatthà haritabbàni, asante hàrake. Tato ce uttariü hareyya asante pi hàrake, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 576] [\x 576/]
NP 17: Eëakalomadhovàpanasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu a¤¤àtikàya bhikkhuniyà eëakalomàni dhovàpeyya và rajàpeyya và vijañàpeyya và, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 580] [\x 580/]
NP 18: Råpiyasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu jàtaråparajataü uggaõheyya và uggaõhàpeyya và upanikkhittaü và sàdiyeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 584] [\x 584/]
NP 19: Råpiyasaüvohàrasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu nànappakàrakaü råpiyasaüvohàraü samàpajjeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 590] [\x 590/]
NP 20: Kayavikkayasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu nànappakàrakaü kayavikkayaü samàpajjeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
Kosiyavaggo dutiyo
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 594] [\x 594/]
NP 21: Pattasikkhàpadaü:
Dasàhaparamaü atirekapatto dhàretabbo. Taü atikkàmayato, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 600] [\x 600/]
NP 22: ænapa¤cabandhanasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu ånapa¤cabandhanena pattena a¤¤aü navaü pattaü cetàpeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
Tena bhikkhunà so patto bhikkhuparisàya nissajitabbo. Yo ca tassà bhikkhuparisàya pattapariyanto, so tassa bhikkhuno padàtabbo: ßAyaü te bhikkhu patto, yàva bhedanàya dhàretabboû ti. Ayaü tattha sàmãci.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 610] [\x 610/]
NP 23: Bhesajjasikkhàpadaü:
Yàni kho pana tàni gilànànaü bhikkhånaü pañisàyanãyàni bhesajjàni, seyyathãdaü: sappi, navanãtaü, telaü, madhu, phàõitaü; tàni pañiggahetvà sattàhaparamaü sannidhikàrakaü paribhu¤jitabbàni. Taü atikkàmayato, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 614] [\x 614/]
NP 24: Vassikasàñikasikkhàpadaü:
ßMàso seso gimhànanû-ti: bhikkhunà vassikasàñikacãvaraü pariyesitabbam. ßAddhamàso seso gimhànanû-ti: katvà nivàsetabbaü. ßOrena ce màso seso gimhànanû-ti: vassikasàñikacãvaraü pariyeseyya. ßOrenaddhamàso seso gimhànanû-ti: katvà nivàseyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 618] [\x 618/]
NP 25: Cãvara-acchindanasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu bhikkhussa sàmaü cãvaraü datvà kupito 16 anattamano acchindeyya và acchindàpeyya và, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 620] [\x 620/]
NP 26: Suttavi¤¤attisikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu sàmaü suttaü vi¤¤àpetvà tantavàyehi cãvaraü vàyàpeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 624] [\x 624/]
NP 27: Mahàpesakàrasikkhàpadaü:
Bhikkhuü paneva uddissa a¤¤àtako gahapati và gahapatànã và tantavàyehi cãvaraü vàyàpeyya. Tatra ce so bhikkhu pubbe appavàrito tantavàye upasaïkamitvà cãvare vikappaü àpajjeyya: ßIdaü kho àvuso cãvaraü maü uddissa viyyati àyata¤-ca karotha, vitthata¤-ca, appita¤-ca, suvãta¤-ca, suppavàyita¤-ca, suvilekhita¤-ca, suvitacchita¤-ca karotha; appeva nàma mayam-pi àyasmantànaü ki¤cimattaü anupadajjeyyàmàû-ti. Eva¤-ca so bhikkhu vatvà ki¤cimattaü anupadajjeyya antamaso piõóapàtamattam-pi, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 630] [\x 630/]
NP 28: Accekacãvarasikkhàpadaü:
Dasàhànàgataü kattikatemàsikapuõõamaü, bhikkhuno paneva accekacãvaraü uppajjeyya, accekaü ma¤¤amànena bhikkhunà pañiggahetabbaü. Pañiggahetvà yàva cãvarakàlasamayaü nikkhipitabbaü. Tato ce uttariü nikkhipeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 634] [\x 634/]
NP 29: Sàsaïkhasikkhàpadaü:
Upavassaü kho pana kattikapuõõamaü yàni kho pana tàni àra¤¤akàni senàsanàni sàsaïkasammatàni sappañibhayàni, tathà råpesu bhikkhu senàsanesu viharanto àkaïkhamàno tiõõaü cãvarànaü a¤¤ataraü cãvaraü antaraghare nikkhipeyya. Siyà ca tassa bhikkhuno kocid-eva paccayo tena cãvarena vippavàsàya, chàrattaparamaü tena bhikkhunà tena cãvarena vippavasitabbaü. Tato ce uttariü vippavaseyya, a¤¤atra bhikkhusammutiyà, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 638] [\x 638/]
NP 30: Pariõatasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu jànaü saïghikaü làbhaü pariõataü attano pariõàmeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
Pattavaggo tatiyo
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 640] [\x 640/]
Uddiññhà kho àyasmanto tiüsa nissaggiyà pàcittiyà dhammà.
Tatthàyasmante pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Dutiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Tatiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Parisuddhetthàyasmanto, tasmà tuõhã, evam-etaü dhàrayàmi.
Nissaggiyapàcittiyà niññhità

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End Notes
1 Editor’s note: It seems every tradition has its own way of introducing the recital of the Pàtimokkha. Here only two of the simpler ways are included. Either the âràdhanà & Okàsakammaü is recited; or the Pubbakiccaü (but not both).
2 The bracketed headings for the various sections are supplied from the ChS edition of the Bhikkhupàtimokkhapàëi.
3 BJT note: Suõàtu me bhante saïgho, ajja uposatho paõõaraso - PTS
4 The following 5 lines are not in BJT.
5 BJT note: This reading is not seen in some books.
6 The Pàràjika rules in BJT are listed simply as Pañhama-, Dutiya-, Tatiya-, & Catutthapàràjikaü; without further identification. Most of the other rules have mnenomic titles usually connected with the wording of the rule, or the occasion for it (but see the notes to the Pàñidesanãya & Sekhiya rules below). The titles in brackets in this section are taken from the ChS edition of the text.
7 Editor’s note: BJT, Bhikkhuhi here, elsewhere bhikkhåhi.
8 Editor’s note: BJT, Kaccãttha here, elsewhere kaccittha.
9 Editor’s note: BJT, Tuõhi here, elsewhere tuõhã.
10 Editor’s note: this is the end title in BJT, the heading simply reads Pañhamasaïghàdisesà, but all the rest of these training rules are given distinctive titles.
11 BJT note: Pañinissajjeyya - ChS.
12 BJT note: Uttari - ChS
13 BJT note: Cãvaracetàpanaü - Thai.
14 Editor’s note: BJT, patiggaõh- here, but pañigaõh- in NP5 above.
15 Editor’s note: BJT, Nissaggãyaü, printer’s error.
16 Editor’s note: BJT, Kåpito - printer’s error.
   
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 Bhikkhupàtimokkhapàëi

1a: âràdhanà 1
(Spoken by the senior monk)
Pubbakaraõapubbakiccàni samàpetvà imissa nisinnassa bhikkhusaïghassa anumatiyà Pàtimokkhaü uddesituü ajjhesanaü karomi.
 
1b: Okàsakammaü
(Spoken by the recitor)
Okàsa me bhante thero dethu Vinayakathaü kathetuü.
 
2: Pubbakiccaü
(Spoken by the recitor)
Sammajjanã padãpo ca ~ udakaü àsanena ca
uposathassa etàni ~ pubbakaraõan-ti vuccati.
Chandapàrisuddhi-utukkhànaü bhikkhugaõanà ca ovàdo
uposathassa etàni pubbakiccan-ti vuccati.
Uposatho yàvatikà ca bhikkhå
kammapattà sabhàgàpattiyo
na vijjanti vajjanãyà ca puggalà
tasmiü na honti pattakallan-ti vuccati.
Pubbakaraõapubbakiccàni samàpetvà desitàppikassa samaggassa bhikkhusaïghassa anumatiyà pàtimokkhaü uddisitum-àràdhanaü karoma.
 
[BJT Vol 3, Page 250] [\x 250/]
(Nidànuddeso) 2
 
Suõàtu me bhante saïgha, yadi saïghassa3 pattakallaü, saïgho uposathaü kareyya pàtimokkhaü uddiseyya. Kiü saïghassa pubbakiccaü? Pàrisuddhiü àyasmanto àrocetha Pàtimokkhaü uddisissàmi. Taü sabbeva santà sàdhukaü suõoma manasikaroma.
Yassa siyà àpatti, so àvãkareyya. Asantiyà àpattiyà, tuõhã bhavitabbaü. Tuõhã bhàvena kho panàyasmante parisuddhà-ti vedissàmi. Yathà kho pana paccekapuññhassa veyyàkaraõaü hoti, evam-evaü evaråpàya parisàya yàvatatiyaü anusàvitaü hoti. Yo pana bhikkhu yàvatatiyaü anusàviyamàne saramàno santiü àpattiü nàvãkareyya, sampajànamusàvàdassa hoti. Sampajànamusàvàdo kho panàyasmanto antaràyiko dhammo vutto Bhagavatà. Tasmà saramànena bhikkhunà àpannena visuddhàpekkhena santã àpatti àvãkàtabbà. âvãkatà hissa phàsu hoti.
Nidànaü niññhitaü
 
(Pàràjikuddeso)
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 028] [\x 028/]
Tatrime cattàro pàràjikà dhammà uddesaü àgacchanti. 5
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 056] [\x 056/]
Pàr 1: (Methunadhammasikkhàpadaü 6):
Yo pana bhikkhu bhikkhånaü sikkhàsàjãvasamàpanno sikkhaü apaccakkhàya dubbalyaü anàvãkatvà methunaü dhammaü pañiseveyya, antamaso tiracchànagatàya pi - pàràjiko hoti, asaüvàso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 104] [\x 104/]
Pàr 2: (Adinnàdànasikkhàpadaü):
Yo pana bhikkhu gàmà và ara¤¤à và adinnaü theyyasankhàtaü àdiyeyya. Yathàråpe adinnàdàne ràjàno coraü gahetvà haneyyuü và bandheyyuü và pabbàjeyyuü và: ßCorosi, bàlosi, måëhosi, thenosã-ti!û. Tathàråpaü bhikkhu adinnaü àdiyamàno - ayam-pi pàràjiko hoti, asaüvàso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 160] [\x 160/]
Pàr 3: (Manussaviggahasikkhàpadaü):
Yo pana bhikkhu sa¤cicca manussaviggahaü jãvità voropeyya, satthahàrakaü vàssa pariyeseyya, maraõavaõõaü và saüvaõõeyya, maraõàya và samàdapeyya: ßAmbho purisa kiü tuyhiminà pàpakena dujjãvitena? Matante jãvità seyyo ti!û Iti cittamano cittasaïkappo anekapariyàyena maraõavaõõaü và saüvaõõeyya, maraõàya và samàdapeyya - ayam-pi pàràjiko hoti, asaüvàso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 200] [\x 200/]
Pàr 4: (Uttarimanussadhammasikkhàpadaü):
Yo pana bhikkhu anabhijànaü uttarimanussadhammaü attåpanàyikaü alam-ariya¤àõadassanaü samudàcareyya: ßIti jànàmi, iti passàmã-ti!û Tato aparena samayena samanuggàhiyamàno và asamanuggàhiyamàno và àpanno visuddhàpekkho evaü vadeyya: ßAjànam-evàhaü àvuso avacaü: jànàmi; apassaü: passàmi; tucchaü musà vilapin-tiû, a¤¤atra adhimànà - ayam-pi pàràjiko hoti, asaüvàso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 254] [\x 254/]
Uddiññhà kho àyasmanto cattàro pàràjikà dhammà. Yesaü bhikkhu a¤¤ataraü và a¤¤ataraü và àpajjitvà na labhati bhikkhåhi 7 saddhiü saüvàsaü. Yathà pure, tathà pacchà, pàràjiko hoti, asaüvàso.
Tatthàyasmante pucchàmi: kaccittha 8 parisuddhà?
Dutiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Tatiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Parisuddhetthàyasmanto, tasmà tuõhã, 9 evam-etaü dhàrayàmi.
Pàràjikaü niññhitaü
 
(Saïghàdisesuddeso)
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 256] [\x 256/]
Ime kho panàyasmanto terasa saïghàdisesà dhammà uddesaü àgacchanti.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 260] [\x 260/]
Sd 1: Sukkavisaññhisikkhàpadaü: 10
Sa¤cetanikà sukkavisaññhi, a¤¤atra supinantà, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 294] [\x 294/]
Sd 2: Kàyasaüsaggasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu otiõõo vipariõatena cittena màtugàmena saddhiü kàyasaüsaggaü samàpajjeyya, hatthagàhaü và veõigàhaü và a¤¤atarassa và a¤¤atarassa và aïgassa paràmasanaü, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 320] [\x 320/]
Sd 3: Duññhullavàcàsikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu otiõõo vipariõatena cittena màtugàmaü duññhullàhi vàcàhi obhàseyya. Yathà taü yuvà yuvatiü methunåpasaühitàhi, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 332] [\x 332/]
Sd 4: Antakàmapàricariyasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu otiõõo vipariõatena cittena màtugàmassa santike attakàmapàricariyàya vaõõaü bhàseyya: ßEtad-aggaü bhagini pàricariyànaü yà màdisaü sãlavantaü kalyàõadhammaü brahmacàriü etena dhammena paricareyyàû-ti, methunåpasaühitena, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 344] [\x 344/]
Sd 5: Sa¤carittasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu sa¤carittaü samàpajjeyya, itthiyà và purisamatiü, purisassa và itthimatiü, jàyattane và jàrattane và, antamaso taïkhaõikàya pi, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 382] [\x 382/]
Sd 6: Kuñikàrasikkhàpadaü:
Sa¤¤àcikàya pana bhikkhunà kuñiü kàrayamànena assàmikaü attuddesaü pamàõikà kàretabbà. Tatridaü pamàõaü: dãghaso dvàdasa vidatthiyo Sugatavidatthiyà tiriyaü sattantarà. Bhikkhå abhinetabbà vatthudesanàya, tehi bhikkhåhi vatthuü desetabbaü anàrambhaü saparikkamanaü. Sàrambhe ce bhikkhu vatthusmiü aparikkamane sa¤¤àcikàya kuñiü kàreyya, bhikkhå và anabhineyya vatthudesanàya, pamàõaü và atikkàmeyya, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 406] [\x 406/]
Sd 7: Vihàrakàrasikkhàpadaü:
Mahallakaü pana bhikkhunà vihàraü kàrayamànena sassàmikaü attuddesaü bhikkhå abhinetabbà vatthudesanàya. Tehi bhikkhåhi vatthuü desetabbaü anàrambhaü saparikkamanaü. Sàrambhe ce bhikkhu vatthusmiü aparikkamane mahallakaü vihàraü kàreyya, bhikkhå và anabhineyya vatthudesanàya, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 424] [\x 424/]
Sd 8: Pañhamaduññhadosasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu bhikkhuü duññho doso appatãto amålakena pàràjikena dhammena anuddhaüseyya: ßAppeva nàma naü imamhà brahmacariyà càveyyan-ti.û. Tato aparena samayena samanuggàhiyamàno và asamanuggàhiyamàno và, amålaka¤-ceva taü adhikaraõaü hoti, bhikkhu ca dosaü patiññhàti, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 436] [\x 436/]
Sd 9: Dutiyaduññhadosasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu bhikkhuü duññho doso appatãto a¤¤abhàgiyassa adhikaraõassa ki¤ci desaü lesamattaü upàdàya pàràjikena dhammena anuddhaüseyya: ßAppeva nàma naü imamhà brahmacariyà càveyyan-ti.û Tato aparena samayena samanuggàhiyamàno và asamanuggàhiyamàno và, a¤¤abhàgiya¤-ceva taü adhikaraõaü hoti, koci deso lesamatto upàdinno, bhikkhu ca dosaü patiññhàti, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 452] [\x 452/]
Sd 10: Pañhamasaïghabhedasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu samaggassa saïghassa bhedàya parakkameyya bhedanasaüvattanikaü và adhikaraõaü samàdàya paggayha tiññheyya. So bhikkhu bhikkhåhi evam-assa vacanãyo: ßMà àyasmà samaggassa saïghassa bhedàya parakkami bhedanasaüvattanikaü và adhikaraõaü samàdàya paggayha aññhàsi. Sametàyasmà saïghena, samaggo hi saïgho sammodamàno avivadamàno ekuddeso phàsu viharatãû-ti. Eva¤-ca so bhikkhu bhikkhåhi vuccamàno tatheva paggaõheyya, so bhikkhu bhikkhåhi yàvatatiyaü samanubhàsitabbo tassa pañinissaggàya. Yàvatatiya¤-ce samanubhàsiyamàno taü pañinissajeyya, 11 iccetaü kusalaü. No ce pañinissajeyya, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 456] [\x 456/]
Sd 11: Dutiyasaïghabhedasikkhàpadaü:
Tasseva kho pana bhikkhussa bhikkhå honti anuvattakà vaggavàdakà, eko và dve và tayo và, te evaü vadeyyuü: ßMà àyasmanto etaü bhikkhuü ki¤ci avacuttha, dhammavàdã ceso bhikkhu, vinayavàdã ceso bhikkhu, amhàka¤-ceso bhikkhu; chanda¤-ca, ruci¤-ca àdàya voharati, jànàti no bhàsati, amhàkam-petaü khamatãû-ti. Te bhikkhå bhikkhåhi evam-assu vacanãyà: ßMà àyasmanto evaü avacuttha. Na ceso bhikkhu dhammavàdã, na ceso bhikkhu vinayavàdã. Mà àyasmantànam-pi saïghabhedo ruccittha. Sametàyasmantànaü saïghena, samaggo hi saïgho sammodamàno avivadamàno ekuddeso phàsu viharatãû-ti. Eva¤-ca te bhikkhå bhikkhåhi vuccamànà tatheva paggaõheyyuü, te bhikkhå bhikkhåhi yàvatatiyaü samanubhàsitabbà tassa pañinissaggàya. Yàvatatiya¤-ce samanubhàsiyamànà taü pañinissajeyyuü, iccetaü kusalaü. No ce pañinissajeyyuü, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 462] [\x 462/]
Sd 12: Dubbacasikkhàpadaü:
Bhikkhu paneva dubbacajàtiko hoti. Uddesapariyàpannesu sikkhàpadesu bhikkhåhi sahadhammikaü vuccamàno attànaü avacanãyaü karoti: ßMà maü àyasmanto ki¤ci avacuttha, kalyàõaü và pàpakaü và. Aham-pàyasmante na ki¤ci vakkhàmi, kalyàõaü và pàpakaü và. Viramathàyasmanto mama vacanàyàû-ti. So bhikkhu bhikkhåhi evam-assa vacanãyo: ßMà àyasmà attànaü avacanãyaü akàsi. Vacanãyam-evàyasmà attànaü karotu. âyasmà pi bhikkhå vadetu sahadhammena, bhikkhå pi àyasmantaü vakkhanti sahadhammena. Evaü saüvaddhà hi tassa Bhagavato parisà, yadidaü a¤¤am-a¤¤avacanena a¤¤am-a¤¤avuññhàpanenàû-ti. Eva¤-ca so bhikkhu bhikkhåhi vuccamàno tatheva paggaõheyya, so bhikkhu bhikkhåhi yàvatatiyaü samanubhàsitabbo tassa pañinissaggàya. Yàvatatiya¤-ce samanubhàsiyamàno taü pañinissajeyya iccetaü kusalaü. No ce pañinissajeyya, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 476] [\x 476/]
Sd 13: Kuladåsakasikkhàpadaü:
Bhikkhu paneva a¤¤ataraü gàmaü và nigamaü và upanissàya viharati kuladåsako pàpasamàcàro. Tassa kho pàpakà samàcàrà dissanti ceva suyyanti ca. Kulàni ca tena duññhàni dissanti ceva suyyanti ca. So bhikkhu bhikkhåhi evam-assa vacanãyo: ßâyasmà kho kuladåsako pàpasamàcàro. âyasmato kho pàpakà samàcàrà dissanti ceva suyyanti ca. Kulàni càyasmatà duññhàni dissanti ceva suyyanti ca. Pakkamatàyasmà imamhà àvàsà. Alan-te idha vàsenàû-ti. Eva¤-ca so bhikkhu bhikkhåhi vuccamàno te bhikkhå evaü vadeyya: ßChandagàmino ca bhikkhå, dosagàmino ca bhikkhå, mohagàmino ca bhikkhå, bhayagàmino ca bhikkhå. Tàdisikàya àpattiyà ekaccaü pabbàjenti, ekaccaü na pabbàjentãû-ti. So bhikkhu bhikkhåhi evam-assa vacanãyo: ßMà àyasmà evaü avaca, na ca bhikkhå chandagàmino, na ca bhikkhå dosagàmino, na ca bhikkhå mohagàmino, na ca bhikkhå bhayagàmino. âyasmà kho kuladåsako pàpasamàcàro. âyasmato kho pàpakà samàcàrà dissanti ceva suyyanti ca. Kulàni càyasmatà duññhàni dissanti ceva suyyanti ca. Pakkamatàyasmà imamhà àvàsà. Alan-te idha vàsenàû-ti. Eva¤-ca so bhikkhu bhikkhåhi vuccamàno tatheva paggaõheyya, so bhikkhu bhikkhåhi yàvatatiyaü samanubhàsitabbo tassa pañinissaggàya. Yàvatatiya¤-ce samanubhàsiyamàno taü pañinissajeyya iccetaü kusalaü. No ce pañinissajeyya, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 482] [\x 482/]
Uddiññhà kho àyasmanto terasa saïghàdisesà dhammà, nava pañhamàpattikà cattàro yàvatatiyakà. Yesaü bhikkhu a¤¤ataraü và a¤¤ataraü và àpajjitvà, yàvatihaü jànaü pañicchàdeti, tàvatihaü tena bhikkhunà akàmà parivatthabbaü. Parivutthaparivàsena bhikkhunà uttarichàrattaü bhikkhumànattàya pañipajjitabbaü. Ciõõamànatto bhikkhu: yattha siyà vãsatigaõo bhikkhusaïgho, tattha so bhikkhu abbhetabbo. Ekena pi ce åno vãsatigaõo bhikkhusaïgho taü bhikkhuü abbheyya, so ca bhikkhu anabbhito, te ca bhikkhå gàrayhà. Ayaü tattha sàmãci.
Tatthàyasmante pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Dutiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Tatiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Parisuddhetthàyasmanto, tasmà tuõhã, evam-etaü dhàrayàmi.
Saïghàdiseso niññhito
 
(Aniyatuddeso)
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 484] [\x 484/]
Ime kho panàyasmanto dve aniyatà dhammà uddesaü àgacchanti.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 486] [\x 486/]
Aniy 1: Pañhama-aniyatasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu màtugàmena saddhiü eko ekàya raho pañicchanne àsane alaïkammaniye nisajjaü kappeyya. Tam-enaü saddheyyavacasà upàsikà disvà tiõõaü dhammànaü a¤¤atarena vadeyya: pàràjikena và saïghàdisesena và pàcittiyena và. Nisajjaü bhikkhu pañijànamàno tiõõaü dhammànaü a¤¤atarena kàretabbo: pàràjikena và saïghàdisesena và pàcittiyena và. Yena và sà saddheyyavacasà upàsikà vadeyya, tena so bhikkhu kàretabbo. Ayaü dhammo aniyato.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 492] [\x 492/]
Aniy 2: Dutiya-aniyatasikkhàpadaü:
Na heva kho pana pañicchannaü àsanaü hoti nàlaïkammaniyaü. Ala¤-ca kho hoti màtugàmaü duññhullàhi vàcàhi obhàsituü. Yo pana bhikkhu tathàråpe àsane màtugàmena saddhiü eko ekàya raho nisajjaü kappeyya. Tam-enaü saddheyyavacasà upàsikà disvà dvinnaü dhammànaü a¤¤atarena vadeyya saïghàdisesena và pàcittiyena và. Nisajjaü bhikkhu pañijànamàno dvinnaü dhammànaü a¤¤atarena kàretabbo saïghàdisesena và pàcittiyena và. Yena và sà saddheyyavacasà upàsikà vadeyya, tena so bhikkhu kàretabbo. Ayam-pi dhammo aniyato.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 496] [\x 496/]
Uddiññhà kho àyasmanto dve aniyatà dhammà.
Tatthàyasmante pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Dutiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Tatiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Parisuddhetthàyasmanto, tasmà tuõhã, evam-etaü dhàrayàmi.
Aniyato niññhito
 
(Nissaggiyapàcittiyà)
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 498] [\x 498/]
Ime kho panàyasmanto tiüsa nissaggiyà pàcittiyà dhammà uddesaü àgacchanti.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 500] [\x 500/]
NP 1: Pañhamakañhinasikkhàpadaü:
Niññhitacãvarasmiü bhikkhunà ubbhatasmiü kañhine, dasàhaparamaü atirekacãvaraü dhàretabbaü. Taü atikkàmayato, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 504] [\x 504/]
NP 2: Dutiyakañhinasikkhàpadaü:
Niññhitacãvarasmiü bhikkhunà ubbhatasmiü kañhine, ekarattam-pi ce bhikkhu ticãvarena vippavaseyya, a¤¤atra bhikkhusammutiyà, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 512] [\x 512/]
NP 3: Tatiyakañhinasikkhàpadaü:
Niññhitacãvarasmiü bhikkhunà ubbhatasmiü kañhine, bhikkhuno paneva akàlacãvaraü uppajjeyya. âkaïkhamànena bhikkhunà pañiggahetabbaü, pañiggahetvà khippam-eva kàretabbaü. No cassa pàripåri, màsaparamaü tena bhikkhunà taü cãvaraü nikkhipitabbaü ånassa pàripåriyà, satiyà paccàsàya. Tato ce uttariü nikkhipeyya, satiyà pi paccàsàya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 518] [\x 518/]
NP 4: Puràõacãvarasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu a¤¤àtikàya bhikkhuniyà puràõacãvaraü dhovàpeyya và rajàpeyya và àkoñàpeyya và, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 524] [\x 524/]
NP 5: Cãvarapañiggahaõasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu a¤¤àtikàya bhikkhuniyà hatthato cãvaraü pañiggaõheyya, a¤¤atra pàrivaññakà, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 530] [\x 530/]
NP 6: A¤¤àtakavi¤¤attisikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu a¤¤àtakaü gahapatiü và gahapatàniü và cãvaraü vi¤¤àpeyya, a¤¤atra samayà, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
Tatthàyaü samayo: acchinnacãvaro và hoti bhikkhu naññhacãvaro và - ayaü tattha samayo.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 534] [\x 534/]
NP 7: Tatuttarisikkhàpadaü:
Ta¤-ce a¤¤àtako gahapati và gahapatànã và bahåhi cãvarehi abhihaññhuü pavàreyya, santaruttaraparamaü tena bhikkhunà tato cãvaraü sàditabbaü. Tato ce uttariü 12 sàdiyeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 536] [\x 536/]
NP 8: Pañhama-upakkhañasikkhàpadaü:
Bhikkhuü paneva uddissa a¤¤àtakassa gahapatissa và gahapatàniyà và cãvaracetàpannaü 13 upakkhañaü hoti: ßIminà cãvaracetàpannena cãvaraü cetàpetvà itthannàmaü bhikkhuü cãvarena acchàdessàmãû-ti. Tatra ce so bhikkhu pubbe appavàrito upasaïkamitvà cãvare vikappaü àpajjeyya: ßSàdhu vata maü àyasmà iminà cãvaracetàpannena evaråpaü và evaråpaü và cãvaraü cetàpetvà acchàdehãû-ti. Kalyàõakamyataü upàdàya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 542] [\x 542/]
NP 9: Dutiya-upakkhañasikkhàpadaü:
Bhikkhuü paneva uddissa ubhinnaü a¤¤àtakànaü gahapatãnaü và gahapatànãnaü và paccekacãvaracetàpannà upakkhañà honti: ßImehi mayaü paccekacãvaracetàpannehi paccekacãvaràni cetàpetvà itthannàmaü bhikkhuü cãvarehi acchàdessàmàû-ti. Tatra ce so bhikkhu pubbe appavàrito upasaïkamitvà cãvare vikappaü àpajjeyya: ßSàdhu vata maü àyasmanto imehi paccekacãvaracetàpannehi evaråpaü và evaråpaü và cãvaraü cetàpetvà acchàdetha ubho va santà ekenàû-ti. Kalyàõakamyataü upàdàya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 548] [\x 548/]
NP 10: Ràjasikkhàpadaü:
Bhikkhuü paneva uddissa ràjà và ràjabhoggo và bràhmaõo và gahapatiko và dåtena cãvaracetàpannaü pahiõeyya: ßIminà cãvaracetàpanena cãvaraü cetàpetvà itthannàmaü bhikkhuü cãvarena acchàdehãû-ti. So ce dåto taü bhikkhuü upasaïkamitvà evaü vadeyya: ßIdaü kho bhante àyasmantaü uddissa cãvaracetàpannaü àbhataü, pañiggaõhàtu 14 àyasmà cãvaracetàpannanû-ti. Tena bhikkhunà so dåto evam-assa vacanãyo: ßNa kho mayaü àvuso cãvaracetàpannaü pañiggaõhàma cãvara¤-ca kho mayaü pañiggaõhàma kàlena kappiyanû-ti. So ce dåto taü bhikkhuü evaü vadeyya: ßAtthi panàyasmato koci veyyàvacakaroû ti. ßCãvaratthikena bhikkhave bhikkhunà veyyàvaccakaro niddisitabbo àràmiko và upàsako và: ßEso kho àvuso bhikkhånaü veyyàvaccakaroû ti. So ce dåto taü veyyàvaccakaraü sa¤¤àpetvà taü bhikkhuü upasaïkamitvà evaü vadeyya: ßYaü kho bhante àyasmà veyyàvaccakaraü niddisi, sa¤¤atto so mayà. Upasaïkamatu àyasmà kàlena, cãvarena taü acchàdessatãû-ti. Cãvaratthikena bhikkhave bhikkhunà veyyàvaccakaro upasaïkamitvà dvattikkhattuü codetabbo sàretabbo: ßAttho me àvuso cãvarenàû-ti. Dvattikkhattuü codayamàno sàrayamàno taü cãvaraü abhinipphàdeyya, iccetaü kusalaü. No ce abhinipphàdeyya, catukkhattuü pa¤cakkhattuü chakkhattuü paramaü tuõhãbhåtena uddissa ñhàtabbaü. Catukkhattuü pa¤cakkhattuü chakkhattuü paramaü tuõhãbhåto uddissa tiññhamàno taü cãvaraü abhinipphàdeyya, iccetaü kusalaü. Tato ce uttariü vàyamamàno taü cãvaraü abhinipphàdeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
No ce abhinipphàdeyya, yatassa cãvaracetàpannaü àbhataü tattha sàmaü và gantabbaü dåto và pàhetabbo: ßYaü kho tumhe àyasmanto bhikkhuü uddissa cãvaracetàpannaü pahiõittha, na taü tassa bhikkhuno ki¤ci atthaü anubhoti, yu¤jantàyasmanto sakaü, mà vo sakaü vinassàû-ti. Ayaü tattha sàmãci.
Cãvaravaggo pañhamo

 
[BJT Vol I, Page 554] [\x 554/]
NP 11: Kosiyasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu Kosiyamissakaü santhataü kàràpeyya, nissaggiyaü 15 pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 556] [\x 556/]
NP 12: Suddhakàëakasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu suddhakàëakànaü eëakalomànaü santhataü kàràpeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 560] [\x 560/]
NP 13: Dvebhàgasikkhàpadaü:
Navaü pana bhikkhunà santhataü kàrayamànena dve bhàgà suddhakàëakànaü eëakalomànaü àdàtabbà, tatiyaü odàtànaü catutthaü gocariyànaü. Anàdà ce bhikkhu dve bhàge suddhakàëakànaü eëakalomànaü tatiyaü odàtànaü catutthaü gocariyànaü navaü santhataü kàràpeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 564] [\x 564/]
NP 14: Chabbassisikkhàpadaü:
Navaü pana bhikkhunà santhataü kàràpetvà chabbassàni dhàretabbaü. Orena ce channaü vassànaü taü santhataü vissajjetvà và avissajjetvà và a¤¤aü navaü santhataü kàràpeyya, a¤¤atra bhikkhusammutiyà, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 570] [\x 570/]
NP 15: Nisãdanasanthatasikkhàpadaü:
Nisãdanasanthataü pana bhikkhunà kàrayamànena puràõasanthatassa sàmantà Sugatavidatthã àdàtabbà dubbaõõakaraõàya, ànàda ce bhikkhu puràõasanthatassa sàmantà Sugatavidatthiü navaü nisãdanasanthataü kàràpeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 572] [\x 572/]
NP 16: Eëakalomasikkhàpadaü:
Bhikkhuno paneva addhànamaggappañipannassa eëakalomàni uppajjeyyuü. âkaïkhamànena bhikkhunà pañiggahetabbàni. Pañiggahetvà tiyojanaparamaü sahatthà haritabbàni, asante hàrake. Tato ce uttariü hareyya asante pi hàrake, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 576] [\x 576/]
NP 17: Eëakalomadhovàpanasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu a¤¤àtikàya bhikkhuniyà eëakalomàni dhovàpeyya và rajàpeyya và vijañàpeyya và, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 580] [\x 580/]
NP 18: Råpiyasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu jàtaråparajataü uggaõheyya và uggaõhàpeyya và upanikkhittaü và sàdiyeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 584] [\x 584/]
NP 19: Råpiyasaüvohàrasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu nànappakàrakaü råpiyasaüvohàraü samàpajjeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 590] [\x 590/]
NP 20: Kayavikkayasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu nànappakàrakaü kayavikkayaü samàpajjeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
Kosiyavaggo dutiyo
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 594] [\x 594/]
NP 21: Pattasikkhàpadaü:
Dasàhaparamaü atirekapatto dhàretabbo. Taü atikkàmayato, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 600] [\x 600/]
NP 22: ænapa¤cabandhanasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu ånapa¤cabandhanena pattena a¤¤aü navaü pattaü cetàpeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
Tena bhikkhunà so patto bhikkhuparisàya nissajitabbo. Yo ca tassà bhikkhuparisàya pattapariyanto, so tassa bhikkhuno padàtabbo: ßAyaü te bhikkhu patto, yàva bhedanàya dhàretabboû ti. Ayaü tattha sàmãci.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 610] [\x 610/]
NP 23: Bhesajjasikkhàpadaü:
Yàni kho pana tàni gilànànaü bhikkhånaü pañisàyanãyàni bhesajjàni, seyyathãdaü: sappi, navanãtaü, telaü, madhu, phàõitaü; tàni pañiggahetvà sattàhaparamaü sannidhikàrakaü paribhu¤jitabbàni. Taü atikkàmayato, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 614] [\x 614/]
NP 24: Vassikasàñikasikkhàpadaü:
ßMàso seso gimhànanû-ti: bhikkhunà vassikasàñikacãvaraü pariyesitabbam. ßAddhamàso seso gimhànanû-ti: katvà nivàsetabbaü. ßOrena ce màso seso gimhànanû-ti: vassikasàñikacãvaraü pariyeseyya. ßOrenaddhamàso seso gimhànanû-ti: katvà nivàseyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 618] [\x 618/]
NP 25: Cãvara-acchindanasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu bhikkhussa sàmaü cãvaraü datvà kupito 16 anattamano acchindeyya và acchindàpeyya và, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 620] [\x 620/]
NP 26: Suttavi¤¤attisikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu sàmaü suttaü vi¤¤àpetvà tantavàyehi cãvaraü vàyàpeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 624] [\x 624/]
NP 27: Mahàpesakàrasikkhàpadaü:
Bhikkhuü paneva uddissa a¤¤àtako gahapati và gahapatànã và tantavàyehi cãvaraü vàyàpeyya. Tatra ce so bhikkhu pubbe appavàrito tantavàye upasaïkamitvà cãvare vikappaü àpajjeyya: ßIdaü kho àvuso cãvaraü maü uddissa viyyati àyata¤-ca karotha, vitthata¤-ca, appita¤-ca, suvãta¤-ca, suppavàyita¤-ca, suvilekhita¤-ca, suvitacchita¤-ca karotha; appeva nàma mayam-pi àyasmantànaü ki¤cimattaü anupadajjeyyàmàû-ti. Eva¤-ca so bhikkhu vatvà ki¤cimattaü anupadajjeyya antamaso piõóapàtamattam-pi, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 630] [\x 630/]
NP 28: Accekacãvarasikkhàpadaü:
Dasàhànàgataü kattikatemàsikapuõõamaü, bhikkhuno paneva accekacãvaraü uppajjeyya, accekaü ma¤¤amànena bhikkhunà pañiggahetabbaü. Pañiggahetvà yàva cãvarakàlasamayaü nikkhipitabbaü. Tato ce uttariü nikkhipeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 634] [\x 634/]
NP 29: Sàsaïkhasikkhàpadaü:
Upavassaü kho pana kattikapuõõamaü yàni kho pana tàni àra¤¤akàni senàsanàni sàsaïkasammatàni sappañibhayàni, tathà råpesu bhikkhu senàsanesu viharanto àkaïkhamàno tiõõaü cãvarànaü a¤¤ataraü cãvaraü antaraghare nikkhipeyya. Siyà ca tassa bhikkhuno kocid-eva paccayo tena cãvarena vippavàsàya, chàrattaparamaü tena bhikkhunà tena cãvarena vippavasitabbaü. Tato ce uttariü vippavaseyya, a¤¤atra bhikkhusammutiyà, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 638] [\x 638/]
NP 30: Pariõatasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu jànaü saïghikaü làbhaü pariõataü attano pariõàmeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
Pattavaggo tatiyo
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 640] [\x 640/]
Uddiññhà kho àyasmanto tiüsa nissaggiyà pàcittiyà dhammà.
Tatthàyasmante pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Dutiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Tatiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Parisuddhetthàyasmanto, tasmà tuõhã, evam-etaü dhàrayàmi.
Nissaggiyapàcittiyà niññhità
 
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End Notes
1 Editor’s note: It seems every tradition has its own way of introducing the recital of the Pàtimokkha. Here only two of the simpler ways are included. Either the âràdhanà & Okàsakammaü is recited; or the Pubbakiccaü (but not both).
2 The bracketed headings for the various sections are supplied from the ChS edition of the Bhikkhupàtimokkhapàëi.
3 BJT note: Suõàtu me bhante saïgho, ajja uposatho paõõaraso - PTS
4 The following 5 lines are not in BJT.
5 BJT note: This reading is not seen in some books.
6 The Pàràjika rules in BJT are listed simply as Pañhama-, Dutiya-, Tatiya-, & Catutthapàràjikaü; without further identification. Most of the other rules have mnenomic titles usually connected with the wording of the rule, or the occasion for it (but see the notes to the Pàñidesanãya & Sekhiya rules below). The titles in brackets in this section are taken from the ChS edition of the text.
7 Editor’s note: BJT, Bhikkhuhi here, elsewhere bhikkhåhi.
8 Editor’s note: BJT, Kaccãttha here, elsewhere kaccittha.
9 Editor’s note: BJT, Tuõhi here, elsewhere tuõhã.
10 Editor’s note: this is the end title in BJT, the heading simply reads Pañhamasaïghàdisesà, but all the rest of these training rules are given distinctive titles.
11 BJT note: Pañinissajjeyya - ChS.
12 BJT note: Uttari - ChS
13 BJT note: Cãvaracetàpanaü - Thai.
14 Editor’s note: BJT, patiggaõh- here, but pañigaõh- in NP5 above.
15 Editor’s note: BJT, Nissaggãyaü, printer’s error.
16 Editor’s note: BJT, Kåpito - printer’s error.


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(Pàràjikuddeso)     (Saïghàdisesuddeso)
(Aniyatuddeso)     (Nissaggiyapàcittiyà)
Bhikkhupàtimokkhapàëi

1a: âràdhanà 1
(Spoken by the senior monk)
Pubbakaraõapubbakiccàni samàpetvà imissa nisinnassa bhikkhusaïghassa anumatiyà Pàtimokkhaü uddesituü ajjhesanaü karomi.
 
1b: Okàsakammaü
(Spoken by the recitor)
Okàsa me bhante thero dethu Vinayakathaü kathetuü.
 
2: Pubbakiccaü
(Spoken by the recitor)
Sammajjanã padãpo ca ~ udakaü àsanena ca
uposathassa etàni ~ pubbakaraõan-ti vuccati.
Chandapàrisuddhi-utukkhànaü bhikkhugaõanà ca ovàdo
uposathassa etàni pubbakiccan-ti vuccati.
Uposatho yàvatikà ca bhikkhå
kammapattà sabhàgàpattiyo
na vijjanti vajjanãyà ca puggalà
tasmiü na honti pattakallan-ti vuccati.
Pubbakaraõapubbakiccàni samàpetvà desitàppikassa samaggassa bhikkhusaïghassa anumatiyà pàtimokkhaü uddisitum-àràdhanaü karoma.
 
[BJT Vol 3, Page 250] [\x 250/]
(Nidànuddeso) 2
 
Suõàtu me bhante saïgha, yadi saïghassa3 pattakallaü, saïgho uposathaü kareyya pàtimokkhaü uddiseyya. Kiü saïghassa pubbakiccaü? Pàrisuddhiü àyasmanto àrocetha Pàtimokkhaü uddisissàmi. Taü sabbeva santà sàdhukaü suõoma manasikaroma.
Yassa siyà àpatti, so àvãkareyya. Asantiyà àpattiyà, tuõhã bhavitabbaü. Tuõhã bhàvena kho panàyasmante parisuddhà-ti vedissàmi. Yathà kho pana paccekapuññhassa veyyàkaraõaü hoti, evam-evaü evaråpàya parisàya yàvatatiyaü anusàvitaü hoti. Yo pana bhikkhu yàvatatiyaü anusàviyamàne saramàno santiü àpattiü nàvãkareyya, sampajànamusàvàdassa hoti. Sampajànamusàvàdo kho panàyasmanto antaràyiko dhammo vutto Bhagavatà. Tasmà saramànena bhikkhunà àpannena visuddhàpekkhena santã àpatti àvãkàtabbà. âvãkatà hissa phàsu hoti.
Nidànaü niññhitaü
 
(Pàràjikuddeso)
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 028] [\x 028/]
Tatrime cattàro pàràjikà dhammà uddesaü àgacchanti. 5
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 056] [\x 056/]
Pàr 1: (Methunadhammasikkhàpadaü 6):
Yo pana bhikkhu bhikkhånaü sikkhàsàjãvasamàpanno sikkhaü apaccakkhàya dubbalyaü anàvãkatvà methunaü dhammaü pañiseveyya, antamaso tiracchànagatàya pi - pàràjiko hoti, asaüvàso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 104] [\x 104/]
Pàr 2: (Adinnàdànasikkhàpadaü):
Yo pana bhikkhu gàmà và ara¤¤à và adinnaü theyyasankhàtaü àdiyeyya. Yathàråpe adinnàdàne ràjàno coraü gahetvà haneyyuü và bandheyyuü và pabbàjeyyuü và: ßCorosi, bàlosi, måëhosi, thenosã-ti!û. Tathàråpaü bhikkhu adinnaü àdiyamàno - ayam-pi pàràjiko hoti, asaüvàso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 160] [\x 160/]
Pàr 3: (Manussaviggahasikkhàpadaü):
Yo pana bhikkhu sa¤cicca manussaviggahaü jãvità voropeyya, satthahàrakaü vàssa pariyeseyya, maraõavaõõaü và saüvaõõeyya, maraõàya và samàdapeyya: ßAmbho purisa kiü tuyhiminà pàpakena dujjãvitena? Matante jãvità seyyo ti!û Iti cittamano cittasaïkappo anekapariyàyena maraõavaõõaü và saüvaõõeyya, maraõàya và samàdapeyya - ayam-pi pàràjiko hoti, asaüvàso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 200] [\x 200/]
Pàr 4: (Uttarimanussadhammasikkhàpadaü):
Yo pana bhikkhu anabhijànaü uttarimanussadhammaü attåpanàyikaü alam-ariya¤àõadassanaü samudàcareyya: ßIti jànàmi, iti passàmã-ti!û Tato aparena samayena samanuggàhiyamàno và asamanuggàhiyamàno và àpanno visuddhàpekkho evaü vadeyya: ßAjànam-evàhaü àvuso avacaü: jànàmi; apassaü: passàmi; tucchaü musà vilapin-tiû, a¤¤atra adhimànà - ayam-pi pàràjiko hoti, asaüvàso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 254] [\x 254/]
Uddiññhà kho àyasmanto cattàro pàràjikà dhammà. Yesaü bhikkhu a¤¤ataraü và a¤¤ataraü và àpajjitvà na labhati bhikkhåhi 7 saddhiü saüvàsaü. Yathà pure, tathà pacchà, pàràjiko hoti, asaüvàso.
Tatthàyasmante pucchàmi: kaccittha 8 parisuddhà?
Dutiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Tatiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Parisuddhetthàyasmanto, tasmà tuõhã, 9 evam-etaü dhàrayàmi.
Pàràjikaü niññhitaü
 
(Saïghàdisesuddeso)
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 256] [\x 256/]
Ime kho panàyasmanto terasa saïghàdisesà dhammà uddesaü àgacchanti.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 260] [\x 260/]
Sd 1: Sukkavisaññhisikkhàpadaü: 10
Sa¤cetanikà sukkavisaññhi, a¤¤atra supinantà, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 294] [\x 294/]
Sd 2: Kàyasaüsaggasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu otiõõo vipariõatena cittena màtugàmena saddhiü kàyasaüsaggaü samàpajjeyya, hatthagàhaü và veõigàhaü và a¤¤atarassa và a¤¤atarassa và aïgassa paràmasanaü, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 320] [\x 320/]
Sd 3: Duññhullavàcàsikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu otiõõo vipariõatena cittena màtugàmaü duññhullàhi vàcàhi obhàseyya. Yathà taü yuvà yuvatiü methunåpasaühitàhi, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 332] [\x 332/]
Sd 4: Antakàmapàricariyasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu otiõõo vipariõatena cittena màtugàmassa santike attakàmapàricariyàya vaõõaü bhàseyya: ßEtad-aggaü bhagini pàricariyànaü yà màdisaü sãlavantaü kalyàõadhammaü brahmacàriü etena dhammena paricareyyàû-ti, methunåpasaühitena, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 344] [\x 344/]
Sd 5: Sa¤carittasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu sa¤carittaü samàpajjeyya, itthiyà và purisamatiü, purisassa và itthimatiü, jàyattane và jàrattane và, antamaso taïkhaõikàya pi, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 382] [\x 382/]
Sd 6: Kuñikàrasikkhàpadaü:
Sa¤¤àcikàya pana bhikkhunà kuñiü kàrayamànena assàmikaü attuddesaü pamàõikà kàretabbà. Tatridaü pamàõaü: dãghaso dvàdasa vidatthiyo Sugatavidatthiyà tiriyaü sattantarà. Bhikkhå abhinetabbà vatthudesanàya, tehi bhikkhåhi vatthuü desetabbaü anàrambhaü saparikkamanaü. Sàrambhe ce bhikkhu vatthusmiü aparikkamane sa¤¤àcikàya kuñiü kàreyya, bhikkhå và anabhineyya vatthudesanàya, pamàõaü và atikkàmeyya, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 406] [\x 406/]
Sd 7: Vihàrakàrasikkhàpadaü:
Mahallakaü pana bhikkhunà vihàraü kàrayamànena sassàmikaü attuddesaü bhikkhå abhinetabbà vatthudesanàya. Tehi bhikkhåhi vatthuü desetabbaü anàrambhaü saparikkamanaü. Sàrambhe ce bhikkhu vatthusmiü aparikkamane mahallakaü vihàraü kàreyya, bhikkhå và anabhineyya vatthudesanàya, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 424] [\x 424/]
Sd 8: Pañhamaduññhadosasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu bhikkhuü duññho doso appatãto amålakena pàràjikena dhammena anuddhaüseyya: ßAppeva nàma naü imamhà brahmacariyà càveyyan-ti.û. Tato aparena samayena samanuggàhiyamàno và asamanuggàhiyamàno và, amålaka¤-ceva taü adhikaraõaü hoti, bhikkhu ca dosaü patiññhàti, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 436] [\x 436/]
Sd 9: Dutiyaduññhadosasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu bhikkhuü duññho doso appatãto a¤¤abhàgiyassa adhikaraõassa ki¤ci desaü lesamattaü upàdàya pàràjikena dhammena anuddhaüseyya: ßAppeva nàma naü imamhà brahmacariyà càveyyan-ti.û Tato aparena samayena samanuggàhiyamàno và asamanuggàhiyamàno và, a¤¤abhàgiya¤-ceva taü adhikaraõaü hoti, koci deso lesamatto upàdinno, bhikkhu ca dosaü patiññhàti, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 452] [\x 452/]
Sd 10: Pañhamasaïghabhedasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu samaggassa saïghassa bhedàya parakkameyya bhedanasaüvattanikaü và adhikaraõaü samàdàya paggayha tiññheyya. So bhikkhu bhikkhåhi evam-assa vacanãyo: ßMà àyasmà samaggassa saïghassa bhedàya parakkami bhedanasaüvattanikaü và adhikaraõaü samàdàya paggayha aññhàsi. Sametàyasmà saïghena, samaggo hi saïgho sammodamàno avivadamàno ekuddeso phàsu viharatãû-ti. Eva¤-ca so bhikkhu bhikkhåhi vuccamàno tatheva paggaõheyya, so bhikkhu bhikkhåhi yàvatatiyaü samanubhàsitabbo tassa pañinissaggàya. Yàvatatiya¤-ce samanubhàsiyamàno taü pañinissajeyya, 11 iccetaü kusalaü. No ce pañinissajeyya, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 456] [\x 456/]
Sd 11: Dutiyasaïghabhedasikkhàpadaü:
Tasseva kho pana bhikkhussa bhikkhå honti anuvattakà vaggavàdakà, eko và dve và tayo và, te evaü vadeyyuü: ßMà àyasmanto etaü bhikkhuü ki¤ci avacuttha, dhammavàdã ceso bhikkhu, vinayavàdã ceso bhikkhu, amhàka¤-ceso bhikkhu; chanda¤-ca, ruci¤-ca àdàya voharati, jànàti no bhàsati, amhàkam-petaü khamatãû-ti. Te bhikkhå bhikkhåhi evam-assu vacanãyà: ßMà àyasmanto evaü avacuttha. Na ceso bhikkhu dhammavàdã, na ceso bhikkhu vinayavàdã. Mà àyasmantànam-pi saïghabhedo ruccittha. Sametàyasmantànaü saïghena, samaggo hi saïgho sammodamàno avivadamàno ekuddeso phàsu viharatãû-ti. Eva¤-ca te bhikkhå bhikkhåhi vuccamànà tatheva paggaõheyyuü, te bhikkhå bhikkhåhi yàvatatiyaü samanubhàsitabbà tassa pañinissaggàya. Yàvatatiya¤-ce samanubhàsiyamànà taü pañinissajeyyuü, iccetaü kusalaü. No ce pañinissajeyyuü, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 462] [\x 462/]
Sd 12: Dubbacasikkhàpadaü:
Bhikkhu paneva dubbacajàtiko hoti. Uddesapariyàpannesu sikkhàpadesu bhikkhåhi sahadhammikaü vuccamàno attànaü avacanãyaü karoti: ßMà maü àyasmanto ki¤ci avacuttha, kalyàõaü và pàpakaü và. Aham-pàyasmante na ki¤ci vakkhàmi, kalyàõaü và pàpakaü và. Viramathàyasmanto mama vacanàyàû-ti. So bhikkhu bhikkhåhi evam-assa vacanãyo: ßMà àyasmà attànaü avacanãyaü akàsi. Vacanãyam-evàyasmà attànaü karotu. âyasmà pi bhikkhå vadetu sahadhammena, bhikkhå pi àyasmantaü vakkhanti sahadhammena. Evaü saüvaddhà hi tassa Bhagavato parisà, yadidaü a¤¤am-a¤¤avacanena a¤¤am-a¤¤avuññhàpanenàû-ti. Eva¤-ca so bhikkhu bhikkhåhi vuccamàno tatheva paggaõheyya, so bhikkhu bhikkhåhi yàvatatiyaü samanubhàsitabbo tassa pañinissaggàya. Yàvatatiya¤-ce samanubhàsiyamàno taü pañinissajeyya iccetaü kusalaü. No ce pañinissajeyya, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 476] [\x 476/]
Sd 13: Kuladåsakasikkhàpadaü:
Bhikkhu paneva a¤¤ataraü gàmaü và nigamaü và upanissàya viharati kuladåsako pàpasamàcàro. Tassa kho pàpakà samàcàrà dissanti ceva suyyanti ca. Kulàni ca tena duññhàni dissanti ceva suyyanti ca. So bhikkhu bhikkhåhi evam-assa vacanãyo: ßâyasmà kho kuladåsako pàpasamàcàro. âyasmato kho pàpakà samàcàrà dissanti ceva suyyanti ca. Kulàni càyasmatà duññhàni dissanti ceva suyyanti ca. Pakkamatàyasmà imamhà àvàsà. Alan-te idha vàsenàû-ti. Eva¤-ca so bhikkhu bhikkhåhi vuccamàno te bhikkhå evaü vadeyya: ßChandagàmino ca bhikkhå, dosagàmino ca bhikkhå, mohagàmino ca bhikkhå, bhayagàmino ca bhikkhå. Tàdisikàya àpattiyà ekaccaü pabbàjenti, ekaccaü na pabbàjentãû-ti. So bhikkhu bhikkhåhi evam-assa vacanãyo: ßMà àyasmà evaü avaca, na ca bhikkhå chandagàmino, na ca bhikkhå dosagàmino, na ca bhikkhå mohagàmino, na ca bhikkhå bhayagàmino. âyasmà kho kuladåsako pàpasamàcàro. âyasmato kho pàpakà samàcàrà dissanti ceva suyyanti ca. Kulàni càyasmatà duññhàni dissanti ceva suyyanti ca. Pakkamatàyasmà imamhà àvàsà. Alan-te idha vàsenàû-ti. Eva¤-ca so bhikkhu bhikkhåhi vuccamàno tatheva paggaõheyya, so bhikkhu bhikkhåhi yàvatatiyaü samanubhàsitabbo tassa pañinissaggàya. Yàvatatiya¤-ce samanubhàsiyamàno taü pañinissajeyya iccetaü kusalaü. No ce pañinissajeyya, saïghàdiseso.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 482] [\x 482/]
Uddiññhà kho àyasmanto terasa saïghàdisesà dhammà, nava pañhamàpattikà cattàro yàvatatiyakà. Yesaü bhikkhu a¤¤ataraü và a¤¤ataraü và àpajjitvà, yàvatihaü jànaü pañicchàdeti, tàvatihaü tena bhikkhunà akàmà parivatthabbaü. Parivutthaparivàsena bhikkhunà uttarichàrattaü bhikkhumànattàya pañipajjitabbaü. Ciõõamànatto bhikkhu: yattha siyà vãsatigaõo bhikkhusaïgho, tattha so bhikkhu abbhetabbo. Ekena pi ce åno vãsatigaõo bhikkhusaïgho taü bhikkhuü abbheyya, so ca bhikkhu anabbhito, te ca bhikkhå gàrayhà. Ayaü tattha sàmãci.
Tatthàyasmante pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Dutiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Tatiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Parisuddhetthàyasmanto, tasmà tuõhã, evam-etaü dhàrayàmi.
Saïghàdiseso niññhito
 
(Aniyatuddeso)
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 484] [\x 484/]
Ime kho panàyasmanto dve aniyatà dhammà uddesaü àgacchanti.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 486] [\x 486/]
Aniy 1: Pañhama-aniyatasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu màtugàmena saddhiü eko ekàya raho pañicchanne àsane alaïkammaniye nisajjaü kappeyya. Tam-enaü saddheyyavacasà upàsikà disvà tiõõaü dhammànaü a¤¤atarena vadeyya: pàràjikena và saïghàdisesena và pàcittiyena và. Nisajjaü bhikkhu pañijànamàno tiõõaü dhammànaü a¤¤atarena kàretabbo: pàràjikena và saïghàdisesena và pàcittiyena và. Yena và sà saddheyyavacasà upàsikà vadeyya, tena so bhikkhu kàretabbo. Ayaü dhammo aniyato.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 492] [\x 492/]
Aniy 2: Dutiya-aniyatasikkhàpadaü:
Na heva kho pana pañicchannaü àsanaü hoti nàlaïkammaniyaü. Ala¤-ca kho hoti màtugàmaü duññhullàhi vàcàhi obhàsituü. Yo pana bhikkhu tathàråpe àsane màtugàmena saddhiü eko ekàya raho nisajjaü kappeyya. Tam-enaü saddheyyavacasà upàsikà disvà dvinnaü dhammànaü a¤¤atarena vadeyya saïghàdisesena và pàcittiyena và. Nisajjaü bhikkhu pañijànamàno dvinnaü dhammànaü a¤¤atarena kàretabbo saïghàdisesena và pàcittiyena và. Yena và sà saddheyyavacasà upàsikà vadeyya, tena so bhikkhu kàretabbo. Ayam-pi dhammo aniyato.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 496] [\x 496/]
Uddiññhà kho àyasmanto dve aniyatà dhammà.
Tatthàyasmante pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Dutiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Tatiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Parisuddhetthàyasmanto, tasmà tuõhã, evam-etaü dhàrayàmi.
Aniyato niññhito
 
(Nissaggiyapàcittiyà)
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 498] [\x 498/]
Ime kho panàyasmanto tiüsa nissaggiyà pàcittiyà dhammà uddesaü àgacchanti.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 500] [\x 500/]
NP 1: Pañhamakañhinasikkhàpadaü:
Niññhitacãvarasmiü bhikkhunà ubbhatasmiü kañhine, dasàhaparamaü atirekacãvaraü dhàretabbaü. Taü atikkàmayato, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 504] [\x 504/]
NP 2: Dutiyakañhinasikkhàpadaü:
Niññhitacãvarasmiü bhikkhunà ubbhatasmiü kañhine, ekarattam-pi ce bhikkhu ticãvarena vippavaseyya, a¤¤atra bhikkhusammutiyà, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 512] [\x 512/]
NP 3: Tatiyakañhinasikkhàpadaü:
Niññhitacãvarasmiü bhikkhunà ubbhatasmiü kañhine, bhikkhuno paneva akàlacãvaraü uppajjeyya. âkaïkhamànena bhikkhunà pañiggahetabbaü, pañiggahetvà khippam-eva kàretabbaü. No cassa pàripåri, màsaparamaü tena bhikkhunà taü cãvaraü nikkhipitabbaü ånassa pàripåriyà, satiyà paccàsàya. Tato ce uttariü nikkhipeyya, satiyà pi paccàsàya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 518] [\x 518/]
NP 4: Puràõacãvarasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu a¤¤àtikàya bhikkhuniyà puràõacãvaraü dhovàpeyya và rajàpeyya và àkoñàpeyya và, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 524] [\x 524/]
NP 5: Cãvarapañiggahaõasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu a¤¤àtikàya bhikkhuniyà hatthato cãvaraü pañiggaõheyya, a¤¤atra pàrivaññakà, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 530] [\x 530/]
NP 6: A¤¤àtakavi¤¤attisikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu a¤¤àtakaü gahapatiü và gahapatàniü và cãvaraü vi¤¤àpeyya, a¤¤atra samayà, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
Tatthàyaü samayo: acchinnacãvaro và hoti bhikkhu naññhacãvaro và - ayaü tattha samayo.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 534] [\x 534/]
NP 7: Tatuttarisikkhàpadaü:
Ta¤-ce a¤¤àtako gahapati và gahapatànã và bahåhi cãvarehi abhihaññhuü pavàreyya, santaruttaraparamaü tena bhikkhunà tato cãvaraü sàditabbaü. Tato ce uttariü 12 sàdiyeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 536] [\x 536/]
NP 8: Pañhama-upakkhañasikkhàpadaü:
Bhikkhuü paneva uddissa a¤¤àtakassa gahapatissa và gahapatàniyà và cãvaracetàpannaü 13 upakkhañaü hoti: ßIminà cãvaracetàpannena cãvaraü cetàpetvà itthannàmaü bhikkhuü cãvarena acchàdessàmãû-ti. Tatra ce so bhikkhu pubbe appavàrito upasaïkamitvà cãvare vikappaü àpajjeyya: ßSàdhu vata maü àyasmà iminà cãvaracetàpannena evaråpaü và evaråpaü và cãvaraü cetàpetvà acchàdehãû-ti. Kalyàõakamyataü upàdàya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 542] [\x 542/]
NP 9: Dutiya-upakkhañasikkhàpadaü:
Bhikkhuü paneva uddissa ubhinnaü a¤¤àtakànaü gahapatãnaü và gahapatànãnaü và paccekacãvaracetàpannà upakkhañà honti: ßImehi mayaü paccekacãvaracetàpannehi paccekacãvaràni cetàpetvà itthannàmaü bhikkhuü cãvarehi acchàdessàmàû-ti. Tatra ce so bhikkhu pubbe appavàrito upasaïkamitvà cãvare vikappaü àpajjeyya: ßSàdhu vata maü àyasmanto imehi paccekacãvaracetàpannehi evaråpaü và evaråpaü và cãvaraü cetàpetvà acchàdetha ubho va santà ekenàû-ti. Kalyàõakamyataü upàdàya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 548] [\x 548/]
NP 10: Ràjasikkhàpadaü:
Bhikkhuü paneva uddissa ràjà và ràjabhoggo và bràhmaõo và gahapatiko và dåtena cãvaracetàpannaü pahiõeyya: ßIminà cãvaracetàpanena cãvaraü cetàpetvà itthannàmaü bhikkhuü cãvarena acchàdehãû-ti. So ce dåto taü bhikkhuü upasaïkamitvà evaü vadeyya: ßIdaü kho bhante àyasmantaü uddissa cãvaracetàpannaü àbhataü, pañiggaõhàtu 14 àyasmà cãvaracetàpannanû-ti. Tena bhikkhunà so dåto evam-assa vacanãyo: ßNa kho mayaü àvuso cãvaracetàpannaü pañiggaõhàma cãvara¤-ca kho mayaü pañiggaõhàma kàlena kappiyanû-ti. So ce dåto taü bhikkhuü evaü vadeyya: ßAtthi panàyasmato koci veyyàvacakaroû ti. ßCãvaratthikena bhikkhave bhikkhunà veyyàvaccakaro niddisitabbo àràmiko và upàsako và: ßEso kho àvuso bhikkhånaü veyyàvaccakaroû ti. So ce dåto taü veyyàvaccakaraü sa¤¤àpetvà taü bhikkhuü upasaïkamitvà evaü vadeyya: ßYaü kho bhante àyasmà veyyàvaccakaraü niddisi, sa¤¤atto so mayà. Upasaïkamatu àyasmà kàlena, cãvarena taü acchàdessatãû-ti. Cãvaratthikena bhikkhave bhikkhunà veyyàvaccakaro upasaïkamitvà dvattikkhattuü codetabbo sàretabbo: ßAttho me àvuso cãvarenàû-ti. Dvattikkhattuü codayamàno sàrayamàno taü cãvaraü abhinipphàdeyya, iccetaü kusalaü. No ce abhinipphàdeyya, catukkhattuü pa¤cakkhattuü chakkhattuü paramaü tuõhãbhåtena uddissa ñhàtabbaü. Catukkhattuü pa¤cakkhattuü chakkhattuü paramaü tuõhãbhåto uddissa tiññhamàno taü cãvaraü abhinipphàdeyya, iccetaü kusalaü. Tato ce uttariü vàyamamàno taü cãvaraü abhinipphàdeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
No ce abhinipphàdeyya, yatassa cãvaracetàpannaü àbhataü tattha sàmaü và gantabbaü dåto và pàhetabbo: ßYaü kho tumhe àyasmanto bhikkhuü uddissa cãvaracetàpannaü pahiõittha, na taü tassa bhikkhuno ki¤ci atthaü anubhoti, yu¤jantàyasmanto sakaü, mà vo sakaü vinassàû-ti. Ayaü tattha sàmãci.
Cãvaravaggo pañhamo

 
[BJT Vol I, Page 554] [\x 554/]
NP 11: Kosiyasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu Kosiyamissakaü santhataü kàràpeyya, nissaggiyaü 15 pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 556] [\x 556/]
NP 12: Suddhakàëakasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu suddhakàëakànaü eëakalomànaü santhataü kàràpeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 560] [\x 560/]
NP 13: Dvebhàgasikkhàpadaü:
Navaü pana bhikkhunà santhataü kàrayamànena dve bhàgà suddhakàëakànaü eëakalomànaü àdàtabbà, tatiyaü odàtànaü catutthaü gocariyànaü. Anàdà ce bhikkhu dve bhàge suddhakàëakànaü eëakalomànaü tatiyaü odàtànaü catutthaü gocariyànaü navaü santhataü kàràpeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 564] [\x 564/]
NP 14: Chabbassisikkhàpadaü:
Navaü pana bhikkhunà santhataü kàràpetvà chabbassàni dhàretabbaü. Orena ce channaü vassànaü taü santhataü vissajjetvà và avissajjetvà và a¤¤aü navaü santhataü kàràpeyya, a¤¤atra bhikkhusammutiyà, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 570] [\x 570/]
NP 15: Nisãdanasanthatasikkhàpadaü:
Nisãdanasanthataü pana bhikkhunà kàrayamànena puràõasanthatassa sàmantà Sugatavidatthã àdàtabbà dubbaõõakaraõàya, ànàda ce bhikkhu puràõasanthatassa sàmantà Sugatavidatthiü navaü nisãdanasanthataü kàràpeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 572] [\x 572/]
NP 16: Eëakalomasikkhàpadaü:
Bhikkhuno paneva addhànamaggappañipannassa eëakalomàni uppajjeyyuü. âkaïkhamànena bhikkhunà pañiggahetabbàni. Pañiggahetvà tiyojanaparamaü sahatthà haritabbàni, asante hàrake. Tato ce uttariü hareyya asante pi hàrake, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 576] [\x 576/]
NP 17: Eëakalomadhovàpanasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu a¤¤àtikàya bhikkhuniyà eëakalomàni dhovàpeyya và rajàpeyya và vijañàpeyya và, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 580] [\x 580/]
NP 18: Råpiyasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu jàtaråparajataü uggaõheyya và uggaõhàpeyya và upanikkhittaü và sàdiyeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 584] [\x 584/]
NP 19: Råpiyasaüvohàrasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu nànappakàrakaü råpiyasaüvohàraü samàpajjeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 590] [\x 590/]
NP 20: Kayavikkayasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu nànappakàrakaü kayavikkayaü samàpajjeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
Kosiyavaggo dutiyo
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 594] [\x 594/]
NP 21: Pattasikkhàpadaü:
Dasàhaparamaü atirekapatto dhàretabbo. Taü atikkàmayato, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 600] [\x 600/]
NP 22: ænapa¤cabandhanasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu ånapa¤cabandhanena pattena a¤¤aü navaü pattaü cetàpeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
Tena bhikkhunà so patto bhikkhuparisàya nissajitabbo. Yo ca tassà bhikkhuparisàya pattapariyanto, so tassa bhikkhuno padàtabbo: ßAyaü te bhikkhu patto, yàva bhedanàya dhàretabboû ti. Ayaü tattha sàmãci.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 610] [\x 610/]
NP 23: Bhesajjasikkhàpadaü:
Yàni kho pana tàni gilànànaü bhikkhånaü pañisàyanãyàni bhesajjàni, seyyathãdaü: sappi, navanãtaü, telaü, madhu, phàõitaü; tàni pañiggahetvà sattàhaparamaü sannidhikàrakaü paribhu¤jitabbàni. Taü atikkàmayato, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 614] [\x 614/]
NP 24: Vassikasàñikasikkhàpadaü:
ßMàso seso gimhànanû-ti: bhikkhunà vassikasàñikacãvaraü pariyesitabbam. ßAddhamàso seso gimhànanû-ti: katvà nivàsetabbaü. ßOrena ce màso seso gimhànanû-ti: vassikasàñikacãvaraü pariyeseyya. ßOrenaddhamàso seso gimhànanû-ti: katvà nivàseyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 618] [\x 618/]
NP 25: Cãvara-acchindanasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu bhikkhussa sàmaü cãvaraü datvà kupito 16 anattamano acchindeyya và acchindàpeyya và, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 620] [\x 620/]
NP 26: Suttavi¤¤attisikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu sàmaü suttaü vi¤¤àpetvà tantavàyehi cãvaraü vàyàpeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 624] [\x 624/]
NP 27: Mahàpesakàrasikkhàpadaü:
Bhikkhuü paneva uddissa a¤¤àtako gahapati và gahapatànã và tantavàyehi cãvaraü vàyàpeyya. Tatra ce so bhikkhu pubbe appavàrito tantavàye upasaïkamitvà cãvare vikappaü àpajjeyya: ßIdaü kho àvuso cãvaraü maü uddissa viyyati àyata¤-ca karotha, vitthata¤-ca, appita¤-ca, suvãta¤-ca, suppavàyita¤-ca, suvilekhita¤-ca, suvitacchita¤-ca karotha; appeva nàma mayam-pi àyasmantànaü ki¤cimattaü anupadajjeyyàmàû-ti. Eva¤-ca so bhikkhu vatvà ki¤cimattaü anupadajjeyya antamaso piõóapàtamattam-pi, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 630] [\x 630/]
NP 28: Accekacãvarasikkhàpadaü:
Dasàhànàgataü kattikatemàsikapuõõamaü, bhikkhuno paneva accekacãvaraü uppajjeyya, accekaü ma¤¤amànena bhikkhunà pañiggahetabbaü. Pañiggahetvà yàva cãvarakàlasamayaü nikkhipitabbaü. Tato ce uttariü nikkhipeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 634] [\x 634/]
NP 29: Sàsaïkhasikkhàpadaü:
Upavassaü kho pana kattikapuõõamaü yàni kho pana tàni àra¤¤akàni senàsanàni sàsaïkasammatàni sappañibhayàni, tathà råpesu bhikkhu senàsanesu viharanto àkaïkhamàno tiõõaü cãvarànaü a¤¤ataraü cãvaraü antaraghare nikkhipeyya. Siyà ca tassa bhikkhuno kocid-eva paccayo tena cãvarena vippavàsàya, chàrattaparamaü tena bhikkhunà tena cãvarena vippavasitabbaü. Tato ce uttariü vippavaseyya, a¤¤atra bhikkhusammutiyà, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 638] [\x 638/]
NP 30: Pariõatasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu jànaü saïghikaü làbhaü pariõataü attano pariõàmeyya, nissaggiyaü pàcittiyaü.
Pattavaggo tatiyo
 
[BJT Vol I, Page 640] [\x 640/]
Uddiññhà kho àyasmanto tiüsa nissaggiyà pàcittiyà dhammà.
Tatthàyasmante pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Dutiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Tatiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Parisuddhetthàyasmanto, tasmà tuõhã, evam-etaü dhàrayàmi.
Nissaggiyapàcittiyà niññhità
 
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End Notes
1 Editor’s note: It seems every tradition has its own way of introducing the recital of the Pàtimokkha. Here only two of the simpler ways are included. Either the âràdhanà & Okàsakammaü is recited; or the Pubbakiccaü (but not both).
2 The bracketed headings for the various sections are supplied from the ChS edition of the Bhikkhupàtimokkhapàëi.
3 BJT note: Suõàtu me bhante saïgho, ajja uposatho paõõaraso - PTS
4 The following 5 lines are not in BJT.
5 BJT note: This reading is not seen in some books.
6 The Pàràjika rules in BJT are listed simply as Pañhama-, Dutiya-, Tatiya-, & Catutthapàràjikaü; without further identification. Most of the other rules have mnenomic titles usually connected with the wording of the rule, or the occasion for it (but see the notes to the Pàñidesanãya & Sekhiya rules below). The titles in brackets in this section are taken from the ChS edition of the text.
7 Editor’s note: BJT, Bhikkhuhi here, elsewhere bhikkhåhi.
8 Editor’s note: BJT, Kaccãttha here, elsewhere kaccittha.
9 Editor’s note: BJT, Tuõhi here, elsewhere tuõhã.
10 Editor’s note: this is the end title in BJT, the heading simply reads Pañhamasaïghàdisesà, but all the rest of these training rules are given distinctive titles.
11 BJT note: Pañinissajjeyya - ChS.
12 BJT note: Uttari - ChS
13 BJT note: Cãvaracetàpanaü - Thai.
14 Editor’s note: BJT, patiggaõh- here, but pañigaõh- in NP5 above.
15 Editor’s note: BJT, Nissaggãyaü, printer’s error.
16 Editor’s note: BJT, Kåpito - printer’s error.
   
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(Suddhapàcittiyà)     (Pàñidesanãyà)
(Suddhapàcittiyà)
Ime kho panàyasmanto dvenavuti pàcittiyà dhammà uddesaü àgacchanti.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 004] [\x 004/]
Pàc 1: Musàvàdasikkhàpadaü:
Sampajànamusàvàde, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 016] [\x 016/]
Pàc 2: Omasavàdasikkhàpadaü:
Omasavàde, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 042] [\x 042/]
Pàc 3: Pesu¤¤asikkhàpadaü:
Bhikkhupesu¤¤e, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 052] [\x 052/]
Pàc 4: Padasodhammasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu anupasampannaü padaso dhammaü vàceyya, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 058] [\x 058/]
Pàc 5: Sahaseyyasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu anupasampannena uttariü 15 dirattatirattaü sahaseyyaü kappeyya, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 064] [\x 064/]
Pàc 6: Dutiyasahaseyyasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu màtugàmena sahaseyyaü kappeyya, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 068] [\x 068/]
Pàc 7: Dhammadesanàsikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu màtugàmassa uttariü chappa¤cavàcàhi dhammaü deseyya, a¤¤atra vi¤¤unà purisaviggahena, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 078] [\x 078/]
Pàc 8: Bhåtàrocanasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu anupasampannassa uttarimanussadhammaü àroceyya bhåtasmiü, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 098] [\x 098/]
Pàc 9: Duññhullàrocanasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu bhikkhussa duññhullaü àpattiü anupasampannassa àroceyya, a¤¤atra bhikkhusammutiyà, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 102] [\x 102/]
Pàc 10: Pathavikhaõanasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu pañhaviü khaõeyya và khaõàpeyya và, pàcittiyaü.
Musàvàdàvaggo pañhamo

 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 106] [\x 106/]
Pàc 11: Bhåtagàmasikkhàpadaü:
Bhåtagàmapàtavyatàya, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 112] [\x 112/]
Pàc 12: A¤¤avàdakasikkhàpadaü:
A¤¤avàdake vihesake, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 118] [\x 118/]
Pàc 13: Ujjhàyanasikkhàpadaü:
Ujjhàpanake khãyanake, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 120] [\x 120/]
Pàc 14: Pañhamasenàsanasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu saïghikaü ma¤caü và pãñhaü và bhisiü và kocchaü và ajjhokàse santharitvà và santharàpetvà và, taü pakkamanto neva uddhareyya na uddharàpeyya, anàpucchaü và gaccheyya, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 124] [\x 124/]
Pàc 15: Dutiyasenàsanasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu saïghike vihàre seyyaü santharitvà và santharàpetvà và, taü pakkamanto neva uddhareyya na uddharàpeyya, anàpucchaü và gaccheyya, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 128] [\x 128/]
Pàc 16: Anupakhajjasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu saïghike vihàre jànaü pubbåpagataü bhikkhuü anupakhajja seyyaü kappeyya: ßYassa sambàdho bhavissati, so pakkamissatãû-ti. Etad-eva paccayaü karitvà ana¤¤aü, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 132] [\x 132/]
Pàc 17: Nikkaóóhanasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu bhikkhuü kupito anattamano saïghikà vihàrà nikkaóóheyya và nikkaóóhàpeyya và, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 136] [\x 136/]
Pàc 18: Vehàsakåñisikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu saïghike vihàre uparivehàsakuñiyà àhaccapàdakaü ma¤caü và pãñhaü và abhinisãdeyya và abhinipajjeyya và, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 140] [\x 140/]
Pàc 19: Mahallakavihàrasikkhàpadaü:
Mahallakaü pana bhikkhunà vihàraü kàrayamànena, yàva dvàrakosà aggalaññhapanàya àlokasandhiparikammàya dvatticchadanassa pariyàyaü, appaharite ñhitena adhiññhàtabbaü. Tato ce uttariü appaharite pi ñhito adhiññhaheyya, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 142] [\x 142/]
Pàc 20: Sappàõasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu jànaü sappàõakaü udakaü tiõaü và mattikaü và si¤ceyya và si¤càpeyya và, pàcittiyaü.
Bhåtagàmavaggo dutiyo

 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 148] [\x 148/]
Pàc 21: Ovàdasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu asammato bhikkhuniyo ovadeyya, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 160] [\x 160/]
Pàc 22: Atthaïgatasikkhàpadaü:
Sammato pi ce bhikkhu atthaïgate suriye bhikkhuniyo ovadeyya, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page ] [\x /]
Pàc 23: Bhikkhunåpassayasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu bhikkhunåpassayaü upsaïkamitvà bhikkhuniyo ovadeyya, a¤¤atra samayà, pàcittiyaü.
Tatthàyaü samayo: gilànà hoti bhikkhunã - ayaü tattha samayo.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 168] [\x 168/]
Pàc 24: âmisasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu evaü vadeyya: ßâmisahetu bhikkhå 16 bhikkhuniyo ovadantãû-ti, pàcittiyaü.

[BJT Vol II (I), Page 174] [\x 174/]
Pàc 25: Cãvaradànasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu a¤¤àtikàya bhikkhuniyà cãvaraü dadeyya, a¤¤atra pàrivaññakà, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 178] [\x 178/]
Pàc 26: Cãvarasibbanasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu a¤¤àtikàya bhikkhuniyà cãvaraü sibbeyya và sibbàpeyya và, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page ] [\x /]
Pàc 27: Saüvidhànasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu 17 bhikkhuniyà saddhiü saüvidhàya ekaddhànamaggaü pañipajjeyya antamaso gàmantaram-pi, a¤¤atra samayà, pàcittiyaü.
Tatthàyaü samayo: satthagamanãyo hoti maggo sàsaïkasammato sappañibhayo - ayaü tattha samayo.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 186] [\x 186/]
Pàc 28: Nàvàbhiråhatasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu bhikkhuniyà saddhiü saüvidhàya ekaü nàvaü abhiråheyya uddhagàminiü 18 và adhogàminiü và, a¤¤atra tiriyaü taraõàya, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 192] [\x 192/]
Pàc 29: Paripàcitasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu jànaü bhikkhunãparipàcitaü piõóapàtaü bhu¤jeyya, a¤¤atra pubbe gihãsamàrambhà, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 196] [\x 196/]
Pàc 30: Rahonisajjasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu bhikkhuniyà saddhiü eko ekàya raho nisajjaü kappeyya, pàcittiyaü.
Bhikkhunovàdavaggo tatiyo

 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 202] [\x 202/]
Pàc 31: âvasathapiõóasikkhàpadaü:
Agilànena bhikkhunà eko àvasathapiõóo bhu¤jitabbo. Tato ce uttariü bhu¤jeyya, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 210] [\x 210/]
Pàc 32: Gaõabhojanasikkhàpadaü:
Gaõabhojane, a¤¤atra samayà, pàcittiyaü.
Tatthàyaü samayo: gilànasamayo, cãvaradànasamayo, cãvarakàrasamayo, addhànagamanasamayo, nàvàbhiråhanasamayo, mahàsamayo, samaõabhattasamayo - ayaü tattha samayo.
 
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 218] [\x 218/]
Pàc 33: Paramparabhojanasikkhàpadaü:
Paramparabhojane, a¤¤atra samayà, pàcittiyaü.
Tatthàyaü samayo: gilànasamayo, cãvaradànasamayo, cãvarakàrasamayo - ayaü tattha samayo.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 224] [\x 224/]
Pàc 34: Kàõamàtusikkhàpadaü:
Bhikkhuü paneva kulaü upagataü påvehi và manthehi và abhihaññhuü pavàreyya. âkaïkhamànena bhikkhunà dvattipattapårà pañiggahetabbà. Tato ce uttariü pañiggaõheyya, pàcittiyaü.
Dvattipattapåre pañiggahetvà tato nãharitvà bhikkhåhi saddhiü saüvibhajitabbaü. Ayaü tattha sàmãci.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 230] [\x 230/]
Pàc 35: Pañhamapavàraõasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu bhuttàvã pavàrito anatirittaü, khàdanãyaü và bhojanãyaü và khàdeyya và bhu¤jeyya và, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 234] [\x 234/]
Pàc 36: Dutiyapavàraõasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu bhikkhuü bhuttàviü pavàritaü anatirittena khàdanãyena và bhojanãyena và abhihaññhuü pavàreyya: ßHanda bhikkhu khàda và bhu¤ja vàû-ti, jànaü àsàdanàpekkho, bhuttasmiü, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 238] [\x 238/]
Pàc 37: Vikàlabhojanasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu vikàle khàdanãyaü và bhojanãyaü và khàdeyya và bhu¤jeyya và, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 242] [\x 242/]
Pàc 38: Sannidhikàrasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu 19 sannidhikàrakaü khàdanãyaü và bhojanãyaü và khàdeyya và bhu¤jeyya và, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 246] [\x 246/]
Pàc 39: Paõãtabhojanasikkhàpadaü:
Yàni kho pana tàni paõãtabhojanàni, seyyathãdaü: sappi, navanãtaü, telaü, madhu, phàõitaü, maccho, maüsaü, khãraü, dadhi. Yo pana bhikkhu evaråpàni paõãtabhojanàni agilàno attano atthàya vi¤¤àpetvà bhu¤jeyya, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 250] [\x 250/]
Pàc 40: Dantaponasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu adinnaü mukhadvàraü àhàraü àhareyya, a¤¤atra udakadantaponà, pàcittiyaü.
Bhojanavaggo catuttho

 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 254] [\x 254/]
Pàc 41: Acelakasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu acelakassa và paribbàjakassa và paribbàjikàya và sahatthà khàdanãyaü và bhojanãyaü và dadeyya, pàcittiyaü.
 
 [BJT Vol II (I), Page 256] [\x 256/]
Pàc 42: Uyyojanasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu bhikkhuü: ßEhàvuso gàmaü và nigamaü và piõóàya pavisissàmàû-ti. Tassa dàpetvà và adàpetvà và uyyojeyya: ßGacchàvuso na me tayà saddhiü kathà và nisajjà và phàsu hoti, ekakassa me kathà và nisajjà và phàsu hotãû-ti. Etad-eva paccayaü karitvà ana¤¤aü, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 260] [\x 260/]
Pàc 43: Sabhojanasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu sabhojane kule anupakhajja nisajjaü kappeyya, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 264] [\x 264/]
Pàc 44: Pañhamarahonisajjasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu 20 màtugàmena saddhiü raho pañicchanne àsane nisajjaü kappeyya, pàcittiyaü.

[BJT Vol II (I), Page 266] [\x 266/]
Pàc 45: Dutiyarahonisajjasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu màtugàmena saddhiü eko ekàya raho nisajjaü kappeyya, pàcittiyaü.
 
 [BJT Vol II (I), Page 274] [\x 274/]
Pàc 46: Càrittasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu nimantito sabhatto samàno santaü bhikkhuü anàpucchà purebhattaü và pacchàbhattaü và kulesu càrittaü àpajjeyya, a¤¤atra samayà, pàcittiyaü.
Tatthàyaü samayo: cãvaradànasamayo, cãvarakàrasamayo - ayaü tattha samayo.

 [BJT Vol II (I), Page 280] [\x 280/]
Pàc 47: Mahànàmasikkhàpadaü:
Agilànena bhikkhunà càtumàsappaccayapavàraõà sàditabbà, a¤¤atra punapavàraõàya, a¤¤atra niccapavàraõàya. Tato ce uttariü sàdiyeyya, pàcittiyaü.
 
 [BJT Vol II (I), Page 286] [\x 286/]
Pàc 48: Uyyuttasenàsikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu uyyuttaü senaü dassanàya gaccheyya, a¤¤atra tathàråpappaccayà, pàcittiyaü.
 
 [BJT Vol II (I), Page 288] [\x 288/]
Pàc 49: Senàvàsasikkhàpadaü:
Siyà ca tassa bhikkhuno kocid-eva paccayo senaü gamanàya, dirattatirattaü tena bhikkhunà senàya vasitabbaü. Tato ce uttariü vaseyya, pàcittiyaü.
 
 [BJT Vol II (I), Page 292] [\x 292/]
Pàc 50: Uyyodhikasikkhàpadaü:
Dirattatirattaü ce bhikkhu senàya vasamàno uyyodhikaü và balaggaü và senàbyåhaü và anãkadassanaü và gaccheyya, pàcittiyaü.
Acelakavaggo pa¤camo

[BJT Vol II (I), Page 300] [\x 300/]
  Pàc 51: Suràpànasikkhàpadaü:
Suràmerayapàne, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 302] [\x 302/]
Pàc 52: Aïgulipatodakasikkhàpadaü:
Aïgulipatodake, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 304] [\x 304/]
Pàc 53: Hassadhammasikkhàpadaü:
Udake hassadhamme, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 306] [\x 306/]
Pàc 54: Anàdariyasikkhapadaü:
Anàdariye, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 310] [\x 310/]
Pàc 55: Bhiüsàpanakasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu bhikkhuü bhiüsàpeyya, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 314] [\x 314/]
Pàc 56: Jotisikkhapadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu agilàno visibbanàpekkho jotiü samàdaheyya và samàdahàpeyya và, a¤¤atra tathàråpappaccayà, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 322] [\x 322/]
Pàc 57: Nahàtasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu orenaddhamàsaü nahàyeyya, a¤¤atra samayà, pàcittiyaü.
Tatthàyaü samayo: diyaóóho màso seso gimhànan-ti, vassànassa pañhamo màso, iccete aóóhateyyamàsà, uõhasamayo, pariëàhasamayo, gilànasamayo, kammasamayo, addhànagamanasamayo, vàtavuññhisamayo - ayaü tattha samayo.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 324] [\x 324/]
Pàc 58: Dubbaõõakarasikkhàpadaü:
Navaü pana bhikkhunà cãvaralàbhena tiõõaü dubbaõõakaraõànaü a¤¤ataraü dubbaõõakaraõaü àdàtabbaü, nãlaü và kaddamaü và kàëasàmaü và. Anàdà ce bhikkhu tiõõaü dubbaõõakaraõànaü a¤¤ataraü dubbaõõakaraõaü navaü cãvaraü paribhu¤jeyya, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 328] [\x 328/]
Pàc 59: Vikappanasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu bhikkhussa và bhikkhuniyà và sikkhamànàya và sàmaõerassa và sàmaõeriyà và sàmaü cãvaraü vikappetvà apaccuddhàrakaü paribhu¤jeyya, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 332] [\x 332/]
Pàc 60: Cãvaràpanidhànasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu 21 bhikkhussa pattaü và cãvaraü và nisãdanaü và såcigharaü và kàyabandhanaü và apanidheyya và apanidhàpeyya và antamaso hassàpekkho pi, pàcittiyaü.
Suràpànavaggo chaññho

 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 336] [\x 336/]
Pàc 61: Sa¤ciccapàõasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu sa¤cicca pàõaü jãvità voropeyya, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 338] [\x 338/]
Pàc 62: Sappàõakasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu jànaü sappàõakaü udakaü paribhu¤jeyya, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 340] [\x 340/]
Pàc 63: Ukkoñanasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu jànaü yathàdhammaü nihatàdhikaraõaü punakammàya ukkoñeyya, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 344] [\x 344/]
Pàc 64: Duññhullasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu bhikkhussa jànaü duññhullaü àpattiü pañicchàdeyya, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 348] [\x 348/]
Pàc 65: ænavãsativassasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu jànaü ånavãsativassaü puggalaü upasampàdeyya, so ca puggalo anupasampanno, te ca bhikkhå gàrayhà. Idaü tasmiü pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 352] [\x 352/]
Pàc 66: Theyyasatthasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu jànaü theyyasatthena saddhiü saüvidhàya ekaddhànamaggaü pañipajjeyya antamaso gàmantaram-pi, pàcittiyaü
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 354] [\x 354/]
Pàc 67: Saüvidhànasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu màtugàmena saddhiü saüvidhàya ekaddhànamaggaü pañipajjeyya antamaso gàmantaram-pi, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 362] [\x 362/]
Pàc 68: Ariññhasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu evaü vadeyya: ßTathàhaü Bhagavatà dhammaü desitaü àjànàmi. Yathà yeme antaràyikà dhammà vuttà Bhagavatà, te pañisevato nàlaü antaràyàyàû-ti. So bhikkhu bhikkhåhi evam-assa vacanãyo: ßMà àyasmà evaü avaca. Mà Bhagavantaü abbhàcikkhi, na hi sàdhu Bhagavato abbhakkhànaü, na hi Bhagavà evaü vadeyya. Anekapariyàyena àvuso antaràyikà dhammà antaràyikà vuttà Bhagavatà, ala¤-ca pana te pañisevato antaràyàyàû-ti. Eva¤-ca pana so bhikkhu bhikkhåhi vuccamàno tatheva paggaõheyya, so bhikkhu bhikkhåhi yàvatatiyaü samanubhàsitabbo tassa pañinissaggàya. Yàvatatiyaü ce samanubhàsiyamàno tam-pañinissajjeyya iccetaü kusalaü. No ce pañinissajjeyya, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 366] [\x 366/]
Pàc 69: Ukkhittasambhogasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu jànaü tathàvàdinà bhikkhunà akañànudhammena taü diññhiü appañinissaññhena saddhiü sambhu¤jeyya và saüvaseyya và saha và seyyaü kappeyya, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 374] [\x 374/]
Pàc 70: Kaõñakasikkhàpadaü:
Samaõuddeso pi ce evaü vadeyya: ßTathàhaü Bhagavatà dhammaü desitaü àjànàmi. Yathà yeme antaràyikà dhammà vuttà Bhagavatà, te pañisevato nàlaü antaràyàyàû-ti. So samaõuddeso bhikkhåhi evam-assa vacanãyo: ßMà àvuso samaõuddesa evaü avaca. Mà Bhagavantaü abbhàcikkhi, na hi sàdhu Bhagavato abbhakkhànaü, na hi Bhagavà evaü vadeyya. Anekapariyàyena àvuso samaõuddesa antaràyikà dhammà antaràyikà vuttà Bhagavatà, ala¤-ca pana te pañisevato antaràyàyàû-ti. Eva¤-ca pana so samaõuddeso bhikkhåhi vuccamàno tatheva paggaõheyya, so samaõuddeso bhikkhåhi evam-assa vacanãyo: ßAjjatagge te àvuso samaõuddesa na ceva so Bhagavà satthà apadisitabbo, yam-pi ca¤¤e samaõuddesà labhanti bhikkhåhi saddhiü dirattatirattaü sahaseyyaü, sàpi te natthi, cara pare vinassàû-ti. Yo pana bhikkhu 22 jànaü tathànàsitaü samaõuddesaü upalàpeyya và upaññhàpeyya và sambhu¤jeyya và saha và seyyaü kappeyya, pàcittiyaü.
Sappàõakavaggo sattamo

 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 380] [\x 380/]
Pàc 71: Sahadhammikasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu bhikkhåhi sahadhammikaü vuccamàno evaü vadeyya: ßNa tàvàhaü àvuso etasmiü sikkhàpade sikkhissàmi, yàva na a¤¤aü bhikkhuü vyattaü vinayadharaü paripucchàmãû-ti, pàcittiyaü.
Sikkhamànena bhikkhave bhikkhunà a¤¤àtabbaü paripucchitabbaü paripa¤hitabbaü. Ayaü tattha sàmãci.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 384] [\x 384/]
Pàc 72: Vilekhanasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu pàtimokkhe uddissamàne evaü vadeyya: ßKiü panimehi khuddànukhuddakehi sikkhàpadehi uddiññhehi, yàvad-eva kukkuccàya, vihesàya, vilekhàya saüvattantãû-ti. Sikkhàpadavivaõõake, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 388] [\x 388/]
Pàc 73: Mohanasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu anvaddhamàsaü pàtimokkhe uddissamàne evaü vadeyya: ßIdàneva kho ahaü jànàmi, ayam-pi kira dhammo suttàgato suttapariyàpanno anvaddhamàsaü uddesaü àgacchatãû-ti. Ta¤-ce bhikkhuü a¤¤e bhikkhå jàneyyum: ßNisinnapubbaü iminà bhikkhunà dvattikkhattuü pàtimokkhe uddissamàne. Ko pana vàdo bhiyyo na ca tassa bhikkhuno a¤¤àõakena mutti atthi. Ya¤-ca tattha àpattiü àpanno, ta¤-ca yathàdhammo kàretabbo, uttariü cassa moho àropetabbo: ßTassa te àvuso alàbhà, tassa te dulladdhaü. Yaü tvaü pàtimokkhe uddissamàne, na sàdhukaü aññhikatvà manasikarosãû-ti. Idaü tasmiü mohanake, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 392] [\x 392/]
Pàc 74: Pahàrasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu bhikkhussa kupito anattamano pahàraü dadeyya, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 396] [\x 396/]
Pàc 75: Talasattikasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu bhikkhussa kupito anattamano talasattikaü uggireyya, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 398] [\x 398/]
Pàc 76: Amålakasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu bhikkhuü amålakena saïghàdisesena anuddhaüseyya, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 400] [\x 400/]
Pàc 77: Sa¤ciccasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu bhikkhussa sa¤cicca kukkuccaü upadaheyya: ßItissa muhuttam-pi aphàsu bhavissatãû-ti. Etad-eva paccayaü karitvà ana¤¤aü, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 404] [\x 404/]
Pàc 78: Upassutisikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu bhikkhånaü bhaõóanajàtànaü kalahajàtànaü vivàdàpannànaü upassutiü tiññheyya: ßYaü ime bhaõissanti, taü sossàmãû-ti. Etad-eva paccayaü karitvà ana¤¤aü, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 408] [\x 408/]
Pàc 79: Kammapañibàhanasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu dhammikànaü kammànaü chandaü datvà pacchà khãyanadhammaü àpajjeyya, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 410] [\x 410/]
Pàc 80: Chandaüadatvàgamanasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu saïghe vinicchayakathàya vattamànàya chandaü adatvà uññhàyàsanà pakkameyya, pàcittiyaü.
 
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 412] [\x 412/]
Pàc 81: Dabbasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu samaggena saïghena cãvaraü datvà pacchà khãyanadhammaü àpajjeyya: ßYathàsanthutaü bhikkhå saïghikaü làbhaü pariõàmentãû-ti, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 418] [\x 418/]
Pàc 82: Pariõàmanasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu jànaü saïghikaü làbhaü pariõataü puggalassa pariõàmeyya, pàcittiyaü.
Sahadhammikavaggo aññhamo

 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 428] [\x 428/]
Pàc 83: Ràjantarapurasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu 23 ra¤¤o khattiyassa muddhàvisittassa anikkhantaràjake anãgataratanake pubbe appañisaüvidito indakhãlaü atikkàmeyya, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 434] [\x 434/]
Pàc 84: Ratanasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu ratanaü và ratanasammataü và, a¤¤atra ajjhàràmà và ajjhàvasathà và uggaõheyya và uggaõhàpeyya và, pàcittiyaü.
Ratanaü và pana bhikkhunà ratanasammataü và ajjhàràme và ajjhàvasathe và uggahetvà và uggahàpetvà và nikkhipitabbaü: ßYassa bhavissati, so harissatãû-ti. Ayaü tattha sàmãci.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 440] [\x 440/]
Pàc 85: Vikàlagàmappavesanasikkhàpadaü: 24
Yo pana bhikkhu santaü bhikkhuü anàpucchà vikàle gàmaü paviseyya, a¤¤atra tathàråpà accàyikà karaõãyà, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 444] [\x 444/]
Pàc 86: Såcigharasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu 25 aññhimayaü và dantamayaü và visàõamayaü và såcigharaü kàràpeyya, bhedanakaü, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 446] [\x 446/]
Pàc 87: Ma¤casikkhàpadaü:
Navaü pana bhikkhunà ma¤caü và pãñhaü và kàrayamànena aññhaïgulapàdakaü kàretabbaü Sugataïgulena, a¤¤atra heññhimàya añaniyà. Taü atikkàmayato, chedanakaü, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 450] [\x 450/]
Pàc 88: Tålonaddhasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu ma¤caü và pãñhaü và tålonaddhaü kàràpeyya, uddàlanakaü, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 452] [\x 452/]
Pàc 89: Nisãdanasikkhàpadaü:
Nisãdanaü pana bhikkhunà kàrayamànena pamàõikaü kàretabbaü. Tatridaü pamàõaü: dãghaso dve vidatthiyo Sugatavidatthiyà, tiriyaü diyaóóhaü, dasà vidatthi. Taü atikkàmayato, chedanakaü, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 456] [\x 456/]
Pàc 90: Kaõóupañicchàdisikkhàpadaü:
Kaõóupañicchàdiü pana bhikkhunà kàrayamànena pamàõikà kàretabbà. Tatridaü 26 pamàõaü: dãghaso catasso vidatthiyo Sugatavidatthiyà, tiriyaü dve vidatthiyo. Taü atikkàmayato, chedanakaü, pàcittiyaü.

[BJT Vol II (I), Page 458] [\x 458/]
Pàc 91: Vassikasàñikasikkhàpadaü:
Vassikasàñikaü pana bhikkhunà kàrayamànena pamàõikà kàretabbà. Tatridaü 27 pamàõaü: dãghaso cha vidatthiyo Sugatavidatthiyà, tiriyaü aóóhateyyà. Taü atikkàmayato, chedanakaü, pàcittiyaü.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 460] [\x 460/]
Pàc 92: Nandattherasikkhàpadaü:
Yo pana bhikkhu Sugatacãvarappamàõaü cãvaraü kàràpeyya atirekaü và, chedanakaü, pàcittiyaü.
Tatridaü 28 Sugatassa Sugatacãvarappamàõaü: dãghaso nava vidatthiyo Sugatavidatthiyà, tiriyaü cha vidatthiyo. Idaü Sugatassa Sugatacãvarappamàõaü.
Ràjavaggo navamo
 
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 462] [\x 462/]
Uddiññhà kho àyasmanto dvenavuti pàcittiyà dhammà.
Tatthàyasmante pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Dutiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Tatiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Parisuddhetthàyasmanto, tasmà tuõhã, evam-etaü dhàrayàmi.
Pàcittiyà niññhità
 
Next Section
 
End Notes
 
15 BJT note: Uttari - ChS.
16 BJT note: Therà bhikkhå - ChS.
17 Editor’s note: BJT, Bhikkhå - printer’s error.
18 BJT note: Uddhaü gàmaniü - ChS.
19 Editor’s note: BJT, Bhikkhå - printer’s error.
20 Editor’s note: BJT, Bhikkhå - printer’s error.
21 Editor’s note: BJT, Bhikkhå - printer’s error.
22 Editor’s note: BJT, Bhikkhå - printer’s error.
23 Editor’s note: BJT, Bhikkhå - printer’s error.
24 Editor’s note: BJT, against its normal practice writes the title as two words: Vikàle gàmappavesanasikkhàpadaü.
25 Editor’s note: BJT, Bhikkhå - printer’s error.
26 Editor’s note: BJT, Tatrãdaü - BJT wavers between Tatridaü & tatrãdaü, for the sake of consistency the former spelling has been preferred here.
27 Editor’s note: BJT, Tatrãdaü - see note above.
28 Editor’s note: BJT, Tatrãdaü - see note above.


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(Pàñidesanãyà)
Ime kho panàyasmanto cattàro pàñidesanãyà dhammà uddesaü àgacchanti.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 466] [\x 466/] 
Pàñ 1: Pañhamapàñidesanãyasikkhàpadaü: 29
Yo pana bhikkhu a¤¤àtikàya bhikkhuniyà antaragharaü paviññhàya hatthato khàdanãyaü và bhojanãyaü và sahatthà pañiggahetvà khàdeyya và bhu¤jeyya và. Pañidesetabbaü tena bhikkhunà: ßGàrayhaü àvuso dhammaü àpajjiü, asappàyaü, pàñidesanãyaü, taü pañidesemãû-ti.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 468] [\x 468/] 
Pàñ 2: Dutiyapàñidesanãyasikkhàpadaü:
Bhikkhå paneva kulesu nimantità bhu¤janti. Tatra ce sà bhikkhunã vosàsamànaråpà ñhità hoti: ßIdha såpaü detha, idha odanaü dethàû-ti. Tehi bhikkhåhi sà bhikkhunã apasàdetabbà: ßApasakka tàva bhagini, yàva bhikkhå bhu¤janti.û Ekassa pi ce 30 bhikkhuno nappañibhàseyya taü bhikkhuniü apasàdetuü: ßApasakka tàva bhagini, yàva bhikkhå bhu¤jantãû-ti. Pañidesetabbaü tehi bhikkhåhi: ßGàrayhaü àvuso dhammaü àpajjimhà, asappàyaü, pàñidesanãyaü, taü pañidesemàû-ti.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 476] [\x 476/] 
Pàñ 3: Tatiyapàñidesanãyasikkhàpadaü:
Yàni kho pana tàni sekhasammatàni kulàni. Yo pana bhikkhu tathàråpesu sekhasammatesu kulesu pubbe animantito agilàno khàdanãyaü và bhojanãyaü và sahatthà pañiggahetvà khàdeyya và bhu¤jeyya và. Pañidesetabbaü tena bhikkhunà: ßGàrayhaü àvuso dhammaü àpajjiü, asappàyaü, pàñidesanãyaü, taü pañidesemãû-ti.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 482] [\x 482/] 
Pàñ 4: Catutthapàñidesanãyasikkhàpadaü:
Yàni kho pana tàni àra¤¤akàni senàsanàni sàsaïkasammatàni sappañibhayàni. Yo pana bhikkhu tathàråpesu senàsanesu viharanto pubbe appañisaüviditaü khàdanãyaü và bhojanãyaü và ajjhàràme sahatthà pañiggahetvà agilàno khàdeyya và bhu¤jeyya và. Pañidesetabbaü tena bhikkhunà: ßGàrayhaü àvuso dhammaü àpajjiü, asappàyaü, pàñidesanãyaü, taü pañidesemãû-ti.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 486] [\x 486/]
Uddiññhà kho àyasmanto cattàro pàñidesanãyà dhammà.
Tatthàyasmante pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Dutiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Tatiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Parisuddhetthàyasmanto, tasmà tuõhã, evam-etaü dhàrayàmi.
Pàñidesanãyà niññhità
 

(Sekhiyà)
Ime kho panàyasmanto sekhiyà dhammà uddesaü àgacchanti.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 488] [\x 488/]
Sekh 1: (Parimaõóalasikkhàpadaü) : 31
Parimaõóalaü nivàsessàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 490] [\x 490/]
Sekh 2:
Parimaõóalaü pàrupissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 3: (Suppañichannasikkhàpadaü):
Supañicchanno antaraghare gamissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 4:
Supañicchanno antaraghare nisãdissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 492] [\x 492/]
Sekh 5: (Susaüvutasikkhàpadaü):
Susaüvuto antaraghare gamissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 6:
Susaüvuto antaraghare nisãdissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 7: (Okkhittacakkhusikkhàpadaü):
Okkhittacakkhu antaraghare gamissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 494] [\x 494/]
Sekh 8:
Okkhittacakkhu antaraghare nisãdissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 9: (Ukkhittakasikkhàpadaü):
Na ukkhittakàya antaraghare gamissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 10:
Na ukkhittakàya antaraghare nisãdissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Parimaõóalavaggo pañhamo
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 496] [\x 496/]
Sekh 11: (Ujjhagghikasikkhàpadaü):
Na ujjagghikàya antaraghare gamissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 12:
Na ujjagghikàya antaraghare nisãdissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 13: (Uccasaddàsikkhàpadaü):
Appasaddo antaraghare gamissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 498] [\x 498/]
Sekh 14:
Appasaddo antaraghare nisãdissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 15: (Kàyappacàlakàdisikkhàpadaü):
Na kàyappacàlakaü antaraghare gamissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 16:
Na kàyappacàlakaü antaraghare nisãdissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 500] [\x 500/]
Sekh 17: (Bàhuppacàlakasikkhàpadaü):
Na bàhuppacàlakaü antaraghare gamissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 18:
Na bàhuppacàlakaü antaraghare nisãdissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 19: (Sãsappacàlakasikkhàpadaü):
Na sãsappacàlakaü antaraghare gamissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 502] [\x 502/]
Sekh 20:
Na sãsappacàlakaü antaraghare nisãdissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Ujjagghiakavaggo dutiyo
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 504] [\x 504/]
Sekh 21: (Khambhakatasikkhàpadaü):
Na khambhakato antaraghare gamissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 22:
Na khambhakato antaraghare nisãdissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 23: (Oguõñhitasikkhàpadaü):
Na oguõñhito antaraghare gamissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 506] [\x 506/]
Sekh 24:
Na oguõñhito antaraghare nisãdissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 25: (Ukkuñikasikkhàpadaü):
Na ukkuñikàya antaraghare gamissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 26: (Pallatthikasikkhàpadaü):
Na pallatthikàya antaraghare nisãdissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.

[BJT Vol II (I), Page 508] [\x 508/]
Sekh 27: (Sakkaccapañiggahaõasikkhàpadaü):
Sakkaccaü piõóapàtaü pañiggahessàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 28: (Pattasa¤¤ãpañiggahaõasikkhàpadaü):
Pattasa¤¤ã piõóapàtaü pañiggahessàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 29: (Samasåpakapañiggahaõasikkhàpadaü):
Samasåpakaü piõóapàtaü pañiggahessàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 510] [\x 510/]
Sekh 30: (Samatittikasikkhàpadaü):
Samatittikaü piõóapàtaü pañiggahessàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Khambhakavaggo tatiyo
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 512] [\x 512/]
Sekh 31: (Sakkaccabu¤janasikkhàpadaü):
Sakkaccaü piõóapàtaü bhu¤jissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 32: (Pattasa¤¤ãbhu¤janasikkhàpadaü):
Pattasa¤¤ã piõóapàtaü bhu¤jissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 33: (Sapadànasikkhàpadaü):
Sapadànaü piõóapàtaü bhu¤jissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 514] [\x 514/]
Sekh 34: (Samasåpakasikkhàpadaü):
Samasåpakaü piõóapàtaü bhu¤jissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 35: (Nathåpakatasikkhàpadaü):
Na thåpato 32 omadditvà piõóapàtaü bhu¤jissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 36: (Odanappañicchàdanasikkhàpadaü):
Na såpaü và bya¤janaü và odanena pañicchàdessàmi bhãyokamyataü 33 upàdàyàti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 516] [\x 516/]
Sekh 37: (Såpodanavi¤¤attisikkhàpadaü):
Na såpaü và odanaü và agilàno attano atthàya vi¤¤àpetvà bhu¤jissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 38: (Ujjhànasa¤¤ãsikkhàpadaü):
Na ujjhànasa¤¤ã paresaü pattaü olokessàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 39: (Kabaëasikkhàpadaü):
Nàtimahantaü kabaëaü karissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 520] [\x 520/]
Sekh 40: (âlopasikkhàpadaü):
Parimaõóalaü àlopaü karissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sakkaccavaggo catuttho
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 522] [\x 522/]
Sekh 41: (Anàhañasikkhàpadaü):
Na anàhañe kabaëe mukhadvàraü vivarissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 42: (Bhu¤jamànasikkhàpadaü):
Na bhu¤jamàno sabbaü hatthaü mukhe pakkhipissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 43: (Sakabaëasikkhàpadaü):
Na sakabaëena mukhena byàharissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.

[BJT Vol II (I), Page 524] [\x 524/]
Sekh 44: (Piõóukkhepakasikkhàpadaü):
Na piõóukkhepakaü bhu¤jissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 45: (Kabaëavacchedakasikkhàpadaü):
Na kabaëàvacchedakaü bhu¤jissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 46: (Avagaõóakàrakasikkhàpadaü):
Na avagaõóakàrakaü bhu¤jissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 526] [\x 526/]
Sekh 47: (Hatthaniddhunakasikkhàpadaü):
Na hatthaniddhunakaü bhu¤jissàmã-ti, 34 sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 48: (Sitthàvakàrakasikkhàpadaü):
Na sitthàvakàrakaü bhu¤jissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 49: (Jivhànicchàrakasikkhàpadaü):
Na jivhànicchàrakaü bhu¤jissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 528] [\x 528/]
Sekh 50: (Capucapukàrakasikkhàpadaü):
Na capucapukàrakaü bhu¤jissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Kabaëavaggo pa¤camo
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 530] [\x 530/]
Sekh 51: (Surusurukàrakasikkhàpadaü):
Na surusurukàrakaü bhu¤jissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 52: (Hatthanillehakàdisikkhàpadaü):
Na hatthanillehakaü bhu¤jissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 532] [\x 532/]
Sekh 53: (Pattanillehakasikkhàpadaü):
Na pattanillehakaü bhu¤jissàmã-ti, 35 sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 54: (Oññhanillehakasikkhàpadaü):
Na oññhanillehakaü bhu¤jissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 534] [\x 534/]
Sekh 55: (Sàmisasikkhàpadaü):
Na sàmisena hatthena pànãyathàlakaü pañiggahessàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 536] [\x 536/]
Sekh 56: (Sasitthakasikkhàpadaü):
Na sasitthakaü pattadhovanaü antaraghare chaóóessàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.

[BJT Vol II (I), Page 538] [\x 538/]
Sekh 57: (Chattapàõisikkhàpadaü):
Na chattapàõissa agilànassa dhammaü desissàmã-ti, 36 sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 58: (Daõóapàõisikkhàpadaü):
Na daõóapàõissa agilànassa dhammaü desissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 540] [\x 540/]
Sekh 59: (Satthapàõisikkhàpadaü):
Na satthapàõissa agilànassa dhammaü desissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 60: (âyudhapàõisikkhàpadaü):
Na àyudhapàõissa agilànassa dhammaü desissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Surusuruvaggo chaññho
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 542] [\x 542/]
Sekh 61: (Pàdukasikkhàpadaü):
Na pàdukàråëhassa agilànassa dhammaü desissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 62: (Upàhanasikkhàpadaü):
Na upàhanàråëhassa agilànassa dhammaü desissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 63: (Yànasikkhàpadaü):
Na yànagatassa agilànassa dhammaü desissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 544] [\x 544/]
Sekh 64: (Sayanasikkhàpadaü):
Na sayanagatassa agilànassa dhammaü desissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 65: (Pallatthikasikkhàpadaü):
Na pallatthikàya nisinnassa agilànassa dhammaü desissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 66: (Veñhitasikkhàpadaü):
Na veñhitasãsassa agilànassa dhammaü desissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 546] [\x 546/]
Sekh 67: (Oguõñhitasikkhàpadaü):
Na oguõñhitasãsassa agilànassa dhammaü desissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 68: (Chamàsikkhàpadaü):
Na chamàya nisãditvà àsane nisinnassa agilànassa dhammaü desissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.

[BJT Vol II (I), Page 548] [\x 548/]
Sekh 69: (Nãcàsanasikkhàpadaü):
Na nãce àsane nisãditvà ucce àsane nisinnassa agilànassa dhammaü desissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.

[BJT Vol II (I), Page 550] [\x 550/]
Sekh 70: (òhitasikkhàpadaü):
Na ñhito nisinnassa agilànassa dhammaü desissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 71: (Pacchatogamanasikkhàpadaü):
Na pacchato gacchanto purato gacchantassa agilànassa dhammaü desissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 72: (Uppathenagamanasikkhàpadaü):
Na uppathena gacchanto pathena gacchantassa agilànassa dhammaü desissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.

[BJT Vol II (I), Page 552] [\x 552/]
Sekh 73: (òhito-uccàrasikkhàpadaü):
Na ñhito agilàno uccàraü và passàvaü và karissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 74: (Harite-uccàrasikkhàpadaü):
Na harite agilàno uccàraü và passàvaü và kheëaü và karissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 554] [\x 554/]
Sekh 75: (Udake-uccàrasikkhàpadaü):
Na udake agilàno uccàraü và passàvaü và kheëaü và karissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Pàdukavaggo sattamo
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 556] [\x 556/]
Uddiññhà kho àyasmanto sekhiyà dhammà.
Tatthàyasmante pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Dutiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Tatiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Parisuddhetthàyasmanto, tasmà tuõhã, evam-etaü dhàrayàmi.
Sekhiyà niññhità
 

(Adhikaraõasamathà)
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 588] [\x 588/]
Ime kho panàyasmanto satta adhikaraõasamathà dhammà uddesaü àgacchanti.
Uppannuppannànaü adhikaraõànaü samathàya våpasamàya:
1: Sammukhàvinayo dàtabbo.
2: Sativinayo dàtabbo.
3: Amåëhavinayo dàtabbo.
4: Pañi¤¤àya kàretabbaü.
5: Yebhuyyasikà.
6: Tassapàpiyyasikà.
7: Tiõavatthàrakoti.
Uddiññhà kho àyasmanto satta adhikaraõasamathà dhammà.
Tatthàyasmante pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Dutiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Tatiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Parisuddhetthàyasmanto, tasmà tuõhã, evam-etaü dhàrayàmi.
Adhikaraõasamathà Niññhità
Uddiññhaü kho àyasmanto nidànaü.
Uddiññhà cattàro pàràjikà dhammà.
Uddiññhà terasa saïghàdisesà dhammà.
Uddiññhà dve aniyatà dhammà.
Uddiññhà tiüsa nissaggiyà pàcittiyà dhammà
Uddiññhà dvenavuti pàcittiyà dhammà.
Uddiññhà cattàro pàñidesanãyà dhammà.
Uddiññhà sekhiyà dhammà.
Uddiññhà satta adhikaraõasamathà dhammà.
Ettakaü tassa Bhagavato suttàgataü suttapariyàpannaü anvaddhamàsaü uddesaü àgacchati. Tattha sabbeheva samaggehi sammodamànehi avivadamànehi sikkhitabbaü.
Bhikkhupàtimokkhaü niññhitaü
 
 
  Bhikkhupàtimokkhapàëi Home Page
âràdhanà     (Nidànuddeso)
(Pàràjikuddeso)     (Saïghàdisesuddeso)
(Aniyatuddeso)     (Nissaggiyapàcittiyà)
(Suddhapàcittiyà)     (Pàñidesanãyà)
(Sekhiyà)     (Adhikaraõasamathà)
Word Index
 
End Notes
 
29 Editor’s note: BJT omits this title by mistake. The Pàñidesanãya rules are listed only as Pañhama-, Dutiya-, etc. there being no distinctive titles for these training rules either in BJT or ChS.
30 BJT note: Ekassa ce pi - ChS
31 Editor’s note: BJT has no distinctive titles for the Sekhiya training rules, they are listed there as Pañhama-, Dutiya-, etc. up to Dasama-, after which they start again with Pañhama-. As the titles serve a useful function as mnemonics they have been inserted here following the ChS editon of the Bhikkhupàtimokkhapàëi. At the beginning of this section as the rules generally come in pairs no title for the second rule is given.
32 BJT note: Thåpakato - ChS.
33 Editor’s note: BJT, Bhãyyokamyataü, but it’s normal practice is to write these forms as bhãyo- etc.
34 Editor’s note: BJT, bhu¤jissàmi-ti, printer’s error.
35 Editor’s note: BJT, bhå¤jissàmã-ti, printer’s error.
36 Editor’s note: BJT, desessàmi-ti, here but desissàmã-ti elsewhere.
 
  Bhikkhupàtimokkhapàëi Home Page
âràdhanà    (Nidànuddeso)
(Pàràjikuddeso)     (Saïghàdisesuddeso)
(Aniyatuddeso)     (Nissaggiyapàcittiyà)
(Suddhapàcittiyà)     (Pàñidesanãyà)
(Sekhiyà)     (Adhikaraõasamathà)
Word Index
 
 
 
(Sekhiyà)     (Adhikaraõasamathà)
(Sekhiyà)
Ime kho panàyasmanto sekhiyà dhammà uddesaü àgacchanti.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 488] [\x 488/]
Sekh 1: (Parimaõóalasikkhàpadaü) : 31
Parimaõóalaü nivàsessàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 490] [\x 490/]
Sekh 2:
Parimaõóalaü pàrupissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 3: (Suppañichannasikkhàpadaü):
Supañicchanno antaraghare gamissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 4:
Supañicchanno antaraghare nisãdissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 492] [\x 492/]
Sekh 5: (Susaüvutasikkhàpadaü):
Susaüvuto antaraghare gamissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 6:
Susaüvuto antaraghare nisãdissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 7: (Okkhittacakkhusikkhàpadaü):
Okkhittacakkhu antaraghare gamissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 494] [\x 494/]
Sekh 8:
Okkhittacakkhu antaraghare nisãdissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 9: (Ukkhittakasikkhàpadaü):
Na ukkhittakàya antaraghare gamissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 10:
Na ukkhittakàya antaraghare nisãdissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Parimaõóalavaggo pañhamo
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 496] [\x 496/]
Sekh 11: (Ujjhagghikasikkhàpadaü):
Na ujjagghikàya antaraghare gamissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 12:
Na ujjagghikàya antaraghare nisãdissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 13: (Uccasaddàsikkhàpadaü):
Appasaddo antaraghare gamissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 498] [\x 498/]
Sekh 14:
Appasaddo antaraghare nisãdissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 15: (Kàyappacàlakàdisikkhàpadaü):
Na kàyappacàlakaü antaraghare gamissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 16:
Na kàyappacàlakaü antaraghare nisãdissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 500] [\x 500/]
Sekh 17: (Bàhuppacàlakasikkhàpadaü):
Na bàhuppacàlakaü antaraghare gamissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 18:
Na bàhuppacàlakaü antaraghare nisãdissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 19: (Sãsappacàlakasikkhàpadaü):
Na sãsappacàlakaü antaraghare gamissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 502] [\x 502/]
Sekh 20:
Na sãsappacàlakaü antaraghare nisãdissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Ujjagghiakavaggo dutiyo
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 504] [\x 504/]
Sekh 21: (Khambhakatasikkhàpadaü):
Na khambhakato antaraghare gamissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 22:
Na khambhakato antaraghare nisãdissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 23: (Oguõñhitasikkhàpadaü):
Na oguõñhito antaraghare gamissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 506] [\x 506/]
Sekh 24:
Na oguõñhito antaraghare nisãdissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 25: (Ukkuñikasikkhàpadaü):
Na ukkuñikàya antaraghare gamissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 26: (Pallatthikasikkhàpadaü):
Na pallatthikàya antaraghare nisãdissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.

[BJT Vol II (I), Page 508] [\x 508/]
Sekh 27: (Sakkaccapañiggahaõasikkhàpadaü):
Sakkaccaü piõóapàtaü pañiggahessàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 28: (Pattasa¤¤ãpañiggahaõasikkhàpadaü):
Pattasa¤¤ã piõóapàtaü pañiggahessàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 29: (Samasåpakapañiggahaõasikkhàpadaü):
Samasåpakaü piõóapàtaü pañiggahessàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 510] [\x 510/]
Sekh 30: (Samatittikasikkhàpadaü):
Samatittikaü piõóapàtaü pañiggahessàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Khambhakavaggo tatiyo
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 512] [\x 512/]
Sekh 31: (Sakkaccabu¤janasikkhàpadaü):
Sakkaccaü piõóapàtaü bhu¤jissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 32: (Pattasa¤¤ãbhu¤janasikkhàpadaü):
Pattasa¤¤ã piõóapàtaü bhu¤jissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 33: (Sapadànasikkhàpadaü):
Sapadànaü piõóapàtaü bhu¤jissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 514] [\x 514/]
Sekh 34: (Samasåpakasikkhàpadaü):
Samasåpakaü piõóapàtaü bhu¤jissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 35: (Nathåpakatasikkhàpadaü):
Na thåpato 32 omadditvà piõóapàtaü bhu¤jissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 36: (Odanappañicchàdanasikkhàpadaü):
Na såpaü và bya¤janaü và odanena pañicchàdessàmi bhãyokamyataü 33 upàdàyàti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 516] [\x 516/]
Sekh 37: (Såpodanavi¤¤attisikkhàpadaü):
Na såpaü và odanaü và agilàno attano atthàya vi¤¤àpetvà bhu¤jissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 38: (Ujjhànasa¤¤ãsikkhàpadaü):
Na ujjhànasa¤¤ã paresaü pattaü olokessàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 39: (Kabaëasikkhàpadaü):
Nàtimahantaü kabaëaü karissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 520] [\x 520/]
Sekh 40: (âlopasikkhàpadaü):
Parimaõóalaü àlopaü karissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sakkaccavaggo catuttho
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 522] [\x 522/]
Sekh 41: (Anàhañasikkhàpadaü):
Na anàhañe kabaëe mukhadvàraü vivarissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 42: (Bhu¤jamànasikkhàpadaü):
Na bhu¤jamàno sabbaü hatthaü mukhe pakkhipissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 43: (Sakabaëasikkhàpadaü):
Na sakabaëena mukhena byàharissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.

[BJT Vol II (I), Page 524] [\x 524/]
Sekh 44: (Piõóukkhepakasikkhàpadaü):
Na piõóukkhepakaü bhu¤jissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 45: (Kabaëavacchedakasikkhàpadaü):
Na kabaëàvacchedakaü bhu¤jissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 46: (Avagaõóakàrakasikkhàpadaü):
Na avagaõóakàrakaü bhu¤jissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 526] [\x 526/]
Sekh 47: (Hatthaniddhunakasikkhàpadaü):
Na hatthaniddhunakaü bhu¤jissàmã-ti, 34 sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 48: (Sitthàvakàrakasikkhàpadaü):
Na sitthàvakàrakaü bhu¤jissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 49: (Jivhànicchàrakasikkhàpadaü):
Na jivhànicchàrakaü bhu¤jissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 528] [\x 528/]
Sekh 50: (Capucapukàrakasikkhàpadaü):
Na capucapukàrakaü bhu¤jissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Kabaëavaggo pa¤camo
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 530] [\x 530/]
Sekh 51: (Surusurukàrakasikkhàpadaü):
Na surusurukàrakaü bhu¤jissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 52: (Hatthanillehakàdisikkhàpadaü):
Na hatthanillehakaü bhu¤jissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 532] [\x 532/]
Sekh 53: (Pattanillehakasikkhàpadaü):
Na pattanillehakaü bhu¤jissàmã-ti, 35 sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 54: (Oññhanillehakasikkhàpadaü):
Na oññhanillehakaü bhu¤jissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 534] [\x 534/]
Sekh 55: (Sàmisasikkhàpadaü):
Na sàmisena hatthena pànãyathàlakaü pañiggahessàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 536] [\x 536/]
Sekh 56: (Sasitthakasikkhàpadaü):
Na sasitthakaü pattadhovanaü antaraghare chaóóessàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.

[BJT Vol II (I), Page 538] [\x 538/]
Sekh 57: (Chattapàõisikkhàpadaü):
Na chattapàõissa agilànassa dhammaü desissàmã-ti, 36 sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 58: (Daõóapàõisikkhàpadaü):
Na daõóapàõissa agilànassa dhammaü desissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 540] [\x 540/]
Sekh 59: (Satthapàõisikkhàpadaü):
Na satthapàõissa agilànassa dhammaü desissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 60: (âyudhapàõisikkhàpadaü):
Na àyudhapàõissa agilànassa dhammaü desissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Surusuruvaggo chaññho
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 542] [\x 542/]
Sekh 61: (Pàdukasikkhàpadaü):
Na pàdukàråëhassa agilànassa dhammaü desissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 62: (Upàhanasikkhàpadaü):
Na upàhanàråëhassa agilànassa dhammaü desissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 63: (Yànasikkhàpadaü):
Na yànagatassa agilànassa dhammaü desissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 544] [\x 544/]
Sekh 64: (Sayanasikkhàpadaü):
Na sayanagatassa agilànassa dhammaü desissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 65: (Pallatthikasikkhàpadaü):
Na pallatthikàya nisinnassa agilànassa dhammaü desissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 66: (Veñhitasikkhàpadaü):
Na veñhitasãsassa agilànassa dhammaü desissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 546] [\x 546/]
Sekh 67: (Oguõñhitasikkhàpadaü):
Na oguõñhitasãsassa agilànassa dhammaü desissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 68: (Chamàsikkhàpadaü):
Na chamàya nisãditvà àsane nisinnassa agilànassa dhammaü desissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.

[BJT Vol II (I), Page 548] [\x 548/]
Sekh 69: (Nãcàsanasikkhàpadaü):
Na nãce àsane nisãditvà ucce àsane nisinnassa agilànassa dhammaü desissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.

[BJT Vol II (I), Page 550] [\x 550/]
Sekh 70: (òhitasikkhàpadaü):
Na ñhito nisinnassa agilànassa dhammaü desissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 71: (Pacchatogamanasikkhàpadaü):
Na pacchato gacchanto purato gacchantassa agilànassa dhammaü desissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 72: (Uppathenagamanasikkhàpadaü):
Na uppathena gacchanto pathena gacchantassa agilànassa dhammaü desissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.

[BJT Vol II (I), Page 552] [\x 552/]
Sekh 73: (òhito-uccàrasikkhàpadaü):
Na ñhito agilàno uccàraü và passàvaü và karissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Sekh 74: (Harite-uccàrasikkhàpadaü):
Na harite agilàno uccàraü và passàvaü và kheëaü và karissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 554] [\x 554/]
Sekh 75: (Udake-uccàrasikkhàpadaü):
Na udake agilàno uccàraü và passàvaü và kheëaü và karissàmã-ti, sikkhà karaõãyà.
Pàdukavaggo sattamo
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 556] [\x 556/]
Uddiññhà kho àyasmanto sekhiyà dhammà.
Tatthàyasmante pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Dutiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Tatiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Parisuddhetthàyasmanto, tasmà tuõhã, evam-etaü dhàrayàmi.
Sekhiyà niññhità
 

(Adhikaraõasamathà)
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 588] [\x 588/]
Ime kho panàyasmanto satta adhikaraõasamathà dhammà uddesaü àgacchanti.
Uppannuppannànaü adhikaraõànaü samathàya våpasamàya:
1: Sammukhàvinayo dàtabbo.
2: Sativinayo dàtabbo.
3: Amåëhavinayo dàtabbo.
4: Pañi¤¤àya kàretabbaü.
5: Yebhuyyasikà.
6: Tassapàpiyyasikà.
7: Tiõavatthàrakoti.
Uddiññhà kho àyasmanto satta adhikaraõasamathà dhammà.
Tatthàyasmante pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Dutiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Tatiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Parisuddhetthàyasmanto, tasmà tuõhã, evam-etaü dhàrayàmi.
Adhikaraõasamathà Niññhità
Uddiññhaü kho àyasmanto nidànaü.
Uddiññhà cattàro pàràjikà dhammà.
Uddiññhà terasa saïghàdisesà dhammà.
Uddiññhà dve aniyatà dhammà.
Uddiññhà tiüsa nissaggiyà pàcittiyà dhammà
Uddiññhà dvenavuti pàcittiyà dhammà.
Uddiññhà cattàro pàñidesanãyà dhammà.
Uddiññhà sekhiyà dhammà.
Uddiññhà satta adhikaraõasamathà dhammà.
Ettakaü tassa Bhagavato suttàgataü suttapariyàpannaü anvaddhamàsaü uddesaü àgacchati. Tattha sabbeheva samaggehi sammodamànehi avivadamànehi sikkhitabbaü.
Bhikkhupàtimokkhaü niññhitaü
 
 
  Bhikkhupàtimokkhapàëi Home Page
âràdhanà     (Nidànuddeso)
(Pàràjikuddeso)     (Saïghàdisesuddeso)
(Aniyatuddeso)     (Nissaggiyapàcittiyà)
(Suddhapàcittiyà)     (Pàñidesanãyà)
(Sekhiyà)     (Adhikaraõasamathà)
Word Index
 
End Notes
 
29 Editor’s note: BJT omits this title by mistake. The Pàñidesanãya rules are listed only as Pañhama-, Dutiya-, etc. there being no distinctive titles for these training rules either in BJT or ChS.
30 BJT note: Ekassa ce pi - ChS
31 Editor’s note: BJT has no distinctive titles for the Sekhiya training rules, they are listed there as Pañhama-, Dutiya-, etc. up to Dasama-, after which they start again with Pañhama-. As the titles serve a useful function as mnemonics they have been inserted here following the ChS editon of the Bhikkhupàtimokkhapàëi. At the beginning of this section as the rules generally come in pairs no title for the second rule is given.
32 BJT note: Thåpakato - ChS.
33 Editor’s note: BJT, Bhãyyokamyataü, but it’s normal practice is to write these forms as bhãyo- etc.
34 Editor’s note: BJT, bhu¤jissàmi-ti, printer’s error.
35 Editor’s note: BJT, bhå¤jissàmã-ti, printer’s error.
36 Editor’s note: BJT, desessàmi-ti, here but desissàmã-ti elsewhere.
 
  Bhikkhupàtimokkhapàëi Home Page
âràdhanà    (Nidànuddeso)
(Pàràjikuddeso)     (Saïghàdisesuddeso)
(Aniyatuddeso)     (Nissaggiyapàcittiyà)
(Suddhapàcittiyà)     (Pàñidesanãyà)
(Sekhiyà)     (Adhikaraõasamathà)
Word Index
 
 (Adhikaraõasamathà)
 
[BJT Vol II (I), Page 588] [\x 588/]
Ime kho panàyasmanto satta adhikaraõasamathà dhammà uddesaü àgacchanti.
Uppannuppannànaü adhikaraõànaü samathàya våpasamàya:
1: Sammukhàvinayo dàtabbo.
2: Sativinayo dàtabbo.
3: Amåëhavinayo dàtabbo.
4: Pañi¤¤àya kàretabbaü.
5: Yebhuyyasikà.
6: Tassapàpiyyasikà.
7: Tiõavatthàrakoti.
Uddiññhà kho àyasmanto satta adhikaraõasamathà dhammà.
Tatthàyasmante pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Dutiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Tatiyam-pi pucchàmi: kaccittha parisuddhà?
Parisuddhetthàyasmanto, tasmà tuõhã, evam-etaü dhàrayàmi.
Adhikaraõasamathà Niññhità
Uddiññhaü kho àyasmanto nidànaü.
Uddiññhà cattàro pàràjikà dhammà.
Uddiññhà terasa saïghàdisesà dhammà.
Uddiññhà dve aniyatà dhammà.
Uddiññhà tiüsa nissaggiyà pàcittiyà dhammà
Uddiññhà dvenavuti pàcittiyà dhammà.
Uddiññhà cattàro pàñidesanãyà dhammà.
Uddiññhà sekhiyà dhammà.
Uddiññhà satta adhikaraõasamathà dhammà.
Ettakaü tassa Bhagavato suttàgataü suttapariyàpannaü anvaddhamàsaü uddesaü àgacchati. Tattha sabbeheva samaggehi sammodamànehi avivadamànehi sikkhitabbaü.
Bhikkhupàtimokkhaü niññhitaü
 
 
  Bhikkhupàtimokkhapàëi Home Page
âràdhanà     (Nidànuddeso)
(Pàràjikuddeso)     (Saïghàdisesuddeso)
(Aniyatuddeso)     (Nissaggiyapàcittiyà)
(Suddhapàcittiyà)     (Pàñidesanãyà)
(Sekhiyà)     (Adhikaraõasamathà)
Word Index
 
End Notes
 
29 Editor’s note: BJT omits this title by mistake. The Pàñidesanãya rules are listed only as Pañhama-, Dutiya-, etc. there being no distinctive titles for these training rules either in BJT or ChS.
30 BJT note: Ekassa ce pi - ChS
31 Editor’s note: BJT has no distinctive titles for the Sekhiya training rules, they are listed there as Pañhama-, Dutiya-, etc. up to Dasama-, after which they start again with Pañhama-. As the titles serve a useful function as mnemonics they have been inserted here following the ChS editon of the Bhikkhupàtimokkhapàëi. At the beginning of this section as the rules generally come in pairs no title for the second rule is given.
32 BJT note: Thåpakato - ChS.
33 Editor’s note: BJT, Bhãyyokamyataü, but it’s normal practice is to write these forms as bhãyo- etc.
34 Editor’s note: BJT, bhu¤jissàmi-ti, printer’s error.
35 Editor’s note: BJT, bhå¤jissàmã-ti, printer’s error.
36 Editor’s note: BJT, desessàmi-ti, here but desissàmã-ti elsewhere.
 
  Bhikkhupàtimokkhapàëi Home Page
âràdhanà    (Nidànuddeso)
(Pàràjikuddeso)     (Saïghàdisesuddeso)
(Aniyatuddeso)     (Nissaggiyapàcittiyà)
(Suddhapàcittiyà)     (Pàñidesanãyà)
(Sekhiyà)     (Adhikaraõasamathà)
Word Index
 
 
 
 
 

Word Index
Rule Index 
  
Rule Index
 
Sinhala Character Version of BJT Pàtimokkha in Word Document Format (332 KB)
 
Table of Contents (detailed)
 
âràdhanà
Nidànuddeso
Pàràjikuddeso
Pàr 1: Methunadhammasikkhàpadaü
Pàr 2: Adinnàdànasikkhàpadaü
Pàr 3: Manussaviggahasikkhàpadaü
Pàr 4: Uttarimanussadhammasikkhàpadaü
Saïghàdisesuddeso
Sd 1: Sukkavisaññhisikkhàpadaü
Sd 2: Kàyasaüsaggasikkhàpadaü
Sd 3: Duññhullavàcàsikkhàpadaü
Sd 4: Antakàmapàricariyasikkhàpadaü
Sd 5: Sa¤carittasikkhàpadaü
Sd 6: Kuñikàrasikkhàpadaü
Sd 7: Vihàrakàrasikkhàpadaü
Sd 8: Pañhamaduññhadosasikkhàpadaü
Sd 9: Dutiyaduññhadosasikkhàpadaü
Sd 10: Pañhamasaïghabhedasikkhàpadaü
Sd 11: Dutiyasaïghabhedasikkhàpadaü
Sd 12: Dubbacasikkhàpadaü
Sd 13: Kuladåsakasikkhàpadaü
Aniyatuddeso
Aniy 1: Pañhama-aniyatasikkhàpadaü
Aniy 2: Dutiya-aniyatasikkhàpadaü
Nissaggiyapàcittiyà
NP 1: Pañhamakañhinasikkhàpadaü
NP 2: Dutiyakañhinasikkhàpadaü
NP 3: Tatiyakañhinasikkhàpadaü
NP 4: Puràõacãvarasikkhàpadaü
NP 5: Cãvarapañiggahaõasikkhàpadaü
NP 6: A¤¤àtakavi¤¤attisikkhàpadaü
NP 7: Tatuttarisikkhàpadaü
NP 8: Pañhama-upakkhañasikkhàpadaü
NP 9: Dutiya-upakkhañasikkhàpadaü
NP 10: Ràjasikkhàpadaü
NP 11: Kosiyasikkhàpadaü
NP 12: Suddhakàëakasikkhàpadaü
NP 13: Dvebhàgasikkhàpadaü
NP 14: Chabbassisikkhàpadaü
NP 15: Nisãdanasanthatasikkhàpadaü
NP 16: Eëakalomasikkhàpadaü
NP 17: Eëakalomadhovàpanasikkhàpadaü
NP 18: Råpiyasikkhàpadaü
NP 19: Råpiyasaüvohàrasikkhàpadaü
NP 20: Kayavikkayasikkhàpadaü
NP 21: Pattasikkhàpadaü
NP 22: ænapa¤cabandhanasikkhàpadaü
NP 23: Bhesajjasikkhàpadaü
NP 24: Vassikasàñikasikkhàpadaü
NP 25: Cãvara-acchindanasikkhàpadaü
NP 26: Suttavi¤¤attisikkhàpadaü
NP 27: Mahàpesakàrasikkhàpadaü
NP 28: Accekacãvarasikkhàpadaü
NP 29: Sàsaïkhasikkhàpadaü
NP 30: Pariõatasikkhàpadaü
Suddhapàcittiyà
Pàc 1: Musàvàdasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 2: Omasavàdasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 3: Pesu¤¤asikkhàpadaü
Pàc 4: Padasodhammasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 5: Sahaseyyasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 6: Dutiyasahaseyyasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 7: Dhammadesanàsikkhàpadaü
Pàc 8: Bhåtàrocanasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 9: Duññhullàrocanasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 10: Pathavikhaõanasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 11: Bhåtagàmasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 12: A¤¤avàdakasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 13: Ujjhàyanasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 14: Pañhamasenàsanasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 15: Dutiyasenàsanasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 16: Anupakhajjasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 17: Nikkaóóhanasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 18: Vehàsakåñisikkhàpadaü
Pàc 19: Mahallakavihàrasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 20: Sappàõasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 21: Ovàdasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 22: Atthaïgatasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 23: Bhikkhunåpassayasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 24: âmisasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 25: Cãvaradànasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 26: Cãvarasibbanasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 27: Saüvidhànasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 28: Nàvàbhiråhatasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 29: Paripàcitasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 30: Rahonisajjasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 31: âvasathapiõóasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 32: Gaõabhojanasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 33: Paramparabhojanasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 34: Kàõamàtusikkhàpadaü
Pàc 35: Pañhamapavàraõasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 36: Dutiyapavàraõasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 37: Vikàlabhojanasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 38: Sannidhikàrasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 39: Paõãtabhojanasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 40: Dantaponasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 41: Avelakasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 42: Uyyojanasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 43: Sabhojanasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 44: Pañhamarahonisajjasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 45: Dutiyarahonisajjasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 46: Càrittasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 47: Mahànàmasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 48: Uyyuttasenàsikkhàpadaü
Pàc 49: Senàvàsasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 50: Uyyodhikasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 51: Suràpànasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 52: Aïgulipatodakasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 53: Hassadhammasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 54: Anàdariyasikkhapadaü
Pàc 55: Bhiüsàpanakasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 56: Jotisikkhapadaü
Pàc 57: Nahàtasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 58: Dubbaõõakarasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 59: Vikappanasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 60: Cãvaràpanidhànasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 61: Sa¤ciccapàõasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 62: Sappàõakasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 63: Ukkoñanasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 64: Duññhullasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 65: ænavãsativassasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 66: Theyyasatthasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 67: Saüvidhànasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 68: Ariññhasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 69: Ukkhittasambhogasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 70: Kaõñakasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 71: Sahadhammikasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 72: Vilekhanasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 73: Mohanasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 74: Pahàrasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 75: Talasattikasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 76: Amålakasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 77: Sa¤ciccasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 78: Upassutisikkhàpadaü
Pàc 79: Kammapañibàhanasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 80: Chandaüadatvàgamanasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 81: Dabbasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 82: Pariõàmanasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 83: Ràjantarapurasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 84: Ratanasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 85: Vikàlagàmappavesanasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 86: Såcigharasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 87: Ma¤casikkhàpadaü
Pàc 88: Tålonaddhasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 89: Nisãdanasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 90: Kaõóupañicchàdisikkhàpadaü
Pàc 91: Vassikasàñikasikkhàpadaü
Pàc 92: Nandattherasikkhàpadaü
Pàñidesanãyà
Sekhiyà
Rules concerning deportment in the village
Rules concerning food
Rules concerning teaching
Miscellaneous Rules
Adhikaraõasamathà

Sinhala Character Version of BJT Pàtimokkha in Word Document Format (332 KB) 
  

Editor’s Preface
The readings for this edition of the Bhikkhupàtimokkhapàëi are substantially a transliteration of the text of the rules as they appear in Pàràjikapàëi & Pàcittiyapàëi, which constitute the first two volumes in the Buddha Jayanti Tripitaka Series (Vols I & I(I)).1 The Pàtimokkha is not printed there as a separate item but is embedded within the Suttavibhaïgha, which contains, wherever appropriate, the origin stories, the various recensions the rules went through, the final rule, the permutations, the exceptions, and a word commentary on the rule itself.
The BJT editors were somewhat inconsistent in providing titles for the rules, and in certain cases omitted them altogether. The deficiency in this regard has been made up from the ChS edition as printed on the Chaññha Saïgàyana CD-ROM (Version 3). In the original edition there were many cases where the text was inconsistent in its use of punctuation and layout. Here an attempt has been made to present a more standardized version of the text in this regard, but these sort of changes have not been noted. Other changes and corrections made by the present editor that affect the substance of the text have been recorded in the notes.
This work has been produced in order to assist in making known the teachings of the Buddha, please remember that many people have contributed their time and energy to this gift of the Dhamma. Anyone with similar aims who wishes to use the document or its database is welcome to do so. If you use this document in any way please make an acknowledgement to the Sri Lanka Tipitaka Project.
 
(Nidànuddeso)
(Pàràjikuddeso)     (Saïghàdisesuddeso)
(Aniyatuddeso)     (Nissaggiyapàcittiyà)
(Suddhapàcittiyà)     (Pàñidesanãyà)
(Sekhiyà)     (Adhikaraõasamathà)
Word Index
Rule Index
End Note
1 The readings for the nidàna come from Vol 3 of the same series.

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07/28/13
994 LESSON 29-07-2013 MONDAY FREE ONLINE eNālāndā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY run through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org Universal Welfare Friend - E- GOOD NEWS DISPENSATION OF AWAKENED ONES WITH AWARENESS is for DUKKHA NIRODHA (End of Suffering) of all SENTIENT & NON-SENTIENT BEINGS (5) the age of generosity (dana-yuga)
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994 LESSON 29-07-2013 MONDAY 

FREE ONLINE  eNālāndā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY 
run through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org 

Universal Welfare Friend -
E- GOOD NEWS 

DISPENSATION OF AWAKENED ONES WITH AWARENESS is for DUKKHA NIRODHA (End of Suffering) of all SENTIENT & NON-SENTIENT BEINGS

(5) the age of generosity (dana-yuga)

http://in-mg61.mail.yahoo.com/neo/launch?.rand=9a6qnbm2od815#mail


Simpsons creator is spending his last months giving away his fortune before dying of colon cancer

Simpsons creator is spending his last months giving away his fortune before dying of colon cancer.  
The producer of The Simpsons has decided to give his vast fortune away before he dies from colon cancer.
Sam
Simon, 58, is spending his final months funding projects that feed
homeless people and save animals from being killed in animal shelters.
‘The
truth is, I have more money than I’m interested in spending. Everyone
in my family is taken care of. And I enjoy this,’ Simon explained.
Simon created the hit cartoon
alongside Matt Groening in 1991 technically retired from The Simpsons in
1993 but still receives tens of millions in royalties every season.
Simon
has set up a food bank in Los Angeles that serves only cruelty-free
vegan food, and turned his Malibu mansion into dog rescue where animals
who are about to be put down by local shelters are taken, cared for, and
then trained to be companions for the deaf.
Philanthropist: Sam Simon made millions off royalties from The Simpsons and he is determined to give it all away

Wealthy: Simon had a falling out with his co-creator Matt Groening (pictured) and left the show in 1993 but retained a healthy stake in the franchise
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2379094/Simpsons-creator-Sam-Simon-spending-months-giving-away-fortune-dying-colon-cancer.html

May Sam
Simon, 58, who is spending his final months funding projects that feed
homeless people and save animals from being killed in animal shelters over come with his illness and live long.
May he have calm. quiet, alert, attentive and equanimity mind with a clear understanding that everything is changing.

Frozen Lemon Cure Cancer, Read []

 

HEALTH INFO  !!!

Frozen Lemon - A Cure for Everything? Literally, yes everything…..almost.  

 

Amazing frozen lemons 
All it is…..is a frozen lemon
 

 

Many professionals in restaurants and eateries are using or consuming
the entire lemon and nothing is wasted. How can you use the whole lemon
without waste? 

 

Simple.. place the washed lemon in the freezer section of your
refrigerator. Once the lemon is frozen, get your grater, and shred the
whole lemon (no need to peel it) and sprinkle it on top of your foods.


WHERE TO SPRINKLE ? 

Sprinkle
it to your vegetable salad, ice cream, soup, cereals, noodles,
spaghetti sauce, rice, sushi, fish dishes, whisky…. the list is
endless.
 

 
All
of the foods will unexpectedly have a wonderful taste, something that
you may have never tasted before.  Most likely, you only think of lemon
juice and vitamin C. Not anymore.

 
Now that you’ve learned this lemon secret, you can use lemon even in instant cup noodles.
 

 
What’s the major advantage of using the whole lemon other than preventing waste and adding new taste to your dishes?
 


WHAT MAJOR ADVANTAGE YOU HAVE BEEN MISSING ? 

Well,
you see lemon peels contain as much as 5 to 10 times more vitamins than
the lemon juice itself.  And yes, that’s what you’ve been wasting.
 

 
But
from now on, by following this simple procedure of freezing the whole
lemon, then grating it on top of your dishes, you can consume all of
those nutrients and get even healthier.


WHAT DOES THE  LEMON PEELS DO IN YOUR BODY ? 

It’s also good that lemon peels are health rejuvenators in eradicating toxic elements in the body.
 

 

So place your washed lemon in your freezer, and then grate it on your
meal every day. It is a key to make your foods tastier and you get to
live healthier and longer! That’s the lemon secret! Better late than
never, right? The surprising benefits of lemon! 

Lemon (Citrus) is a miraculous product to kill cancer cells. It is much, much stronger than chemotherapy

.

 
Why
do we not know about that? Because there are laboratories interested in
making a synthetic version that will bring them huge profits.
 

 
You
can now help a friend in need by letting him/her know that lemon juice
is beneficial in preventing the disease. Its taste is pleasant and it
does not produce the horrific effects of chemotherapy.

 
How
many people will die while this closely guarded secret is kept, so as
not to jeopardize the beneficial multimillionaires large corporations?
 

 

 
You
can eat the fruit in different ways: you can eat the pulp, juice press,
prepare drinks, sorbets, pastries, etc… It is credited with many
virtues, but the most interesting is the effect it produces on cysts and
tumours.
 

 
This
plant is a proven remedy against cancers of all types. Some say it is
very useful in all variants of cancer. It is considered also as an anti
microbial spectrum against bacterial infections and fungi, effective
against internal parasites and worms, it regulates blood pressure which
is too high and an antidepressant, combats stress and nervous disorders.
 
 The
source of this information is fascinating: it comes from one of the
largest drug manufacturers in the world, says that after more than 20
laboratory tests since 1970, the extracts revealed that It destroys the
malignant cells in 12 cancers, including colon, breast, prostate, lung
and pancreas…
 

The compounds of this tree showed 10,000 times better than the product
Adriamycin, a drug normally used chemotherapeutic in the world, slowing
the growth of cancer cells.

 

And what is even more astonishing: this type of therapy with lemon
extract only destroys malignant cancer cells and it does not affect
healthy cells. 
So, give those lemons a good wash, freeze them and grate them. Your whole body will love you for it!!!!!


Live simply, Love generously, Care deeply, Speak kindly.
 

– THERE ARE NO STRANGERS, ONLY FRIENDS YOU HAVEN’T MET!! 

This could be the eighth wonder of the World!



it is turly “INCREDIBLE”.

Absolutely amazing!  How did they build and carve on a mountain face ?
 
 Maytszishan Caves — China
Buddhist complex Maytszishan little known. It is located in Gansu Province in northwest China. This is a striking architectural complex, carved out of the rock. Maytszishan has 7,000 Buddhist sculptures and nearly 1,000 square meters of murals.
 
Buddhist
complex Maytszishan little known. It is located in Gansu Province in
northwest China. This is a striking architectural complex, carved out of
the rock. Maytszishan has 7,000 Buddhist sculptures and nearly 1,000
square meters of murals. 
11 more images …
Buddhist complex Maytszishan little known. It is located in Gansu Province in northwest China. This is a striking architectural complex, carved out of the rock. Maytszishan has 7,000 Buddhist sculptures and nearly 1,000 square meters of murals.
 
Maytszishan is just a few miles south of the Great Silk Road. Many of the monks chose to stay in these caves and work there.
 
Buddhist complex Maytszishan little known. It is located in Gansu Province in northwest China. This is a striking architectural complex, carved out of the rock. Maytszishan has 7,000 Buddhist sculptures and nearly 1,000 square meters of murals.
 
Buddhist complex Maytszishan little known. It is located in Gansu Province in northwest China. This is a striking architectural complex, carved out of the rock. Maytszishan has 7,000 Buddhist sculptures and nearly 1,000 square meters of murals.
 
One
of the earliest written records about this are found in the biographies
of the two monks Tanhonga and Huanggang, who meditated there with his
disciples.
 
Buddhist complex Maytszishan little known. It is located in Gansu Province in northwest China. This is a striking architectural complex, carved out of the rock. Maytszishan has 7,000 Buddhist sculptures and nearly 1,000 square meters of murals.
 
Buddhist complex Maytszishan little known. It is located in Gansu Province in northwest China. This is a striking architectural complex, carved out of the rock. Maytszishan has 7,000 Buddhist sculptures and nearly 1,000 square meters of murals.
 
Buddhist complex Maytszishan little known. It is located in Gansu Province in northwest China. This is a striking architectural complex, carved out of the rock. Maytszishan has 7,000 Buddhist sculptures and nearly 1,000 square meters of murals.
 
Buddhist complex Maytszishan little known. It is located in Gansu Province in northwest China. This is a striking architectural complex, carved out of the rock. Maytszishan has 7,000 Buddhist sculptures and nearly 1,000 square meters of murals.
 
Buddhist complex Maytszishan little known. It is located in Gansu Province in northwest China. This is a striking architectural complex, carved out of the rock. Maytszishan has 7,000 Buddhist sculptures and nearly 1,000 square meters of murals.
 
Buddhist complex Maytszishan little known. It is located in Gansu Province in northwest China. This is a striking architectural complex, carved out of the rock. Maytszishan has 7,000 Buddhist sculptures and nearly 1,000 square meters of murals.
 
Buddhist complex Maytszishan little known. It is located in Gansu Province in northwest China. This is a striking architectural complex, carved out of the rock. Maytszishan has 7,000 Buddhist sculptures and nearly 1,000 square meters of murals.
 
Buddhist complex Maytszishan little known. It is located in Gansu Province in northwest China. This is a striking architectural complex, carved out of the rock. Maytszishan has 7,000 Buddhist sculptures and nearly 1,000 square meters of murals.
Huge
Buddha is almost parallel to the side of the mountain - the highest is
more than 16 meters in height. Stairs that lead up and around the caves
were originally made of wood, but after been fitted with metal supports,
for security purposes.



(5) the age of generosity (dana-yuga)

http://movedbylove.servicespace.org/blog/?gclid=CKrsqPGk07gCFYgB4godty0A5w

http://www.ayogisway.com/dharma/article-dana-generosity/


Sri Lanka

Peradeniya

http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/michaelasanda-1872771-royal-botanic-gardens-sri-lanka3/

Peradeniya

Royal Botanic Gardens

Grădina Botanică Regală înfiinţată în 1371 poate arăta
vizitatorilor săi sau botaniştilor din lumea mare lucruri
interesante despre arborii săi seculari
şi plantele sale
rare, o minune a istoriei
ţării concentrată între zidurile
sale de verdeaţă

A tourist attraction for sure with a long and grandiose
history of colonialism, a monument of Kandyan King
Wickramabahu III in the 14th century is the horse shoe-
shaped Royal Botanic Gardens, Peradeniya situated on
147 acres, a significant national asset to Sri Lanka.

A place not to be missed, the Royal Botanic Gardens
has flourished since 1371 and stands today to tell its
visitors and Botanists interesting facts about its age-old
trees and plants a unique marvel of Lankan history
unfolded within the precincts of its lustrous greenery.

Peste 2 milioane vizitatori anual
Copaci seculari sau foarte rari
Aproape 10.000 de plante

Foarte aproape de intrare se află Sera de orhidee.
Climatul tropical al insulei este foarte adecvat
creşterii orhideelor, cea mai diversificată
și
răspândită dintre familiile de plante superioare

The best known attraction of the Gardens is the
famous Orchid House, which house for more than
300 varieties of exquisite orchids from the rare
indigenous Foxtail and Vesak orchids, to many
natural and hybrid species which have made this one
of the best known orchid centers of the world.

Familia orhideelor are în lume peste 20.000 de
specii
și mai mult de 200.000 de hibrizi.

Along with the Asteraceae, the orchid family is one
of the two largest families of flowering plants, with
between 21,950 and 26,049 currently accepted
species, found in 880 genera

Heliconia pendula

Heliconia, false bird-of-paradise

Remarcabilă plantă agăţătoare originară din pădurile tropicale din Filipine, cu o
spectaculoasă inflorescenţă bleu-vert, de unde
şi numele: liana de jad

Strongylodon macrobotrys, commonly known as jade vine, emerald vine or
turquoise jade vine, is a species of leguminous perennial woody vine, a native of
the tropical forests of the Philippines, with stems that can reach up to 18 m in
length

Fiecare floare are 7-7,5 centimetri iar inflorescenţa în
formă de ciorchine poate depăşi 90 de centimetri
Florile (care îşi schimbă culoarea la soare), sunt
polenizate de liliecii frugivori

The pale green foliage consists of three leaflets. The
claw-shaped flowers are carried in pendent trusses
or pseudoracemes of 75 or more flowers and can
reach as much as 3 m long. The turquoise flower
color is similar to some forms of the minerals
turquoise and jade, varying from blue-green to mint
green. The short, oblong, fleshy seedpods are up to
15 cm long and contain up to 12 seeds.

Sri
Lanka

Text : Internet
Pictures: Sanda Foişoreanu

Nicoleta Leu

Lucia Buzdugan
Copyright: All the images belong to their authors

Presentation: Sanda Foişoreanu
www.slideshare.net/michaelasanda

Sound: - Wasanthaya Oba (You are the Spring)
Davasaka

- Pera Eka

/Users/JC/Library/Containers/com.apple.Preview/Data/Downloads/peradeniya3srilanka-1.pps


“Donation-Based Classes: Practicing Generosity”

Spirit Rock Meditation Center's Dharma Hall - Woodacre, CA (Acquired solely via Community Dana)
Spirit Rock Meditation Center’s Dharma Hall - Woodacre, CA (Acquired solely via Community Dana)

Perhaps you’ve
already heard the murmurs about donation-based classes in your yoga
community.  If you’re a practitioner of Buddhist
meditation then you’ve most certainly been exposed to the practice
of generosity as one of Buddhism’s paramitas, or perfections.  In this
post I will give a brief overview and description of
the what and why of donation-based offerings.


 

Traditionally in
Asia all teachings have been offered in an ‘open-handed’ manner.  That
is, they are offered free of charge, and in a way
that makes the teachings equally accessible to all who desire to
learn and grow from them.  This way of offering teachings is done purely
from a place of generosity, with no expectation of
reciprocal exchange of any kind.  The benefits of making practices
available to all is quite obvious; it is the natural extension of having
benefited from them ourselves.


 

All that we need to
do to truly see when teachings are not being offered ‘freely’, is to
take a glance around at the participants in the next
class we attend - does the community consist solely of middle-aged
participants of European descent?  Nothing ultimately wrong with this
per se; but to yoke our practice with the vision of a
world that is inclusively free, is to take the next step in helping
to create freedom for as many as possible.  And simply put, this is the
result of offering teachings by donation.


 

If we pause here to
reflect on what drives most of our daily life, we immediately notice
that most of our action are done in the hopes of causing
certain results.  Not only that, but the consumer culture we live in
is based upon the ‘law of exchange’; money for things and services,
favors for praise and friendship, etc.  The fact
that our world is entrenched with exchange may sound familiar, as
this is also the basic description of samsara, or the cyclic existence
that mindful practice hopes to liberate us from.
 Exchange is in the very fiber of how we live, and often to even
consider a ’system’ that does not include exchange, can be next to
impossible.  Money is not ‘bad’, but only serves its
purpose at a certain ‘level’, or frequency of living.


 

Basically the
donation-based system of offering classes is ‘pay at a level that is
appropriate for you’.  What is appropriate?  This is
where the donation-based offerings truly shine, as now the student
is brought to a more full relationship with the concepts of value,
generosity, and support.  Hmmm…  Based on my
income, what the practice means to me, how I believe the practice
should be made accessible, etc, an amount is then decided upon.  This is
not a payment for the class, but rather an
opportunity to be generous.


 

Some people will
have the means to give more, some less.  Again, the means is not just a
big bank account, but includes things like feeling
that one has enough to give.  We’ve all known some financially
wealthy people who consistently thought they were ‘broke’; and we
probably have also known someone who has very little
financial resources, but always seem to have plenty to share.  The
practice of generosity allows us all to learn how to ’stretch’ our
hearts a little bit at a time.


 

This may sound like
playing with semantics; I assure you it is not.  The teachings are
given freely… done.  No donation is required,
but if the student so chooses, then they can support the propagation
of the teachings via supporting the specific teacher.  At first when
this new practice is offered, a student may feel
obligated to give; thinking, ‘I know its donation-based, but I’m
sure they expect me to give the going rate’; but as the student’s
relationship to generosity matures, they then can most clearly
begin to feel the benefits of being generous.  The Buddha said, ‘If
you knew what I do about generosity, you wouldn’t allow a single meal to
pass without sharing it’.  It is true,
generosity feels so very good - so natural.


 

Conversely, I have
been to donation-based classes that were so very close to offering
teachings freely, but when it came down to it they really
weren’t offering them in an ‘open-handed’ manner.  There was a bit
of ‘but offer a little bit more… please’ energy.  This completely
undermines the initial act of generosity, as it
says to the student, ‘thank you, but your generosity isn’t quite
enough’.  A person’s ability and means to be generous is what it is, and
no one can access that for another - that is the
beauty of donation-based offerings; each student makes a practice of
extending their heart, a relationship that grows over a lifetime.


 

Because
donation-based offerings and generosity are ‘outside’ of cause and
effect, they then exist also outside of time.  An act of
generosity can have immense impact, both on the recipient, but also
on the giver (and it doesn’t need to be money - that’s for sure).
 Generosity is an affirmation of abundance; it is an
expression from the wellspring that is each person’s true nature.
 Have you ever known anyone who seemed to seldom be generous - with
their time, their resources, or else-wise?  How do
you think that person experiences the world?  Do you think it is a
happy and expansive experience?  Most likely not.  The practice of
generosity actively cultivates the freedom
that each heart longs for.


 

As a practice, I
recommend doing something generous for anyone - it can be someone you
know or someone you do not know.  When performing the
act, check in with your intention.  Notice closely if you have any
agenda or desire to be ‘noticed’ or ‘rewarded’ for your act.  To truly
act from generosity is to be free to act in the
way nature intended for you.  You’ll feel it when you are in line
with the truth of who you are.  Enjoy this practice, and the discovery
of your truest expressions.

http://www.elephantjournal.com/2013/01/dana-generosity-barry-h-gillespie/


Dana: Generosity. ~ Barry H. Gillespie

Via
on Jan 28, 2013

Helping the homeless

Give freely and receive graciously.

Dana is the first of the 10 paramis, the “perfections,” that Theravaden Buddhism encourages us to practice.

Whenever the Buddha taught, especially to lay people, the first thing he taught was Dana.

Why did he do that?

There are two principal reasons. The first is that everyone, no
matter their level of education or intelligence or physical ability, can
practice generosity. The second is that Dana is a direct
antidote to grasping, the cause of suffering. When you grasp something
your hand has to close around it. When you are being generous, when you
are offering something, your hand has to open and let go.

In our culture we are encouraged to define ourselves by what we
possess: the cool car, the nice house, the good job, the latest
electronic gizmo. All these things are “mine.” Thinking in this way we
create a sense of separateness, of me and not me. Our self-image is
propped up by owning these things. They help us define who we are: our
status, our rank in society relative to others.

I had a student once who wore a t-shirt that said, “The person with
the most toys when they die wins.” That pretty well sums up our culture.

Generosity allows us to start thinking of our possessions,
of the things we use to carry on our daily lives, not so much as “mine”
and more as “just stuff.” We have this thing now because we need it.
When we no longer need it, or someone needs it more, we can simply let the user of the object change.
I don’t need to cling to anything. Generosity not only breaks down our
sense of a separate self, it helps us connect to the needs and suffering
of others, to feel more connected to everyone else. Generosity
increases our ability to experience compassion.

Generosity is what Buddhists call a wholesome mind state.

The more often our mind is in a wholesome state, the less often we
get dragged down by being in an unwholesome mind state like greed. It is
also a long lasting mind state. We feel it when we contemplate the act
of giving, we feel it as we actually give something and we feel it
afterwards, reflecting on our act of generosity.

This does not mean we should fill ourselves with feelings of
self-importance. Giving just becomes a natural act. We become one with
the flow of stuff. Nothing special. We need to be careful not to start
thinking that we are somehow better than the one we are giving to. This
simply takes us back to the mind state of us and them.

We need to give whatever we give gladly,
without regret and with no need for praise. The quality of our feelings
as we give affects the process, and the receiver. There is a great
story from the Buddha’s time that illustrates this.

All of the bikhus, the monastic students of the Buddha,
had gathered together for the rains retreat, a three month period when
they didn’t travel but instead stayed with the Buddha and practiced.
Part of the discipline of the monks was that they couldn’t grow food,
store food or handle money. They were totally dependent on the
generosity of the nearby lay people for their daily meal. A famous lay
disciple of the Buddha, a wealthy merchant, gladly fed 500 of them every
day. When the local king heard about this he decided he couldn’t be out
done, and ordered his cooks and servants to prepare a big feast every
day and feed another 500 monks. The monks would come, but never eat the
food in his presence. The king got curious, wondering why he never saw
them eat the food. What he found out was that the monks would take the
food, give it to other lay disciples, who would then immediately give it
back to them, but without any attitude of self-importance. Then the
monks could eat it.

Another aspect of generous acts we should always keep in mind lettomg
other people give to us. Let them experience the joy of giving. Often
when someone offers us something, especially if it is something we don’t
particularly need or perhaps even like, or if we feel that they really
can’t afford to give, we politely (or so we think) decline. This is very
ungenerous of us. It breaks the cycle of generosity. It reinforces our
own sense of superiority. Just take whatever is offered. You can always
pass it on again to someone else later.

Generosity doesn’t have to mean giving material things or money. In
fact, often the most generous thing we can give in our busy world is our
time. There are so many things that need doing that we can do
voluntarily. We just look around us and see all the suffering there is
in the world and then step in and help out where our help is needed.

How does generosity relate to our more formal meditation practice?

Choosing to sit with others, to be part of a sangha, is a
very generous act. People regularly sitting together reinforce each
other. If we are having a low energy day the knowledge and the feeling
of all those other people sitting around us lifts us up and helps keep
us going. Then the next time we sit, we may be full of energy and
concentration, helping others who may be struggling.

Generosity is easy to practice. We just need to consciously take the
many opportunities to be generous that present themselves every day. As
we deepen our generosity we will break down our need to grasp and our
sense of separation from others. We’ll become more like a Buddha.

 

Barry_120x120Barry H. Gillespie
was introduced to formal meditation practice in 1978, through the
Sivananda Yoga Vedanta Ashram. In 2003 he began exploring Theravaden
Buddhist practice, sitting many long retreats at the Insight Meditation
Society in Barre, MA and Spirit Rock in Woodacre, CA. His principle
teacher is Guy Armstrong. His teaching arises out of his desire to share
what he has learned with others. Barry currently leads the Full Moon
Sit at the Yoga Workshop in Boulder, CO. This article is based on a
dharma talk he gave there. For more information on his teaching go to
his website.


http://www.spiritrock.org/page.aspx?pid=298

Slideshow image 2

Slideshow image 3

Slideshow image 4


Dana - The Practice of Generosity

Dana (pronounced “dah-na”) is a Pali word meaning generosity. Dating
back to the time of the Buddha, there has existed an interdependence
between those who offer the teachings and those who receive them. The
teachings are given freely, since they are considered priceless.
Registration fees for retreats cover food, rental, transportation, and
other Spirit Rock expenses. None of this money goes directly to the
teachers or residential retreat staff. Classes and daylongs are also
held on a donation basis. To allow the teachers and residential retreat
staff to continue their dharma work, support from the students is
needed. There will be an opportunity to contribute at the end of each
retreat, class and daylong.

In addition, the development of
Spirit Rock as a retreat center has been funded almost entirely by
donations from individuals. The completion of the planned developments
will depend on the continued generosity of committed supporters. Your
support of both the Center and the Spirit Rock teachers will allow the
Center to flourish and others to benefit from the teachings.

According
to the Buddha, generosity, or sharing what we have, is one of the
central pillars of a spiritual life. In the act of giving we develop our
ability to let go, cultivate a spirit of caring, and acknowledge the
inter-connectedness that we all share. The Buddha created a system to
develop this quality of open-handedness whereby those who share the
teachings are dependent on those who receive them. Monks and nuns go on
daily alms rounds with a begging bowl, relying on the generosity of lay
people for support in continuing their teaching and spiritual life.

It
is the practice of dana that has kept the Buddhist tradition alive for
more than 2,500 years in Asia, where committed supporters have given
generously to establish networks of monasteries and retreat centers
providing for millions of teachers and practitioners. As this ancient
teaching moves to the West, we hope to keep alive this joyful tradition.


The Effective Sweet Treat that Relieves Arthritis Pain


 

This may help us with pains & it is enjoyable too


 This is the best e-mail I have received, I tell you why.

 Some of you know that I have osteoarthritis stabalised by 
 knee exercises and Glucosamine and Condrontin for the 
 last 8 years while a few of my peers had knee replacement 
 during this time. 

 Last November I went to Hanoi Bay and did quite a bit of 
 climbing that aggravated the pain in my right knee and 
 started the pain in the left. Still I persisted with my 
 medication and knee exercises. It gave relieve up to 70%.

 One of my favourite fruits is pineapple. I realize that for 

 weeks since my trip to Hanoi I have not eaten any pineapple. 
 I really missed that so went out to purchase one. 
 Walloped one big piece heartily. Lo and behold, next morning 
 when I started my exercises, the pain was nearly gone. 
 There was around 95% relieve. Thinking it was the benefit 
 of the exercises I increased the momentum another 5 to 10 
 minutes.

 Later in the day I began to think how could the pain decrease 

 so much overnight. Aha. only difference was the pineapple 
 that I ate. Yes you guessed it, I went and walloped some more 
 and obtained more relieve . Back to before I went to Hanoi Bay. 

 Happy but too shy to tell anyone until my sister rang up to inform 
 of
her back ache and unable to stand straight. Rebuked her for not  doing
anything like rubbing ointment or seeing a Dr. Jokingly  informed her of
my pineapple experience. Laughingly she said 
 she was going to try that. A
week or so later she came over and  proudly showed me that she could
walk straight without any pain. 
 With thumb up she informed that the pineapple worked.

 So friends if you or anyone you know have arthritis pain, pineapple 

 is worth the try. I dare to inform you after receiving this e-mail.
 
* The Effective Sweet Treat that Relieves Arthritis Pain*
 By Jim Healthy On  October 19th, 2012

 Did you know that there are certain kinds of foods that actually help
 reduce or even stop arthritis pain?
 These “superfoods” are usually easy to find and inexpensive.

 Of all the foods that help fight against arthritis — delicious, sweet
 pineapple comes up close to the top of the list.

 *THE SWEET PAIN RELIEVER

 For generations, people around the world have used fresh pineapple  to ease their arthritis inflammation.

 Loaded with joint-protecting vitamin C, pineapple is undoubtedly a  superior arthritis-healing food.
 Its anti-inflammatory ingredient — bromelain — is so potent that many
 boxers drink the juice after fights to heal their bruises.

 A 1960 study compared boxers who took bromelain with those  receiving a placebo. In just four
days, an amazing 78% of those 

 taking bromelain were inflammation-free, while only 14% of the    control group had recovered.

 Other than bromelain, pineapple also contains manganese, which  
 bones and protects joints.

 Here are 5 reasons you should be indulging in this delicious fruit if  you struggle with joint pain and arthritis:

 *Reason #1: Joint Protection*

 Higher
intake levels of the antioxidant vitamin C is essential for
 people with arthritis…And just one cup of pineapple has a whopping
 94% of the recommended daily allowance (RDA)!

 Research published in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases showed
 that vitamin C-rich foods protect against inflammatory polyarthritis, 

 a type of rheumatoid arthritis in which two or more joints are affected.

 If you have osteoarthritis,
you may be concerned by warnings that  you should not increase your
vitamin C intake. But know that those  warnings are based on a 2004
study on guinea pigs!

 Studies on humans show vitamin C actually reduces pain, cartilage  loss and disease progression.

 *Reason #2: Healthier Joint Tissue*

 Pineapple is a great source of the trace mineral manganese.
 Manganese is absolutely essential for building healthy joint tissue 

 and dense bones. One cup of pineapple provides 128% of the RDA 
 for manganese.

 Research shows that manganese tackles free radicals that can  damage joint cartilage.
 Tip: It’s best to eat your pineapple raw. Fruit skewers alternating fresh
 pineapple chunks with strawberries is a great way to do that. Grilled  and cooked pineapple is extraordinarily tasty too.

 *Reason #3: Smoother Joint Movement*

 Pineapple’s enzymes literally clean up “rusty” joints. When you eat
 pineapple on an empty stomach, the enzymes go right to work on  your joints.

 Tip: If you eat pineapple with other foods, the enzymes divert their
 activity to digesting the rest of your meal instead of the gunk in your
 joints.
 So
keep pineapple around for between-meal snacks. Juice the hard  inner
core as well to take advantage of the concentrated bromelain
 located there.

 *#4: Pain Relief*

 For optimal arthritis pain-relief, eat fresh pineapple. The bromelain in
 pineapple is destroyed by heat, so fresh pineapple will give you the  most benefit.

 Frozen pineapple retains active enzymes, but canned fruit and
 commercially processed juice don’t provide the anti-inflammatory
 benefit of fresh fruit.
 It’s important to note bromelain causes anti-clotting activity…

 So you should consult with your physician before combining  pineapple
with blood-thinning medications such as warfarin  (Coumadin), heparin,
or aspirin.
 Tip: If the fruit needs to ripen, keep it on your kitchen counter for a

 couple days. You’ll know it’s sweet and ready to eat when the bottom
 softens a bit.

 *Reason #5: Protection
from Inflammation*

 Pineapple’s bromelain halts
inflammation. The sulfur-based enzyme  bromelain in fresh pineapple is
one of the best-researched natural  anti-inflammatory agents around.
 Bromelain clobbers inflammatory agents that trigger joint pain and

 cartilage degeneration.
 A 2006 study cited in Clinical and
Experimental Rheumatology found  that supplemental bromelain is
effective in easing discomfort from 

 hip arthritis.
 The
Arthritis Foundation stated that pineapple’s bromelain produces
 effects comparable to NSAIDs for relieving pain and inflammation.
 UK
researchers reviewed ten studies on osteoarthritis and bromelain.
 They found that every single one confirmed bromelain’s benefits.

 Tip: Most of the bromelain in pineapples is found in  the core and the stem.
 So don’t throw away that tough, fibrous core!


 Just chop it up, throw it in a blender with some water and pulse to    convert it to juice.

http://seattletimes.com/html/health/2021488329_indiasurrogatesxml.html
The Seattle Times

COOL GOOGLE PROJECTS



In India, a rise in surrogate births for West

A new survey paid for by India’s government
said that in the absence of regulation, unscrupulous agents are luring
poor, uneducated women into signing surrogacy contracts that they do not
fully understand.

The Washington Post

As
you know, Google - is not only a search engine: The company is a world
leader in gadget creation,internet services, smartphone apps and more.
The most curious development is the secret Google X; among X projects -
airships that distribute wireless Internet, but this is just the tip of
the iceberg, here are 10 ideas that the Internet giant seeks to bring to
life in the near future.

10 Cool Google Projects
Driverless Car
Negotiations
are underway with the authorities for permission to test the
self-governing vehicles on public roads, but only in California and
Nevada.

10 Cool<br />
 Google Projects
Google Glass will change the way you think about gadgets
Having
put on those glasses, you can forget about the screens of smartphones
and computers - the right information will always be available in only
one eye movements.
Calendar, email, social networks, weather, everything that you might want to know on the go.
Google
Glass makes a revolutionary technology available to a wide range of
people so far only a few lucky people, mostly developers and journalists
were able to get a working prototype, but the consumers may get
their hands on one as soon as 2014.

10 Cool Google Projects
“Smart Home” from Google
The
technology, called Android @ Home, will fully automate all of the life
support system by connecting to the Internet, for example, while you are
not home, a refrigerator will be able to order the necessary products
itself, and coffee maker will make coffee exactly for your arrival.
You might say this is crazy but apparently Bill Gates has similar system in his home, and I didnt hear him complain about it.

10 Cool Google Projects
Space Elevator
In
2011 Google X team began to look into “space elevator” project, in the
so-called list of “What if …”. I must say, the very concept of this
method of delivery to the orbit of people and goods put forward by K.
Tsiolkovsky is both crazy and awesome.
Do
not wait for Google’s early implementation of this idea - the
development of “lift into orbit,” presents many technical challenges,
and all the more likely to say that to implement this idea in life is
impossible, or is it, time will tell.

10 Cool Google Projects
Android SmartWatch
Recently,
it was reported that Google is preparing a direct competitor for iWatch
from Apple - a watch, combined with the smartphone.
This latest «must have»-new to the gadget lovers will be available early 2014.

10 Cool Google Projects
Google will take care of your health
The
Internet giant has a stake in the
company Adimab, engaged in the development of diagnostics and treatment
of various diseases, which would bring a variety of technologies and
methods to combat diseases. The revolutionary idea is the invention of
miniature sensors involved in the search and optimization of antibodies
produced by the body - to start treatment only need to swallow such a
sensor.

10 Cool Google Projects
Internet airships to make the entire world WiFi hotspot.
Google’s
ambitions as a provider of Internet reached all-time highs - the
company is developing airships that will provide wireless connectivity
the entire planet, including remote regions in Africa and other parts of
the
Earth.
If
the project is realized, the “world wide web” will get about another 1
billion people - mostly residents of the “third world.”

10 Cool Google Projects
Game console based on Android
The popularity of the Android platform is growing all over the world, and Google is seeking to use its potential to the maximum.
«Wall
Street Journal» spoke about the development of the gaming console from
Google, which is designed to be a “killer”: game console from Google
will allow you to run
any Android-games directly on your home television.
Console wont be limited to games only, TV, internet access, social networking is something many will expect from this console.

10 Cool Google Projects
Google and Motorola
Google bought Motorola Mobility (transaction was $ 12.5 billion) to become the owner of 24.5 thousand patents and designs.
Under
the Motorola wing Google will release a smartphone Motorola Moto X
based on Android, which has all the modern features and
characteristics, as well as, of course, a number of trendy “chips”,
which has no rivals - release date unknown (but soon apparently).

10 Cool Google Projects
Eco-friendly sources of energy
The
company Makani Power - developer of wind and solar energy technologies
teamed up with Google X to come up with wind turbines, hovering at an
altitude of almost 300 meters to 650 meters above sea level to generate
electricity out of thin air, literally.

 
Tricky Answer to a Simple Problem

Scroll Down for Solution

Answer: 3

Did you answer 12? Come on, you were already told that 3=6…

comments (0)
07/27/13
993 LESSON 28-07-2013 SUNDAY FREE ONLINE eNālāndā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY run through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org Universal Welfare Friend - E- GOOD NEWS DISPENSATION OF AWAKENED ONES WITH AWARENESS is for DUKKHA NIRODHA (End of Suffering) of all SENTIENT & NON-SENTIENT BEINGS (4) the age of learning [the texts] (suta-yuga) http://www.bps.lk/olib/wh/wh381-p.html
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Posted by: @ 9:32 pm

993 LESSON 28-07-2013 SUNDAY 

FREE ONLINE  eNālāndā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY 
run through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org 

Universal Welfare Friend -
E- GOOD NEWS 

DISPENSATION OF AWAKENED ONES WITH AWARENESS is for DUKKHA NIRODHA (End of Suffering) of all SENTIENT & NON-SENTIENT BEINGS

(4) the age of learning [the texts] (suta-yuga)

http://www.bps.lk/olib/wh/wh381-p.html

VOICE OF SARVA SAMAJ SADBHAVANA


The Times of India


Now, Farooq Abdullah says you can fill your stomach for 1 rupee


Jagatheesan Chandrasekharan(Bangalore)
If you don’t eat anything you need not spend even a rupee. Preachers must practice. Then no advise will be required.


Logo




Uttar Pradesh bags award for free laptop scheme

Jagatheesan Chandrasekharan

If Internet connection which costs around Rs.1000/- is not provided
students will start selling the lap tops as they did earlier.



image00112.jpg
Is this a
mosquito? No. It’s an insect spy drone for urban areas, already in
production, funded by the US Government.  It can be remotely
controlled and is equippe
d with a camera and a microphone.  It can
land on you, and it has the potential to take a DNA sample or leave RFID
tracking nanotechnology on your skin.  It can fly through an open
window, or it can attach to your clothing until you take it in your
home.

Given their propensity to request macro-sized drones for
surveillance, one is left with little doubt that police and military may
look into these gadgets next. (And to think we were worried about West
Nile virus!)

And now you know why our government has requested the law
be changed to allow drone surveillance in the United
States.


கஜுராஹோ சிற்பங்கள் - சிறப்பு புகைப்படத் தொகுப்பு…

ஆண்கள் எல்லாம் சன்யாசிகளாக காடு மலைகளுக்கு சென்றுவிட்ட காலத்தில் இக்கோவிலை நிறுவி அவர்களை திறப்பு விழாவிற்கு அழைத்து, அவர்கள் வந்தப்பின் எல்லோரும் அவர்களின் மனைவிகளை தேடிக்கொண்டு வீடுகளுக்கு சென்றுவிட்டனர்.

 

The Coming Buddha
Ariya Metteyya

By

Saya U Chit Tin, PhD.

Assisted by

William Pruitt, PhD.

Buddhist Publication Society
Kandy • Sri Lanka

The Wheel Publication No. 381/383

2nd revised edition
Copyright © 1992

By the Sayagyu U Ba Khin Memorial Trust, U.K.

ISBN 955–24–0098–8

Originally published in 1988 as Dhammadana Series 7 by the The Sayagyi U Ba Khin Memorial Trust, U.K. This 2nd revised edition is published in the Wheel Series with the consent of the author and the original publisher.

BPS Online Edition © (2011)

Digital Transcription Source: BPS Transcription Project

For free distribution. This work may be republished, reformatted,
reprinted and redistributed in any medium. However, any such
republication and redistribution is to be made available to the public
on a free and unrestricted basis, and translations and other derivative
works are to be clearly marked as such.

Contents

List of abbreviations

Introduction

Introduction to the Revised Edition

The Bodhisatta Metteyya

Buddha Ariya Metteyya

The Duration of the Sasana of Buddha Gotama

The Coming of Buddha Ariya Metteyya

The Birth of the Next Buddha

The Wheel-turning Monarch Sankha

The Career of Bodhisatta Metteyya

How to Meet Buddha Metteyya

Appendix A:

The Chronicle of the Future Buddha

Translation

Appendix B: Aspirations to Meet Buddha Ariya Metteyya



List of abbreviations

Unless otherwise stated, all editions are by the Pali Text Society.

A Anguttara Nikaya (trans., GS)

Anag

Anagatavamsa, editions used: JPTS, 1886, pp. 33–53 (Minayeff, ed.), and Ernst Leumann, Maitreya-samiti, das Zukunftsideal der Buddhisten (Strassburg: Karl J. Trubner, 1919; Pali text, pp. 184–191; notes, pp. 192–226)

As

Atthasalini (trans., Expos.)

BN 630

Bibliothèque nationale, Pali mss 630
(& 862), commentary on Anag. We thank Mme J. Filliozat for making
available a copy of her transcription of this text.

BN 862

Bibliothèque nationale, Pali mss 862.

BT

Buddhism in Translation (trans. by H.C. Warren)

Bv-a

Buddhavamsa-atthakatha (Madhuravilasini) (trans., CSM)

CB

Chronicle of Buddhas (Buddhavamsa)

CPD

A Critical Pali Dictionary

CSM

The Clarifier of the Sweet Meaning (trans. of Bv-a)

Culte

Mohan Wijayaratna, Le Culte des dieux chez les bouddhistes singhalais (Paris: Cerf, 1987)

D

Digha-nikaya (trans., DB, TS)

DB

Dialogues of the Buddha (D)

Dbk

Dasabodhisattuppattikatha (The Birth-stories of the Ten Bodhisattas). The first number refers to the trans., the second number to the Pali text.

Dbu

Dasabodhisatta-uddesa (ed. and
French trans. by F. Martini [BEFEO 36, 2 (1936), pp. 287–390]. The first
number refers to the French trans., the second number to the Pali
text).

DPPN

Dictionary of Pali Proper Names

D-t

Digha-nikaya-tika

Dvp

Dasavatthuppakarana (ed. and trans.
by J. Ver Eecke, EFEO [1976]. The first number refers to the Pali text,
the second number to the French translation.

Expos.

The Expositor (As)

GD

The Group of Discourses (Sn)

GS

The Gradual Sayings (A)

Illus.

The Illustrator of Ultimate Meaning (Paramatthajotika I)

Ja

Jataka

JPTS

The Journal of the Pali Text Society

KS

The Kindred Sayings (S)

M

Majjhima Nikaya (trans., MLS)

MB

The Manuals of Buddhism by Ledi Sayadaw (Union of Buddha Sasana Council, 1965)

MLS

The Middle Length Sayings (M)

Moh

Mohavicchedani

Mp

Manorathapurani (commentary on A)

PED

The Pali-English Dictionary

Pj II

Paramatthajotika (commentary on Sn)

Sih

Sihalavatthuppakarana (ed. and trans. by J. Ver Eecke, EFEO [1980])

Sn

Suttanipata (trans., GD)

Sp

Samantapasadika (commentary on the Vinaya-Pitaka)

Spk

Saratthappakasini (commentary on the Samyutta-nikaya)

Sv

Sumangalavilasini (commentary on D)

Th

Theragatha

Th-a

Theragatha-atthakatha (Paramatthadipani V)

Treatise

’A Treatise on the Paramis,’ The All-Embracing Net of Views (Buddhist Publication Society 1978)

TS

Ten Suttas from Digha Nikaya (Rangoon: Burma Pitaka Association, 1984)

v(v)

verse(s)

Vism

Visuddhimagga



Namo Tassa Bhagavato Arahato Sammasambuddhassa

Introduction

We have gathered here all the information we could find in the Theravada tradition concerning the coming Buddha. [1] In Burma and Sri Lanka, the coming Buddha is generally spoken of as Ariya Metteyya, the Noble Metteyya. [2]
The term Ariya was already added to the name in some post-canonical
Pali texts, and it shows the deep respect felt for the Bodhisatta who
will attain Awakening in the best of conditions. Indeed, all aspects of
his career as a Buddha rank among the highest achievements of Buddhas of
the past as recorded in the Buddhavamsa (The Chronicle of Buddhas).

It is only natural that over the years many people have aspired to
meet Buddha Ariya Metteyya—not only because it has become less common
for people to attain Awakening, but also because of a natural desire to
encounter such a rare occasion. In his introduction to his edition and
translation of the Dasabodhisattuppattikatha (The Birth Stories of the Ten Bodhisattas),
Ven. H. Saddhatissa has given several texts included in Pali
commentaries and chronicles and in Sinhalese Buddhist texts in which the
writers express the wish to meet the coming Buddha. [3]

The commentary on the Jataka stories ends with a poem in which the
writer aspires to be with the Bodhisatta Metteyya in the Tusita Deva
world and to receive a sure prediction of future Buddhahood from him
when he becomes a Buddha. [4] Sinhalese versions of the Visuddhimagga
end with a poem in which the writer aspires to rebirth in the Tavatimsa
Deva world and then to final liberation under Buddha Metteyya. [5]
Ven. Saddhatissa attributes these verses to Ashin Buddhaghosa, but they
seem to be written by a copyist. Another aspiration to encounter Buddha
Metteyya is found at the end of Sinhalese manuscripts of Ashin
Buddhaghosa’s Dasabodhisattuppattikatha[6]

Ven. Saddhatissa also cites many instances from the Pali chronicles (Mahavamsa and Culavamsa) in which Sinhalese kings honoured Metteyya. [7] King Du?t?thagamani of the second century BC was considered to be destined to become the next Buddha’s chief disciple.

Royalty and high-ranking officials in Burma often made similar
aspirations. This seems to have led to building pagodas with five sides
at Pagan. Paul Strachan points out that with the Dhamma-Yazika Pagoda
(Dhamma-rajika) Pagoda, completed in 1196 by King Sithu II, “The
addition of a fifth side to temple and stupa ground plans in Burma is
without precedent throughout the Buddhist world and the Burmese were
possibly the first society throughout the world to attempt this
pentagonal type of plan for a major architectural work. The origins of
this movement lie in contemporary religious thought: the cults of
Mettaya, the future buddha, and the present cycle of five buddhas.” [8]
Two thirteenth-century inscriptions at the temple in Buddha Gaya record
that repairs on the temple were carried out through the generosity of
King Kyawswa of Burma, and the concluding verse is an aspiration to
become a disciple of Buddha Metteyya. [9] As in Sri Lanka, many Buddhist texts end with the aspiration to meet Buddha Ariya Metteyya.

Just as the future Buddha Metteyya became more important for
Buddhists as the centuries went by, many of the texts giving infomation
about him are fairly late. The Anagatavamsa is said to have been written by the author of the Mohavicchedani, Ashin Kassapa (1160–1230 AD). [10]
It is very difficult to know how far back information goes when it is
given in the Pali commentaries, sub-commentaries, chronicles, and other
texts written down after the canon. We have given all the information
available to us that is part of the Theravada tradition, but we must be
careful to remember that texts such as the Dasabodhisattuppattikatha (The Birth Stories of the Ten Bodhisattas), the Dasabodhisatta-uddesa, the Dasavatthuppakarana, and the Sihalavatthuppakarana
seem to contain information that was added at a relatively late date.
This is especially evident in the many variants in various texts for
names and numbers.

It takes more than just a wish if a person is to encounter a Buddha
and attain Nibbana, however. Sayagyi U Ba Khin taught his meditation
students that they must practise Sila, Samadhi, and Pañña
(virtue, concentration, and wisdom) as Buddha Gotama taught we should.
Sayagyi U Ba Khin made every effort to make sure that his own practice
and what he taught was consistent with what his teachers passed on to
him and with the Teachings of the Buddha in the Pali canon and
commentaries.

There are many pressures in the world today to modify the Teachings
of the Buddha. The Buddha foresaw that this would happen and warned his
disciples to be careful to maintain the practice just as he had taught
them. Ven. Maha-Kassapa convened the First Buddhist Council shortly
after the Buddha’s demise in order to rehearse the Teachings. The Sangha
has kept these Teachings intact over the centuries, and the Sixth
Buddhist Council, held in Burma in 1954–1956, was the most recent effort
to make sure the three collections of texts (Tipitaka) are kept pure.

Sayagyi U Ba Khin repeated the Burmese tradition that those who live
in accordance with these Teachings will meet Buddha Ariya Metteyya. It
is even believed that the coming Buddha’s power will be such that he
will be able to reach people who have lived up to the Teachings in this
life but who have done deeds in the past which lead to their being born
in lower realms before he comes. Some hints of this are found in Pali
texts which show the power of sharing merits.

Sayagyi also often repeated a saying of the Buddha’s found in Dhammapada verse 354: Sabbadanam dhammadanam jinati.
“The gift of the Dhamma surpasses all other gifts.” This, of course,
does not mean that we should not give material gifts. Sayagyi himself
was always very generous with gifts to the Sangha and others. But the
gift of the Dhamma can only be given while the Teachings of a Buddha are
available, and by laying emphasis on this quotation of the Buddha’s,
Sayagyi reminded us that we must never become so involved in material
considerations that we neglect the most important gift of all. (See also
paragraph 2, page 12 below. If we assume that Bodhisatta Metteyya’s
last human life before attaining Buddhahood is during a Buddha’s
Dispensation, he would be able to give the gift of the Dhamma, unlike
Vessantara, who lived outside such a period.)

May all make the right effort here and now in this life so that they will attain Nibbana!

Introduction to the Revised Edition

This new edition includes corrections and additions to the first two
editions. We wish to thank Venerable Bhikkhu Bodhi was his suggestions
for this second revision of our text. Mother Sayamagyi and I were
pleased that the first revised edition of this text was included among
the publications marking the tenth anniversary of our coming out of
Burma to continue our work in teaching the Buddha-Dhamma in the
tradition of our esteemed teacher Sayagyi U Ba Khin. We hope that this
new edition in the Wheel series will make the text available to a larger audience.

Saya U Chit Tin
International Meditation Centre
Heddington, Calne, U.K.
October 12, 1992



The Bodhisatta Metteyya

Uttamo Metteyyo Ramo Pasenadi Kosalo ca
Abhibhu Dighasoni ca Candani ca Subo Todeyyabrahmano
Nalagiri Palaleyyo bodhisatta anukkamena
Sambodhim labhanti anagate.

(Buddha Gotama predicted as follows:)

In the future (ten) Bodhisattas will attain full awakening in the
following order: the most honourable (Ariya) Metteyya, (King) Rama,
(King) Pasenadi of Kosala, (the Deva) Abhibhu, (the Asura Deva)
Dighasoni, (the Brahman) Candani, (the young man) Subha, the Brahman
Todeyya, (the elephant) Nalagiri, and (the elephant) Palaleya. [11]

The most important aspiration for any individual is to aim for the
true liberation of attaining Nibbana. When a person is able to make this
resolve in the presence of a Teaching Buddha and get a sure prediction
from him, he or she becomes one who is intent on Awakening, a
Bodhisatta. [12] There are three types of Bodhisattas:

(1) those who aspire to become Awakened as a disciple of a Teaching Buddha:

(a) ordinary disciples (savaka),

(b) eighty leading disciples (maha-savaka), and

(c) two chief disciples (agga-savaka);

(2) those who aspire to become Awakened through their own efforts but who will not teach others the way to Awakening (pacceka-bodhisatta), and

(3) those who aspire to become Awakened through their own efforts and who will teach others the way to Awakening (maha-bodhisatta). [13]

In this paper, we will concentrate on the last type of Bodhisatta, with particular reference to the next Buddha, Metteyya. [14]

It is natural that interest in the coming Buddha has grown as the
years go by. When Buddha Gotama was available, most of the people’s
efforts went to practising his Teachings and attaining Awakening.
Immediately after his demise, his Teachings were collected, and, since
that time, great care has gone into maintaining their purity in order
that they may remain effective.

The number of those who attain Nibbana are less as time goes by, and
so people began to think more in terms of meeting the next Buddha and
achieving Awakening under him. [15]
It is important that the practice of the Buddha’s Teachings not be
neglected, however. It is not wishful thinking that enables us to
encounter a Buddha, but rather developing the ten perfections and
advancing as far as possible in the practice of a Buddha’s Teachings
whenever possible. This is particularly important today as the Buddha’s
Teachings are on the decline and it becomes easier and easier to go down
to the four lower planes of existence. If this should happen, it is
very unlikely that a person would meet the next Buddha.

A Teaching Buddha is the greatest of all beings, and the preparation for achieving this state of being a Supreme Awakened One (Sammasambuddha) takes longer than the preparation to attain Awakening as a disciple or a Pacceka-Buddha.

In the commentaries on the Pali canon, the preparation of a Maha-bodhisatta is given in detail. This Great Being (Mahasatta) will develop the ten perfections (parami)
longer and to a higher degree than the lesser types of Bodhisattas. A
person who becomes Awakened as an ordinary disciple of a Teaching Buddha
must work on the ten perfections for ten to one hundred thousand
aeons. [16]
Leading disciples must prepare one hundred thousand aeons. Chief
disciples work for one incalculable and one hundred thousand aeons. To
become a Pacceka Buddha requires two incalculable aeons. But a man
working to become a Teaching Buddha develops the perfections on three
levels, making thirty perfections in all. [17]
The three levels of perfections mean the sacrifice of external
possessions for the ordinary level, the sacrifice of any of one’s limbs
for the middle level, and the sacrifice of one’s life for the highest
level. [18]

Several other interpretations for the three levels are given, [19]
and some of these are of interest for meditators today. The three
levels can be understood to mean: (1) rejoicing in other people’s
merits, (2) encouraging other people to practise the Teachings, (3)
practising oneself. Or, they can be taken to mean that acquiring merit
and knowledge on the first level leads to life in happy states, on the
second level it leads to attaining Nibbana oneself, and on the third
level it leads to aiding others to attain both of these types of
happiness.

The Great Bodhisatta achieves the three levels of the perfection of giving (dana) by giving (1) his belongings, children, and wife; (2) his limbs; and (3) his life. He will not transgress virtue (sila) on account of these three. He fulfils renunciation (nekkhamma)
by giving up these three after cutting off all attachment to them. By
rooting out all craving for these three, he is able to discriminate
between what is beneficial or harmful to beings—thus perfecting wisdom (pañña). The three levels of energy (viriya) are reached by striving to relinquish these three. Through patience (khanti) he endures obstacles to his belongings, limbs, and life. He will not abandon truthfulness (sacca) on account of these three. His resolution (adhitthana) is unshakeable even if these three are destroyed. He maintains loving kindness (metta) towards others even though they destroy these three. He perfects equanimity (upekkha) by remaining neutral whether others are helpful or harmful to any of these three. [20]

Great Bodhisattas are of three types: [21] (1) those in whom wisdom (pañña) is predominant, (2) those in whom faith (saddha) is predominant, and (3) those in whom energy (viriya)
is predominant. For the first type, the preparation requires four
incalculable and one hundred thousand aeons. The second type works for
eight incalculable and one hundred thousand aeons. The Bodhisatta
Metteyya is the third type, those who work for sixteen incalculable and
one hundred thousand aeons. [22]
These three types are also explained as being due to the degree of the
quality of the energy they put forth, or again, as being determined by
the degree they develop the mental factors which bring emancipation to
maturity (vimuttiparipacaniya dhamma).

These three types of Great Bodhisattas are determined by how much
they have developed the perfections when they make the aspiration to
become a Teaching Buddha. At the time they aspire to become a Teaching
Buddha, they will already have prepared to attain final Nibbana,
Arahatship. [23] They will be at the point that they could become Arahats (1) through a condensed teaching of less than three lines (ugghatitaññu), (2) through an elaborated teaching of less than four lines (vipañcitaññu), or (3) through further training amounting to hearing four lines (neyya). According to the commentary on the Anagatavamsa[24]
Those in whom faith is predominant, which was the case for the
Bodhisatta who became Buddha Gotama, would be able to understand a
condensed teaching of less than three lines. Those in whom faith is
predominant would understand a teaching of less than four lines. Those
in whom energy is predominant, as was the case for Bodhisatta Metteyya,
would understand on hearing four lines. This might seem to suggest that
the future Buddha Gotama was more advanced that the future Buddha
Metteyya when he made his resolve to become a Buddha. But the difference
may be related to the fact that a Bodhisatta for whom energy is
predominant develops the perfections four times as long as a Bodhisatta
for whom wisdom is predominant.

There are many conditions associated with making the resolve to become a Teaching Buddha. [25] The aspiration (abhinihara)
is: “Crossed over I would cause (others) to cross over, released I
would cause (others) to be released, tamed I would cause (others) to be
tamed, calmed I would cause (others) to be calmed, comforted I would
cause (others) to be comforted, completely quenched I would cause
(others) to be completely quenched, Awakened I would cause (others) to
be Awakened, purified I would cause (others) to be purified.”

There are eight qualifications for the man who is to become a Great Bodhisatta: [26]

  1. He must be a human being (manusatta), as this is the plane in
    which Buddhas arise. This is the plane in which beings can have the
    three root causes of being free of greed, hatred, and confusion.
  2. He must be a male (lingasampatti), for only a man can become a Buddha.
  3. He must have achieved the necessary conditions supporting Buddhahood, in other words, the cause (hetu), which means that at the time of the aspiration he was prepared to attain Arahatship.
  4. He must see the Teacher (sattharadassana), as the aspiration
    can only be successful if made in the presence of a living Buddha. Only a
    Teaching Buddha can see the capability of the person making the
    aspiration and what will work out in the future.
  5. He must have gone forth (pabbajja) either as a bhikkhu or as
    an ascetic who believes in the doctrines of volitional actions and the
    moral effectiveness of action.
  6. He must have achieved the noble qualities (gunasampatti)
    which come with highly developed control over the mind. Only then will
    he be able to investigate the ten perfections that he will need to
    develop.
  7. He must possess great dedication (adhikara). He will be so devoted he would give his life for a Buddha.
  8. And he must have a strong desire (chandata), a wholesome desire, if he is to develop the mental factors which make for Buddhahood.

The aspiration has one of four conditions (paccaya): the man
is inspired because (1) he sees a Teaching Buddha, or (2) he hears of
the great power of a Teaching Buddha, or (3) he hears the Doctrine of a
Teaching Buddha being taught and the powers of a Buddha explained, or
(4) he is a man of lofty temperament and noble disposition. Bodhisatta
Metteyya comes under the second condition, as we shall see.

The aspiration has four causes (hetu):

The Great Bodhisatta has already fulfilled his duties under former Buddhas and acquired the supporting conditions (upanissaya)
for fulfilling his task. These supporting conditions create a clear
distinction between the Great Bodhisatta and the beings intent on
becoming Awakened as disciples or Pacceka Buddhas. Great Bodhisattas are
endowed with lucid faculties and lucid knowledge, while the others do
not. He practises for the welfare and happiness of many, out of
compassion for the world, for the good, welfare, and happiness of Devas
and men. The others practise mainly for their own welfare. He applies
skilfulness to his practise through his ability to create opportunities
to benefit others and through his skill in distinguishing what is and
what is not possible.

  1. He is by nature compassionate, ready to give his own body and life to alleviate the suffering of others.
  2. He is willing to struggle and strive for a long time, despite the great hardships he will encounter.
  3. He relies on good friends who restrain him from evil and establish him in what is good.

Finally, the aspiration is based on four powers (Bala): (1) internal power (ajjhattika-bala), (2) external power (bahira-bala), (3) the power of the supporting conditions (upanissaya-bala), and (4) the power of effort (payoga-bala).
The internal power is the longing or undeviating inclination for
supreme Awakening based on his personal ideals and reverence for the
Dhamma. The external power is this same longing based on consideration
of others. Through developing the supporting conditions, he has the
power of this longing. And the power of effort means he is endowed with
the appropriate effort for attaining supreme Awakening. His effort will
be thorough and he will persevere in his work.

The Great Bodhisattas are confirmed in their aspiration by many Buddhas. A sixteenth-century Pali text from Thailand [27]
says that Bodhisatta Metteyya received his prediction of future
Buddhahood from Buddha Mahutta. This would presumably be the first
prediction for him. This text also gives details of the period during
which the Bodhisatta who became Buddha Gotama made a mental resolve to
become a Teaching Buddha. This is shown to be his preparation for the
life in which he received his first sure prediction. Bodhisatta Metteyya
is mentioned as being associated with him in two of these lives: as his
leading disciple when he was a religious teacher [28] and as his chaplain (named Sirigutta) when he was King Atideva. [29]

The story of one occasion when Bodhisatta Metteyya made an aspiration
and when the perfection which is strongest for him is illustrated is
told in Pali texts which were written down after the compilation of the
canon. [30]
The story of Bodhisatta Metteyya’s aspiration was told to the leading
disciple Ven. Sariputta when he was residing near Savatthi in the
Pubbarama, the monastery offered by the laywoman Visakha.

Long ago, Bodhisatta Metteyya was the Wheel-turning Monarch Sankha in
the city of Indapatta in the Kuru country. This large city resembled a
city of the Devas. Wheel-turning Monarchs reign over the whole earth and
have seven great treasures: a great wheel, an elephant, horse, gem,
wife, householder, and adviser. Sankha lived in a seven-storey palace
made of the seven kinds of gems. This palace rose up out of the earth
through the power of his merit. Sankha led others to follow the path
leading to rebirth in the higher planes of existence, and he
administered justice with impartiality.

After Sankha became a Wheel-turning Monarch, there arose the Buddha Sirimata. [31] Whenever a Bodhisatta is to be born in his last life, there is a Buddha proclamation a thousand years before. [32]
Brahmas of the Pure Abodes (Suddhavasa) travel throughout the world of
men and proclaim: “A thousand years from now, a Buddha will arise in the
world.” King Sankha must have heard of this proclamation, for one day,
as he sat on his golden throne under the royal white umbrella, he said,
“A long time ago there was a proclamation that a Buddha would be born. I
will turn over the place of Wheel-turning Monarch to whoever knows of
the Triple Gem, to whoever points out to me the gems of the Buddha, the
Dhamma, and the Sangha, as well as the Dispensation. I will go to see
the Supreme Buddha.” Buddha Sirimata was residing at that time only
sixteen leagues from Sankha’s capital city. Among the samaneras
(novices) in the Sangha, there was a boy who came from a poor family.
His mother was a slave, so the samanera went to the city to seek wealth
in order to set his mother free. When the people saw him, they thought
he was a Yakkha, or ogre, so they threw sticks at him. Afraid, he went
to the palace and stood before the king. “Who are you, young man?” the
king asked.

“I am called a samanera, O great king,” the samanera answered.

“Why do you call yourself a samanera?”

“Because, O great king, I do no evil, I have established myself in
moral conduct, and thus I lead the holy life. Therefore I am called a
samanera.”

“Who gave you that name?”

“My teacher, O great king.”

“What is your teacher called, young man?”

“My teacher is called a bhikkhu, O great king.”

“Who gave your teacher the name ’bhikkhu,’ young man?”

“O great king, my teacher’s name was given by the priceless gem of the Sangha.”

Full of joy, King Sankha rose from his throne and prostrated himself
at the feet of the samanera. And he asked, “Who gave the name to the
Sangha?” “O great king, the Noble Supreme Buddha Sirimata gave the name
to the Sangha.” Hearing the word “Buddha,” which is so difficult to hear
in many hundreds of thousands of aeons, King Sankha fainted from joy.
When he regained consciousness, he asked, “Venerable sir, where does the
Noble Supreme Buddha Sirimata reside at present?”

And the samanera told him the Buddha was in a monastery called
Pubbarama, sixteen leagues away. King Sankha turned over the power of
Wheel-turning Monarch to the samanera. He gave up his kingdom and a
great number of relatives. Filled with joy at the thought of seeing the
Buddha, he started walking to the north towards the Pubbarama. The first
day, the soles of his feet split open, for they were very tender due to
his luxurious upbringing. On the second day, his feet began to bleed.
He was unable to walk on the third day, so he went on his hands and
knees. On the fourth day, his hands and feet bled, so he determined to
continue on his chest. The joy of the possibility of seeing the Buddha
enabled him to overcome his great suffering and pain.

Buddha Sirimata surveyed the world with his All-knowing Knowledge and seeing the power of the effort (viriya-bala) of the king, the Buddha thought, “This Wheel-turning Monarch Sankha is surely a seed, a Buddha-sprout (Buddankura-bijo).
He undertakes great pain because of me. Indeed, I should go to him.” By
his psychic powers, the Buddha hid his great splendour and went
disguised as a young man in a chariot. He went to where Sankha was and
blocked his path in order to test the power of his effort.

“You there!” Buddha Sirimata said to King Sankha, “go back on your
chest! I am going down this road in my chariot.” But King Sankha
refused, saying he was on his way to see the Buddha. The Buddha in
disguise invited the king to get into his chariot, saying that is where
he was going. On the way, the Deva maiden Sujata came down from the
Tavatimsa heaven, and taking the form of a young girl, offered food. The
Buddha had it given to Sankha. Then Sakka, in the form of a young man,
came down from the Tavatimsa heaven and gave water. As a result of the
divine food and water, all King Sankha’s ailments disappeared.

When they arrived at Pubbarama, the Buddha sat on his seat in the
monastery, assuming his true appearance with the rays of six colours
shining forth. When the king went in and saw the Buddha, he again lost
consciousness. After a while, he came to himself, approached the Buddha,
and paid his respects.

“Venerable sir,” he requested, “protector of the world, refuge of the
world, teach me one (point of the) doctrine which may calm me when I
have heard it.” “Very well,” the Buddha said, “listen.” The Buddha
reviewed the Doctrine of Nibbana and taught the king a discourse
concerning Nibbana. This aroused reverence for the Doctrine in the king,
but after hearing only a little of the Doctrine, he requested the
Buddha, “Please stop, Blessed One. Do not teach me any more.” He said
this because he thought to himself that he would not have a gift worthy
of what the Buddha taught him if he heard any more.

“Indeed, venerable sir,” the king said, “of all the doctrines taught,
the Blessed One has pointed out Nibbana, which is the highest. So, of
all the parts of my body, I will pay homage to your Doctrine with my
head.” He began to sever his neck with his fingernails and said,
“Venerable Buddha Sirimata, you go [33]
to the deathless first; through the gift of my head, I will afterwards
go to Nibbana. Having said just these few words, I pay homage to the
doctrine of Nibbana. Now, may this be the means for (my attaining)
omniscience.” And saying this, he finished severing his head with his
fingernails.

King Sankha’s predominant characteristic was his great energy (viriya).
This is shown through his overcoming the difficulties in going to see
Buddha Sirimata. His effort was so strong, the Buddha realised that he
was a Great Bodhisatta. Other perfections are also illustrated in this
story. He gives away his position of Wheel-turning Monarch. Even before
hearing of the Buddha, he set the example of leading a moral life
leading to higher rebirths. As a just king, he would show his wisdom,
patience, truthfulness, loving kindness, and equanimity. Once he hears
of the Buddha, he renounces his kingdom and family, giving up the
highest position that can be attained by a human being. And great
resolution worked together with his energy.

The final action of King Sankha is the gift of his head to the
Buddha. This may seem strange, but it is explained in the text by the
fact that the Buddha had taught him one aspect of the Doctrine
concerning Nibbana, the highest goal. King Sankha cannot find any other
gift worthy of Nibbana, so he resolves to offer his own head. In the
Pali commentaries, [34]
23 it is said that only giving their own limbs or their life makes
Great Bodhisattas exalt when they give. Joy arises when they give such
gifts and they experience no contrariety of mind. So we can see that
such gifts are beyond ordinary people, and we need not feel that we
should make such sacrifices ourselves.

During the time of Buddha Gotama, the Great Bodhisatta who is to be the next Buddha was a bhikkhu named Ajita. [35] According to the commentary on the Anagatavamsa, Ajita was the son of King Ajatasattu and Queen Kancanadevi. [36]
Prince Ajita had five hundred attendants, and when he reached the age
of sixteen, the king asked his son to inherit the Buddha’s heritage. The
Prince agreed, so the king took him to the Veluvana Monastery in great
pomp and splendour along with his five hundred attendants. Prince Ajita
was ordained as a novice, and because of his serenity, calmness, and
wisdom he was much respected. Later he was ordained as a bhikkhu. The
Buddha took him when he went from Rajagaha to Kapilavatthu to reside in
the Nirodharama Monastery.

While they were residing at that monastery, Maha-Pajapati-Gotami came
one day with two special cloths to be presented to the Buddha for use
as robes. She had planted the cotton seeds herself and did all the
necessary work up to the time the robes were finished. The account of
the gift of the cloths is found in the Majjhima-nikaya. [37]
There, the Buddha refused three times to accept the robes offered by
Maha-Pajapati-Gotami and suggested that she offer them to the Sangha
with the Buddha at its head. Ven. Ananda approached the Buddha,
suggesting he should accept the cloths. The Buddha then gave the
discourse on the analysis of offerings.

No other details are given in the Pali canon or Ashin Buddhaghosa’s commentary on this discourse. In the commentary on the Anagatavamsa,
it is said that the Buddha accepted one robe for himself and instructed
his step-mother to offer the second one to the Sangha. But not one of
the eighty leading disciples came forward to accept that robe.
Eventually, Ven. Ajita thought to himself that the Buddha had told his
step-mother to give the robe to the Sangha for her benefit, so he
bravely got up like a king of the lions in the midst of the Sangha and
accepted the robe. There was some disappointment and much talk about how
an unknown bhikkhu could accept the robe when none of the leading
disciples had taken it. Realising the situation and in order to dispel
any doubts, the Buddha said, “Do not say this bhikkhu is an ordinary
bhikkhu. He is a Bodhisatta who will be the coming Buddha Metteyya.”
Then the Buddha took the bowl that had been given to him shortly after
his Awakening by the world’s four Guardian Devas and threw it into the
air. None of the eighty leading disciples could retrieve it, but Ven.
Ajita understood that the Buddha intended for him to show his psychic
powers, so he brought back the bowl. Then Ven. Ajita took the cloth he
had accepted and put it in the Buddha’s Perfumed Chamber as a canopy
under the ceiling, making the aspiration that this act of generosity
might result in his having a canopy made of seven gems and with hangings
made of gold, silver, coral, and pearls measuring twelve leagues when
he becomes a Buddha. [38]
The Buddha smiled after this and Ven. Ananda asked why he had smiled.
The Buddha replied, “Ananda, the bhikkhu Ajita will become the Buddha
Ariya Metteyya in this Auspicious Aeon.” Then he remained silent,
enjoying the fruits of Arahatship. The first chief disciple, Ven.
Sariputta, who knew the assembled bhikkhus wished to hear more
information, requested the Buddha give a discourse about the coming
Buddha. And the Buddha gave the account in the Anagatavamsa.

The prediction concerning Metteyya is found in the Pali canon, [39]
but the details concerning the future Buddha will be given in a
separate talk. The Dasavatthu goes on to say that from the time of the
sure prediction, the Bodhisatta taught a large number of bhikkhus,
explaining the whole canon and causing them to increase in insight and
to attain the knowledge of adaptable patience. At the end of that life,
he was reborn in a Deva world. But there is a reference to at least one
other human life as he should have a life in which he is generous in the
way the Bodhisatta Vessantara was. [40]
After that life, he should be reborn in the Tusita Deva world, where
all Great Bodhisattas reside before their final birth. According to the
Culavamsa, the Bodhisatta would have other human births. [41]

When Ashin Buddhaghosa went from India to Ceylon to consult the
commentaries on the Pali canon, he was given two verses to comment on as
a test. The result was the Visuddhimagga (The Path of Purification).
The Devas, in order to convince the people of his greatness, hid the
text twice so that Ashin Buddhaghosa had to copy it twice. When the
copies were compared with the original, no deviations were found. The
Sangha then exclaimed, “Without a doubt this is Metteyya!” The Visuddhimagga
is especially important for those practising the Buddha’s Teachings.
Sayagyi U Ba Khin considered this work the most important single work
explaining true Buddhist meditation. In another Pali text that is not
part of the canon, there is a description of Metteyya in the Tusita
world. [42]
He is said to go to the Culamani shrine in the Tavatimsa Deva world to
pay respects to the hair cut off by the Bodhisatta Siddhattha when he
made the great renunciation and to relics brought there by the Deva king
Sakka after the death of Buddha Gotama. The Bodhisatta Metteyya is
described as being surrounded by a host of Devas and Devis. Four Devi
maidens in particular are described as having beautiful complexions,
halos, ornaments, and clothes, one of a shining colour, one red, one
dark gold, and the fourth, golden. The main point of this text is that
beings who wish to encounter the coming Buddha and attain Awakening
under him should act accordingly. Bhikkhus should not create a schism in
the Sangha. The five heinous actions which inevitably lead to rebirth
in the lower worlds should be avoided. In addition to not creating a
schism, these include not killing one’s father, one’s mother, or an
Arahat. The fifth point, not drawing the blood of a Buddha, of course,
is no longer possible. Other actions to be avoided are destroying
pagodas (thupas) or breaking Bodhi trees. Bodhisattas should not
be killed. One should not be stingy or tell lies. In one of the texts
about Buddha Gotama’s description of the ten future Buddhas, [43]
the following positive actions are said to be necessary if those who
encounter this Buddha Dispensation wish to meet Buddha Metteyya: they
must give gifts (dana), observe morality (sila), and develop mental control—that is to say, meditation (bhavana).

Those of us today who are practising the Teachings of the Buddha
should try to advance as far as possible. Some people may be able to
become Ariyas here and now. People who have not developed the
perfections required for such attainments or who have made an aspiration
under a former Buddha to meet Buddha Metteyya will need to make a
maximum effort in order not to miss this opportunity or in order to gain
the maximum benefits. We should not just assume that we are meant to
defer Awakening until we meet the next Buddha. Ashin Buddhaghosa gives
the example of Elder Maha-Sangharakkhita who needed a reminder in order
not to miss his opportunity to attain Arahatship, for he had mistakenly
thought he should wait until the next Buddha. [44]
Meditators who become Ariyas aside from Arahats may eventually go to
the Brahma worlds of the Pure Abodes (Suddhavasa), and there they may
live long enough to meet the coming Buddha. [45] So we should all make our best effort in this life.



Buddha Ariya Metteyya

Atta-dipa bhikkhave viharatha atta-sarana anañña-sarana dhamma-dipa dhamma-sarana anañña-sarana.

Kathañ ca bhikkhave bhikkhu atta-dipo viharati atta-sarano anañña-Sarano, dhamma-dipo dhamma-sarano anañña-sarano?

Idha bhikkhave bhikkhu kaye kayanu-passi viharati atapi
sampajano satima, vineyya-loke abhijjha-domanassam, veda-nasu … cittesu …
dhammesu dhammanu-passi viharati, atapi sampajano satima, vineyya loke
abhijjha-domanassam. Evam kho bhikkhave bhikkhu atta-dipo viharati
atta-sarano ananñña-sarano, dhamma-dipo dhamma-sarano anañña-sarano.

Dwell, bhikkhus, with yourselves as an island, with yourselves as a
refuge, with no one else as a refuge; with the Doctrine as an island,
with the Doctrine as a refuge, with no other [doctrine] as a refuge.

And how, bhikkhus, does a bhikkhu dwell with himself as an island,
with himself as a refuge, with no one else as a refuge; with the
Doctrine as an island, with the Doctrine as a refuge, with no other
[doctrine] as a refuge?

Here (in this Teaching), bhikkhus, a bhikkhu lives, contemplating the
body in the body, contemplating the sensations in the sensations,
contemplating the consciousness in the consciousness, contemplating
mental objects in mental objects, ardent, attentive, mindful, having
removed covetousness and discontent with regards to the world. Thus,
bhikkhus, does a bhikkhu dwell with himself as an island, with himself
as a refuge, with no one else as a refuge; with the Doctrine as a
refuge, with no other [doctrine] as a refuge.

Digha-nikaya III 58, 77

This quotation begins the discourse in which the Buddha describes the coming of the next Buddha, Metteyya. [46]
The Buddha first describes the ideal conditions that existed on earth
long ago when there were a succession of seven Wheel-turning Monarchs.
Eventually, there was a king who neglected to provide for the poor. As a
consequence, theft arose in the world. Gradually, people became more
and more immoral and killed others. Because of this, their life span
declined from eighty thousand years to forty thousand years. Then people
began to tell lies, and the human life span declined to twenty thousand
years. Next, malicious speech became prevalent, and the life span
decreased to ten thousand years. Then sexual misconduct became
prevalent, with the result that people lived for five thousand years.
Harsh speech and frivolous talk became prevalent, and people lived for
two and a half thousand years and two thousand years. With the advent of
covetousness and ill will, the life span declined to one thousand
years. When people began to entertain wrong beliefs, their life span
decreased to five hundred years. Then three things became rampant:
incest, unnatural greed, and homosexuality. [47]
As a result, the human life span decreased to two hundred and fifty
years and two hundred years. Then there was a lack of filial duty
towards parents, failure to fulfil duties towards religious leaders (samanas and brahmanas),
and failure to respect community leaders; and the life span decreased
to one hundred years. This was the human life span at the time of Buddha
Gotama. When the life span is shorter than a hundred years, there can
be no Buddha in the world. [48]

The Buddha explained that immorality will continue to increase and
the human life span will continue to decrease until it is only ten
years. Girls will be married at five years of age. At that time, people
who have no respect for their parents, for religious leaders, or for
community leaders will be honoured and praised. Promiscuity will be so
common, human beings will be like animals. Animosity, ill will, and
hatred will be so strong, people will want to kill the members of their
own family. There will be a seven-day war with great slaughter. But some
people will hide for the seven days, and afterwards they will rejoice
to see those who have survived. They will determine to stop killing, and
their life spans will increase to twenty years. Seeing this, they will
undertake to keep other moral precepts, and gradually the human life
span will increase again.

The Duration of the Sasana of Buddha Gotama

During the period from the time of Buddha Gotama to the minimum life span, the Buddha’s Dispensation (Buddha-sasana)
will disappear. When the Buddha agreed to create the Bhikkhuni Sangha,
he told Ven. Ananda that the Sasana would last only half as long because
of this. Instead of lasting one thousand years, it would last five
hundred years. The commentary on the Abhidhamma text, Dhammasangani,
says that when the First Buddhist Council convened by Ven. Maha-Kassapa
rehearsed the Pali Canon, this made it possible for the Sasana to endure
for five thousand years. [49]

The commentaries on the Vinaya Pitaka [50] and the Anguttara-nikaya [51]
say that the eight important rules which the Buddha gave to the
Bhikkhuni Sangha will make his Teachings last for five thousand years
rather than five hundred. There will be one thousand years for Arahats
who attain analytical insight, one thousand years for Arahats without
those attainments, one thousand years for Non-returners, one thousand
years for Once-returners, and one thousand years for Stream-winners.
After these five thousand years of penetration of the true Doctrine (pativedha-sadhamma), [52]
the accomplishment in the texts (pariyatti-dhamma) will remain. After
the accomplishment in the texts disappears, the signs (linga) will
continue for a long time

In the commentary to the Theragatha [53] the Sasana is said to consist of five periods: (1) the age of deliverance (vimutti-yuga), (2) the age of concentration (samadhi-yuga), (3) the age of morality (sila-yuga), (4) the age of learning [the texts] (suta-yuga), and (5) the age of generosity (dana-yuga).
Ven. Dhammapala says, concerning the disappearance of learning, “In a
region where there is no purity of morality, accomplishment (in the
texts) remains through taking up great learning, through the desire to
acquire, etc. But when accomplishment in the summary [i.e., the
Patimokkha] is completely ended, it disappears. From that time on, only
the mere sign (linga) remains. Then, having accumulated riches in various ways, they give away gifts (dana); this, truly, is the last right practice. Then, [the period starting] after the disappearance of learning is the last time (pacchima-kala).
Others say that it is from the time of the disappearance of morality.”
According to the tradition in Burma, the Sasana will last five thousand
years. The five periods will occur twice. The first half of the Sasana
has just passed, with each of the five periods lasting five hundred
years. We are now in the second half, when these periods will be
repeated, each lasting for another five hundred years.

In the Anagatavamsa commentary, the Buddha is said to preface
the account of the future Buddha Ariya Metteyya by saying his own
dispensation will disappear in five stages: (1) the disappearance of
analytical insight (patisambhida), (2) the disappearance of the Paths and Fruition States, (3) the disappearance of the practice (patipatti), (4) the disappearance of the texts (pariyatti), and (5) the disappearance of the Sangha.

Other commentaries also speak in terms of five stages of disappearance (antaradhana) of the Sasana: [54] (1) First, there will be the disappearance of attainment (adhigama), which would correspond to the age of deliverance. (2) The second disappearance is of the practice (patipatti), which corresponds to the ages of concentration and morality. (3) The disappearance of accomplishment in the texts (pariyatti) is third and corresponds to the age of learning. (4) The fourth disappearance is of the signs (linga).
During this period, the only good action left is making gifts to those
who wear a yellow strip of cloth around their necks, so this would
correspond to the age of generosity. When this disappearance occurs,
five thousand years will have passed. [55] After this period there occurs (5) the disappearance of the relics (dhatu).
When the relics no longer receive honour, they will assemble at the
seat where the Buddha attained Awakening under the Great Bodhi tree.
There, they will make an effigy of the Buddha and perform a marvel
similar to the Twin Marvel and will teach the Doctrine. No human being
will be present, only Devas from the ten thousand world systems will
listen, and many of them will attain release. After that, the relics
will be burned up without remainder. [56]

The Coming of Buddha Ariya Metteyya

In the discourse with which we began, the Buddha goes on to describe
how morality among human beings grows stronger and stronger. As a
result, their life span grows longer until it reaches eighty thousand
years, [57]
and at that time, Buddha Metteyya will come. Ashin Buddhaghosa explains
that the life span increases to an incalculable number of years (Asankheyya) and then begins to decrease again until it reaches 80,000 years, for Buddhas arise only when the life span is decreasing. [58]
A tradition in Burma says that Buddha Metteyya will live for 80,000
years and that the human life span will be 100,000 years, just as Buddha
Gotama lived for eighty years when the human life span was one hundred
years. No definite number of years is given for the period between
Buddha Gotama and Buddha Metteyya. The Anagatavamsa (verse 5) says Buddha Metteyya will arise ten million years later (vassa-kotiye), but the commentary [59] says this means after many hundreds of thousands times ten million years. [60]

This aeon (kappa) is an Auspicious Aeon (bhaddha-kappa),
which means that the maximum number of five Buddhas will arise in the
same aeon. Some aeons are empty ones, meaning no Buddhas arise. In other
types of aeons, one to four Buddhas arise. Buddha Gotama was the fourth
Buddha in this Auspicious Aeon, so Metteyya will be the last Buddha in
it. The commentary to the Buddhavamsa says that an Auspicious Aeon is
very difficult to encounter. Those who are born in such aeons are
usually rich in goodness and happiness. They usually have the three root
conditions (of non-greed, non-hatred, and non-confusion) and destroy
the defilements. Those with the two root conditions (of non-greed and
non-hatred) are usually reborn in good planes of existence, and those
with no root condition acquire one. [61] In another commentary, [62]
it is said that during the time of Buddha Metteyya, the group of
sensual pleasures will have little initial power (to distract).

The Birth of the Next Buddha

Many details concerning the coming Buddha can be assembled by combining Buddha Gotama’s prediction in the Digha-nikaya, [63] the Anagatavamsa[64] the two versions of The Ten Bodhisattas[65] and the Dasavatthuppakarana. [66] Further details can be added from the description by Buddha Gotama of the past Buddha Vipassi, [67] Ven. Ananda’s praise of the Buddha, [68] and the commentary on The Chronicle of Buddhas[69]

Before his last rebirth, which is in the human world, each Bodhisatta
resides in the Tusita Deva world. He is mindful and aware when he is
reborn there and while he lives there. He lives there as long as his
life span lasts. One thousand years before he is to be reborn as a human
and become a Buddha, Devas or Brahmas go to the world of men and
announce that a Buddha will arise. This is a Buddha tumult. [70]

When the time is right, he descends into his mother’s womb, [71]
mindful and aware. He is aware it is his last existence. At that time,
there is an illimitable, splendid radiance throughout the universe. His
mother is protected by four Devas during the gestation period. His
mother does not break the five precepts during her pregnancy, and she is
not attracted to any man. The mother is surrounded by all the pleasures
of the five senses. She suffers from no illness, and she can see the
Bodhisatta in her womb. He is seated cross-legged in the womb facing
outward.

His mother gives birth in a standing position and in a forest. The
Bodhisatta Metteyya will be born in the deer park at Isipatana. [72]
The feet of the baby are placed in a golden cloth. He is received first
by Devas and afterwards by men. Before his feet touch the ground, four
Devas present him to his mother, saying, “Rejoice, lady, for mighty is
the son that is born to you.” He comes forth without any stain. Two
showers of cool and warm water fall from the sky to bathe the mother and
the Bodhisatta. He takes seven steps to the north, surveys the four
quarters, and pronounces the lion’s roar that he is supreme in the
world. When he is born, an illimitable, splendid radiance is seen
throughout the universe. Seven days after the birth of the Bodhisatta,
his mother dies and is reborn in the Tusita Deva world. [73]

When Bodhisatta Metteyya is reborn in the human world, life on earth
will be like life in a Deva world. Women will marry at the age of five
hundred. There will only be three diseases: desire (to eat) (iccha), sluggishness after eating (anasana), and old age (jara). [74]
India will have Ketumati (present-day Baranasi) as its capital city. In
addition, there will be 84,000 cities with 90,000 crores of princes. [75] India [76]
will extend for 100,000 leagues. It will be without thorns, clear, with
green grass. There will be grass which is four inches high and soft as
cotton. The climate will always be good. The rains will be even, and the
winds will be neither too hot nor too cold. The rivers and ponds will
not lack water. There will be white sand that is not rough, the size of
peas and beans. The country will be like an adorned garden. The villages
will be close together, full of people, without interval.

The people will be tranquil, safe, and free from danger. They will be
happy and joyful, enjoying festivals. They will have plenty to eat and
drink. India will be delightful, like Alakamanda, the capital city of
the Kurus. The capital city of lndia, [77] Ketumati, will be twelve leagues long and seven leagues wide. [78]
The city will have beautiful lotus ponds, full of water that is
fragrant, clear, clean, cool, and sweet. The ponds will be accessible to
people at all times. There will be seven rows of palm trees and walls
of seven colours, made of jewels, will surround the city.

In squares at the gates of the city, there will be shining wishing trees: one blue, one yellow, one red, and one white. [79] Divine adornments and ornaments as well as all sorts of wealth and possessions will be hanging on the trees.

The Wheel-turning Monarch Sankha

At this time, there will be a Wheel-turning Monarch named Sankha.  [80]
In a past life, he and his father had made a hut for a Pacceka Buddha.
They had him stay there for the three months of the rains retreat and
then gave him three robes. In the same way, they had seven Pacceka
Buddhas stay in the hut. The father and son [81]
were reborn in the Tavatimsa Deva world, and Sakka requested that the
father be reborn in the human world as Prince Maha-Panada. The architect
for the Devas, Vissakamma, built a palace for Maha-Panada. During the
time of Buddha Gotama, Maha-Panada was the Elder Bhaddaji, who, on one
occasion, raised up the Maha-Panada palace from the bottom of the
Ganges. The palace still waits there for the future Sanka, who was the
son that gave to the Pacceka Buddhas in the past. [82]

When Sankha becomes the Wheel-turning Monarch, he will raise up the
Maha-Panada palace which will serve as his palace in the centre of
Ketumati. The palace is described as resplendent with many jewels, so
bright it is hard to look at. [83]
And he will possess the seven treasures of a Wheel-turning Monarch: the
wheel, elephant, horse, gem, wife, householder, and adviser. [84]

Through the merit of Sankha, there will be a square in the middle of
the city with four halls facing the four directions with wishing trees.
Hanging from the trees there will be all sorts of fine garments, drums,
and jewellery.

Through the merit of the people at that time, there will be rice that
grows without being cultivated. It will be pure, sweet-smelling, and
the grains will be ready-husked. The residents of Ketumati will have
whatever they want. They will be very rich. They will wake up to the
sound of drums and lutes. They will be exceedingly happy in both body
and mind. [85]

King Sankha’s palace will have 84,000 dancing girls. [86] He will have one thousand sons, valiant, of heroic forms, crushing enemy armies. [87] The eldest son [88]
will be the king’s adviser. The king will conquer the sea-girt land (of
India) without violence, without a sword, but rather by righteousness.

The Career of Bodhisatta Metteyya

The Bodhisatta will be the son of the Wheel-turning Monarch’s head priest, Subrahma, and his wife, Brahmavati. [89]
He will be named Ajita, and he will bear the thirty-two marks and
eighty minor marks that are common to Buddhas and Wheel-turning
Monarchs. [90] He will lead the household life for eight thousand years. He will have four palaces named: [91] Sirivaddha, Vaddhamana, Siddhattha, and Candaka. He will have 100,000 dancing girls. [92] His wife will be Candamukhi [93] and his son will be named Brahmavaddhana.

Bodhisattas decide to give up household life after they have seen the
four signs (an old man, a sick man, a dead man, and a contented man who
has gone forth from lay life) and after a son is born to them. They put
on the yellow robe and engage in striving. The Bodhisatta Metteyya will
go forth in one of his palaces. Accompanied by his followers, he will
fly through the air in the palace and go to the Naga tree, which will be
his Bodhi tree. He will engage in striving for seven days, which is the
minimum period.

There is a detailed account of these events in the Dasabodhisatta-uddesa: [94]

At the age of eight thousand years, the Bodhisatta will mount a
chariot that resembles a glorious celestial palace and when going to the
royal park, he will see the four signs. They will produce the knowledge
of a sense of urgency. And he will long for the state of going forth.
Then he will return and go up to his palace. His mind will be bent on
the state of going forth. At that moment, that jewel palace will fly up
by a path in the sky, and he will leap up into the sky, like the king of
the golden water fowl, together with his followers.

Then the Devas of the ten thousand world systems will take flowers
and honour him. The eighty-four thousand kings (of India), the people
from the cities and from the countryside will honour him with perfume
and flowers. The king of the Asuras will guard the palace. The king of
the Nagas will take (him) a precious gem, the king of the Supannas will
take (him) a jewel necklace, the king of Gandhabbas will honour him with
musical instruments and dancers. The Wheel-turning Monarch, together
with his consorts and followers, will go to the Bodhisatta.

By the power of the king and the power of the Great Being, all that
crowd will be established in the state of going forth, and the people
will rise into the sky with him and go [to the Bodhi tree]. Then, the
Maha-Brahma will take a sixty-league parasol and hold it [over them].
The Deva king Sakka will blow the Vijayuttara [95]
conch shell. [The king of the Yama Devas,] Suyama, will take a yak’s
tail fan and honour him. [The king of the Tusita Devas,] Santusita, will
hold a jewel fan. [The Gandhabba Deva,] Pañcasikha, will take his
celestial lute Velupanda, [96]
and play it. The [four Great Deva] Kings, swords in hand, will surround
them on all four sides. All those Devas, all those people and
Gandhabbas, all those Yakkhas, Nagas, and Supannas, surrounding him in
front, in back, and on both sides, will go with him. Surrounded by that
crowd of Devas, women, etc., of great splendour and beauty, he [the
Bodhisatta] will rise into the sky, [and then] descend near the Terrace
of Awakening. At that moment, the Maha-Brahma will take the eight
requisites [of an ascetic] created by his psychic powers and offer them
to him. Then the Great Being will cut off the topknot of hair [on his
head] and throw it up in the sky. He will take the eight requisites from
the hands of the [Maha-]Brahma and go forth. For seven days he will
make the Great Effort. And all that great crowd [of people] will follow
the [example] of the Great Being in going forth.

The Naga tree where the Bodhisatta will be Awakened is described [97] as being 120 cubits high with four (main) branches 120 or 130 cubits long. There will be 2,000 (minor) branches. [98]
The tips of the branches will be bent, (constantly) moving, and will be
continually in bloom with blossoms as big as wheels. They will have a
heavenly smell, full of pollen. [99]
The perfume will spread around for ten leagues, both with and against
the wind. The leaves will be a deep green in all seasons and the flowers
will scatter on the people all around.

The Anagatavamsa[100]
describes the people who go forth with the Buddha, including the names
of the most important people among them: He will be accompanied by a
large group of people, including friends, ministers, and members of his
family. There will be a fourfold army and an assembly of the four castes
to go forth with him. There will be 84,000 princesses and 84,000
Brahmas who are skilled in the Vedas. Among the 84,000 there will be the
brothers Isidatta and Purana; the twins of unlimited wisdom, Jatimitta
and Vijaya; the householder Suddhika and the female disciple Suddhana;
the male disciple Sankha and the female disciple Sankha, [101]
the householder Saddara and the famous man Sudatta; and the husband and
wife Visakha and Yasavati. Many other citizens and people from the
countryside of various social rank will go forth.

The spot on which the Bodhisattas attain Awakening is one of the four
fixed places, so Metteyya will make his final bid for liberation on the
same spot as all the past Buddhas—the present-day Bodha-gaya. On the
day they attain Self-Awakening, Bodhisattas have a meal of milk-rice.
They are seated on a spreading of grass. They use mindfulness of
breathing as their preparation for developing insight and shatter the
forces of Mara. They attain the three knowledges and the special
qualities not shared by others, etc., while still seated in the
cross-legged position. And they spend seven weeks near the Tree of
Awakening after becoming Self-Awakened. The Anagatavamsa commentary says that from the time he becomes Awakened, Ariya Metteyya will be known as the King of the Buddhas (Buddharaja).

Then the Maha-Brahma will request that Buddha Metteyya teach others the path to Nibbana.

Buddha Metteyya will preach his first discourse, the Setting in
Motion of the Wheel of the Doctrine, in Nagavana (“The Elephant
Grove”). [102] The park is said to be in Isipatana near the city of Ketumati. [103]
He will be surrounded by an assembly extending one hundred leagues. A
great many Devas will approach him at that time, and he will set free
one hundred crores from their bondage. [104] This will be the first occasion when a great number of beings attain penetration (Abhisamaya) into the Four Noble Truths. [105]

Then King Sankha will give his jewel palace to the Sangha with the
Buddha at its head, and he will make a great donation to the poor, the
needy, and beggars. Accompanied by his wife and 90,000 crores of people,
the king will approach the Buddha. And all that 90,000 crores of people
will be ordained with the words ’Come, bhikkhu’ (ehi bhikkhu). [106] This will be the second penetration.

After that, the third penetration of 80,000 crores will take place
when Devas and men approach the Buddha with a question concerning
Arahatship.

There will be three assemblies (Sannipata) of Arahats. [107]
The first will include 100,000 crores. This may be, as for many past
Buddhas, at the time the Buddha recites the Patimokkha on the full-moon
day of Magha to an assembly possessing four factors: (1) all the
bhikkhus present are ordained with the “Come, bhikkhu” ordination, (2)
all have the six types of higher knowledge, (3) all of them come without
any previous announcement, and (4) the observance day (Uposatha) is on the fifteenth (day in the bright fortnight). [108]
The second assembly will be at the time the Buddha proclaims the
“Invitation” at the end of the rainy season and will include 90,000
crores. For the third assembly, 80,000 crores of Arahats will accompany
the Buddha when he goes in seclusion on the Gandhamadana slope of the
Himavant mountain range. Otherwise, the Buddha Metteyya will continually
be surrounded by 100,000 crores of those who have attained the six
types of higher knowledge (abhiñña) and great psychic power. [109]

Buddha Gotama said [110] that just as he was accompanied by a Sangha of hundreds of bhikkhus when he wandered around, [111] Buddha Metteyya will be accompanied by thousands.

Buddha Metteyya will go through the countryside teaching the Doctrine, awakening many people. [112]
Some will take the three refuges, some will be established in the five
precepts, some will undertake the ten skilful actions. There will be
some who become ordained, some who attain the four excellent Fruition
States, some who will attain analytic insight into the Doctrine, some
who will attain the eight excellent perfections, some the three
knowledges, and some the six types of higher knowledge. The Teachings of
Buddha Metteyya will be widespread. Seeing people who are ready to be
Awakened, he will go 100,000 leagues in a moment to cause them to be
Awakened.

It is even said that Buddha Metteyya will quench the heat for beings reborn in the lower realms. [113] The first chief disciple will be the Wheel-turning Monarch Sankha who will have the bhikkhu name of Asoka. [114]
The second chief disciple will be Brahmadeva. The Buddha’s attendant
will be named Siha. The chief women disciples among the bhikkhunis will
be Paduma and Sumana. The chief lay attendants among the men will be
Sumano [115] and Sangha; [116] among the women, Yasavati and Sangha. [117]

Wherever he goes, Buddha Metteyya will be accompanied by a great company of Devas honouring him. [118]
The Kamavacarika Devas will make necklaces which will be adorned by the
kings of the Nagas and Supannas. There will be eight garlands each of
gold, silver, jewels, and coral. There will be many hundreds of banners
hanging down. Awnings adorned with jewels will resemble the moon. They
will be surrounded by nets of bells and jewelled garlands. They will
scatter sweet-smelling flowers and different sorts of (perfumed) powder,
both divine and human. And there will be various types of cloth of many
colours. Having faith in the Buddha, they will sport all around. And
many marvels will take place through the power of Buddha Metteyya’s
merit. Seeing those marvels, many people will decide they would rather
die than abandon him as their refuge. Many of them will attain
Awakening, and those who do not will do good deeds which lead to
heavenly worlds.

Several other details can be predicted for Buddha Metteyya as they
are part of the list of thirty things that are true of all Buddhas: [119]
He will live regularly at a monastery at Jetavana. His bed there will
be on the same spot as those of past Buddhas. He will perform the Marvel
of the Double at the gateway to the city of Savatthi. He will teach the
Abhidhamma to his mother in the Tavatimsa Deva world. He will descend
from that Deva world at the gateway to the city of Sankassa.

He will lay down a rule of training whenever necessary. He will tell
the story of one of his past lives (Jataka) whenever necessary, and he
will teach the Buddhavamsa (The Chronicle of Buddhas) to a gathering of his relatives.

Several details have to do with his day-to-day habits: he will give a
friendly welcome to bhikkhus when they arrive. He will spend the rains
retreat where he is invited to and will not leave without asking
permission. Each day, he will carry out the duties to be performed
before and after meals and for the three watches in the night.

Many details are given about the physical appearance of Buddha Metteyya. [120] He will be eighty-eight cubits [121] high. His chest will be twenty-five cubits in diameter. [122]
There will be twenty-two cubits from the soles of his feet to the
knees, from the knees to the navel, from the navel to the collar bone,
and from the collar bone to the apex of his head. His arms will be
twenty-five cubits long. [123] The collar bones will be five cubits. [124]
Each finger will be four cubits. Each palm will be five cubits. The
circumference of the neck will be five cubits. Each lip will be five
cubits. [125]
The length of his tongue will be ten cubits. His elevated nose will be
seven cubits. Each eye socket will be seven cubits. The eyes themselves
will be five cubits. The Anagatavamsa says [126] his eyelashes will be thick, that the eyes will be broad and pure, not winking day or night; [127]
and that with his physical eye, he will be able to see large and small
things all around for ten leagues without obstruction. The space between
the eyebrows will be five cubits. [128] The eyebrows will be five cubits. Each ear will be seven cubits. [129] The circumference of his face will be twenty-five cubits. [130] The spiral of the protuberance on his head [131] will be twenty-five cubits.

Rays of six colours will radiate from his body and illumine the 10,000 world systems. [132] The major and minor marks will always be visible as countless hundreds of thousands of rays [133] which will shine in all directions for twenty-five leagues. [134]
Through the merit acquired when the blood flowed from his head when he
offered it to Buddha Sirimata, his radiance as a Buddha (Buddha-patha)
will shine from the summit of the world to the lowest of the hells,
Avici, and the offering of his head and the drops of blood will mean
that the radiance from the hair between his eyebrows will be unlimited. [135]

People will not be able to distinguish night from day. [136]
The only way they will know when it is night is through the sound of
bird cries and the closing of the blossoms and leaves of lotuses and
water lilies. They will know it is day by the cries of birds going to
seek food and the opening of the flowers and leaves of lotuses and water
lilies. [137]

Wherever Buddha Metteyya walks, lotuses will spring up for him to step on. [138] This is said to be the result of his great effort in the past life when he was King Sankha and went to Buddha Sirimata. [139] The main petals of the lotuses will be thirty cubits, and the minor petals, twenty-five. The stamens will be twenty cubits, [140] the pistils will be sixteen cubits, and they will be full of red pollen. [141]

But even Buddhas are subject to the law of impermanence. Eventually,
Buddha Metteyya will attain final Nibbana. All Buddhas have a meal with
meat on the day of their final Nibbana. Before their final Nibbana, they
will have accomplished 2,400,000 crores of attainments. [142] According to the Anagatavamsa commentary, when Ariya Metteyya attains final Nibbana, he will not leave behind his human body (Vipaka-kammaja-rupa, ’the body produced by the fruition [of volitional actions]’); he will enter the element of Nibbana (Nibbana-dhatu) and no relics will remain. Although the poem says his dispensation will last for 180,000 years, [143] the commentary says it will continue for 380,000 years.

How to Meet Buddha Metteyya

The Dasabodhisatta-uddesa and Anagatavamsa both give
instructions on what people must do if they are to meet Buddha Metteyya.
This is very important for all those who do not attain at least the
first stage of Awakening during this Buddha Dispensation, for, as we
have seen, Buddha Metteyya will be the last Buddha to arise in this
world cycle. If a person does not attain Awakening in this world cycle,
it will be extremely difficult to get another opportunity.

In the Dasabodhisatta-uddesa, [144] Buddha Gotama says to Ven. Sariputta, “Not all men will see my physical body. If they encounter my Teachings (sasana), give gifts (dana), observe morality (sila), and cultivate development of the mind (bhavana), through the fruit of that, they will be reborn in the time of Buddha Ariya Metteyya.”

These three actions are the basis of meritorious action (puñña). [145]
Through these actions a person can be assured of rebirth in the higher
planes of existence. Developing the mind leads to the temporary purity
attained through the Jhana states. But it can also lead to insight (Vipassana) and true liberation.

The Anagatavamsa [146] gives more details. In order to meet Buddha Metteyya, people should put forth effort (viriya) and be firm (dalha), with agitated mind (ubbigga-manasa). We can surmise that “agitated mind” means the profound stirring of the mind or sense of urgency (samvega)
that comes from realising the urgent need to work for liberation. All
those who do good deeds and who are vigilant—whether they are bhikkhus,
bhikkhunis, laymen, or laywomen—will be able to encounter the next
Buddha. All those who pay great honour to the Buddha will see the
auspicious assembly of Buddha Metteyya. The holy life (brahma-cariya) should be practised. Gifts (dana) should be given. The Observance days (Uposatha) should be kept. Loving kindness (metta)
should be carefully developed. By delighting in vigilance and
meritorious actions, it will be possible to eventually make an end to
misery (dukkha).

Ven. Ledi Sayadaw [147] points out that it is necessary to make balanced effort in terms of good conduct (carana) and right knowledge (vijja) if one is to meet the next Buddha.

Right conduct means developing morality (sila) and concentration (samadhi). Knowledge means developing wisdom (pañña).
Right conduct can be compared to having sound limbs. Right knowledge
can be compared to being able to see. If one or the other is missing, a
person will be unsuccessful. A person may be generous and keep the
permanent moral rules of the five precepts and the eight precepts on
Observance days, but if the seeds of knowledge are not planted, that
person may meet Buddha Metteyya but not be able to be Awakened. If only
knowledge is developed, wrong conduct will mean that the chances of
encountering the next Buddha will be slight, due to the intervening
period (antara-kappa) between this Buddha Dispensation and the next one.

Examples of wrong conduct mentioned by Ven. Ledi Sayadaw are: not
being generous, being poorly guarded in physical actions, being
unrestrained in speech, and unclean in thought. Such conduct will mean
rebirth in the lower realms, either in the next life or in a future
life. If people who act in this way do manage to be reborn in a higher
world, their lack of generosity will mean they will encounter hardships,
trials, and tribulations in making a living. Through not keeping the
precepts, they are likely to meet with disputes, quarrels, anger, and
hatred; and they will be susceptible to diseases and ailments. This will
make it even harder to avoid actions leading to the lower worlds.

It may be possible, however, that a person today has already prepared
in the past for attaining Awakening. If the right effort is made in
this life, that person can reach at least the first stage of Awakening
and become a Sotapanna. Then, it will be impossible to do any action
that results in rebirth in the lower realms. This will not necessarily
mean that such a person will miss the opportunity to see the next
Buddha. Eventually, as a Non-returner, he or she can be reborn in the
Suddhavasa Brahma worlds, and life in these worlds can span the careers
of several Buddhas. [148]

If a person who has enough perfections (parami) to reach
Awakening in this lifetime does not make the necessary effort, it may be
possible to become a Sotapanna in the next life in the Deva worlds. If
such a person does not practise the factors leading to Awakening, he or
she will miss out entirely during this Buddha’s Dispensation and will
only be able to attain release during the next Buddha’s Dispensation.

Ven. Ledi Sayadaw’s instructions concerning the necessary work to be
done in this life include what should be done by a person who practises
bare insight meditation. [149] One should fulfil the first eleven of the fifteen good actions (carana-dhamma), [150] that is to say, all except the Jhana states. The first four actions are: (1) being moral, [151] (2) guarding the sense doors, (3) being moderate in eating, and (4) wakefulness.

The next seven qualities are the seven good states (saddhamma) which the Buddha compared to the various protections for the citizens of a royal border town: [152]

(1) Faith (saddha) in the Buddha is like a deeply embedded pillar.

(2) Modesty (hiri) is like a deep, wide moat and means the disciple is ashamed of wrong conduct in body, speech, and mind.

(3) Shrinking from doing wrong (ottappa) is like a high, wide
road surrounding the city and means the disciple is concerned with
avoiding wrong conduct in body, speech, and mind.

(4) Being of great learning (bahu-sacca) is like a great
armoury of spears and swords. A person who has heard much, who remembers
what was heard, and who treasures it means a person who knows the
Buddha’s Doctrine.

(5) Energy (viriya) is like a large army protecting the city,
for a person should rouse energy to get rid of unskilled mental states,
to acquire skilled mental states, to be steadfast, firm in advance, and
persevere with skilled mental states.

(6) Mindfulness (sati) is like a wise, intelligent gate keeper
who refuses entrance to unknown people and only lets in those who are
known. A person should have the highest degree of mindfulness and
discrimination.

(7) Wisdom (pañña) is like a high, wide rampart covered with
plaster. A person should possess wisdom leading to (the cutting off of)
rise and fall, with the noble penetration leading to the complete
destruction of misery.

All seven of these good states enable a person to abandon wrong
actions and cultivate good actions, to abandon what is blameworthy and
develop blamelessness. Thus he develops purity.

We need not worry about whether we will be able to attain the goal of
Nibbana in this life or whether we will only be able to do so under
Buddha Ariya Metteyya. If we make the best effort we can, such questions
will take care of themselves. We must grow as much as possible in sila, samadhi, and pañña, confident that in this way we will be able to come to the end of all suffering.

Truth Will Triumph!



Appendix A:

The Chronicle of the Future Buddha
Anagatavamsa Pali  [153]

Namo Tassa Bhagavato Arahato Samma-Sambudhassa
 

1 Sariputto maha-pañño Upatisso vinayako
dhamma-senapati dhiro upetva loka-nayakam

2 anagatam jin’ arabbha apucchi kankham attano:
tuyh’ anantariko dhiro Buddho kidisako bhave?

3 vittharen’ eva tam sotum iccham’, acikkha cakkhuma.
therassa vacanam sutva bhagava etad abravi:

4 anappakam puñña-rasim Ajitassa maha-yasam
na sakka sabbaso vattum vittharen’ eva kassa-ci;
eka-desena vakkhami, Sariputta, sunohi me.

5 imasmim Bhaddake kappe ajate vassa-kotiye
Metteyyo nama namena sambuddho dvipad’ uttamo

6 maha-puñño maha-pañño maha-nani maha-yaso
mahabbalo maha-thamo uppajjissati cakkhuma;

7 maha-gati sati c’ eva dhitima bahusaccava
samkhato sabba-dhammanam nato di ho suphassito
pariyogalho paramattho uppajjissati so jino.

8 tada Ketumati nama rajadhani bhavissati
dvadasa-yojan’-ayama satta-yojana-vitthata,

9 akinna nara-narihi, pasadehi vicittita,
sevita suddha-sattehi, ajeyya dhamma-rakkhita.

10 Sankho nam’ asi so raja ananta-bala-vahano,
satta-ratana-sampanno, cakkavatti mahabbalo,

11 iddhima yasava c’ eva sabba-kama-samappito;
hata-paccatthikam khemam anusasissati dhammato.

12 pasado sukato tattha dibba-vimana-sadiso
puññakammabhinibbato nana-ratana-cittito

13 vedikahi parikkhitto suvibhatto manoramo
pabhassar’ accuggato se ho duddikkho cakkhu-musano

14 rañño Maha-Panadassa pavatto ratanamayo
tam yupam ussapetvana Sankho raja vasissati.

15 athapi tasmim nagare nana-vithi tahim-tahim
sumapita pokkharani ramaniya supatittha

16 acchodaka vippasanna sadu-sita sugandhika
sama-titthika kaka-peyya atho valuka-samthata

17 padum’ uppala-samchanna sabbotuka-m-anava a.
satt’ eva tala-pantiyo sattavannika-pakara

18 ratanamaya parikkhitta nagarasmim samantato.
Kusavati rajadhani tada Ketumati bhave.

19 catukke nagare-dvare kappa-rukkha bhavissare
nilam pitam lohitakam odatan ca pabhassara.

20 nibbatta dibba-dussani dibba c’ eva pasadhana
upabhoga-paribhoga ca sabbe tatthupalambare.

21 tato nagara-majjhamhi catu-salam catummukham
puññakammabhinibbatto kappa-rukkho bhavissati.

22 kappasikan ca koseyyam khoma-kodumbarani ca
puññakammabhinibbatta kappa-rukkhesu lambare.

23 panissara mutinga ca muraj’ alambarani ca
puññakammabhinibbatta kappa-rukkhesu lambare.

24 pariharakan ca kayuram giveyyam ratanamayam
puññakammabhinibbatta kappa-rukkhesu lambare.

25 unnatam mukhaphullan ca angada mani-mekhala
puññakammabhinibbatta kapparukkhesu lambare.

26 aññe ca nana-vividha sabb’ abharanabhusana
puññakammabhinibbatta kappa-rukkhesu lambare.

27 aropitam sayam-jatam puññakammena jantunam
akanam athusam suddham sugandham tandula-phalam
akattha-pakimam salim paribhunjanti manusa.

28 dve sakala-sahassani dve sakala-satani ca
sakala sattati c’ eva ambanam solasam bhave.

29 atho pi dve ca tumbani tandulani pavuccare
eka-bije samuppanna puññakammena jantunam.

30 ye Ketumatiya viharanti Sankhassa vijite nara
tada pi te bhavissanti guni-kayuradharino

31 sampunna-mana-sankappa sumukha thula-kundala
hari-candana-litt’-anga kasik’ uttama-dharino

32 bahuta-vitta dhanino vina-tala-ppabodhana
accanta-sukhita niccam kaya-cetasikena ca.

33 dasa yojanasahassani Jambudipo bhavissati
akan ako agahano samo harita-saddalo.

34 tayo roga bhavissanti iccha anasanam jara,
pancavassasat’ itthinam vivaha ca bhavissanti;

35 samagga sakhila niccam avivada bhavissare.
sampanna phala-pupphehi lata gumba-vana duma,

36 catur-angula tina-jati muduka tula-sannibha.
natisita naccunha ca sama-vassa manda-maluta

37 sabbada utusampanna, anuna talaka nadi.
tahim-tahim bhumi-bhage akhara suddha-valuka
kalaya-mugga-mattiyo vikinna mutta-sadisa.

38 alamkatuyyanam iva ramaniya bhavissati.
gamanigama akinna accasanne tahim-tahim

39 nalavelu-vanam iva braha kukku a-sampati
avici maññe va phuttha manussehi bhavissare,

40 pagalham nara-narihi sampunna phu abhedana
iddha phita ca khema ca aniti anupaddava.

41 sada-rati sada-khidda ekanta-sukha-samappita
nakkhatte vicarissanti tuttha-hattha pamodita.

42 bahv-añña-pana bahu-bhakkha bahu-mamsa-surodaka
Alakamanda va devanam visala rajadhani va
Kurunam ramaniyo va Jambudipo bhavissati.

43 Ajito nama namena Metteyyo dvipaduttamo
anubyanjana-sampanno dvattimsavara-lakkhano

44 suvanna-vanno vigata-rajo supabhaso jutimdharo
yasaggappatto sirima abhirupo sudassano

45 mahanubhavo asamo jayissati brahmana-kule.
mahaddhano maha-bhogo maha ca kula-m-uttamo
akkhitto jati–vadena jayissati brahmana-kule.

46 Sirivaddho Vaddhamano ca Siddhattho c’ eva Candako
Ajitatthaya uppanna pasada ratanamaya.

47 nariyo sabbangasampanna sabbabharana-bhusita
mahamajjhimaka cula Ajitassa paricarika,

48 anuna satasahassa nariyo samalamkata.
Candamukhi nama nari, putto so Brahmavaddhano.

49 ramissati ratisampanno modamano maha-sukhe,
anubhutva yasam sabbam Nandane Vasavo yatha

50 attha vassa-sahassani agaramhi vasissati.
kada-ca rati-m-atthaya gaccham uyyane kilitum

51 kamesv adinavam dhiro bodhisattana dhammata
nimitte caturo disva kama-rati–vinasane

52 jinnam vyadhitakan c’ eva matan ca gata-m-ayukam
sukhitam pabbajitam disva sabbabhutanukampako

53 nibbinno kama-ratiya anapekkho maha-sukhe
anuttaram santa-padam esamano Ñbhinikkhami.

54 sattaham padhana-caram caritva purisuttamo
pasaden’ eva langhitva nikkhamissati so jino.

55 mittamacca-sahayehi nati-salohitehi ca
caturangini-senaya parisahi catuvannihi

56 caturasiti sahassehi raja-kannahi purekkhato
mahata jana-kayena Ajito pabbajissati.

57 caturasiti sahassani brahmana veda-paragu
Metteyyasmim pabbajite pabbajissanti te tada.

58 Isidatto Purano ca ubhayo te pi bhataro
caturasiti sahassani pabbajissanti te tada.

59 Jatimitto Vijayo ca yuga amita-buddhino
paccupessanti sambuddham caturasiti-sahassato.

60 Suddhiko nama gahapati Sudhana ce upasika
paccupessanti sambuddham caturasiti-sahassato.

61 Sankho nama upasako Sankha nama upasika
paccupessanti sambuddham caturasiti-sahassato.

62 Sudhano nama gahapati Sudatto iti vissuto
paccupessanti sambuddham caturasiti-sahassato.

63 itthi Yasavati nama Visakha iti vissuta
caturasiti-sahassehi nara-narihi purekkhita

64 nikkhamissanti nekkhammam Metteyyassanusasane.
aññe nagarika c’ eva tato janapada bahu
khattiya brahmana vessa sudda c’ eva anappaka

65 nekkhammabhimukha hutva nana-jacca maha-jana
Metteyyassanupabbajjam pabbajissanti te tada.

66 yasmim ca divase dhiro nekkhammam abhinikkhami
nikkhanta-divase yeva bhodi-mandam upehiti.

67 aparajita-nisabha-thane bodhipallanka-m-uttame
pallankena nisiditva bujjhissati maha-yaso.

68 upetva uyyana-varam phullam Nagavanam jino
anuttaram dhamma-cakkam evam so vattayissati:

69 dukkham dukkha-samuppadam dukkhassa ca atikkamam
ariyam atthangikam maggam dukkhupasama-gaminam.

70 tada manussa hessanti samanta sata-yojane
parisa loka-nathassa dhammaccaka-pavattane.

71 tato bhiyyo bahu deva upessanti tahim jinam,
nesam mocessati tada bandhana sahassa-kotinam.

72 tada so Sankha-raja ca pasadam ratanamayam
jinapamokkha-sanghassa niyyadetva, punaparam

73 maha-danam daditvana kapaniddhika-vanibbake,
taramana-rupo sambuddham deviya saha-m-ekato

74 maharajanubhavena ananta-bala-vahano
navuti-koti-sahassehi saddhim jinam upehiti.

75 tada hanissati sambuddho dhamma-bherim varuttamam
amatadudrabhi-nigghosam catusacca-pakasanam.

76 rañño anucara janata navuti-sahassa-kotiyo,
sabbe va te nivavasesa bhavissant’ ehi-bhikkhuka.

77 tato deva manussa ca upetva loka-nayakam
arahatta-varam arabbha panham pucchissare jinam.

78 tesam jino byakareyya, arahatta-vara-pattiya
asiti-koti-sahassehi tatiyabhibasmayo bhave.

79 khinasavanam vimalanam santa-cittana tadinam
koti-sata-sahassanam pathamo hessati samagamo.

80 vassam vu hassa bhagavato abhighu he pavarane
navuti-koti-sahassehi pavaressati so jino.

81 yada ca Himavantamhi pabbate Gandhamadane
hema-rajata-pabbhare paviveka-gato muni

82 asiti-koti-sahassehi santa-cittehi tadihi
khinasavehi vimalehi kilissati jhana-kilitam.

83 koti-sata-sahassani chalabhiñña mahiddhika
Metteyyam loka-natham tam parivaressanti sabbada,

84 patisambhidasu kusala nirutti-pada-kovida
bahu-ssuta dhamma-dhara viyatta sangha-sobhana

85 sudanta sorata dhira parivaressanti tam jinam.
purekkhato tehi bhikkhuhi nago nagehi tadihi
tinno tinnehi santehi saddhim santi-samagato

86 saddhim savaka-sanghehi pavaretva maha-muni
anukampako karuniko Metteyyo divpaduttamo

87 uddharanto bahu-satte nibbapento sa-devake
gama-nigama-rajadhanim carissati carikam jino.

88 ahantiva dhamma-bherim dhamma-sankha-palapanam
dhamma-yagam pakittento dhamma-dhajam samussayam

89 nadanto siha-nadam va vattento cakkam uttamam
rasuttamam sacca-panam payanto nara-narinam

90 hitaya sabba-sattanam nathanatham maha-janam
bodhento bodhaneyyanam carissati carikam jino.

91 kassa-ci saranagamane nivesessati cakkhuma
kassa-ci panca-silesu kassa-ci kusale dasa,

92 kassa-ci dassati samaññam caturo phala-m-uttame,
kassa-ci asame dhamme dassati patisambhida,

93 kassa-ci vara-sampatti attha dassati cakkhuma,
kassa-ci tisso vijjayo chal abhiñña pavacchati.

94 tena yogena jana-kayam ovadissati so jino,
tada vittharikam hessam Metteyya-jina-sasanam.

95 bodhaneyya-janam disva sata-sahasse pi yojane
khanena upagantvana bodhayissati so muni.

96 mata Brahmavati nama Subrahma nama so pita
purohito Sankha-rañño Metteyyassa tada bhave.

97 Asoko Brahmadevo ca agga hessanti savaka,
Siho nama upatthako upatthissati tam jinam.

98 Paduma c’ eva Sumana ca agga hessanti savika,
Sumano c’ eva Sankho ca bhavissant’ aggupatthaka,

99 Yasavati ca Sankha ca bhavissant’ aggupatthika.
bodhi tassa bhagavato Nagarukkho bhavissati

100 visa-hattha-sata-kkhandho, sakha visa-satani ca
samvellitagga lulita, mora-hattho va sobhati.

101 supupphitagga satatam surabhi-deva-gandhika
nali-pura bhave renu suphulla cakka-mattaka

102 anuvata-pa ivatamhi vayati dasa yojane
ajjhokirissati pupphani bodhi-mande samantato.

103 samagantva janapada ghayitva gandham uttamam
vakyam niccharayissanti tena gandhena modita:

104 sukho vipako puññanam Buddha-se hassa tadino
yassa tejena pupphanam acinteyyo pavayati.

105 atthasiti bhave hattho ayamen’ eva so jino,
uram bhave pannavisam vikkhambhe tassa satthuno.

106 visala-netto alarakkhi visuddha-nayano isi,
animisam diva-rattim anu thulam mamsa-cakkhuna

107 anavaranam passeyya samanta dvadasa-yojanam;
pabha niddhavati tassa yavata pannavisati.

108 sobhati vijju-latthi va dipa-rukkho va so jino,
ratanagghika-sankaso bhanuma viya bhahiti.

109 lakkhananubyanjana ramsi dissanti sabbakalika,
patanti vividha ramsi aneka-sata-sahassiyo.

110 paduddhare paduddhare suphulla paduma ruha,
timsa-hattha sama patta, anupatta pannavisati,

111 kesara visati-hattha, kannika solasam bhave,
suratta-renu-bharita paduma kokasa-m-antare.

112 Kamavacarika deva nimminissanti agghike,
Naga-raja ca Supanna ca tada te Ñlankarissare;

113 attha sovannaya agghi attha rupimayani ca
attha manimaya agghi attha pavalamayani ca.

114 aneka-ratana-samcita dhajamala-vibhusita
lambamana kilissanti dhaja neka-sata bahu.

115 mani-mutta-dama-bhusita vitana soma-sannibha
parikkhitta kinkanika-jala vatamsaka-ratana bahu.

116 nana-puppha vikirissanti surabhigandha-sugandhika
vividha nana-cunnani dibba-manussakani ca.

117 vicitta nana-dussani pancavannika-sobhana
abhipasanna Buddhasmim kilissanti samantato.

118 tattha sahassa-m-ubbedha dossaneyya manorama
ratanagghika-torana asambadha susam hita

119 sobhamana padissanti visala sabbato-pabha.
tesam majjha-gato Buddho bhikkhusanghapurekkhato

120 Brahma va parisajjanam Indo va vimanantare.
gacchanti Buddhe gacchante, titthamanamhi thassare,

121 nisinne sayite capi satthari saha-parise
catu-iriyapathe niccam dharayissanti sabbada.

122 eta c’ añña ca pujayo dibba-manussaka pi ca
vividhani patihirani hessanti sabbakalika

123 anantapuñña-tejena Metteyyam abhipujitum.
disvana tam patihiram nana-jacca maha-jana

124 sa-putta-dara panehi saranam hessanti satthuno.
ye brahmacariyam carissanti sutvana munino vacam

te tarissanti samsaram maccudheyyam suduttaram.
125 bahu ggihi dhamma-cakkhum visodhessanti te tada
dasahi puñña-kiriyahi tihi sucaritehi ca

126 agamadhigamen’ eva sodhayitvana s’ adaram
anudhamma-carino hutva bahu saggupaga bhave.

127 na sakka sabbaso vattum ettakam iti va yasam.
accanta-sukhita niccam tasmim gate kala-sampade

128 maha-yasa sukhenapi ayu-vanna-balena ca
dibba-sampatti va tesam manussanam bhavissati.

129 anubhutva kama-sukham addhanam yavaticchakam
te paccha sukhita yeva nibbissant’ ayu-sankhaya;

130 asiti–vassa-sahassani tada ayu bhavissare,
tavata titthamano so taressati jane bahu.

131 paripakka-manase satte bodhayitvana sabbaso
avasesaditthasaccanam maggamaggam anusasiya

132 dhammokkam dhamma-navan ca dhammadasan ca osadham
sakkaccena hi sattanam thapetva ayatim-jane

133 saddhim savakasanghena kata-kiccena tadina
jalitva aggikkhandho va nibbayissati so jino.

134 parinibbutamhi sambuddhe sasanam tassa hahiti
vassasata-sahassani asiti c’ eva sahassato;

tato param antaradhanam loke hessati darunam.

135 evam anicca sankhara addhuva tavakalika,
ittara bhedana c’ eva jajjara rittaka bhava,

136 tucchamutthi-sama suñña-sankhara bala-lapana,
na kassa-ci vaso tattho vattati iddhimassa pi;

137 evam ñatva yatha-bhutam nibbinde sabba-sankhate.
dullabho purisajañño, na so sabbattha jayati;
yattha so jayati dhiro tam kulam sukham edhati.

138 tasma Metteyya-buddhassa dassanatthaya vo idha
ubbiggamanasa sutthum karotha viriyam dalham.

139 ye keci kata-kalyana appamadaviharino
bhikkhu bhikkhuniyo c’ eva upasaka upasika

140 mahantam Buddha-sakkaram ularam abhipujayum
dakkhinti bhadra-samitim tasmim kale sa-devaka.

141 caratha brahmacariyam. Detha danam yatha Ñraham.
uposatham upavasatha, mettam bhavetha sadhukam.

142 appamada-rata hotha puññakiriyasu sabbada.
idh’ eva katva kusalam dukkhass’ antam karissatha ti.
Anagatavamso nitthito.

Translation



Praise to That One, the Blessed One, the Noble One, the Fully Self-Awakened One

1 Sariputta of great wisdom, the leader Upatissa, the firm general of the Doctrine, approached the leader of the world

2–3 and asked the Conqueror about his own doubts with reference to
the future Buddha: “What will the wise Buddha immediately after you be
like? I wish to hear this in detail. Please tell me, o Seeing One.”
Hearing the Thera’s words, the Blessed One said this:

4 It is not possible for anyone to describe at length Ajita’s great
accumulated merit which is not small, which is of great fame. I will
tell [you about] it in part. Listen, o Sariputta.

5 In this auspicious world cycle, in the future, in a crore of years, there will be an Awakened One named Metteyya, best of men,

6 of great merit, great wisdom, great knowledge, great fame, great power, great steadfastness; he will be born, one who sees.

7 Having great rebirth, [great] mindfulness, full of wisdom, of great
learning, he will be a preacher, a knower, one who sees well, who
touches and plunges into the highest goal. He will be born, that
Conqueror.

8 At that time, there will be a royal city named Ketumati, twelve leagues long and seven leagues wide,

9 full of men and women, adorned with palaces, frequented by men and women, incomparable, rightly protected.

10 There will be a king named Sankha, of limitless strength and
vehicles, possessing the seven jewels, a Wheel-turning Monarch of great
power,

11 having psychic powers, fame, enjoying all sensual pleasures; and
he will preach the doctrine of quiescence that destroys all its
opponents.

12 A well-made palace there, like a divine palace, will arise through his merit. [It will be] resplendant with many jewels,

13 surrounded by balustrades, well designed, delightful, resplendant, very tall, the best, hard to look at, harming the eyes.

14 The jewel palace that came into existence for King Maha-Panadassa will rise up for him and King Sankha will live in it.

15 And then, in that city, there will be various streets here and
there, delightful lotus ponds, well built, with beautiful banks,

16 full to the brim of fragrant, clear, clean, cool, sweet water, [with banks] strewn with sand,

17 [ponds] covered with red and blue lotuses, accessible to all
people at all times. There will be seven rows of palm trees and walls of
seven colours

18 made of jewels encircling all the city. The royal city of Kusavati at that time will be Ketumati

19 In squares at the gate[s] of the city there will be shining
wishing trees, [one] blue, [one] yellow, [one] red, and [one] white.

20 There will have come into being divine clothes and divine ornaments hanging there, all sorts of wealth and possessions.

21 At that time, in the middle of the city, there will be four halls,
facing the four directions, and there will be [another] wishing tree
produced by his merit.

22 Hanging from those wishing trees there will be cotton cloth, sheaths, flaxen cloth of Kodum produced by his merit.

23 Hanging from those wishing trees there will be tambourines, tambours, and small drums produced by his merit.

24 Hanging from those wishing trees there will be encircling bracelets and necklaces made of jewels produced by his merit.

25 Hanging from those wishing trees there will be “high” oranments,
“blooming-face” ornaments, bracelets and girdles produced by his merit.

26 And hanging from those wishing trees there will be many other ornaments and decorations of different sorts.

27 Through the action of beings’ merits, men will enjoy
self-generated rice that has no “dust,” no chaff, that is pure,
sweet-smelling, with grains ready husked, ripened without cultivation.

28 A sixteenth of [today’s] ambana [measure] will be 2,270 cartloads.

29 And at that time one grain will produce two tumbas—they are called rice grains—produced by the action of beings’ merits.

30 The men who live in Ketumati in the kingdom of Sankha will wear armour and braclets.

31 Whatever they want will be fulfilled. They will have happy faces.
They will wear large earrings. Their bodies will be covered with yellow
sandalwood paste. They will wear garments from Kasi.

32 They will be of great wealth, rich; they will be waked by drums
and lutes. They will constantly be exceedingly happy in body and mind.

33 Jambudipa will be ten thousand leagues, without thorns, clear, with green grass.

34 There will be three diseases: desire, hunger, and old age. The women will marry at the age of five hundred.

35 They will always be in unity, congenial, without disputes. The
vines, trees, and bushes will be equipped with fruit and flowers.

36 There will be a grass four-inches high that will be as soft as
cotton. There will be even rains and gentle winds, neither too hot nor
too cold.

37 There will always be a beautiful climate. The rivers and ponds
will not lack [in water]. Here and there in the districts, the pure sand
will not be rough. It will be scattered around like pearls the size of
peas and beans.

38 It will be delightful like an adorned garden. Here and there,
there will be villages and towns very close together and full of people.

39 [The villages and towns] will be like a great forest of reeds and
bamboo, full of people, I think, at a cockflight’s [distance], without
interval.

40 Trading cities will be filled with men and women who will be
prosperous, rich and tranquil, free from danger and in good health.

41 They will wander about festivals, always joyful, always playing, extremely happy. They will rejoice, happy and pleased.

42 There will be much food and water, much to eat, much meat, drink,
and water. Jambudipa will be delightful, like the Alakamanda of the
Devas or the broad capital of the Kurus.

43–45 One named Ajita [will be born], Metteyya, the best of
two-footed beings, with the thirty-two excellent marks and the [eighty]
minor characteristics, of golden complexion, without stain, very
splendid, resplendent, of the highest fame, glorious, of perfect form,
of good sight, of great power, incomparable. He will be born in a
Brahman family, with great wealth and possessions, and of excellent
family. There will be no dispute concerning his birth.

46 [Four] palaces made of jewels will have come into being for Ajita: Sirivaddha, Vaddhamana, Siddhattha, and Candaka.

47 Ajita’s female attendants will be women perfect in all their
limbs, adorned with [all kinds of] ornaments, small, medium, and large.

48 There will be a complete [retinue of] one hundred thousand women
fully adorned. Candamukhi will be his wife. Brahmavaddhana will be his
son.

49 He will delight in great happiness, be joyful, and endowed with pleasure. He will enjoy all fame like Nandana and Vasava.

50 He will live in a household for eight thousand years. At some time, he will go to a park for pleasure to amuse himself.

51 Seeing the danger in sensual pleasures and being wise in
accordance with the nature of Bodhisattas, he will see the four signs
which destroy sensual pleasures:

52 an old man, a sick man, a dead man, and a happy wanderer. He will go forth. Having sympathy for all beings,

53 he will become averse to sensual pleasures. Not looking for the
unsurpassed, great happiness and bliss in seeking honour, he will go
forth.

54 He will undertake the practice of exertion for seven days. That
Conqueror will go forth, leaping up [into the air] with his palace.

55–56 Ajita will go forth, honoured by a great group of people,
friends and companions, blood relatives, a fourfold army, an assembly of
the four castes, and 84,000 princesses.

57 When Metteyya has gone forth, at that time, 84,000 Brahmans who are skilled in the Vedas will go forth.

58 At that time, both of the brothers, Isidatta and Purana will go forth [with] 84,000 [other people].

59 The twins, Jatimitta and Vijaya, of unlimited wisdom, will approach that Perfect Buddha from the 84,000.

60 The householder named Suddhika and the lay woman Sudhana will approach the perfect Buddha from that 84,000.

61 The lay disciple named Sangha and the lay woman named Sangha will approach that perfect Buddha from the 84,000.

62 The householder named Saddhara and the renowned Sudatta will approach that perfect Buddha out of the 84,000.

63 The woman named Yasavati and the renowned Visakha will be honoured by men and women.

64 They will go forth in renunciation on the admonition of Metteyya.
Other citizens and many people from the country, and no few nobles,
Brahmans, merchants, and workers,

65 inclined to renunciation, a great crowd of all sorts of birth, will then go forth, following the going forth of Metteyya.

66 On the day that Wise One goes forth in renunciation, on that very
day of renouncing, he will approach the dais of the tree of awakening.

67 In the place of the unconquered Bulls Among Men, on that supreme
seat of awakening, seated in a cross-legged position, the One of Great
Fame will be awakenend.

68 The Conqueror will go to the excellent garden Nagavana in full
flower, and there he will set in motion the incomparable Wheel of the
Doctrine: 69 misery, the arising of misery, the overcoming of misery,
and the Noble Eightfold Path leading to the cessation of misery.

70 Then, there will be a gathering of men all around for one hundred
leagues when that protector of the world sets in motion the Wheel of the
Doctrine.

71 Then, very many Devas will approach the Conqueror there, and he will free 100,000 crores from their bondage.

72–73 Then, that king Sankha, having given his jewel palace to the
Sangha with the Conqueror at its head, having given another great gift
to the poor, the needy, and to beggars, hurrying along with this queen,
he will approach the Perfect Buddha.

74 Through the power of the great king and his limitless force of
charriots, he will approach the Conqueror accompanied by 90,000 crores
[of people].

75 Then the Perfect Buddha will beat the drum of the Doctrine, the
excellent and highest sound of the kettle drum of the undying, making
known the Four Truths.

76 The company of people accompanying the king, all 90,000 crores without exception, will become “Come Bhikkhu” monks.

77 Then Devas and men will approach the Leader of the World and ask the Conqueror a question concerning Arahatship.

78 That Conqueror will answer them and 80,000 crores will attain
Arahatship. That will be the third penetration. 79 The first assembly
will be of 100,000 crores of those whose taints are destroyed, who are
spotless, of peaceful minds, venerable ones.

80 When the Blessed One proclaims the Invitation [to declare purity]
at the end of the rainy season, that Conqueror will be surrounded by
90,000 crores.

81 And when the Sage has gone in seclusion to the golden and silver Gandhamadana slope of the Himavanta mountain range,

82–83 he will enjoy the sport of meditation [accompanied by] 80,000
crores of those whose taints are destroyed, who are spotless, of
peaceful minds, venerable ones. 83 100,000 crores of those who possess
the six higher knowledges, who possess great psychic power, will
constantly surround that Protector of the World, Metteyya.

84 Skilled in discriminating knowledge, knowing the words and the
explanation [of the Doctrine], very learned,expert in the Doctrine,
knowledgeable, adorning the Sangha,

85 well tamed, gentle, firm, they will surround that Conqueror. That
Naga [the Buddha] will be honoured by those monks who will be Nagas like
him. He who will have crossed over, together with those who have
crossed over, who are at peace, who assemble in peace.

86 Together with an order of disciples surrounding that Great Sage,
the Compassionate One, the Sympathetic One, Metteyya, greatest of
two-footed beings,

87 raising up many individuals and Devas, will bring them to Nibbana.
That Conqueror will wander around the towns and villages and capitals.

88 He will beat the drum of the Doctrine. He will sound the conch
shell of the Doctrine. He will proclaim the spiritual sacrifice. He will
raise the banner of the Doctrine.

89 He will roar the lion’s roar, set in motion the excellent wheel
[of the Doctrine], and cause men and women to drink the drink of truth
with its excellent taste.

90 That Conqueror will wander for the sake of all beings, both rich
and poor, causing many people who are capable of being awakened to be
awakened.

91 The Seeing One will cause some to take refuge [in the Triple Gem],
some to take the five moral precepts, and some to undertake the ten
skilful [actions].

92 He will give some the state of being a novice and the four
excellent Fruition States. He will give some discriminating knowledge
into the incomparable Doctrine.

93 The Seeing One will give some the eight excellent attainments. He
will give some the three knowledges and the six higher knowledges.

94 That Conqueror will admonish [a large] group of people [to
undertake] that practice. Then the Teaching of the Conqueror Metteyya
will be wide spread.

95 Seeing people capable of being awakened, that Sage will go 100,000 leagues in a moment and will cause them to be awakened.

96 At that time, Metteyya’s mother will be named Brahmavati, his
father will be named Subrahma and will be the priest of King Sankha.

97 His foremost lay disciples will be Asoka and Brahmadeva. The [lay] attendant Siha will attend on that Conqueror.

98 Paduma and Sumana will be his foremost female disciples. Sumana and Sangha will be his foremost personal attendants.

99 Yasavati and Sangha will be his foremost female attendants. The Naga tree will be the awakening [place] for that Blessed One.

100 Its trunk will be two thousand cubits. It will have 20,000
branches with curved tips [always] moving. It will shine like the
outspread tail of a peacock.

101 The tips [of the branches] will be continually in flower and
fragrant with a heavenly smell. The blossoms will be the size of wheels,
with enough pollen to fill a nali measure.

102 [The tree] will send its perfume in all directions for ten
leagues, both with and against the wind. It will scatter its flowers all
around the throne of awakening.

103 People from the country, coming together there, will smell the
excellent odour and pour forth words [of admiration], rejoicing in its
odour.

104 There will be a happy fruition of meritorious deeds for that
venerable one, the Best of Buddhas, whose unimaginable radiance will
spread out [like the smell of] the flowers.

105 That Conqueror will be eighty-eight cubits tall. That Teacher’s chest will be twenty-five cubits in diameter.

106 The Seer will have broad eyes with thick eyelashes. His eyes will
be pure, not blinking day or night. His physical eye will see small or
large things

107 in all directions for ten leagues without obstruction. His radiance will stream forth as far as twenty-five leagues.

108 That Conqueror will shine like a streak of lightening or a
candlestick. He will shine like the sun, resembling a garland of jewels.

109 His [thirty-two major] marks and [eighty] secondary marks will at
all times be seen as rays. Many hundreds of thousands of different
sorts of rays will fall down.

110 At every footstep [he takes] a beautiful flowering lotus will
grow. [The lotuses will be] thirty cubits [across] with even petals and
twenty-five minor petals.

111 The stamens will be twenty cubits long and the pericaps will be
sixteen cubits long. Inside the red lotuses [the flowers] will be filled
with very red pollen.

112 The Kamavacarika Devas will make columns of honour and Naga kings and Supanna [Devas] will decorate them.

113 There will be eight columns of gold, eight of silver, eight of jewels, and eight made of coral.

114 There will be many hundreds of flags hanging there disporting
themselves—adorned garlands of flags ornamented with many precious
things.

115 There will be awnings adorned with jewels and resembling the
moon. There will be many jewelled head ornaments with nets of small
bells surrounding them.

116 They will scatter fragrant, sweet-smelling, perfumed flowers, and different sorts of powder, both human and divine,

117 and a variety of cloths of diverse colours, beautiful, of the
five colours. They will all sport around, having faith in the Buddha.

118 There will be gateways there with strings of jewels, a thousand
[cubits] high, delightful, beautiful, unobstructed and well-formed.

119 They will be seen to be shining, with their radiance widespread
all around. The Buddha, at the head of the Order of Monks, will go in
their midst,

120 like Brahma in his assembly or lnda in his palace. When the
Buddha goes [anywhere], they will go; when he stays [in a place], they
will stay;

121 when the Teacher sits or lies down together with his assembly, they will always practise the [same] four postures.

122 There will be these honours as well as others, both human and divine. There will constantly be many sorts of marvels

123 to honour Metteyya through the power of his endless merit. Having
seen that marvel, many people of various births, [many] men with their
families, will only abandon the Teacher as their refuge at the cost of
their lives.

124 Whoever practises the holy life after hearing the word of the
Sage, that person will go beyond journeying-on, which is subject to
death and difficult to escape from.

125 Many householders will purify the eye of the Doctrine by means of
the ten meritorious acts and the three types of right action.

126 Many will be destined for heaven through being accomplished in
the traditional learning and texts, having purified [themselves] through
respect for him, and through following the true Doctrine.

127 It would not be possible to describe in every detail their fame
which will be so great. They will be continually very happy. When they
reach the end of their time [in that life],

128 those men will have great fame as well as happiness. Life,
beauty, and strength, and heavenly bliss [in a heavenly world] will be
theirs.

129 They will experience the happiness of sensual pleasures for as
long as they wish. Then afterwards, at the end of their lives, they will
enter into [true] happiness.

130 [The Buddha’s] lifetime there will be 80,000 years. Remaining there that long, he will bring many people to the other shore.

131 He will cause beings whose minds are ripe to be completely
awakened and he will instruct others who have not perceived the [four]
truths concerning which is the right path and which is the wrong path.

132 He will carefully establish the torch of the Doctrine, the boat
of the Doctrine, the mirror of the Doctrine, the medicine [of the
Doctrine] for beings [at that time and] in the future.

133 Then, in the midst of the venerable order of lay disciples who
will have done what should be done, that Conqueror will blaze out like a
mass of fire, and he will be extinguished.

134 When the Perfect Buddha has been completely extinguished, his
Teaching will remain for 180,000 years. After that, there will be a
terrible disappearance in the world.

135 Thus, the constituent elements are impermanent, not firm,
temporary, transitory, liable to destruction and old age, and empty.

136 The constituent elements are like an empty fist, they are empty,
they are the talk of fools. There is no power for anyone there, not even
for one who has the psychic powers.

137 Thus, knowing this as it really is, one should be disillusioned
with all compounded things. A Thoroughbred Among Men is hard to find. He
is not born everywhere. Wherever that Hero is born, that happy family
prospers.

138 Therefore, in order to see Buddha Metteyya here, act rightly, firmly, energetically, with agitated mind.

139 Whoever does good things here and dwells vigilant, whether a monk, nun, lay disciple, or laywoman disciple,

140 whoever esteems the great Buddha, pays great honour to the Great
One, that person together with the Devas will see the auspicious
assembly at that time.

141 Practise the holy life. Give suitable gifts. Keep the observance days. Practise loving kindness carefully.

142 Be one who delights in being vigilant, always performing
meritorious actions. Having acted skilfully here, you will make an end
of misery.



Appendix B:

Aspirations to Meet Buddha Ariya Metteyya


We have made some alterations in the following translations. [154]

1. Aspiration concluding many Pali manuscripts in Sri Lanka (from Dbk, p. 36):

By the merit of this writing may I draw near to
Metteyya (and) having been established in the Refuges, may I be well
established in the Sasana.

2. Aspiration concluding manuscripts in Sinhalese (from Dbk, p. 37):

By the power of these meritorious deeds, without
falling into the four hells, may I seek the Bodhisatta Metteyya in the
Tavatimsa heaven and enjoying divine happiness, and going from there to
Ketumati City, eradicating the defilements, may I receive the peace of
liberation from the Buddha Metteyya.

3. Aspiration concluding the Dvadasaparitta (from Dbk, p. 38):

In the future, Buddha Metteyya will be unexcelled in the world, he of great merits, of great power; may you have great peace.

4. Aspiration attributed to King Parakramabahu I of Sri Lanka (from Dbk, p. 38):

Having departed from here and being reborn on the
peak of Himalaya in the noble Jambudipa (India) as a leading deity of an
aeon’s life-span, I shall indeed hear the Doctrine of Lord Metteyya.

5. Aspiration at the conclusion of the commentary on the Jataka (from Dbk, p. 39; verses 4–11 of the concluding 37 verses):

May I, through this meritorious deed, be born in my
next life in the city of Tusita, the beautiful dwelling-place of the
gods. May I listen to the preaching of Lord Metteyya and enjoy great
glory with him for a long time. When this Great Being is born in the
charming city of Ketumati as the Buddha, may I be reborn with the three
noble root-conditions in a Brahman family. May I make offerings to that
Great Sage of invaluable robes of the finest sort, alms, dwelling-places
and medicines in abundance. May I undertake the life of a bhikkhu in
the dispensation and illumine that noble (institution), being the
possessor of potency, mindful and well-versed in the Tipitaka. May he
predict (of me), “This one will be a Buddha in the future.” And may I
offer gifts to the Buddhas who will come one after the other and
(receive sure prediction) from them too. May I fare on in repeated
births, give food and other things that are desired like a
wish-conferring tree. May I fulfil all the perfections of morality,
renunciation, wisdom, and so forth, and having attained the summit of
the perfections, become an incomparable Buddha. May I preach the sweet
Doctrine which brings bliss to all beings, liberating the whole world
with its Devas from the bondage of repeated births. May I guide them to
the most excellent, tranquil Nibbana.

6. Aspiration at the conclusion of Sinhalese manuscripts of Ashin Buddhaghosa’s Visuddhimagga (The Path of Purification, pp. 837f.):

By the performance of such merit
As has been gained by me through this
And any other still in hand
So may I in my next becoming
Behold the joys of Tavatimsa,
Glad in the qualities of virtue
And unattached to sense desires
By having reached the first fruition,
And having in my last life seen
Metteyya, Lord of Sages, highest
Of persons in the world, and helper
Delighting in all beings’ welfare,
And heard the Holy One proclaim
The teaching of the Noble Law,
May I grace the Victor’s Dispensation
By realising its Highest Fruit.

7. The aspiration of Thera Maha-Mangala in his biography of Ashin Buddhaghosa (Buddhaghosuppatti) (from Dbk, p. 40):

O may it be my lot to meet with him, the Lord Metteyya! He, the Fully Awakened One, shall lead vast multitudes across samsara’s stream.

When I have found Metteyya, may I be versed in the
three scriptures, and then in wisdom I shall see face-to-face the lord
of mercy.

8. Aspiration at the end of sharing merits in the Dana ceremony in Sri Lanka (from Dbk, p. 41):

By the aid of this meritorious deed of Dana, may you
be reborn in the heavenly and human worlds, enjoying the greatest of
worldly happiness, and may you be born again in the presence of Buddha
Metteyya, and benefiting from his teaching of the Four Noble Truths, may
you attain to the supreme, immortal, great Nibbana!

9. Aspiration used in connection with the recitation Parittas (verses of protection) in Sri Lanka (from Dbk, p. 42):

May the multitude of gods dwelling over the seven
oceans, on Mount Meru, in the Titans’ world, in the world of Nagas, in
the six celestial worlds, in the four shrines of the (four Guardian)
Devas, on Mount Samantakuta, on the Himalayas, over the seven lakes,
over Lake Anotatta, in the sky, on the earth, in all the Brahma worlds,
in this Cakkavala (world-system), in the island of Ceylon, partake of
these merits with loving thoughts and perceive Nibbana by seeing the
sage-king Metteyya.

10. Closing verses at the end of Sinhalese manuscripts of Ashin Buddhaghosa’s Atthasalini (from The Expositor, p. 542):

By grace of this, the book I wrote,
Into Metteyya’s presence am I come.
Within the Refuges established
Upon the Sasana I take my stand.
May mother, father, teachers, they who wish me well
And they who do not, give me happy thanks
And long safeguard the merit I have won.



Notes

  1. One text, the Mahasampindanidana, was not
    available to us. For the story in it concerning Ven. Maha-Kassapa, see
    Dbk, pp. 43–45. According to this text, the body of an Arahat name
    Kassapa who lived after the time of the Buddha Kassapa is inside
    Kukkutasampata Mountain and will come out at the time of the next Buddha
    to be cremated then.

    Some works which include discussions of the material found in Pali
    texts have not added any new information, and so are not quoted. See,
    for example, Emile Abegg, Der Messiasglaube in Indian und Iran (Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 1928); Emil Abegg, ‘Der Buddha Maitreya,’ Mitteilunger der Schwizerischen Gestellschaft der Freunde Ostasiasticher Kultur, VIl (1945), pp. 7–37. For a discussion of the importance of Metteyya in Sri Lanka, see Culte, pp. 86–96.[Back]

  2. The name is also shortened in Burma to Arimetteyya. [Back]
  3. See pp. 32–43. [Back]
  4. These verses are given in Pali and English in Dbk, pp. 381. They are not included in the English translation of the Jataka. [Back]
  5. The Path of Purification, pp. 837f. and Dbk, p. 40. [Back]
  6. Expos., p. 542. [Back]
  7. See Dbk, pp. 42f. [Back]
  8. Pagan, Art and Architecture of Old Burma (Whiting Bay: Kiscadale Publications, 1989), p. 122. See also p. 32. [Back]
  9. See Dipak K. Barua, Buddha Gaya Temple: Its History (Buddha Gaya Temple Management Committee, 1981), pp. 195–200. [Back]
  10. According to the Gandhavamsa (61, 1). See K.R. Norman, Pali Literature (Wiesbaden: Otto Harrassowitz, 1983), pp. 147, 161. [Back]
  11. These verses begin the printed Burmese texts consulted: Dipeyin Sayadaw, Anagatavamsa (Rangoon: Icchasaya Pitaka Printing Press); Maung Ba Pe, Anagatavan kyam: (Rangoon: Tuin:ok Bha:ma:, 1907); and the anonymous Anagatavan kyam:
    (Rangoon: Kawimyakmhan, 1924). In this translation, we include in
    brackets the information the authors supply in their word-by-word
    translation of the Pali into Burmese. The wording is very close to that
    found in a Burmese manuscript quoted by Minayeff (JPTS, 1883, p. 37), in
    Dbu, (p. 334), and in a Burmese nissaya (word-by-word translation), dated 1842, of the Anagatavamsa
    in the Museum fur Indische Kunst, Berlin (Hs-Birm 3) (see No. 88 [p.
    117] in Heinz Bechert, Daw Khin Khin Su, Daw Tin Tin Myint, Burmese Manuscripts, part 1, Verzeichnis der Orientalischen Handschriften in Deutschland,
    Band XXIII, 1 (Wiesbaden: Franz Steiner, 1979). Dbu has the following
    variants for names: Dighajanghi for Dighasoni and Sona for Candani; the
    lines quoted by Minayeff (and cited in Dbk, p. 17) give Samkacca for
    Candani; Hs-Birm 3 has Samcicca for Candani, all three texts have
    Palileyyo for Palaleyo. [Back]
  12. Only a Teaching Buddha has the ability to see if the aspiration will be fulfilled. See Treatise, p. 263 under “(4) The Sight of the Master.” [Back]
  13. See Treatise, p. 303. These are also mentioned in the introduction to Th-a. [Back]
  14. His name is also given as Ariya Metteyya. In Myanmar, this is usually contracted to Ari-Metteyya (see the Myanmar–English Dictionary, Deparment of the Myanmar Language Commission, 3rd ed., 1993, p. 586, Ari-Metteyya = Ariya + Metteyya). [Back]
  15. See Ven. H. Saddhitissa’s introduction to Dbk, p. 33. [Back]
  16. See Sayagyi U Ba Khin, Dhamma Texts, pp. 53f.; CSM, p. 88;
    and The Path of Purification (Vism), XIII 16. In CSM, the ordinary
    disciple is not mentioned and the time given for the Pacceka Buddha is
    two incalculables and one hundred thousand aeons. The figures we have
    given are based on how far back the various Bodhisattas can recollect
    given in Vism. [Back]
  17. See Treatise, pp. 312–314; CSM, 23, 89, 162. They
    are also mentioned at Dh-a I 84 and Ja I 25. The Jataka stories
    illustrating the highest perfections in the case of Buddha Gotama are
    given in CSM (pp. 89–92). [Back]
  18. See CSM, pp. 89, 162, and Treatise, p. 313. [Back]
  19. See Treatise, pp. 312f. [Back]
  20. See Treatise, pp. 313f. [Back]
  21. See Treatise, pp. 325f. [Back]
  22. This is mentioned in Dvp, p. 133. [Back]
  23. CSM, p. 130f. (in the discussion of “cause”). [Back]
  24. In an unpublished passage. This is mentioned by Sayadaw U Vicittasarabhivamsa in his Mahabuddhavan (Yangon: Sasana Council, 1977), pp. 6–10 (he quotes as his source: Ashin Thilawuntha [Silavamsa], Parami-kan-pyo). [Back]
  25. See Treatise, pp. 267–270. [Back]
  26. See CSM, pp. 132–134. [Back]
  27. Jinakalamali (Epochs of the Conqueror). [Back]
  28. Epochs, pp. 5f. [Back]
  29. Epochs, pp. 8f. [Back]
  30. Dbk (see also pp. 391–413 of the next text), and Dbu. [Back]
  31. There does not seem to be any information as to when this
    Buddha lived. He would have lived before the twenty-four Buddhas under
    whom the Bodhisatta who became Buddha Gotama made his resolutions. [Back]
  32. See Illus., p. 131. [Back]
  33. Reading yatha with the Martini ed. (p. 395 and variant reading p. 306) for yava in the Pali Text Society ed. (p. 127). [Back]
  34. See CSM, p. 215. [Back]
  35. Dbk, p. 54. [Back]
  36. We base the following account on the information in Dipeyin Sayadaw’s Anagatavamsa. See also: Dbk, p. 54; Sylvain Levi, “Maitreya le consolateur,” Etudes d’orientalisme publiées par le Musée Guimet à la memoire de Raymonde Linossier
    (1932), Vol. II, p. 366 (his information is based on a Pali text from
    Thailand, Pathamasambodhi); and George Cœdès, “Une vie indochinoise du
    Bouddha: la Pathamasambodhi,” Mélanges d’indianiste à la memoire de Louis Renou
    (1968), pp. 217–227. According to Dvp, Chapter 31 (Pali, pp. 125–127,
    French, pp. 132–134), Ajita was from a prosperous family in Sankassa.
    This text says that Bodhisatta Metteyya had already fulfilled the
    perfections for sixteen incalculables and a hundred thousand aeons when
    he was born as a human during the time of Buddha Gotama. His family
    lived at the gate of the city Sankassa (Sankhassa in the French ed.). It
    was here that the Buddha descended from the Tavatimsa Deva world after
    teaching the Abhidhamma. On this occasion he asked Ven. Sariputta a
    question which none of the other disciples were able to answer in order
    to show that the chief disciple understood the Doctrine better than any
    of the other disciples (see Buddhist Legends, III, 54–56). When
    the Great Bodhisatta heard Ven. Sariputta’s answer, he was very pleased.
    Seeing the pleasing appearance of the Buddha and hearing him teach the
    Doctrine, Ajita was drawn to become a bhikkhu. (The French translation
    of this passage is slightly inaccurate.) [Back]
  37. Suttanta No. 142 (MLS, III 300–305). [Back]
  38. The account in the Pathamasambodhi differs somewhat (see
    Sylvain Levi, “Maitreya,” p. 366). In this account, Ajita is still a
    novice, the newest member of the Sangha. He is given both of the robes
    and uses the second one by tearing it up to make garlands to hang from
    the border of the canopy. After having done all this, Ajita makes a vow
    to become a Teaching Buddha and Buddha Gotama then gives his sure
    prediction. The details concerning the robe and the sure prediction are
    also found in Dvp (Pali, p. 126). [Back]
  39. D, No. 26 (DB, III, 72–74; TS, pp. 364–368). [Back]
  40. Sayagyi U Ba Khin interpreted this passage to mean that the
    generosity would consist mainly of the gift of the Dhamma (see above,
    p. vii). [Back]
  41. See Vol. I, 22–25 (Ch. XXXVII, verses 215–246). This passage is quoted by Ven. Nanamoli in the introduction of his translation, The Path of Purification (pp. xxi–xxii). [Back]
  42. Sih, Chapter III (Pali, pp. 8–12; French, second pagination, pp. 10–14). [Back]
  43. Dbu, p. 344. [Back]
  44. See The Path of Purification, Chapter I,135. [Back]
  45. See DB II, 39–41 (D, No. 14). Those who attain the third
    stage of Awakening (Non-returners) can live in the Pure Abodes
    (Suddhavasa) of the Brahma worlds long enough to encounter more than one
    Buddha. Buddha Gotama recounts meeting Brahmas in the Pure Abodes who
    confirm for him events that he recalls from the time of former Buddhas
    (see D, n. 14 [DB, II 4–41, especially pp. 39–41] ). [Back]
  46. D III 58–79, translated in DB III 59–76 and TS 347–370.
    Miss Horner seems to overlook this when she says that there is no
    mention in the Canon or Commentaries that Buddha Gotama made a
    declaration of future Buddhahood for Metteyya (CB xvi). [Back]
  47. See also GS I 142, where the Buddha says that these three things were already prevalent in his day. [Back]
  48. See CSM 391. [Back]
  49. As 27, see Expos. 35. [Back]
  50. Sp 1291. [Back]
  51. Mp IV 136f. [Back]
  52. Ven. Ledi Sayadaw (MB 169) calls these five thousand years the age of Ariyas (Noble Ones). [Back]
  53. Th-a III 89. [Back]
  54. See the commentary on A (Mp I 87), Moh 201–203, and the
    extract from the Anag commentary (JPTS, 1886, pp. 33–36; translated in
    BT 481–486). [Back]
  55. The number of years is mentioned only in the Anag commentary. [Back]
  56. Some texts speak of three disappearances. See CPD under antaradhana for references. [Back]
  57. Dbk 55/120 says 82,000 years. [Back]
  58. Sv III 885f. [Back]
  59. JPTS, 1886, p. 41, n. 5. [Back]
  60. Dvp 125/132 says that after the human life span decreases to ten years, there will be seven intervening aeons (sattantara-kappa),
    then the life span will increase to an incalculable, and when it has
    decreased again to 80,000 years, the next Buddha will arise. [Back]
  61. CSM 277. [Back]
  62. Spk III 390; cf. KS IV 60, n. 2. [Back]
  63. D III 75–77 (DB III 72–74; TS 365–368). [Back]
  64. This “Chronicle of the Future” is entirely devoted to the next Buddha. [Back]
  65. Dbk 55f., 61/120f., 127f.; Dbu 298–302, 306/338–341, 344. [Back]
  66. Dvp 125–127/132–134. [Back]
  67. D II 1–54 (DB II 4–41) (Mahapadana Suttanta). [Back]
  68. M sutta n. 123 (MLS III 163–169). [Back]
  69. CSM 428–430. [Back]
  70. CSM 389 mentions three such tumults and says the four guardian Devas will make the announcement of a Buddha. Illus. 130f. mentions five tumults and says the Brahmas of the Suddhavasa Brahma world announce a Buddha. [Back]
  71. According to Dbu he is conceived on the full-moon day of Asalha (June-July). [Back]
  72. According to Dvp 126/133. [Back]
  73. See Th-a I 502. From the Tusita world, she goes to the Tavatimsa world to hear the Abhidhamma. [Back]
  74. The translation of the first two diseases is based on the
    commentary to D III 75 (Sv 855). Pj II 323 says these mean (1) the
    craving which is a wish to be a Deva (Devapatthana-tanha), (2) hunger (khuda), and (3) the decay of old age (paripaka-jara). [Back]
  75. Dbu 299/339. [Back]
  76. Anag vv 33–42. [Back]
  77. Anag vv 8, 15–20. [Back]
  78. Dbu 299/338 says one league wide. [Back]
  79. According to Dbu 106/344 a wishing tree will spring up
    through the merit of the seven-days walk made by the Bodhisatta in the
    past life when he went to see Buddha Sirimutta. [Back]
  80. Not to be confused with the Bodhisatta Sankha. According to
    Dbu, the future Sankha is a Deva named Maha-Nalakara (cf. D-t 43).
    Nalakara was the name of Maha-Panada in the Tavatimsa Deva world (Ja IV
    318–323). [Back]
  81. The account in Ja No. 489 says the father became
    Maha-Panada. Sv III 856 says it was the son and that the father is still
    in the Deva worlds. D 43 gives his name as Nalakara (“the basket
    maker”) which would mean both father and son had this name in the Deva
    worlds. Dvp (119–127/126–134) gives their names as
    Nava-khuddhaka-Nalakara (or Cula-Nalakara), meaning “the younger
    Nalakara,” and Jetthaka-Nalakara (or Jettha-Nalakara), meaning “the
    older Nalakara,” so that here too it is the father who will be the
    future Sankha. [Back]
  82. Sv Ill 856f. says that the palace has not disappeared
    because of the meritorious act done by both the father and son in the
    past. Thus, it awaits the future king, Sankha, to be enjoyed by him. [Back]
  83. Anag vv 12–14. Cf. Th vv 163–164. [Back]
  84. In Dvp (125/132) his career as a Wheel-turning Monarch is
    described as following the pattern for other Monarchs (see DPPN II
    1343ff.). [Back]
  85. Anag vv 27–32. [Back]
  86. Dbu 300/338. Th v 164: “6000 musicians danced there.” [Back]
  87. D III 75 (DB III 73). This is a common feature to all Wheel-turning Monarchs, see Sn p. 106 (GD 96). [Back]
  88. He will have the same name as the Bodhisatta in that life: Ajita (according to Dbu 300/338). [Back]
  89. Also mentioned in Vism chap. XIII, 127 and As 415 (Expos. 525). Dvp (126/133) gives the mother’s name as Pajapati. [Back]
  90. For the list of the 32 marks, see D I 17–19 (DB I 1416). The 80 minor marks are given in the introduction to Dbk. [Back]
  91. This is the only case in which a Bodhisatta is said to have
    four rather than three palaces. As each of the three palaces were used
    for one of the three seasons, we can surmise that there will be four
    seasons during the time of the next Buddha. Dbu (300/339), and Dvp
    (126/133) mention only three palaces. [Back]
  92. Dbu (300/339) says 700,000. [Back]
  93. According to Dvp (126/132) she will be the chief consort out of 1,000 wives. [Back]
  94. Dbu 300/339f. [Back]
  95. Alternate reading: Vijjuttara. [Back]
  96. Usually named Beluva-pandu-vina. PED defines vina as a lute, but translates as “flute” (sic) under the entries panddu and beluva. [Back]
  97. Dvp 126f./134, Dbu 300f./340; Anag vv 100–103. [Back]
  98. Dbu says that from the root to the extremity of the
    branches will be 200 feet plus 40 cubits. Anag says the trunk will
    measure 2,000 cubits. [Back]
  99. Anag v 100 says the pollen (of each bloom) will be enough to fill a nali measure. [Back]
  100. Vv 55–63. [Back]
  101. Alternate reading: Sangha and Sangha. [Back]
  102. Dvp (126f./134) says it will be at the park in Isipatana
    near the city of Ketumatì. In this version, King Saòkha is present for
    the First Sermon. [Back]
  103. CSM 429, but cf. CB xxii. [Back]
  104. Dvp (127/134) says an incalculable. Dbu (301/340) says 100 crores of humans and an unlimited number of Devas. [Back]
  105. The twenty-five Buddhas described in the Buddhavamsa (including Buddha Gotama) are said to have three “penetrations.” [Back]
  106. In CSM (279), only Buddha Padumuttara is described as
    having “Ehi bhikkhus” in a “penetration.” Many past Buddhas had such
    bhikkhus in assemblies. [Back]
  107. Buddhas generally have three assemblies, but Buddha Gotama
    and the three Buddhas before him had only one each (D I 2–7 [DB I
    6f.]). [Back]
  108. Cf. CSM 180. [Back]
  109. Anag v 83. [Back]
  110. D III 76 (DB III 74). [Back]
  111. The last detail is added by the commentary (Sv 856). [Back]
  112. This paragraph is based on Anág vv 87–95. [Back]
  113. Sìh III v 20. [Back]
  114. Names of the chief disciples are found in Anag vv 97–99.
    The commentary in BN 630/862 gives the information concerning Sankha
    taking the bhikkhu name of Asoka. [Back]
  115. Alternate reading in BN 630/862: Suddhana. [Back]
  116. Alternate reading: Sankha. [Back]
  117. Alternate reading: Sankha. These two pairs are identified as lay disciples in BN 630/862. [Back]
  118. Details in this paragraph are from Anág vv 112–123. [Back]
  119. CSM 428ff. [Back]
  120. Dbk 55/61, Dbu 301/340, Anág vv 105–109. [Back]
  121. Miss Horner says that a cubit (hattha) is the distance between the elbow and the tip of the extended middle finger (CB xxii). [Back]
  122. Dbk says 25 cubits broad and 25 cubits lengthwise. Dbu says 25 cubits thick. [Back]
  123. Dbu says 40 cubits. [Back]
  124. Dbu says from one shoulder to the other will be 25 cubits. [Back]
  125. Dbu says 15 cubits, but a variant reading gives 5. [Back]
  126. V 106. [Back]
  127. Usually given as a sign of a Deva or Yakkha. [Back]
  128. Dbu says 4. [Back]
  129. Dbu says 5. [Back]
  130. Dbk has “the circle of the face and ears” (trans.: “each auricle”). Dbk: kanna-mukha-mandalam; Dbu: mukha-mandalam. [Back]
  131. Dbu 301: avatta-unhisam. This mark is not entirely clear as it seems an exceptionally high figure. [Back]
  132. Dbk 55/120, Dbu 301/340. [Back]
  133. Anag v 109. [Back]
  134. Anag v 107, Dbk 61/128. [Back]
  135. Dbu 306/344. [Back]
  136. According to Dbu (106/344) he will shine both day and
    night through the merit he acquired from the blood which flowed from his
    legs and feet when he went to see Buddha Sirimata in a past life. [Back]
  137. Dbk 120f./55, Dbu 301f./340. [Back]
  138. Details from Anág Vv 110f., Dbk 55/121, and Dbu 302/341. [Back]
  139. Dbk 61/128. [Back]
  140. Left out of the translation of Dbk (p. 55). [Back]
  141. Dbk translates “pollen of ten cubits” for dasa-dasa-sampanna nenu which should perhaps mean “filled with tens (of loads) of pollen” (Dbu has dasa-dasa-ammana-renuka, ammana meaning “a load”). The size of an ammana is not known precisely, but would be a large quantity. [Back]
  142. CSM 430. [Back]
  143. Anag v 134 [Back]
  144. 306/344. [Back]
  145. DB III 211. [Back]
  146. Vv 138–142. [Back]
  147. MB 176–172. Cf. Vism, chap. VIl, 30. [Back]
  148. See DB II 39–41. Buddha Gotama recounts how the Brahmás in the Suddhávása worlds told him about the six Buddhas before him. [Back]
  149. Sukkha-vipassaka, literally, “one who develops ‘dry’ insight.” [Back]
  150. Vism, chap. VII, 30f. For a discussion of these, see MLS II 20–25. [Back]
  151. Ven. Ledi Sayadaw says generosity is included here. [Back]
  152. See GS Ill 71–73. We discuss them in the order found there. The jhanas are added to the seven there. [Back]
  153. I wish to thank Mr. K.R. Norman for his help in translating the Anagatavamsa.
    I am responsible, of course, for the final version and any mistakes in
    it. I hope to prepare an edition with full critical apparatus, but this
    will only be possible after the unpublished commentary has been examined
    in detail. Mr Norman has revised this translation and published it with
    his notes in the Journal of the Pali Text Society, Vol. XXVIII, pp. 19–37 (reprinted in his Collected Papers, Vol. VIII, pp. 242–60).—William Pruitt [Back]
  154. See Culte, pp. 559–560, for the formula recited by
    lay people in Sri Lanka and the exhortation of the bhikkhus to the lay
    people to aspire to rebirth in the Deva worlds in their next life in
    order to eventually encounter Metteyya, hear him preach, and attain
    liberation. [Back]



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07/26/13
992 LESSON 27-07-2013 SATURDAY FREE ONLINE eNālāndā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY run through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org Universal Welfare Friend - E- GOOD NEWS AWAKENED ONES WITH AWARENESS DISPENSATION (3) the age of morality (sila-yuga) In the commentary to the Theragatha[52] the Sasana is said to consist of five periods: (1) the age of deliverance (vimutti-yuga) VOICE OF SARVA SAMAJ SADBHAVANA http://seattletimes.com/html/politics/2021460167_apusobama.html The Seattle Times Obama economic tour attracts low expectations Jagatheesan Chandrasekharan as barewfoot comments
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AWAKENED ONES WITH AWARENESS DISPENSATION

(3) the age of morality (sila-yuga)

In
the commentary to the Theragatha[52] the Sasana is said to consist of
five periods: (1) the age of deliverance (vimutti-yuga)

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(3) the age of morality (sila-yuga)

sīla (Pāli) in Buddhism is one of three sections of the Noble Eightfold Path,
and is a code of conduct that embraces a commitment to harmony and
self-restraint with the principle motivation being non-violence, or
freedom from causing harm. It has been variously described as virtue,[1] right conduct,[2] morality,[3] moral discipline[4] and precept.

Sīla is an internal, aware, and intentional ethical behavior,
according to one’s commitment to the path of liberation. The Pali word sīla is an ethical compass within self and
relationships, rather than what is associated with the English word
“morality” (i.e., obedience, a sense of obligation, and external
constraint - all of which are quite foreign to the concept of sīla as
taught by Gautama the Buddha since 588BC). In fact, the commentaries
explain the word sīla by another word, samadhana, meaning “harmony” or
“coordination.” [5]

Sīla is one of the three practices foundational to Buddhism and the non-sectarian Vipassana movement — sīla, samādhi, and paññā as well as the Theravadin foundations of sīla, dana, and bhavana. It is also the second pāramitā.[6]
Though some popular conceptions of these ethics carry negative
connotations of severe discipline and abstinence, sīla is more than just
avoiding the unwholesome.

Sīla is also wholehearted commitment to what is wholesome. Two
aspects of sīla are essential to the training: right “performance”
(caritta), and right “avoidance” (varitta). Honoring the precepts of sīla
is considered a “great gift” (mahadana) to others, because it creates
an atmosphere of trust, respect, and security. It means we pose no
threat to another person’s life, property, family, rights, or
well-being.[7]

Buddhist
Perfections
 
10 pāramī
dāna
sīla
nekkhamma
paññā
viriya
khanti
sacca
adhiṭṭhāna
mettā
upekkhā
   
 6 pāramitā 
dāna
sīla
kṣānti
vīrya
dhyāna
prajñā
 
Colored items are in both lists.


Non-Harming

Non-harming, Pāli
cognate avihiṃsā, is not a technical term in the Buddhist tradition,
rather a permeating foundation for the code of conduct known as sīla.
Non-harming manifests perspectives both absolute and relative,
particularly in the ever-increasingly complex ethics of global culture.
For example, though eating meat/animal products is technically different
than killing for the meat, if one knows that such foods comes from
inhumane industrialized animal husbandry then one may understand one’s
sīla to present new ethical questions.


Levels of sila

There are several levels of sīla, which correspond to the basic morality of five precepts, the basic morality with asceticism of eight precepts, novice ordination’s ten precepts and full ordination’s vinaya or prātimokṣa. Laypeople generally undertake to live by the five precepts which are common to all Buddhist schools. If they wish, they can choose to undertake the eight precepts, which have some additional precepts of basic asceticism.

Five Precepts

The five precepts
are not given in the form of commands, but are training guidelines to
help one live a life in which one is happy, without worries, and able to
meditate well. Breaking one’s sīla as pertains to sexual conduct
introduces harmfulness towards one’s practice or the practice of another
person if it involves uncommitted relationship.[9] They are:[10]

  1. I undertake the training rule to abstain from taking life;
  2. I undertake the training rule to abstain from taking what is not given;
  3. I undertake the training rule to abstain from sensual misconduct;
  4. I undertake the training rule to abstain from false speech; and
  5. I undertake the training rule to abstain from liquors, wines, and other intoxicants, which are the basis for heedlessness.

In Buddhist thought, the cultivation of giving (dāna) and ethical conduct will themselves refine consciousness to such a level that rebirth in one of the lower heavens is likely,[11]
even if there is no further Buddhist practice. There is nothing
improper or un-Buddhist about limiting one’s aims to this level of
attainment, although by itself it does not gain one nirvāna or end suffering.[9]

Eight Precepts

During special occasions, monastic retreats for lay followers, and
such, a more stringent set of precepts is undertaken, usually for 24
hours, until dawn the following day. The eight precepts encourage further discipline and are modeled on the monastic code. Note that in the eight precepts, the third precept on sexual misconduct is made more strict and becomes a precept of celibacy.

The three additional rules of the Eight Precepts are:[10]

  1. “I accept the training rule to abstain from food at improper times.”
    (e.g. no solid foods after noon, and not until dawn the following day)
  2. “I accept the training rule (a) to abstain from dancing, singing,
    instrumental music, and shows, and (b) from the use of jewelry,
    cosmetics, and beauty lotions.”
  3. “I accept the training rule to abstain from the use of high and luxurious beds and seats.”

Ten Precepts

Novice-monks use the ten precepts, which are the basic precepts for monastics: people who have left the domestic life and live in monasteries.

Patimokkha

Vinaya is the specific moral code for nuns and monks . It includes the prātimokṣa, a set of rules (227 for monks in the Theravādin recension). The precise content of the scriptures on vinaya (vinayapiṭaka)
differ slightly according to different schools, and different schools
or subschools set different standards for the degree of adherence to the
vinaya.

Mahāyāna Precepts

In Mahāyāna Buddhism, there is also a distinctive vinaya and ethics for bodhisattvas contained within the Mahāyāna Brahmajala Sutra
(not to be confused with the Pāli text of that name). These exist above
and beyond the existing monastic code, or lay follower precepts.[12] Here the eating of meat, for example, is frowned upon and vegetarianism is actively encouraged (See: vegetarianism in Buddhism). These precepts, have no parallel in Theravāda Buddhism.

VOICE OF SARVA SAMAJ SADBHAVANA


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jagran Post



Uttar Pradesh bags award for free laptop scheme


Jagatheesan Chandrasekharan


If Internet connection costing around Rs.1000/per month is not provided they will sell the lap tops as they did earlier.

http://seattletimes.com/html/politics/2021460167_apusobama.html

The Seattle Times

Obama economic tour attracts low expectations

It’s hard to find anyone who thinks President
Barack Obama’s series of heavily promoted economic speeches will be the
flash point that unclogs the system in Washington - including the
president.

Bangalore

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July 25, 2013 at 8:33 PM
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President Barack Obama may try to
focus public attention on the following economy as well for welfare,
peace and happiness of the entire people to attain Eternal Bliss as
Final Goal:

Black capitalism in the US is the inspiration for SC/ST (UNTOUCHABLE) capitalism

Black capitalism has brought visibility with recognition to the
Blacks. If you compare their situation today with their immediate past,
there is a landmark change. In absolute terms of course they remain
unequal to the Whites. In India, capitalism is emancipatory because in
capitalism , nothing is fixed by birth . The only permanent thing is
competition and a SC/ST (UNTOUCHABLE) has the opportunity to move ahead
through competition. In the caste order, you cannot buy Brahmin status.
In capitalism, you can buy a Mercedes and hire a Brahmin driver. That’s
the difference capitalism is making.

Capitalism may have class-based problems but these are radically
different from caste-based problems. A caste-based system is a system of
humiliation. In capitalism , there is poverty of course but that is
universal to everyone regardless of his birth. Anyone who is lazy, who
doesn’t want to compete, will face the problem of poverty but minus the
humiliation.

The SC/ST (UNTOUCHABLE) Indian Chamber of Commerce and Industry has
floated the fund to produce 100 SC/ST billionaires. That will send a
powerful message to SC/STs that they can succeed. Its president Milind
Kamble’s philosophy is to fight caste with capital. There have been many
movements historically to replace the caste system but we had nothing
to replace it with. Now capitalism has come and material markers have
replaced social markers . SC/STs need to know that in this phase of
history, only their work matters , not their birth. We do not see
capitalism as merely a system of economic transaction. It is also a
social order. The market doesn’t care about social groups. It only
recognizes individuals who have surpluses in their pockets. And that is
good for SC/STs because the market will not reject a SC/ST simply
because he is a SC/ST.

The market can be cruel too. It makes no allowances for those who are weak and vulnerable as most SC/STs still are.

There cannot be anything more liberating than the market if you
compare market with caste. If somebody has faced the cruelty of caste,
the cruelty of the market can be enjoyed in fact. In the old order, you
worked without rewards. Now I can work hard and reap the benefits.

In no society can all members become billionaires . We are saying
that SC/ST billionaires will lead the charge of emancipation. This is
the beginning of a new era for SC/STs , in which with very little
education, they can be driving a BMW. Otherwise they will be doomed to
compete for a few government jobs through reservations until the MASTER
KEY as desired by the father of the Constitution Dr. B.R.Ambedkar is
acquired by the SC/STs ( say Ms mayawati the symbol of political
success) to unlock all doors of progress and development along with the
economic success.

Therefore state benefits should not abandon. A section of SC/STs
needs help from the government. This is no enough. In the US, the idea
of Black capitalism and affirmative action came together. And capitalist
welfarism is much better than socialist welfarism because a socialist
state has no surplus to distribute where as a capitalist system does.

SC/STs are not only takers. They are also givers . It is important
to change the image of SC/STs and show that they can dream beyond a BPL
card and reservations. Those who belong to the poverty school think they
are losing SC/STs if they see a SC/ST capitalist. An ideal SC/ST for
them is one who is dark-skinned, bare chested, carrying a farm tool,
sweating profusely under a hot sun, sweating profusely. It’s a shock for
them to see a SC/ST walking into a boardroom.

?Handful of SC/ST billionaires along with reservation (which is a
must) in trade and business can empower a historically oppressed and
exploited community just like Black capitalism in the US to avoid
continue to languish behind on all socio-economic indicators. This is
possible only when they acquire the MASTER KEY that will unlock all
doors of progress and development.

?Mayawati is a symbol of political success. A billionaire is a
symbol of economic success. Surely SC/STs need both. SC/ST billionaires
must help BSP to acquire the MASTER KEY as desired by Dr.Ambedkar and
25% of their profit for spreading Dhamma as they are quiet aware of
this. They must also help Start-up small enterprises in their humble
way.

They are aware of the fact that whatever they do it is of the SC/STs by the SC/STs for the Sarva Samaj Sadbhavan.

The SC/ST Indian Chamber of Commerce and Industry and all Buddhist
traders and business communities all over the world could start

CODI

(CO-OPERATIVE DIRECT INVESTMENT)

CF SALE MART

(CYBERNETIC FAIR SALE MART)

CO-OPERATIVE DIRECT INVESTMENT CODI CYBERNETIC FAIR SALE MART assert
that, “The way to change the world is to change the nature of man,”that
offers Insight to Improve Conditions for Planet, Inhabitants.

The world needs waves of reforms.

Generate an opportunity to set the world on a more equitable and sustainable path of development.

CYBERNETIC FAIR SALE MART (CF SALE MART) much to offer that process. CF SALE MART assert that.

The spirit to care not just for ourselves but for others, based on
an awareness of our interlinked fates, lies at the heart of CF SALE MART
- and, indeed, all of the world’s great religions.

These thoughts challenge families, communities and nations to act in
concert for the advancement of our common well-being. That is the best
way to secure individual and collective progress in an interdependent
world.

We must also change longstanding assumptions and open our minds to
new ideas and possible solutions if we are to address major global
threats, from the proliferation of deadly weapons to intolerance and
inequality.

We must invite Awakened Ones with Awareness (AOA) and people of all
traditions to use the occasion to reflect on how we can change our
actions to pave the way for a more sustainable future.

AOA bequeathed to humanity profound thoughts that can guide our efforts to resolve the severe problems facing today’s world.

Injunction against the three poisons of greed, anger and ignorance
is especially relevant to multilateral efforts to overcome the hunger
that needlessly affects nearly a billion people in a world of plenty,
the brutal violence that takes millions of lives each year, and the
senseless environmental damage that humans cause to our only home, the
planet Earth.

Socio-economic development may sound modern, but its core is the
very problem of human suffering that was addressed more than 2,500 years
ago.

Numerous AOA organizations are putting these thoughts into practice.
Their support is for activities to achieve the Millennium Development
Goals, our blueprint for enabling all people to enjoy lives of dignity
and opportunity.

Let us draw on the universal values of AOA to act in solidarity with
those who are suffering, thereby contributing to a more compassionate
and awakened world for all.

ECONOMY OF THE AOA (CF SALE MART ) is to provide all people with a minimum income.

Radiation theory sees the economy prospering through the virtuous actions of individuals following the moral law.

CF SALE MART accept existing political and economic institutions,
even while providing a democratic social ethos revolutionary for its
time.

King Asoka, greatest of all emperors, pursued a highly activist
fiscal policy even though he believed only meditation could help people
to advance in moral living.

CF SALE MART places great stress on gift giving.

Income Redistribution in the Ideal State

Through the laws of cause and condition there is a distributive
cycle of one’s current social and economic position is due to one’s good
cause and condition accumulated in the past. This does not mean
indifference to the poor, for one’s economic status is not only
dependent on the laws of cause and condition, but is also complemented
by the moral virtues of compassion and generosity.’ Alms giving to the
poor is regarded as increasing one’s merit. The importance of our active
intervention has some important implications for behavior of the
“righteous ruler” as well.

CF SALE MART rulers are also known for the financial aid which they
provided for the poor; indeed, the rulers were advised to give their
gifts to all who are poor. Moreover, gifts to the those who practice CF
SALE MART do not prevent them from providing a refuge for the destitute
or from redistributing such beneficence to the indigent.

Redistribution of income, either through the public or private,
sectors, is certainly regarded in a favorable light. In order to favor
the spiritual improvement of the population, the State is justified in
taking steps to provide all people with a minimum income.

Radiation: Virtue as a Positive Externality

CF SALE MART theory of radiation sees the economy prospering
through the collective impact of the virtuous actions of individuals.

CF SALE MART argue that since the economy can ultimately prosper
only through virtuous action, ultimately the only hope for prosperity
lies in a regeneration of human kind, e.g., through the cultivation of
the Four Sublime Abodes (loving kindness, compassion, sympathetic joy,
and equanimity). Any appropriate good action inevitably leads to an
increase of the material wealth of the community.

CF SALE MART discussion on right livelihood prohibits trade in
certain goods and services, which means that all other types of trade
are apparently allowed (but not explicitly approved). In an interesting
comparison between trading and agriculture as means of livelihood, the
CF SALE MART also notes that both can bring high or low returns,
depending on the circumstances; however, trading is an occupation with
little to do, few duties, a small administration, and small problems,
while agriculture is the reverse. The capable merchant is approvingly
said to know the value of goods and prices and the profits he obtains;
and to buy where the price is low and to sell where the price is high.

A merchant who was generous to the cause was highly praised for his piety.

CF SALE MART accepts competition in general in the sense that it
is possible to compete without hurting others,excel in virtue.

“prizes in the school of life that each may strive for to obtain….
If a man chooses to interpret this as free competition, it is still
competition without rivalry, for victory to oneself does not mean the
defeat of someone else.”

Economic Policies

Description of the origins of property also discusses the origins of
the State. As crime increased after the division of the land, the
people elected a ruler to maintain law and order, paying him for his
troubles. This suggests a type of social contract theory, which means
that the ruler has important obligations toward the people.

Some of the discussion about economic policy are traditional Ten
Royal Precepts of Rulership: generosity, morality, liberality,
uprightness, gentleness, self-restraint, non-anger, non-hurtfulness,
forbearance, and non-opposition.

However, more practical advice can also be found. For instance, one
of the sources, speaks of the Royal Acts to increase prosperity which
include

giving of seed corn and food to farmers and of

capital to merchants to start or increase their business.

The particular source emphasizes that if prosperity increases, economic disorders and crime such as theft decrease.

Additional insight into State economic activities can be gained by
examining the records of some of the “righteous rulers” who are revered
by the CF SALE MART. It should be noted that because of the
participation of the State in the operations of the irrigation systems
in many of these countries, the ruler had a fairly active role in the
economy.

The prototypical important righteous ruler was the revered King
Asoka (Ashoka) (ca. 274-232 B.C.E.), the grandson of the founder of the
Mauryan dynasty in indict and one of the greatest of the emperors.

2 From Asoka’s edicts it appears that he generally accepted the economic and political institutions of his time.

However, he also took as the goal of statecraft the welfare and
happiness of the people. He adopted a highly activist fiscal policy,
both with regard to current and capital expenditures. For instance, he
gave gifts to the aged, other needy, and religious orders; he set up
public education courses to teach the doctrines of Rule of the Law; he
cut back on large public festivals; he imported and planted medicinal
herbs; and he carried out various public works projects such as digging
of wells, planting of trees, construction of rest houses and animal
watering stations along main roads in the empire. Some of his edicts
appeared to enforce traditional CF SALE MART beliefs, e.g, bans on
slaughtering various animals. The funds spent on the maintenance of the
ruler and good works were high, e.g., taxes were apparently about one
fourth of the revenue of land.

Still another righteous ruler was King Ruang who lived in the 14th
century in Thailand, long after the canonical scriptures had been
completed. Ruang stated quite clearly that a righteous ruler brings
prosperity to his subjects. He apparently had a much less luxurious
court or a less activist governmental expenditure policy than Asoka,
since he advised that taxes should be less than 10 percent of the crop
(and less in a drought) and that such taxes should never be higher than
those of the preceding king. He also urged that the State provide
interest free loans to those wishing to engage in commerce and that no
profit taxes should be placed upon such commercial activities.

The AOA (CF SALE MART ) had gone beyond all worldly affairs, but still gave advice on good government.

The AOA came from a warrior caste and was naturally brought into
association with rulers and ministers. Despite His origin and
association, He never resorted to the influence of political power to
introduce His thoughts nor allowed His Thoughts to be misused for
gaining political power. But today, many politicians try to drag the
AOA’s name into politics by introducing Him as a communist, capitalist,
or even an imperialist. They have forgotten that the new political
philosophy as we know it really developed in the West long after the
AOA’s time. Those who try to make use of the good name of the AOA for
their own personal advantage must remember that the AOA was the
Supremely Awaken One who had gone beyond all worldly concerns.

There is an inherent problem of trying to intermingle religion with
politics. The basis of religion is morality, purity and faith, while
that for politics is power. In the course of history, religion has often
been used to give legitimacy to those in power and their exercise of
that power. Religion was used to justify wars and conquests,
persecutions, atrocities, rebellions, destruction of works of art and
culture.?

When religion is used to pander to political whims, it has to forego
its high moral ideals and become debased by worldly political demands.

The thrust of the CF SALE MART Rule of Law is not directed to the
creation of new political institutions and establishing political
arrangements. Basically, it seeks to approach the problems of society by
reforming the individuals constituting that society and by suggesting
some general principles through which the society can be guided towards
greater humanism, improved welfare of its members, and more equitable
sharing of resources.

There is a limit to the extent to which a political system can
safeguard the happiness and prosperity of its people. No political
system, no matter how ideal it may appear to be, can bring about peace
and happiness as long as the people in the system are dominated by
greed, hatred and delusion. In addition, no matter what political system
is adopted, there are certain universal factors which the members of
that society will have to experience: the effects of good and bad Cause
and Condition, the lack of real satisfaction or everlasting happiness in
the world characterized by unsatisfactoriness, impermanence), and
egolessness. To the CF SALE MART, nowhere in Samsara is there real
freedom, not even in the heavens or the world of Creator.

?Although a good and just political system which guarantees basic
human rights and contains checks and balances to the use of power is an
important condition for a happy in society, people should not fritter
away their time by endlessly searching for the ultimate political system
where men can be completely free, because complete freedom cannot be
found in any system but only in minds which are free. To be free, people
will have to look within their own minds and work towards freeing
themselves from the chains of ignorance and craving. Freedom in the
truest sense is only possible when a person uses Rule of Law to develop
his character through good speech and action and to train his mind so as
to expand his mental potential and achieve his ultimate aim of
awaken-ness.

While recognizing the usefulness of separating religion from
politics and the limitations of political systems in bringing about
peace and happiness, there are several aspects of the AOA’s thoughts
which have close correspondence to the political arrangements of the
present day. Firstly, the AOA spoke about the equality of all human
beings long before Abraham Lincoln, and that classes and castes are
artificial barriers erected by society. The only classification of human
beings, according to the AOA, is based on the quality of their moral
conduct. Secondly, the AOA encouraged the spirit of social
-co-operation and active participation in society. This spirit is
actively promoted in the political process of modern societies. Thirdly,
since no one was appointed as the AOA’s successor, the members of the
Order were to be guided by the Rule of Law. Until today very member of
the Order is to abide by the Rule of Law which governs and guides their
conduct.

Fourthly, the AOA encouraged the
spirit of consultation and the democratic process. This is shown within
the community of the Order in which all members have the right to decide
on matters of general concern. When a serious question arose demanding
attention, the issues were put before the monks and discussed in a
manner similar to the democratic parliamentary system used today. This
self-governing procedure may come as a surprise to many to learn that in
the assemblies of AOAs 2,500 years and more ago are to be found the
rudiments of the parliamentary practice of the present day. A special
officer similar to ‘Mr. Speaker’ was appointed to preserve the dignity
of the Parliamentary Chief Whip, was also appointed to see if the quorum
was secured. Matters were put forward in the form of a motion which was
open to discussion. In some cases it was done once, in others three
times, thus anticipating the practice of Parliament in requiring that a
bill be read a third time before it becomes law. If the discussion
showed a difference of opinion, it was to be settled by the vote of the
majority through balloting.

?The AOA approach to political power is the moralization and the
responsible use of public power. The AOA preached non-violence and
peace as a universal message. He did not approve of violence or the
destruction of life, and declared that there is no such thing as a
‘just’ war. He taught: ‘The victor breeds hatred, the defeated lives in
misery. He who renounces both victory and defeat is happy and peaceful.’
Not only did the AOA teach non-violence and peace, He was perhaps the
first and only religious teacher who went to the battlefield personally
to prevent the outbreak of a war. He diffused tension between the Sakyas
and the Koliyas who were about to wage war over the waters of Rohini.
He also dissuaded King Ajatasattu from attacking the Kingdom of the
Vajjis.

The AOA discussed the importance and the prerequisites of a good
government. He showed how the country could become corrupt, degenerate
and unhappy when the head of the government becomes corrupt and unjust.
He spoke against corruption and how a government should act based on
humanitarian principles.

The AOA once said, ‘When the ruler of a country is just and good,
the ministers become just and good; when the ministers are just and
good, the higher officials become just and good; when the higher
officials are just and good, the rank and file become just and good;
when the rank and file become just and good, the people become just and
good.

The AOA said that immorality and crime, such as theft, falsehood,
violence, hatred, cruelty, could arise from poverty. Kings and
governments may try to suppress crime through punishment, but it is
futile to eradicate crimes through force.

The AOA suggested economic development instead of force to reduce
crime. The government should use the country’s resources to improve the
economic conditions of the country. It could embark on agricultural and
rural development, provide financial support to entrepreneurs and
business, provide adequate wages for workers to maintain a decent life
with human dignity.

The AOA had given 10 rules for Good Government. These ten rules
can be applied even today by any government which wishes to rule the
country peacefully. The rules are as follows:?

1) be liberal and avoid selfishness,?2) maintain a high moral
character,?3) be prepared to sacrifice one’s own pleasure for the
well-being of the subjects,?4) be honest and maintain absolute
integrity,?5) be kind and gentle,?6) lead a simple life for the subjects
to emulate,?7) be free from hatred of any kind,?8) exercise
non-violence,?9) practice patience, and?10) respect public opinion to
promote peace and harmony.

Regarding the behavior of rulers, He further advised:

- A good ruler should act impartially and should not be biased and
discriminate between one particular group of subjects against another.

- A good ruler should not harbor any form of hatred against any of his subjects.

- A good ruler should show no fear whatsoever in the enforcement of the law, if it is justifiable.

- A good ruler must possess a clear understanding of the law to be
enforced. It should not be enforced just because the ruler has the
authority to enforce the law. It must be done in a reasonable manner and
with common sense.

‘If a man, who is unfit,
incompetent, immoral, improper, unable and unworthy of rulership, has
enthroned himself a ruler with great authority, he is subject to be
tortured‚ to be subject to a variety of punishment by the people,
because, being unfit and unworthy, he has placed himself unrighteously
in the seat of sovereignty. The ruler, like others who violate and
transgress moral codes and basic rules of all social laws of mankind, is
equally subject to punishment; and moreover, to be censured is the
ruler who conducts himself as a robber of the public. It is mentioned
that a ruler who punishes innocent people and does not punish the
culprit is not suitable to rule a country.

The ruler always improves himself and carefully examines his own
conduct in deeds, words and thoughts, trying to discover and listen to
public opinion as to whether or not he had been guilty of any faults and
mistakes in ruling the kingdom. If it is found that he rules
unrighteously, the public will complain that they are ruined by the
wicked ruler with unjust treatment, punishment, taxation, or other
oppressions including corruption of any kind, and they will react
against him in one way or another. On the contrary, if he rules
righteously they will bless him: ‘Long live His Majesty.

The AOA’s emphasis on the moral duty of a ruler to use public power
to improve the welfare of the people had inspired Emperor Asoka in the
Third Century B.C. to do likewise. Emperor Asoka, a sparkling example of
this principle, resolved to live according to and preach the Rule of
Law and to serve his subjects and all humanity. He declared his
non-aggressive intentions to his neighbors, assuring them of his
goodwill and sending envoys to distant kings bearing his message of
peace and non-aggression. He promoted the energetic practice of the
socio-moral virtues of honesty, truthfulness, compassion, benevolence,
non-violence, considerate behavior towards all, non-extravagance,
non-acquisitiveness, and non-injury to animals. He encouraged religious
freedom and mutual respect for each other’s creed. He went on periodic
tours preaching the Rule of Law to the rural people. He undertook works
of public utility, such as founding of hospitals for men and animals,
supplying of medicine, planting of roadside trees and groves, digging of
wells, and construction of watering sheds and rest houses. He expressly
forbade cruelty to animals.

Sometimes the AOA is said to be a social reformer. Among other
things, He condemned the caste system, recognized the equality of
people, spoke on the need to improve socio-economic conditions,
recognized the importance of a more equitable distribution of wealth
among the rich and the poor, raised the status of women, recommended the
incorporation of humanism in government and administration, and taught
that a society should not be run by greed but with consideration and
compassion for the people. Despite all these, His contribution to
mankind is much greater because He took off at a point which no other
social reformer before or ever since had done, that is, by going to the
deepest roots of human ill which are found in the human mind. It is only
in the human mind that true reform can be effected. Reforms imposed by
force upon the external world have a very short life because they have
no roots. But those reforms which spring as a result of the
transformation of man’s inner consciousness remain rooted. While their
branches spread outwards, they draw their nourishment from an unfailing
source — the subconscious imperatives of the life-stream itself. So
reforms come about when men’s minds have prepared the way for them, and
they live as long as men revitalize them out of their own love of truth,
justice and their fellow men.

The doctrine preached by the AOA is not one based on ‘Political
Philosophy’. Nor is it a doctrine that encourages men to worldly
pleasures. It sets out a way to attain Eternal Bliss. In other words,
its ultimate aim is to put an end to craving that keeps them in bondage
to this world.’The path that leads to worldly gain is one, and the path
that leads to Eternal Bliss (by leading a religious life)is another.’

?However, this does not mean that AOA s cannot or should not get
involved in the political process, which is a social reality. The lives
of the members of a society are shaped by laws and regulations, economic
arrangements allowed within a country, institutional arrangements,
which are influenced by the political arrangements of that society.
Nevertheless, if a AOA wishes to be involved in politics, he should not
misuse religion to gain political powers, nor is it advisable for those
who have renounced the worldly life to lead a pure, religious life to
be actively involved in politics.



Putting Awaken One with Awareness (CYBERNETIC FAIR SALE MART ) to Work: ?

A New Approach to Management and Business??AOA (CF SALE MART )
Economics: The Emerging Middle Path between Capitalism and Socialism??A
novel approach to economic management that goes beyond socialism and
capitalism. The proposed economics for the 21st century is ‘AOA (CF SALE
MART )Economics’.??Based on the insight of the AOA (CF SALE MART ) that
spiritual liberation is attained by avoiding extremes, whether by
indulgence in worldly pleasures or severe asceticism, and treading
namely ‘ the Middle Way ‘, ‘AOA (CF SALE MART ) Economics ‘ is
recommended as the ideal middle path between the competing models of
capitalism and socialism. Both these systems, have failed to contain the
relentless destruction of the natural environment and the human
community, thereby forcing leading executives and planners to search for
new solutions for planetary problems.??Best aspects of both capitalist
and socialist economic systems is drawn in ‘ AOA (CF SALE MART )
Economics ‘ model. It supports the conventional forces of a free market
and competition without destroying either nature or human society.
Alternate vision of sustainable economics is meant to be more just and
more ecologically sound.??Inspired by the fundamental CF SALE MART
insight of the inter-connectedness existing among all living things,
that CF SALE MART, Economics and Ecology are all inter-related. There is
a heavy emphasis on the concept of freedom as understood in CYBERNETIC
FAIR SALE MART in contrast to the Western concept of ‘freedom’. In the
West ‘freedom’ revolves around the rights of the individual i.e. freedom
to do what one wishes. In CF SALE MART, ‘freedom’ means freedom from
personal desires or attachments.??An AOA (CF SALE MART ) approach to
economics requires an understanding that economics and a moral and
spiritual life are neither separate nor mutually exclusive. The 20th
Century has been ravaged by a materialistic, self-centered consumerism.
The next century needs to focus on the quality and spirituality of life
itself. AOA (CF SALE MART ), which advocates the ‘Middle Path’, serves
as an important resource to pursue an alternative to the extremes of
capitalism and socialism, or pure self-interest and utter self-negation.

The Essence of Awaken One with Awareness (CYBERNETIC FAIR SALE MART )
Economics??Three key phrases are identified that underlie the model of
AOA (CF SALE MART ) Economics. ?

They are:

??

1) an economics that benefits oneself and others

?2) an economics of tolerance and peace

?

3) an economics that can save the earth.??

An Economics that benefits oneself and others??Theory of free
enterprise based on the concept of self-benefit is developed. This led
to people being more concerned with enriching themselves and
disregarding the interests of others. At the international level, major
colonial powers such as England, Netherlands, France, Portugal and Spain
developed their economies from the resources taken from other poorer
regions, without an adequate resulting benefit accruing to the colonies.
In contrast, the earlier CF SALE MART societies such as India during
the time of the CYBERNETIC FAIR SALE MART or Japan during the time of
Prince Shotuku ( 574 - 622 AD ) existed with a radically different
social approach. In Japanese society where the density of population was
high, human relations were tightly interwoven, and Japanese people were
encouraged to pay great attention to how other people thought or
reacted. In the Japanese world of business, earning the trust of others
and entering into mutually beneficial transactions have always been
given priority. Such conduct was the result of deep-seated CF SALE MART
influence.??The Western obsession with ’self-benefit ‘ and indifference
to the rights of non-European people has been well analysed by former
diplomat K.M.Panikkar in his ground breaking book ‘Asia and Western
Domination - A Survey of the Vasco De Gama Epoch of Asian History 1498 -
1945, published in 1953. Panikkar says that western colonial powers
were reluctant to recognise that doctrines of international law applied
outside Europe or that European nations had any moral obligations when
dealing with Asian people. For example, when Britain insisted on the
opium trade against the laws of China in the 19th Century, there was a
prohibition by law on opium smoking in England. In countries under
direct British occupation eg. India, Ceylon and Burma, though there were
equal rights established by law, there was considerable reservation in
enforcing the law against Europeans. 

Maurice Collis, a British
magistrate in Burma, gives a rare candid account in his book ‘Trials in
Burma’ ( 1938 ) about the pressures brought upon him by the members of
the Colonial Government and the British expatriate community, to be
partial towards Europeans in his judgments. Panikkar avers that this
doctrine of different rights (which made a mockery of the concept of the
Rule of Law) persisted to the very end of western colonial domination
and was a prime cause of Europe’s ultimate failure in Asia.

An Economics of Tolerance and Peace

The Emperor Asoka established the world’s first welfare state in the
third century BC upon embracing AOA approach. He renounced the idea of
conquest by the sword. In contrast to the western concept of ‘ Rule of
Law ‘, Asoka embarked upon a ‘policy of piety or rule of righteousness’.
The basic assumption of this policy of piety was that the ruler who
serves as a moral model would be more effective than one who rules
purely by strict law enforcement. The right method of governing is not
only by legislation and law enforcement, but also by promoting the moral
education of the people. Asoka began by issuing edicts concerning the
ideas and practice of Rule of Law, dealing with universal law and social
order. Realizing that poverty eroded the social fabric, one of his
first acts was to fund social welfare and other public projects. Asoka’s
ideals involved promoting policies for the benefit of everyone in
society, treating all his subjects as if they were his children and
protecting religion. He built hospitals, animal welfare shelters and
enforced a ban on owning slaves and killing. He gave recognition to
animal rights in a number of his rock edicts and accepted state
responsibility for the protection of animals. Animal sacrifice was
forbidden by law.

An important aspect of Asoka’s economics of peace was tolerance. In
one of his rock edicts, Asoka calls for religious freedom and tolerance,
and declares that by respecting someone else’s religion, one brings
credit to one’s own religion. The idea of religious tolerance only
emerged in the West in 1689 with the publication of John Locke’s book ‘ A
Letter Concerning Toleration ‘.

From a CYBERNETIC FAIR SALE MART perspective, politics can be
summed up by the wheel turner, which means a king or political ruler who
protects his people and the CYBERNETIC FAIR SALE MART t teachings.
Asoka was the prototype of this ruler whose political ideas were to
inspire a countless number of other Asian Emperors and rulers. One
enthusiastic follower of Asoka in Japan was Prince Shotuku. (574 - 622
AD ). An ardent believer in AOA approach, Shotukti drafted a 17 Article
Constitution (the first AOA approach Constitution of Japan), which was
promulgated in 604 AD. Shotuku appeals neither to ’self-evident truths ‘
(as in the American Constitution ) nor to some divine right of kings as
the basis of law. Instead he begins pragmatically by stating that if
society is to work efficiently for the good of all, then people must
restrain factionalism and learn to work together. A key feature of this
Constitution is the emphasis placed on resolving differences by appeals
to harmony and common good, using the procedure of consensus. This
approach is in marked contrast to the western view that factions can be
controlled only legally by a balance of powers. Decision making by
consensus is a significant characteristic of Japanese society. Every
effort is made to ensure that minority dissident factions are not
allowed to lose face.

The influence of AOAapproach in Japan was such that in 792 AD
Emperor Kammu (781 - 806 AD) despite constant threats from Korea,
abolished the 100 year old national army, except for one regiment to
guard the region near Korea. National security was maintained by sons of
local clan leaders somewhat similar to the present day police. Japan
was effectively without an army until the emergence of the new warrior
class before the Kamakura, Shogunate (1192 - 1333 AD). Tibet is another
example of demilitarisation (in the 17th century). What is significant
to note here is that long before the ideal of demilitarisation was
espoused in western countries, ancient AOA countries had already
implemented it. In Japan, beginning from the 9th century, the death
penalty was abolished for nearly three and a half centuries.

An Economics to save the Earth??The practice of industrial societies
indulging in a policy of take-and-take from nature is criticized,
despite economics being fundamentally about exchange or give-and-take.A
possible root cause of the western attitude towards nature. This passage
declares:

“So God created man in his own
image, in the image created he him, male and female created he them. And
God blessed them, and God said unto them, “Be fruitful and multiply,
and replenish the earth and subdue it, and have dominion over the fish
of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over every living thing
that moveth upon the earth”.??Some have interpreted this passage
literally, as one giving divine sanction to domination of the earth for
the benefit of only human beings and disregarding the interests of both
plants and other living creatures of this world. In contrast, AOA
approach sacred texts are much more humble and always emphasise the need
to live in harmony with nature and peacefully co-exist with other
living creatures, as the ideal and noble way. In the AOA approach
worldview, humans rather being masters of this earth, simply make up one
tiny element in a vast cosmos. In the AOA approach Economics that
proposes, the earth rather than human beings will be placed at the
center of our worldview.

History of Economics

The major ideas in the theories of prominent economists such as Adam
Smith (1723 - 1790), David Ricardo (1772 - 1823), Karl, Marx (1818 -
1883), John Keynes (1883 - 1946) Joan Robinson (1903 - 1983) and the
German Economists Friedrich von Hayek (1899 - 1992), Wilhelm Lopke (1899
- 1966) and Ludwig Erhard (1897 - 1977) is examined.Lopke’s
best-selling book ‘ Civitas Humanas (Human Citizen) published in 1949 as
laying the foundation for the new humanistic school of economics is
singled out.The concept of `social market economics’ advocated by Ludwig
Erhard in his 1957 book ‘Woffistand fur Alles (Happiness for All ) as
the precedent for developing the new AOA government ‘price valuation’ to
ensure fair pricing, rent control and supporting people with
disabilities.

Dr. E.F Schumacher’s book ‘Small is Beautiful’, which has a chapter
on AOA approach Economics is an inspiration. Schumacher was heavily
influenced by AOA approach meditation and wisdom during his time in
Myanmar (formerly Burma). Though Schumacher recommended a new approach
to economics based on AOA approach, that Schumacher’s ultimate solutions
were sought in Christian oriented ethics. Nevertheless, that
Schumacher’s book should serve as a wake up call for those living in AOA
approach countries. He further says that given the destruction of the
natural environment that has taken place in the industrial West, the
time has come to use a AOA approach to economics.

Historical Background of Awaken One with Awareness (CYBERNETIC FAIR SALE MART ) Economics

The life story of the CF SALE MART offers a valuable lesson when
focusing on AOA approach economics. The Prince rejected the material
comforts of a royal life, and also realised the futility of asceticism
and denial of natural physical needs. ‘’The AOA walked a fine line
between materialism and denial of the world, and this middle way or
moderate standpoint is fundamental to understanding CF SALE MART
Economics’.

?The ordinary public and the merchant class supported AOA approach
from the very outset. As AOA approach moved eastwards over the
centuries, to China, Korea and Japan it absorbed elements of the culture
of these countries and became transformed along the way. It also
managed to transform the societies and economies of these countries by
introducing ethical concepts into the pursuit of profit. In Japanese
history there has been substantial AOA approach support of commerce,
which had come to fruition during the Edo period (1603 - 1867). This
period witnessed an explosion of economic activity. Some sociologists
have found interesting parallels in the connections between the
Protestant work ethic and capitalism, and between the rise of Japanese
Capitalism and the religious thought of the time.

Unrestrained Consumption

The world’s natural resources would be depleted if two factors are not immediately addressed:

1) the ever increasing population growth, and

?

2) the mismanagement of desire ( particularly of those people in the so-called advanced countries)

In the Ryoan-ji, the AOATemple of Kyoto, famous for its stone and
sand garden, there is a poem carved on a stone, which says ‘ Know what
one really needs ‘. This is no simple injunction. To know what one
really needs in life requires great wisdom. But to have the strength to
say ‘no’ to the unessential products in life would release a person from
the coils of consumption. This view i.e. of wanting what is really
essential reflects the AOA approach view of consumption and it is the
ideal attitude to be promoted in the coming century.



Right Livelihood??Right livelihood
is one of the components of the Noble Eightfold Path. Its importance
lies in the fact that the work one does for a living influences a
person’s thinking. The AOA has named five types of occupations as
unwholesome ways of earning a living.

They are

1) Selling liquor or being connected with the production and sale of liquor

2) Sale of flesh or being connected with the raising and killing of animals

3) Poison (includes drugs)

4) Trading in living beings (includes slavery or for similar purposes)

5) Dangerous weapons.

The layman’s code of discipline or gihi vinaya is the premise for
developing the right work ethic for the next century. In one passage AOA
says “One should work like a bee to earn one’s livelihood. Do not wait
for others to help, nor depend on others foolishly”. AOA showed his
concern for the material welfare and the spiritual development of his
lay disciples. In the discourse to young Sigala, the AOA explained the
full range of duties owed by a layman to all those with whom he
interacts.

The AOA also indicated how wealth has to be spent i.e.

one portion for one’s needs, which includes offerings to Order of AOA and charity,

two portions on investment and

the fourth portion to be kept for an emergency.??Japanese
entrepreneurs who had incorporated AOA principles and meditation
techniques in their day to day work in an effort to develop a more
humanistic and environmentalist business ethic.??Awaken One with
Awareness (CYBERNETIC FAIR SALE MART ) Economic Vision??Provides food
for thought to anyone wishing to adopt an innovative approach to
Management and Business. However the greatest appeal of this highly
readable book lies in the elaborate development of Schumacher’s profound
insight that there is another way of approaching economics, based on
the ideas taught in the East 2500 years ago, particularly of the
fundamental interconnectedness of people and nature. It is upon this
premise that the world can shift from a throw-away culture to a more
sustainable* civilisation. This work also throws a challenge to
governments in AOA approach countries to develop a CF SALE MART
economic vision as a part of national planning, as we move towards a new
millennium.

THANK YOU



State
Level Competition Exam to be held in the month of Dec’2013 (6th Dec) on
Babasaheb’s books with………………………. 
Prizes
Rs. 1,00,000/-, Rs. 75,000/-, Rs. 60,000/-, Rs. 40,000/-, Rs. 25,000/-,
Rs. 15,000/-, Rs. 10,000/-, Rs. 7,000/- and Rs. 5,000/- 

1)
Castes in India 2) Jatibhed Nirmulan 3) Kranti Pratikranti 4) Who were
Shudras? 5) Who Were Untouchables? 6) Bharatachi Phalni (Optional) 7)
Buddha or Karl Marx 8) Buddha and His Dhamma 
A) Paper submission on any 1 book    2) Que-Ans (on 7 books excluded optional)
Spread this message like fire and pls start reading all books.

Last date of application 31.08.2013

For Any clarification u can contact Mr. Jayant A Ingle (JAI) Jt. Sec. BANAE, Nagpur on 9422101281.

Regards,
Ranjit Nandagawali


Dear Buddhist Brothers and Sisters,
Namo Buddhay!

1. Baba
Saheb, the Prophet of Buddhism says about Indian National Congress -
It    kills   us by pseudo love. ( Puchkar kar marna )

2. M. Kanshi Ram Sahab says about BJP - It kills us by kicking. ( Dutkarkar Marna )

3. Hindu Dharma kills us by keeping behind themselves. ( Peechhe lagakar Marna )

These three forces are made us to kill only. You are prey for these hunters.

1. BSP is our real Party.
2. Buddhism is our real Dharma.

These are one and want to make us the king of our country. So, Be Buddhist and enjoy the fruits of kingdom.

With Best Regards!

Bauddhacharya DP Bauddha 


“Today Mahatama Gandhi met Chitragupta in heaven and asked him as to how his Three Monkeys are doing?

Chitragupta said, ‘’they are doing very well in India.

The one who was blind has become the Law.

The one who was deaf has become the Government.

And the one who was dumb is very very happy as he has become the Prime Minister.”

And Ms Mayawati after acquiring the MASTER KEY will operate the blind to see. the deaf to hear and she started speaking of
Sarva Samaj Sadbhavan to become the Prime Minister to do good governing
for peace, happiness and welfare of the entire people to attain Eternal
Bliss as Final Goal.

வெடிகுண்டு தயாரிக்க ஆர்.எஸ். எஸ். பயிற்சி அளிக்கிறது: காங்கிரஸ் ‘திடுக்’ குற்றச்சாட்டு!

மிஸ்
மாயாவதி விஷ்வ ஹிந்து பரிஷத், ராஷ்ட்ரிய ஸ்வயம் சேவக் சங்கம், பஜரங்க தளம்
ஆகியவற்றை தடை செய்ய வேண்டும் என்றது  சரியே. காங்கிரசும் பாஜகாவும் ஒரு
நாணயத்தின் இரு முகங்கள். ஒருவர் மேல் ஒருவர் குறைக் கூறிக்கொண்டு நாட்டை
சூறை ஆடிக்கொண்டிருக்கின்றனர். நிலக்கரி மற்றும் இரும்புப் பாறைகளின்
சிதறல்கள். ஏழை கிராமவாசிகள் மற்றும் குடிசைவாசிகளின் பிணங்களை தின்னும்
கழுகுகள்.

எனக்கு நன்றாகவே தெரியும் தாங்கள் இந்த காமெண்டை போட மாட்டீகள் என்று. காரணம் ஒரே குட்டையில் ஊறிய மட்டைகள்.

Please watch:


http://funsterz.com/2012/08/28/bike-made-from-9-worth-of-cardboard-supports-485-lbs/

for 

1 ) bike made from 9 worth of cardboard which supports 485-lbs

http://funsterz.com/2012/08/30/shark-vs-octopus-who-you-think-can-win-think-again-or-watch-this-video/

2) shark-vs-octopus


comments (0)
07/25/13
991 LESSON 26-07-2013 FRIDAY FREE ONLINE eNālāndā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY run through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org Universal Welfare Friend - E- GOOD NEWS AWAKENED ONES WITH AWARENESS DISPENSATION samadhi-yuga In the commentary to the Theragatha[52] the Sasana is said to consist of five periods: (1) the age of deliverance (vimutti-yuga), (2) the age of concentration (samadhi-yuga) http://sped2work.tripod.com/fetters.html IN THE WAY OF AWAKENMENT: 
 The Ten Fetters of Buddhism-Black capitalism in the US is the inspiration for SC/ST (UNTOUCHABLE) capitalism
Filed under: General
Posted by: @ 6:01 pm

991 LESSON 26-07-2013 FRIDAY 
FREE ONLINE  eNālāndā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY 
run through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org   Universal Welfare Friend -
E- GOOD NEWS 

AWAKENED ONES WITH AWARENESS DISPENSATION

samadhi-yuga

In
the commentary to the Theragatha[52] the Sasana is said to consist of
five periods: (1) the age of deliverance (vimutti-yuga),

(2) the age of concentration (samadhi-yuga)

http://sped2work.tripod.com/fetters.html
IN THE WAY OF AWAKENMENT:

The Ten Fetters of Buddhism
Black capitalism in the US is the inspiration for SC/ST (UNTOUCHABLE) capitalism

PRELUDE:
The first five Fetters (orambhagiya-samyojana) of the Ten Fetters play an important role in the final outcome of one of the best stories in Buddhism, the meeting of Upaka the Ascetic and the Buddha on the road to Benares. I call it the best based on two points, both systematically overlooked or ignored in Zen and Buddhism overall, and, when and if not overlooked, underemphasized.

Over and over you hear the Buddha never said nor claimed to be Awakened with Awareness, so much so practically, that those that say it have said it so many times that they now claim among themselves by citing each other that is must be so. However, the Majjhima Nikaya MN-26 claims quite clearly otherwise. The second part “best” refers to the first but has more to do with the Buddha’s Awakenment as viewed by an outsider rather than his own awareness to it. Upaka meets the Buddha walking on the road to Benares. The Buddha tells him he (the Buddha) “is an all Enlightened one beholden to no teacher.” Upaka SEES NOTHING in the Buddha that would indicated the Buddha’s statement as carrying weight and, apparently unimpressed, replies, “It must be so, friend,” and wanders off.

The point missed by so many adherents and followers of Awakenment, Buddhism, and Zen is: Upaka was in the presence of the Buddha himself and still NOT able to recognize or discern in the Buddha the Awakenment transformation claimed to have occurred under the Bodhi Tree called Annuttara Samyak Sambodhi, the Consummation of Incomparable Awakenment. What is implied in the Sutra, but overlooked by those either seeking Enlightenment or proof of Enlightenment is, that IF the claimed Awakenment of the Buddha by the Buddha in the first point above, is taken as the truth, that is, that the Buddha did indeed and in fact attain Awakenment as claimed by the Sutras specifically and Buddhism generally, then Awakenment, regardless even of the highest depth of attainment, can NOT necessarily be determined, recognized, or known to be such in ALL cases by ALL people.

Simply put, in that Upaka was unable to recognize Awakenment even in the Buddha, then it follows that Awakenment is not always recognizable in every case by every person. That is, Awakenment is not a universally accepted, known, recognizable phenomenon such as say being trapped in an area with insufficient air.

The question arises then, does the knowing or not knowing of Awakenment enhance or inhibit Attainment?

Three high profile examples of not knowing Awakenment beforehand, but reaching Attainment notwithstanding and without benefit of teachers, would be the Buddha, the Sixth Patriarch of Chinese Zen, Hui-neng, and the self-Enlightened holy sage of Arunachala, the Bhagavan Sri Ramana Maharshi. Typically, after it becomes widespread acceptable common knowledge that a person “is” an Awakened being, then there is a perception of expectation that precedes that person by those that know. Whether that “Awakenment” is spoon-fed concocted propaganda or not is another thing, but, say in Ramana’s case, whose known Attainment preceded him (at least in India), both Paul Brunton and british playwright and author William Somerset Maugham perceived enough of something about something when in the presence of the Maharshi that they both spent a great deal of time writing about it. Maugham even fainted in his presence the first time he saw him. So too, perhaps because of his experience with Sri Ramana, when Maugham came within the presence of MY Mentor [1] he sensed a similar “something.” For Maugham in Ramana’s case it may have been because of an earlier expectation, but in my Mentor’s there was no previous expectation. When Hui-neng came before the Fifth Patriarch the Patriarch sensed right away Hui-neng’s Attainment. Of course, the Fifth Patriarch knew of Enlightenment and he himself was Enlightened. In my case when I met my mentor for the first time, I sensed something, but if that “something” was Awakenment per se’ or some sort of projected outflow from a “carriage vessel of Attainment” is open to more Monday morning quarterbacking now than a specific answer. I will say others did not seem to preceive it, at least as I seemed to. In a total opposite sort of way, the same sort of preception cannot be said to have transpired in my meeting with Guy Hague, the man many people consider the real life role model for Larry Darrell, the seeker along the path chronicled in W. Somerset Maugham’s book The Razor’s Edge. However, even though as a young boy I had met Franklin Merrell-Wolff and experienced what would be called nothing less than a Kensho experience under his auspices, it must be said my level of understanding in those days still remained practically nil. It was much more refined by the time I ended up in a monastery high up along the side of some steep Chinese mountain somewhere on the southern edge of the Qinghai-Tibet plateau, and of which afterwards, being sent by my mentor to study-practice under the American Zen master Alfred Pulyan — although looking back, I am sure the results regarding Hague would have remained the same.

THE TEN FETTERS:

How does any of the above tie in with the Ten Fetters and those ten standing in the way of Awakenment? It has to do in example with Upaka and thus yourself and possibly any quest thereof. If you follow what happened to Upaka after his meeting the Buddha [2] you will find some years later after marriage and a child he returns to become a follower of the Buddha, reaching the stage of Anagami, a Once-returner, having done so by overcoming the first five Fetters. This by a man that initially was unable to perceive Awakenment even in the Buddha.

In Buddhist lore, prior to his Awakenment, while sitting under the Bodhi Tree, Siddhārtha Gautama was confronted by Mara, the Evil One, who sent ten temptors in an effort to stop him from reaching Awakenment. As it has come down to us the temptors have been presented as manifested personifications, angels, or spiritual entities and given names as any person might. However, over time the names of each so named have come to represent the temptations to be overcome for any who may so choose to follow the Buddhist path to Awakenment. Originally The Ten Chief Sins in their personifications, they are, or least their names and the temptations so endowed, are now represented in The Ten Fetters. The following is an exploration of The Ten Fetters claimed by the Buddha specifically and Buddhism generally as standing in the way of Awakenment:

1. Sakkaya-ditthi is translated as “personality belief.” This is the belief that we are solid beings, which leads to the illusion of a separate self, egoism, or individuality. This is a major obstacle to spiritual progress. Not only are we attached to the idea of self, we even glorify it. Conceit, arrogance, pride, self-abasement. Attachment to idea of “I” is fundamental to all problems; we defend the idea of I, we seek to cherish I, make a fuss of it. It is difficult to be entirely free from idea of self (Anatta), but at least do not take the five aggregates as self.

2. Vicikiccha means “skeptical doubt.” In particular, doubt about (a) the Buddha, (b) the Dhamma, (c) the Sangha, (d) the disciplinary rules, (e) the past (for example, “What have I been in the past?”), (f) the future (for example, “What shall I be in the future?”), (g) both the past and the future (for example, “From what state to what state shall I change in the future?”, “Who am I?”, “What am I?”, “How am I?”, etc.), (h) the doctrine of dependent origination. The Buddha said that this kind of doubt is like being lost in a desert without a map. Vicikiccha is typically listed as the fifth of The Five Hindrances

3. Silabbata Paramasa means “adherence to wrongful rites, rituals and ceremonies”…in the mistaken belief that purification can be achieved simply by their performance. Examples are the extreme ascetic practices condemned by the Buddha. Also at that time, the Brahmins had developed very complicated rituals which only they could carry out and which meant that the rest of the population had to ask the Brahmins for perform all the religious ceremonies on their behalf. “Oneself is one’s own master. Who else can be the master?” (Dhp. v. 160).
The Buddha said that neither the repetition of holy scriptures, nor self-torture, nor sleeping on the ground, nor the repetition of prayers, penances, hymns, charms, mantras, incantations and invocations can bring us the real happiness of Nirvana.[3] Instead the Buddha emphasized the importance of making individual effort in order to achieve our spiritual goals. He likened it to a man wanting to cross a river; sitting down and praying will not suffice, but he must make the effort to build a raft or a bridge.

The Buddha was talking to one of his prominent lay-disciples, called Anathapindika and said, “There are, O householder, five desirable, pleasant and agreeable things which are rare in the world. What are those five? They are long life, beauty, happiness, fame and rebirth in the heavens. But of these five things, O householder, I do not teach that they are to be obtained by prayer or by vows. If one could obtain them by prayer or vows, who would not do it?

“For a noble disciple who wishes to have long life, it is not befitting that he should pray for long life or take delight in so doing. He should rather follow a path of life that is conducive to longevity.” (Anguttara Nikaya V, 43) He goes on to recommend the same course of action in respect of the other four desirable things.
4. Kama-raga, also kamacchandra, means “sensual desire.” This is one of the roots of Tanha which is at the heart of all our problems with Dukkha. After we experience Dukkha we latch onto something. But what we latch on to has nothing to do with the Dukkha. What comes up is called in Sanskrit Samudaya. Desire, as Tanha, is a “Daughter of Mara,” one of the first three temptors unleashed by Mara, The Personification of Evil, to entice the future Buddha into abandoning his quest for Awakenemnt. Also considered one of The Three Poisons and the first of The Five Hindrances.

Equally as significant this same hindrance is Number One at the top of the list of the Patimokka, the 227 Rules to be observed by members of the Buddhist Order. Out of the 227 rules it is one of ONLY four, called the Parajikas, that if breached incurs explusion from the order for life. If you think Buddhism takes it lightly take some time to read Parajikas. Buddhism might not be your cup of tea.

5. Patigha, also vyapada, The literal meaning of this term is “to hit against,” but it is often translated into English as “ill-will or hatred.” This is the cause of conflict both on an individual basis, and between nations as well. As Arati, aversion, another of the “Three Daughters of Mara” initally unleashed by Mara. Hatred is one of The Three Poisons as well as the second of The Five Hindrances.

6. Rupa-raga is “attachment to the form realms.” It is a fetter when it continues to bind one to the Samsaric world. When overcome it is similar to Patanjali’s samprajnata samadhi. Samprajnata-samadhi incorporates the first four of the Eight Jhana States within its scope, which when overcome, often through entry level Access Concentration, can lead to the eradication of The Five Hindrances, a major step toward liberation. As lust, Raga is also considered one of “Three Daughters of Mara” originally unleashed.

7. Arupa-raga is “attachment to the formless realms.” It remains a fetter impeding liberation if the attachment is not breached. When breached it is similar to Patanjali’s asamprajnata samadhi. Asamprajnata-samadhi incorporates the last four Jhanas within its scope. Asamprajnata-samadhi is sometimes known in Vedanta circles as Nirvikalpa-samadhi. The Buddha surpassed this fetter under the Bodhi Tree on the night of his Awakenment through Insight (Vipassana Meditation).

8. Mana literally this means “measuring” and is often translated as “conceit, arrogance, self-assertion or pride,” but measuring is a better term because it means all forms of evaluation. Feeling oneself to be superior to others (the superiority complex) is indeed a form a conceit. But mana also includes measuring in the sense of judging oneself to be inferior to others (the inferiority complex) and also equal to others. Even in spiritual matters, e.g. how many do you observe precepts? how long do you sit for meditation? Certainly we are all different, but it is not helpful to engage in comparisons between oneself and others.

9. Uddhacca means “restlessness.” It is the confused, distracted, restless state of mind, in which there is no tranquillity or peace. It has been defined as, “the excitement of mind which is disturbance, agitation of the heart, turmoil of mind.” (Dhammasangani 429). It is the opposite of one-pointedness. Number four of The Five Hindrances.

10. Avijja is translated as “ignorance,” but this is ignorance in a special sense. It does not mean ignorance as it is used in the everyday sense, but it means specifically ignorance of the Four Noble Truths and the delusion which prevents us from seeing the real nature of impermanence and Dukkha. Last of of The Three Poisons.

The first five Fetters are known as Lower Fetters (orambhagiya-samyojana) because they bind us to the sensuous world. The second five Fetters are known as Higher Fetters (uddhambhagiya-samyojana) because they bind us to the rupa and arupa worlds (see #6 and 7 above).

These Fetters can be eradicated in four stages, what we call The Four Stages of Sainthood. When a Fetter has been eradicated, this is permanent, it does not come back again. One who has eradicated the first three Fetters is a Sotapanna, Stream Enterer. He has had a glimpse of Nirvana, like someone walking in the foothills of a mountain has a glimpse of the top of the mountain through the clouds. He has entered the stream that leads to Nibbana. He has complete confidence in the Buddha, Dhamma and Sangha, and perfect moral conduct.

The next stage of sainthood is a Sakadagami, Once Returner, which is marked by the reduction of the next two Fetters. They are not yet eradicated, but are suppressed.

When these two Fetters are completely eradicated, then the third stage has been reached. This is a Anãgãmi, Non Returner.

The last stage is the Arahat, and is marked by the eradication of the last five Fetters. This state is not restricted by age, sex or social status. It is open to lay people as well as ordained monks. The Arahant will continue to live for his body’s natural span, but he has eradicated all craving which binds ordinary people to the process of rebirth. Remember:

The Arahat creates no new Karma; he has gone beyond both good and evil, but he must still live with the Karmic effects of his previous actions. [4]

But when the life in the body eventually passes away the Arahat has to die just like anyone else. One can summarize this state by saying that it is freedom of suffering, it is the destruction or Death of the Ego and the eradication of greed, hatred and delusion.

In the Ratana Sutta is says: “Their past is dead, the new no more arises, Mind to future becoming is unattached, The germ has died. They have no more desire for growth. Those wise (and steadfast ones) go out as died this lamp.” (Sutta Nipata, 14)

To summarize: Although Nibbana may be defined as the end of craving, it is NOT a conditioned state, it is not the result of anything. The direct nature of the Buddha’s teaching is focused solely on the cessation of dukkha. The eradication of the Ten Fetters leads through The Four Stages of Sainthood to the ultimate goal of all Buddhist practice, which is the realization of Nirvana and thus then Sunyata. The way which leads to this realization is called the Eightfold Noble Path.

The eradication of the Ten Fetters or the mind being ripe sets the stage for total transformation. All of it can be a long drawn out process or it can transpire in an instant — or a combination of the two. Re: the Buddha at Vulture Peak holding up the flower and the Venerable Mahakashyapa’s Attainment thereof via a “Transmission” of sort. Enlightenment occured for Mahakashyapa through a sudden flash of insight and not through a gradual process of reasoning.

Loosly stemming from that thesis, Zen master Huang Po (circa 770 - 850) taught what has come to be called Transmission of the Mind, that the nature of Mind cannot be transmitted by speech or by writing and is not a conceptual object which can be transmitted from person to person or from place to place — but can only be transmitted by a sudden flash of intuitive insight if conceptual thinking is transcended.(see) It should be stated the transmission-event does not have to be triggered through the process of another person, only that the mind be ripe, a classical example being the bottom of the water pail breaking through with Chiyono, aka Mugai Nyodai. See Zen and the Transmission of Spiritual Power.

Fetters not withstanding, it should be brought to your attention again, many have Awakened to the Absolute out of nowhere with little or no formal religious background, and definitely without a personal guru — so in the end none of it may really be necessary.

Black capitalism in the US is the inspiration for SC/ST (UNTOUCHABLE) capitalism

Black capitalism has brought visibility with recognition to the Blacks. If you compare their situation today with their immediate past, there is a landmark change. In absolute terms of course they remain unequal to the Whites. In India, capitalism is emancipatory because in capitalism , nothing is fixed by birth . The only permanent thing is competition and a SC/ST (UNTOUCHABLE) has the opportunity to move ahead through competition. In the caste order, you cannot buy Brahmin status. In capitalism, you can buy a Mercedes and hire a Brahmin driver. That’s the difference capitalism is making.

Capitalism may have class-based problems but these are radically different from caste-based problems. A caste-based system is a system of humiliation. In capitalism , there is poverty of course but that is universal to everyone regardless of his birth. Anyone who is lazy, who doesn’t want to compete, will face the problem of poverty but minus the humiliation.

The SC/ST (UNTOUCHABLE) Indian Chamber of Commerce and Industry  has floated the fund to produce 100 SC/ST billionaires. That will send a powerful message to SC/STs that they can succeed. Its president Milind Kamble’s philosophy is to fight caste with capital. There have been many movements historically to replace the caste system but we had nothing to replace it with. Now capitalism has come and material markers have replaced social markers . SC/STs need to know that in this phase of history, only their work matters , not their birth. We do not see capitalism as merely a system of economic transaction. It is also a social order. The market doesn’t care about social groups. It only recognizes individuals who have surpluses in their pockets. And that is good for SC/STs because the market will not reject a SC/ST simply because he is a SC/ST.

The market can be cruel too. It makes no allowances for those who are weak and vulnerable as most SC/STs still are.
There cannot be anything more liberating than the market if you compare market with caste. If somebody has faced the cruelty of caste, the cruelty of the market can be enjoyed in fact. In the old order, you worked without rewards. Now I can work hard and reap the benefits.
In no society can all members become billionaires . We are saying that SC/ST billionaires will lead the charge of emancipation. This is the beginning of a new era for SC/STs , in which with very little education, they can be driving a BMW. Otherwise they will be doomed to compete for a few government jobs through reservations until the MASTER KEY as desired by the father of the Constitution Dr. B.R.Ambedkar is acquired by the SC/STs ( say Ms mayawati the symbol of political success) to unlock all doors of progress and development along with the economic success.

Therefore  state benefits should not abandon. A section of SC/STs needs help from the government. This is no enough. In the US, the idea of Black capitalism and affirmative action came together. And capitalist welfarism is much better than socialist welfarism because a socialist state has no surplus to distribute where as a capitalist system does.
SC/STs are not only takers. They are also givers . It is important to change the image of SC/STs and show that they can dream beyond a BPL card and reservations. Those who belong to the poverty school think they are losing SC/STs if they see a SC/ST capitalist. An ideal SC/ST for them is one who is dark-skinned, bare chested, carrying a farm tool, sweating profusely under a hot sun, sweating profusely. It’s a shock for them to see a SC/ST walking into a boardroom.


Handful of SC/ST billionaires along with reservation (which is a must) in trade and business can empower a historically oppressed and exploited community just like Black capitalism in the US to avoid continue to languish behind on all socio-economic indicators. This is possible only when they acquire the MASTER KEY that will unlock all doors of progress and development.

Mayawati is a symbol of political success. A billionaire is a symbol of economic success. Surely SC/STs need both. SC/ST billionaires must help BSP to acquire the MASTER KEY as desired by  Dr.Ambedkar and 25% of their profit for spreading Dhamma as they are quiet aware of this. They must also help Start-up small  enterprises in their humble way.
They are aware of the fact that whatever they do it is of the SC/STs by the SC/STs for the Sarva Samaj Sadbhavan.
The SC/ST Indian Chamber of Commerce and Industry and all Buddhist traders and business communities all over the world could start
 

CODI
(CO-OPERATIVE DIRECT INVESTMENT)

CF SALE MART
(CYBERNETIC FAIR SALE MART)

CO-OPERATIVE DIRECT INVESTMENT CODI CYBERNETIC FAIR SALE MART assert that, “The way to change the world is to change the nature of man,”that offers Insight to Improve Conditions for Planet, Inhabitants.

The world needs waves of reforms.

Generate an opportunity to set the world on a more equitable and sustainable path of development.

CYBERNETIC FAIR SALE MART (CF SALE MART) much to offer that process. CF SALE MART  assert that.

The spirit to care not just for ourselves but for others, based on an awareness of our interlinked fates, lies at the heart of CF SALE MART - and, indeed, all of the world’s great religions.

These thoughts challenge families, communities and nations to act in concert for the advancement of our common well-being. That is the best way to secure individual and collective progress in an interdependent world.

We must also change longstanding assumptions and open our minds to new ideas and possible solutions if we are to address major global threats, from the proliferation of deadly weapons to intolerance and inequality.

We must invite Awakened Ones with Awareness (AOA) and people of all traditions to use the occasion to reflect on how we can change our actions to pave the way for a more sustainable future.

AOA bequeathed to humanity profound thoughts that can guide our efforts to resolve the severe problems facing today’s world.

Injunction against the three poisons of greed, anger and ignorance is especially relevant to multilateral efforts to overcome the hunger that needlessly affects nearly a billion people in a world of plenty, the brutal violence that takes millions of lives each year, and the senseless environmental damage that humans cause to our only home, the planet Earth.

 Socio-economic development may sound modern, but its core is the very problem of human suffering that was addressed more than 2,500 years ago.

Numerous AOA organizations are putting these thoughts into practice. Their support is for activities to achieve the Millennium Development Goals, our blueprint for enabling all people to enjoy lives of dignity and opportunity.

Let us draw on the universal values of AOA to act in solidarity with those who are suffering, thereby contributing to a more compassionate and awakened world for all.

ECONOMY OF THE AOA (CF SALE MART ) is to provide all people with a minimum income.

Radiation theory sees the economy prospering through the virtuous actions of individuals following the moral law.

CF SALE MART  accept existing political and economic institutions, even while providing a democratic social ethos revolutionary for its time.

King Asoka, greatest of all emperors, pursued a highly activist fiscal policy even though he believed only meditation could help people to advance in moral living.

CF SALE MART  places great stress on gift giving.

Income Redistribution in the Ideal State

Through the laws of cause and condition there is a distributive cycle of one’s current social and economic position is due to one’s good cause and condition accumulated in the past. This does not mean indifference to the poor, for one’s economic status is not only dependent on the laws of cause and condition, but is also complemented by the moral virtues of compassion and generosity.’ Alms giving to the poor is regarded as increasing one’s merit. The importance of our active intervention has some important implications for behavior of the “righteous ruler” as well.

CF SALE MART  rulers are also known for the financial aid which they provided for the poor; indeed, the rulers were advised to give their gifts to all who are poor. Moreover, gifts to the those who practice CF SALE MART  do not prevent them from providing a refuge for the destitute or from redistributing such beneficence to the indigent.

Redistribution of income, either through the public or private, sectors, is certainly regarded in a favorable light. In order to favor the spiritual improvement of the population, the State is justified in taking steps to provide all people with a minimum income.

Radiation: Virtue as a Positive Externality

CF SALE MART  theory of radiation sees the economy prospering through the collective impact of the virtuous actions of individuals.

CF SALE MART  argue that since the economy can ultimately prosper only through virtuous action, ultimately the only hope for prosperity lies in a regeneration of human kind, e.g., through the cultivation of the Four Sublime Abodes (loving kindness, compassion, sympathetic joy, and equanimity). Any appropriate good action inevitably leads to an increase of the material wealth of the community.

Trade Through the Market

CF SALE MART discussion on right livelihood prohibits trade in certain goods and services, which means that all other types of trade are apparently allowed (but not explicitly approved). In an interesting comparison between trading and agriculture as means of livelihood, the CF SALE MART  also notes that both can bring high or low returns, depending on the circumstances; however, trading is an occupation with little to do, few duties, a small administration, and small problems, while agriculture is the reverse. The capable merchant is approvingly said to know the value of goods and prices and the profits he obtains; and to buy where the price is low and to sell where the price is high.

A merchant who was generous to the cause was highly praised for his piety.

CF SALE MART   accepts competition in general in the sense that it is possible to compete without hurting others,excel in virtue.

“prizes in the school of life that each may strive for to obtain…. If a man chooses to interpret this as free competition, it is still competition without rivalry, for victory to oneself does not mean the defeat of someone else.”

Economic Policies

Description of the origins of property also discusses the origins of the State. As crime increased after the division of the land, the people elected a ruler to maintain law and order, paying him for his troubles. This suggests a type of social contract theory, which means that the ruler has important obligations toward the people.

Some of the discussion about economic policy are traditional Ten Royal Precepts of Rulership: generosity, morality, liberality, uprightness, gentleness, self-restraint, non-anger, non-hurtfulness, forbearance, and non-opposition.

However, more practical advice can also be found. For instance, one of the sources, speaks of the Royal Acts to increase prosperity which include

giving of seed corn and food to farmers and of

capital to merchants to start or increase their business.

The particular source emphasizes that if prosperity increases, economic disorders and crime such as theft decrease.

Additional insight into State economic activities can be gained by examining the records of some of the “righteous rulers” who are revered by the CF SALE MART. It should be noted that because of the participation of the State in the operations of the irrigation systems in many of these countries, the ruler had a fairly active role in the economy.

The prototypical important righteous ruler was the revered King Asoka (Ashoka) (ca. 274-232 B.C.E.), the grandson of the founder of the Mauryan dynasty in indict and one of the greatest of the emperors.

2 From Asoka’s edicts it appears that he generally accepted the economic and political institutions of his time.

However, he also took as the goal of statecraft the welfare and happiness of the people. He adopted a highly activist fiscal policy, both with regard to current and capital expenditures. For instance, he gave gifts to the aged, other needy, and religious orders; he set up public education courses to teach the doctrines of Rule of the Law; he cut back on large public festivals; he imported and planted medicinal herbs; and he carried out various public works projects such as digging of wells, planting of trees, construction of rest houses and animal watering stations along main roads in the empire. Some of his edicts appeared to enforce traditional CF SALE MART beliefs, e.g, bans on slaughtering various animals. The funds spent on the maintenance of the ruler and good works were high, e.g., taxes were apparently about one fourth of the revenue of land.

Still another righteous ruler was King Ruang  who lived in the 14th century in Thailand, long after the canonical scriptures had been completed. Ruang stated quite clearly that a righteous ruler brings prosperity to his subjects. He apparently had a much less luxurious court or a less activist governmental expenditure policy than Asoka, since he advised that taxes should be less than 10 percent of the crop (and less in a drought) and that such taxes should never be higher than those of the preceding king. He also urged that the State provide interest free loans to those wishing to engage in commerce and that no profit taxes should be placed upon such commercial activities.


AOA (CF SALE MART ) and Politics

The AOA (CF SALE MART ) had gone beyond all worldly affairs, but still gave advice on good government.

The AOA  came from a warrior caste and was naturally brought into association with rulers and ministers. Despite His origin and association, He never resorted to the influence of political power to introduce His thoughts nor allowed His Thoughts to be misused for gaining political power. But today, many politicians try to drag the AOA’s name into politics by introducing Him as a communist, capitalist, or even an imperialist. They have forgotten that the new political philosophy as we know it really developed in the West long after the AOA’s  time. Those who try to make use of the good name of the  AOA  for their own personal advantage must remember that the  AOA was the Supremely Awaken One who had gone beyond all worldly concerns.

There is an inherent problem of trying to intermingle religion with politics. The basis of religion is morality, purity and faith, while that for politics is power. In the course of history, religion has often been used to give legitimacy to those in power and their exercise of that power. Religion was used to justify wars and conquests, persecutions, atrocities, rebellions, destruction of works of art and culture.


When religion is used to pander to political whims, it has to forego its high moral ideals and become debased by worldly political demands.

The thrust of the  CF SALE MART Rule of Law is not directed to the creation of new political institutions and establishing political arrangements. Basically, it seeks to approach the problems of society by reforming the individuals constituting that society and by suggesting some general principles through which the society can be guided towards greater humanism, improved welfare of its members, and more equitable sharing of resources.

There is a limit to the extent to which a political system can safeguard the happiness and prosperity of its people. No political system, no matter how ideal it may appear to be, can bring about peace and happiness as long as the people in the system are dominated by greed, hatred and delusion. In addition, no matter what political system is adopted, there are certain universal factors which the members of that society will have to experience: the effects of good and bad Cause and Condition, the lack of real satisfaction or everlasting happiness in the world characterized by unsatisfactoriness, impermanence), and egolessness. To the  CF SALE MART, nowhere in Samsara is there real freedom, not even in the heavens or the world of Creator.


Although a good and just political system which guarantees basic human rights and contains checks and balances to the use of power is an important condition for a happy in society, people should not fritter away their time by endlessly searching for the ultimate political system where men can be completely free, because complete freedom cannot be found in any system but only in minds which are free. To be free, people will have to look within their own minds and work towards freeing themselves from the chains of ignorance and craving. Freedom in the truest sense is only possible when a person uses Rule of Law to develop his character through good speech and action and to train his mind so as to expand his mental potential and achieve his ultimate aim of awaken-ness.
While recognizing the usefulness of separating religion from politics and the limitations of political systems in bringing about peace and happiness, there are several aspects of the  AOA’s thoughts which have close correspondence to the political arrangements of the present day. Firstly, the  AOA spoke about the equality of all human beings long before Abraham Lincoln, and that classes and castes are artificial barriers erected by society. The only classification of human beings, according to the  AOA, is based on the quality of their moral conduct. Secondly, the  AOA encouraged the spirit of social -co-operation and active participation in society. This spirit is actively promoted in the political process of modern societies. Thirdly, since no one was appointed as the  AOA’s successor, the members of the Order were to be guided by the Rule of Law. Until today very member of the Order is to abide by the Rule of Law which governs and guides their conduct.

Fourthly, the  AOA encouraged the spirit of consultation and the democratic process. This is shown within the community of the Order in which all members have the right to decide on matters of general concern. When a serious question arose demanding attention, the issues were put before the monks and discussed in a manner similar to the democratic parliamentary system used today. This self-governing procedure may come as a surprise to many to learn that in the assemblies of  AOAs 2,500 years and more ago are to be found the rudiments of the parliamentary practice of the present day. A special officer similar to ‘Mr. Speaker’ was appointed to preserve the dignity of the Parliamentary Chief Whip, was also appointed to see if the quorum was secured. Matters were put forward in the form of a motion which was open to discussion. In some cases it was done once, in others three times, thus anticipating the practice of Parliament in requiring that a bill be read a third time before it becomes law. If the discussion showed a difference of opinion, it was to be settled by the vote of the majority through balloting.


The AOA approach to political power is the moralization and the responsible use of public power. The  AOA preached non-violence and peace as a universal message. He did not approve of violence or the destruction of life, and declared that there is no such thing as a ‘just’ war. He taught: ‘The victor breeds hatred, the defeated lives in misery. He who renounces both victory and defeat is happy and peaceful.’ Not only did the AOA teach non-violence and peace, He was perhaps the first and only religious teacher who went to the battlefield personally to prevent the outbreak of a war. He diffused tension between the Sakyas and the Koliyas who were about to wage war over the waters of Rohini. He also dissuaded King Ajatasattu from attacking the Kingdom of the Vajjis.
The  AOA discussed the importance and the prerequisites of a good government. He showed how the country could become corrupt, degenerate and unhappy when the head of the government becomes corrupt and unjust. He spoke against corruption and how a government should act based on humanitarian principles.

The  AOA once said, ‘When the ruler of a country is just and good, the ministers become just and good; when the ministers are just and good, the higher officials become just and good; when the higher officials are just and good, the rank and file become just and good; when the rank and file become just and good, the people become just and good.

The  AOA  said that immorality and crime, such as theft, falsehood, violence, hatred, cruelty, could arise from poverty. Kings and governments may try to suppress crime through punishment, but it is futile to eradicate crimes through force.

The  AOA  suggested economic development instead of force to reduce crime. The government should use the country’s resources to improve the economic conditions of the country. It could embark on agricultural and rural development, provide financial support to entrepreneurs and business, provide adequate wages for workers to maintain a decent life with human dignity.
The  AOA had given 10 rules for Good Government.  These ten rules can be applied even today by any government which wishes to rule the country peacefully. The rules are as follows:

1) be liberal and avoid selfishness,
2) maintain a high moral character,
3) be prepared to sacrifice one’s own pleasure for the well-being of the subjects,
4) be honest and maintain absolute integrity,
5) be kind and gentle,
6) lead a simple life for the subjects to emulate,
7) be free from hatred of any kind,
8) exercise non-violence,
9) practice patience, and
10) respect public opinion to promote peace and harmony.

Regarding the behavior of rulers, He further advised:

- A good ruler should act impartially and should not be biased and discriminate between one particular group of subjects against another.

- A good ruler should not harbor any form of hatred against any of his subjects.

- A good ruler should show no fear whatsoever in the enforcement of the law, if it is justifiable.

- A good ruler must possess a clear understanding of the law to be enforced. It should not be enforced just because the ruler has the authority to enforce the law. It must be done in a reasonable manner and with common sense.

‘If a man, who is unfit, incompetent, immoral, improper, unable and unworthy of rulership, has enthroned himself  a ruler with great authority, he is subject to be tortured‚ to be subject to a variety of punishment by the people, because, being unfit and unworthy, he has placed himself unrighteously in the seat of sovereignty. The ruler, like others who violate and transgress moral codes and basic rules of all social laws of mankind, is equally subject to punishment; and moreover, to be censured is the ruler who conducts himself as a robber of the public. It is mentioned that a ruler who punishes innocent people and does not punish the culprit is not suitable to rule a country.
The ruler always improves himself and carefully examines his own conduct in deeds, words and thoughts, trying to discover and listen to public opinion as to whether or not he had been guilty of any faults and mistakes in ruling the kingdom. If it is found that he rules unrighteously, the public will complain that they are ruined by the wicked ruler with unjust treatment, punishment, taxation, or other oppressions including corruption of any kind, and they will react against him in one way or another. On the contrary, if he rules righteously they will bless him: ‘Long live His Majesty.

The AOA’s emphasis on the moral duty of a ruler to use public power to improve the welfare of the people had inspired Emperor Asoka in the Third Century B.C. to do likewise. Emperor Asoka, a sparkling example of this principle, resolved to live according to and preach the Rule of Law and to serve his subjects and all humanity. He declared his non-aggressive intentions to his neighbors, assuring them of his goodwill and sending envoys to distant kings bearing his message of peace and non-aggression. He promoted the energetic practice of the socio-moral virtues of honesty, truthfulness, compassion, benevolence, non-violence, considerate behavior towards all, non-extravagance, non-acquisitiveness, and non-injury to animals. He encouraged religious freedom and mutual respect for each other’s creed. He went on periodic tours preaching the Rule of Law to the rural people. He undertook works of public utility, such as founding of hospitals for men and animals, supplying of medicine, planting of roadside trees and groves, digging of wells, and construction of watering sheds and rest houses. He expressly forbade cruelty to animals.

Sometimes the  AOA  is said to be a social reformer. Among other things, He condemned the caste system, recognized the equality of people, spoke on the need to improve socio-economic conditions, recognized the importance of a more equitable distribution of wealth among the rich and the poor, raised the status of women, recommended the incorporation of humanism in government and administration, and taught that a society should not be run by greed but with consideration and compassion for the people. Despite all these, His contribution to mankind is much greater because He took off at a point which no other social reformer before or ever since had done, that is, by going to the deepest roots of human ill which are found in the human mind. It is only in the human mind that true reform can be effected. Reforms imposed by force upon the external world have a very short life because they have no roots. But those reforms which spring as a result of the transformation of man’s inner consciousness remain rooted. While their branches spread outwards, they draw their nourishment from an unfailing source — the subconscious imperatives of the life-stream itself. So reforms come about when men’s minds have prepared the way for them, and they live as long as men revitalize them out of their own love of truth, justice and their fellow men.

The doctrine preached by the  AOA  is not one based on ‘Political Philosophy’. Nor is it a doctrine that encourages men to worldly pleasures. It sets out a way to attain Eternal Bliss. In other words, its ultimate aim is to put an end to craving  that keeps them in bondage to this world.’The path that leads to worldly gain is one, and the path that leads to Eternal Bliss (by leading a religious life)is another.’


However, this does not mean that  AOA s cannot or should not get involved in the political process, which is a social reality. The lives of the members of a society are shaped by laws and regulations, economic arrangements allowed within a country, institutional arrangements, which are influenced by the political arrangements of that society. Nevertheless, if a  AOA wishes to be involved in politics, he should not misuse religion to gain political powers, nor is it advisable for those who have renounced the worldly life to lead a pure, religious life to be actively involved in politics.

Putting Awaken One with Awareness (CYBERNETIC FAIR SALE MART ) to Work: 


A New Approach to Management and Business

AOA (CF SALE MART ) Economics: The Emerging Middle Path between Capitalism and Socialism

A novel approach to economic management that goes beyond socialism and capitalism. The proposed economics for the 21st century is ‘AOA (CF SALE MART )Economics’.

Based on the insight of the AOA (CF SALE MART ) that spiritual liberation is attained by avoiding extremes, whether by indulgence in worldly pleasures or severe asceticism, and treading namely ‘ the Middle Way ‘,  ‘AOA (CF SALE MART ) Economics ‘ is recommended as the ideal middle path between the competing models of capitalism and socialism. Both these systems, have failed to contain the relentless destruction of the natural environment and the human community, thereby forcing leading executives and planners to search for new solutions for planetary problems.

Best aspects of both capitalist and socialist economic systems is drawn in  ‘ AOA (CF SALE MART ) Economics ‘ model. It supports the conventional forces of a free market and competition without destroying either nature or human society. Alternate vision of sustainable economics is meant to be more just and more ecologically sound.

Inspired by the fundamental CF SALE MART insight of the inter-connectedness existing among all living things, that CF SALE MART, Economics and Ecology are all inter-related. There is a heavy emphasis on the concept of freedom as understood in CYBERNETIC FAIR SALE MART  in contrast to the Western concept of ‘freedom’. In the West ‘freedom’ revolves around the rights of the individual i.e. freedom to do what one wishes. In CF SALE MART, ‘freedom’ means freedom from personal desires or attachments.

An AOA (CF SALE MART ) approach to economics requires an understanding that economics and a moral and spiritual life are neither separate nor mutually exclusive. The 20th Century has been ravaged by a materialistic, self-centered consumerism. The next century needs to focus on the quality and spirituality of life itself. AOA (CF SALE MART ), which advocates the ‘Middle Path’, serves as an important resource to pursue an alternative to the extremes of capitalism and socialism, or pure self-interest and utter self-negation.

The Essence of Awaken One with Awareness (CYBERNETIC FAIR SALE MART ) Economics

Three key phrases are identified that underlie the model of AOA (CF SALE MART ) Economics. 


They are:



1) an economics that benefits oneself and others


2) an economics of tolerance and peace

3) an economics that can save the earth.



An Economics that benefits oneself and others

Theory of free enterprise based on the concept of self-benefit is developed. This led to people being more concerned with enriching themselves and disregarding the interests of others. At the international level, major colonial powers such as England, Netherlands, France, Portugal and Spain developed their economies from the resources taken from other poorer regions, without an adequate resulting benefit accruing to the colonies. In contrast, the earlier CF SALE MART societies such as India during the time of the CYBERNETIC FAIR SALE MART  or Japan during the time of Prince Shotuku ( 574 - 622 AD ) existed with a radically different social approach. In Japanese society where the density of population was high, human relations were tightly interwoven, and Japanese people were encouraged to pay great attention to how other people thought or reacted. In the Japanese world of business, earning the trust of others and entering into mutually beneficial transactions have always been given priority. Such conduct was the result of deep-seated CF SALE MART influence.

The Western obsession with ’self-benefit ‘ and indifference to the rights of non-European people has been well analysed by former diplomat K.M.Panikkar in his ground breaking book ‘Asia and Western Domination - A Survey of the Vasco De Gama Epoch of Asian History 1498 - 1945, published in 1953. Panikkar says that western colonial powers were reluctant to recognise that doctrines of international law applied outside Europe or that European nations had any moral obligations when dealing with Asian people. For example, when Britain insisted on the opium trade against the laws of China in the 19th Century, there was a prohibition by law on opium smoking in England. In countries under direct British occupation eg. India, Ceylon and Burma, though there were equal rights established by law, there was considerable reservation in enforcing the law against Europeans. Maurice Collis, a British magistrate in Burma, gives a rare candid account in his book ‘Trials in Burma’ ( 1938 ) about the pressures brought upon him by the members of the Colonial Government and the British expatriate community, to be partial towards Europeans in his judgments. Panikkar avers that this doctrine of different rights (which made a mockery of the concept of the Rule of Law) persisted to the very end of western colonial domination and was a prime cause of Europe’s ultimate failure in Asia.

An Economics of Tolerance and Peace

The Emperor Asoka established the world’s first welfare state in the third century BC upon embracing AOA approach. He renounced the idea of conquest by the sword. In contrast to the western concept of ‘ Rule of Law ‘, Asoka embarked upon a ‘policy of piety or rule of righteousness’. The basic assumption of this policy of piety was that the ruler who serves as a moral model would be more effective than one who rules purely by strict law enforcement. The right method of governing is not only by legislation and law enforcement, but also by promoting the moral education of the people. Asoka began by issuing edicts concerning the ideas and practice of Rule of Law, dealing with universal law and social order. Realizing that poverty eroded the social fabric, one of his first acts was to fund social welfare and other public projects. Asoka’s ideals involved promoting policies for the benefit of everyone in society, treating all his subjects as if they were his children and protecting religion. He built hospitals, animal welfare shelters and enforced a ban on owning slaves and killing. He gave recognition to animal rights in a number of his rock edicts and accepted state responsibility for the protection of animals. Animal sacrifice was forbidden by law.

An important aspect of Asoka’s economics of peace was tolerance. In one of his rock edicts, Asoka calls for religious freedom and tolerance, and declares that by respecting someone else’s religion, one brings credit to one’s own religion. The idea of religious tolerance only emerged in the West in 1689 with the publication of John Locke’s book ‘ A Letter Concerning Toleration ‘.

From a CYBERNETIC FAIR SALE MART  perspective, politics can be summed up by the wheel turner, which means a king or political ruler who protects his people and the CYBERNETIC FAIR SALE MART t teachings. Asoka was the prototype of this ruler whose political ideas were to inspire a countless number of other Asian Emperors and rulers. One enthusiastic follower of Asoka in Japan was Prince Shotuku. (574 - 622 AD ). An ardent believer in AOA approach, Shotukti drafted a 17 Article Constitution (the first AOA approach Constitution of Japan), which was promulgated in 604 AD. Shotuku appeals neither to ’self-evident truths ‘ (as in the American Constitution ) nor to some divine right of kings as the basis of law. Instead he begins pragmatically by stating that if society is to work efficiently for the good of all, then people must restrain factionalism and learn to work together. A key feature of this Constitution is the emphasis placed on resolving differences by appeals to harmony and common good, using the procedure of consensus. This approach is in marked contrast to the western view that factions can be controlled only legally by a balance of powers. Decision making by consensus is a significant characteristic of Japanese society. Every effort is made to ensure that minority dissident factions are not allowed to lose face.

The influence of AOAapproach in Japan was such that in 792 AD Emperor Kammu (781 - 806 AD) despite constant threats from Korea, abolished the 100 year old national army, except for one regiment to guard the region near Korea. National security was maintained by sons of local clan leaders somewhat similar to the present day police. Japan was effectively without an army until the emergence of the new warrior class before the Kamakura, Shogunate (1192 - 1333 AD). Tibet is another example of demilitarisation (in the 17th century). What is significant to note here is that long before the ideal of demilitarisation was espoused in western countries, ancient AOA countries had already implemented it. In Japan, beginning from the 9th century, the death penalty was abolished for nearly three and a half centuries.

An Economics to save the Earth

The practice of industrial societies indulging in a policy of take-and-take from nature is criticized, despite economics being fundamentally about exchange or give-and-take.A possible root cause of the western attitude towards nature. This passage declares:

“So God created man in his own image, in the image created he him, male and female created he them. And God blessed them, and God said unto them, “Be fruitful and multiply, and replenish the earth and subdue it, and have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over every living thing that moveth upon the earth”.

Some have interpreted this passage literally, as one giving divine sanction to domination of the earth for the benefit of only human beings and disregarding the interests of both plants and other living creatures of this world. In contrast, AOA approach sacred texts are much more humble and always emphasise the need to live in harmony with nature and peacefully co-exist with other living creatures, as the ideal and noble way. In the AOA approach worldview, humans rather being masters of this earth, simply make up one tiny element in a vast cosmos. In the AOA approach Economics that proposes, the earth rather than human beings will be placed at the center of our worldview.

History of Economics

The major ideas in the theories of prominent economists such as Adam Smith (1723 - 1790), David Ricardo (1772 - 1823), Karl, Marx (1818 - 1883), John Keynes (1883 - 1946) Joan Robinson (1903 - 1983) and the German Economists Friedrich von Hayek (1899 - 1992), Wilhelm Lopke (1899 - 1966) and Ludwig Erhard (1897 - 1977) is examined.Lopke’s best-selling book ‘ Civitas Humanas (Human Citizen) published in 1949 as laying the foundation for the new humanistic school of economics is singled out.The concept of `social market economics’ advocated by Ludwig Erhard in his 1957 book ‘Woffistand fur Alles (Happiness for All ) as the precedent for developing the new AOA government ‘price valuation’ to ensure fair pricing, rent control and supporting people with disabilities.

Dr. E.F Schumacher’s book ‘Small is Beautiful’, which has a chapter on AOA approach Economics is an inspiration. Schumacher was heavily influenced by AOA approach meditation and wisdom during his time in Myanmar (formerly Burma). Though Schumacher recommended a new approach to economics based on AOA approach, that Schumacher’s ultimate solutions were sought in Christian oriented ethics. Nevertheless, that Schumacher’s book should serve as a wake up call for those living in AOA approach countries. He further says that given the destruction of the natural environment that has taken place in the industrial West, the time has come to use a AOA approach to economics.

Historical Background of Awaken One with Awareness (CYBERNETIC FAIR SALE MART ) Economics

The life story of the CF SALE MART  offers a valuable lesson when focusing on AOA approach economics. The Prince rejected the material comforts of a royal life, and also realised the futility of asceticism and denial of natural physical needs. ‘’The AOA walked a fine line between materialism and denial of the world, and this middle way or moderate standpoint is fundamental to understanding CF SALE MART  Economics’.


The ordinary public and the merchant class supported AOA approach from the very outset. As AOA approach moved eastwards over the centuries, to China, Korea and Japan it absorbed elements of the culture of these countries and became transformed along the way. It also managed to transform the societies and economies of these countries by introducing ethical concepts into the pursuit of profit. In Japanese history there has been substantial AOA approach support of commerce, which had come to fruition during the Edo period (1603 - 1867). This period witnessed an explosion of economic activity. Some sociologists have found interesting parallels in the connections between the Protestant work ethic and capitalism, and between the rise of Japanese Capitalism and the religious thought of the time.

Unrestrained Consumption

The world’s natural resources would be depleted if two factors are not immediately addressed:

1) the ever increasing population growth, and

2) the mismanagement of desire ( particularly of those people in the so-called advanced countries)

In the Ryoan-ji, the AOATemple of Kyoto, famous for its stone and sand garden, there is a poem carved on a stone, which says ‘ Know what one really needs ‘. This is no simple injunction. To know what one really needs in life requires great wisdom. But to have the strength to say ‘no’ to the unessential products in life would release a person from the coils of consumption. This view i.e. of wanting what is really essential reflects the AOA approach view of consumption and it is the ideal attitude to be promoted in the coming century.

Right Livelihood

Right livelihood is one of the components of the Noble Eightfold Path. Its importance lies in the fact that the work one does for a living influences a person’s thinking. The AOA has named five types of occupations as unwholesome ways of earning a living.

They are

1) Selling liquor or being connected with the production and sale of liquor

2) Sale of flesh or being connected with the raising and killing of animals

3) Poison (includes drugs)

4) Trading in living beings (includes slavery or for similar purposes)

5) Dangerous weapons.

The layman’s code of discipline or gihi vinaya  is the premise for developing the right work ethic for the next century. In one passage AOA says “One should work like a bee to earn one’s livelihood. Do not wait for others to help, nor depend on others foolishly”. AOA showed his concern for the material welfare and the spiritual development of his lay disciples. In the discourse to young Sigala, the AOA explained the full range of duties owed by a layman to all those with whom he interacts.

The AOA  also indicated how wealth has to be spent i.e.
one portion for one’s needs, which includes offerings to Order of AOA and charity,
two portions on investment and

the fourth portion to be kept for an emergency.

Japanese entrepreneurs who had incorporated AOA principles and meditation techniques in their day to day work in an effort to develop a more humanistic and environmentalist business ethic.

Awaken One with Awareness (CYBERNETIC FAIR SALE MART ) Economic Vision

Provides food for thought to anyone wishing to adopt an innovative approach to Management and Business. However the greatest appeal of this highly readable book lies in the elaborate development of Schumacher’s profound insight that there is another way of approaching economics, based on the ideas taught in the East 2500 years ago, particularly of the fundamental interconnectedness of people and nature. It is upon this premise that the world can shift from a throw-away culture to a more sustainable* civilisation. This work also throws a challenge to governments in AOA approach countries to develop a CF SALE MART  economic vision as a part of national planning, as we move towards a new millennium.


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07/24/13
990 LESSON 25-07-2013 THURSDAY FREE ONLINE eNālāndā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY run through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org Universal Welfare Friend - E- GOOD NEWS Buddha Sasana samadhi-yuga
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990 LESSON 25-07-2013 THURSDAY 
FREE ONLINE  eNālāndā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY 
run through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org   Universal Welfare Friend -
E- GOOD NEWS 

Buddha Sasana

samadhi-yuga

In the commentary to the Theragatha[52] the Sasana is said to consist of five periods: (1) the age of deliverance (vimutti-yuga),

(2) the age of concentration (samadhi-yuga)

http://the-wanderling.com/nirvakalpa.html



NIRVIKALPA SAMADHI



SAHAJA SAMADHI


PRESENTED BY
the Wanderling

NIRVIKALPA SAMADHI

ALSO KNOWN AS: Asamprajnata-Samadhi

SAMADHI: (Sanskrit) “Enstasy without form or seed.” The
realization of the Self, Parasiva, a state of oneness beyond all change
or diversity; beyond time, form and space.

NIRVIKALPA:- Nir means “without.” Vi means “to change, make different.” Kalpa means “order, arrangement; a period of time.”

Nirvikalpa Samadhi is generally considered to incorporate the following four Jhanas within its scope:

8) Eighth Jhana: jhana beyond perception and nonperception (nevasannanasanna) Saijojo.
7) Seventh Jhana: jhana of pure emptiness (akinci, lit.
“nothingness”) Ken-Chu-Shi.
6) Sixth Jhana: jhana of pure expansive consciousness (vinnana).
5) Fifth Jhana: jhana of boundless space (anantakasa).

Enstasy: A difficult term that embraces both ecstasy and
profound attainment of wisdom, the state of enstasy is, in fact, that
state of Nirvana when one recognizes The Void, the absolute reality that
everything is nothing.

Kalpa: (as a period of time) A Maha Yuga is 4.32 million
years, ten times as long as Kali Yuga. Twenty seven Maha Yugas is one
Pralaya. Seven Pralayas is one Manvantara. Finally, six Manvantaras is a
Kalpa. That is, one Kalpa is 27×7x6 = 1,134 Maha Yugas. This works out
to 1134 x 4.3 million = 4.876 billion years.

Kalachakra: the Wheel of Time:

1. The Outer Wheel – the cosmic time cycle. While each Kala comprises
a year, an unit of Chakra is the time taken by the sun to move across
twelve constellations and for the Kala to repeat 21,600 times.

2. The Inner Wheel – the life force. Channels and energy
circulation within the individual person. While each Kala comprises a
day, a unit of Chakra is the time taken by the various internal energies
to pass the ‘Twelve Wheels’ and for one to breathe 21600 times.

3. The Other Wheel – shatters the Ten Fetters
of life and death, enables the practitioner to transcend the cycle of
Rebirth, and gain spiritual purity and emancipation, thus achieving the
“Kalachakra Buddhahood”. The Other Wheel is based on the mutual
interaction, circulation and spiritual union between the Outer Wheel and
the Inner Wheel.

Once upon a time, Indra, the king of heaven and of whom Indra’s Jeweled Net is attributed, wanted to stop an event. Indra summoned Mother Kali,
representing Time, who acted as Obstruction to stop the event.
Obstruction then began to stop many other events. Only Ganesha was
beyond Time, so Ganesha controlled Time and became Lord-of-Obstruction.
Now, at the start of ANY undertaking, the help of Ganesha is needed to
control Obstructions.

It is said the legendary land of Spiritual Enlightenment, the
mystical kingdom of Shambhala, hidden deep in the mountains of Tibet,
guards the most sacred and secret spiritual teachings of the world,
including the Kalachakra (Wheel of Time), the pinnacle of Buddhist
wisdom.

As to the above opening sentence, “Nirvikalpa Samadhi is
generally considered to incorporate the following four Jhanas within its
scope,” then going on to list Jhana’s number 5 through 8, it should be
so brought to the attention of the reader that the Buddha in his quest
for Awakening was NOT able to fully find the answers he
sought in the Eight Jhana States to his satifaction. They are, thus
then, not the end all be all of Full Attainment. To wit the following
as found in The Jhanas in Theravadan Buddhist Meditation:


“Before he became the Buddha, at the beginning of his
spiritual quest, Siddhartha Gautama studied with two teachers. The
first teacher taught him the first Seven Jhanas; the other
teacher taught him the Eighth Jhana. Both teachers told him they
had taught him all there was to learn. But Siddhartha still
didn’t know why there was suffering, so he left each of these
teachers and wound up doing six years of austerity practises.
These too did not provide the answer to his question and he
abandoned these for what has come to be known as the Middle Way.
The suttas indicate that on the night of his Enlightenment, he
sat down under the and began his meditation by
practising the Jhanas (for example, see the Mahasaccaka Sutta -
Majjhima Nikaya #36). When his mind was “concentrated, purified,
bright, unblemished, rid of imperfection, malleable, wieldy,
steady and attained to imperturbability” he direct it to the
“true knowledges” that gave rise to his incredible breakthrough in
consciousness known in the sutras as
Anuttara Samyak Sambodhi. So we see that the Jhanas are not only at the
heart of his teaching, but also were at the heart of his own
practise.”
(source)

The
first teacher taught him the first Seven Jhanas; the other
teacher taught him the Eighth Jhana. Both teachers told him they
had taught him all there was to learn. But Siddhartha still
didn’t know why there was suffering, so he left each of these
teachers and wound up doing six years of austerity practises.

On the night of his Enlightenment, he
sat down under the Bodhi Tree and began his meditation by
practising the Jhanas. When his mind was “concentrated, purified,
bright, unblemished, rid of imperfection, malleable, wieldy,
steady and attained to imperturbability” he direct it to the
“true knowledges” that gave rise to his incredible breakthrough in
consciousness known in the sutras as Anuttara Samyak Sambodhi. The
austerity practises as found in Zen monasteries that follow the
original tenents of the ancient traditions is designed to replicate the
environment faced by Siddhartha that led up to his breakthrough. See:


DOING HARD TIME IN A ZEN MONASTERY

It should be noted that in his monograph, The Question of the Importance of Samadhi In Modern and Classical Advaita Vedanta (1993), discussing Asamprajnata Samadhi being the same as Nirvikalpaka Samadhi, Michael Comans, PhD, writes:


“I do not know why later Vedantins used the word
Nirvikalpa to characterize what is essentially the yogic
Asamprajnata Samadhi. Perhaps they wished to distinguish
their practice from that of classical Yoga. The word
Nirvikalpaka was first introduced into the astika
(”orthodox”) tradition by Kumarila Bhatta, who used it in
his explanation of perception, under the influence of the
Buddhist philosopher Dignaga. See D. N. Shastri, The
Philosophy of Nyaya-Vaisesika and Its Conflict with the
Buddhist Dignaga School (Delhi: Bharatiya Vidya
Prakashan, 1976), p. 438.”
(source)

SEE
BUDDHIST MEDITATION: Stages of Mindfulness and Absorption
PATH OF MINDFULNESS LEADING TO INSIGHT

SAHAJA SAMADHI

The explanation of the distinction between Sahaha Samadhi and
Nirvikalpa Samadhi is a difficult one. The following on Sahaja Samadhi
is extrapolated from the works of Ed Fisher:

The Baghavan Sri Ramana Maharshi distinguishes Sahaja Samadhi from Nirvikalpa Samadhi by saying:


In Sahaja Samadhi the mind is “dead”, “resolved into the self, like a river discharged into the ocean and its identity lost.”

Ramana also says: “the trance has no good unless vasanas
(latent ideas and forms of the mind) are destroyed.” But Ramana holds a
strong bias to the early Upanishad and Vedanta that essentially dismiss
the Advaita experience of non-duality as anti-thetical to their
doctrine which may account for his disparaging the “trance” and
“ecstasy” of Nirvikalpa Samadhi and placing it in a lower status than
HIS version of a Sahaja Samadhi with duality and content.

In an effort to explain Ramana’s distinction between Nirvikalpa
and Sahaja it may be he assumes it is not the quality of the
“experience” (which may range from a Near Death Experience to Nirvikalpa Samadhi) that determines rank in the Samadhi hierarchy — but to what degree vasanas
are permanently destroyed, or (as in his own case) already highly
evolved — upon re-entering phenomenal life. This appears to determine
the level of Enlightenment one manifests after the Advaitic experience-
which can range from remaining in a state of relative ignorance to
becoming a jivanmukta like Ramana.

Ramana’s vasanas were already highly evolved at the time of his experience, so upon re-emergence from whatever experience he attained his vasanas
further evolved via intense intellectual perception of religious texts
to the degree he could function as a jivanmukta. Thus for Ramana it is
more the quality of Enlightenment one retains after the transcendent
experience as to what name and rank he awards the level of the original
experience — and thus in my view (i.e., Fisher) arbitrarily applies
the term ‘Sahaja Samadhi’.

In short — I assume Sahaja does not enter into defining the
quality of the ultimate state of a samadhic experience where Nirvikalpa
is supreme- but distinguishes any level of advaitic experience which
results in the experiencer becoming imbued with highly evolved vasana enabling his/her permanent Enlightenment as a jivanmukta.(see)

NOTE: In a question and answer interview in the book Be As You Are
by David Godman, Sri Ramana is asked to clear up the difference between
Samprajnata-Samadhi and Nirvikalpa Samadhi. Ramana responds with:


“Holding on to the supreme state is Samadhi. When it is with effort due
to mental disturbances, it is Samprajnata. When these disturbances are
absent, it is Nirvikalpa. Remaining permanently in the primal state
without effort is Sahaja.”

Ramana seems to elevate Sahaja Samadhi to a higher rank than
Nirvikalpa Samadhi wherein Fisher smoothes out the distinction. Fisher,
of whose works the above section on Sahaja Samadhi is cited from, and
whom I worked closely with editing and citing his works, is a champion
of Nirvikalpa Samadhi, primarily because he himself, at age 42,
experienced a self-realization consciousness raising event he calls a spontaneous transcendent episode
that he relates almost exclusively as being Nirvikalpa Samadhi. Fisher
fully outlines his Awakening experience in a booklet, now found in it’s
completeness online at:


A MYSTICAL EXPERIENCE: A Transcendent Journey

To his everlasting credit, and why I find Fisher’s experience credible, is what he presents in a footnote on his transcendent journey:


“Wholeness is an invented term expressing the ultimate reality (or non
reality) partially revealed through transcendent experience. The feeling
is that this account describes one infinitesimal step towards awareness
of an ultimate state similar but not identical to the Buddhist concept
of Suchness.”

The fact that Fisher says his experience is most likely just one infinitesimal step towards awareness of an ultimate state similar but not identical to the Buddhist concept of Suchness
is most telling. Especially so in that the section on Nirvikalpa
Samadhi it is stated that Nirvikalpa Samadhi, of which Fisher champions,
incorporates the highest Jhana states but nothing about going beyond
them. If you recall, the Buddha had to go beyond the Jhana states in order to achieve the consummantion of incomparable enlightenment, Anuttara Samyak Sambodhi.

James Swartz, known as Ram, in an interview titled Commentary on
the Teachings of Ramana Maharshi and conducted by John Howells in
January 2003, at Tiruvannamalai, South India, offers the following
regarding Nirvikalpa Samadhi:


“If you argue that you are aiming at nirvikalpa samadhi where there is
no mind, fine, but the problem with nirvikalpa samadhi is that a fly
landing on your nose can bring you out of it, not that there is anyone
there to come ‘out’. And when the ‘you’ who wasn’t there does ‘come
back,’ as I just mentioned, you are just as stupid as you were before…
because you were not there in the samadhi to understand that you are the
samadhi. If you are the samadhi you will have it all the time because
you have you all the time…so there will be no anxiety about making it
permanent.”

(source)

Compare Fisher’s experience with that of the Wanderling’s as found in Dark Luminosity.

For possible additional clarification, especially as it applies
to the Ramana side of things and Nirvikalpa Samadhi, as well as other
spiritual guides, please see:


SAHAJA SAMADHI: OTHER VIEWS

SEE ALSO:
SRI RAMANA MAHARSHI: THE LAST AMERICAN DARSHAN
RECOUNTING A YOUNG BOY’S NEARLY INSTANT TRANSFORMATION INTO THE ABSOLUTE DURING HIS ONLY DARSHAN WITH THE MAHARSHI

Fundamentally, our experience as experienced is not different from the Zen master’s. Where
we differ is that we place a fog, a particular kind of conceptual overlay onto that experience
and then make an emotional investment in that overlay, taking it to be “real” in and of itself.


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(3) the age of morality (sila-yuga), (4) the age of learning [the texts] (suta-yuga), and (5) the age of generosity (dana-yuga). Ven. Dhammapala says, conerning the disappearance of learning, “In a region where there is no purity of morality, accomplishment (in the texts) remains through taking up great learning, through the desire to acquire, etc. But when accomplishment in the summary [i.e., the Patimokkha] is completley ended, it disappears. From that time on, only the mere sign (linga) remains. Then, having accumu- lated riches in various ways, they give away gifts (dana); this, truly, is the last right practice. Then, [the period starting] after the disappearance of learning is the last time (pacchima-kala). Others say that it is from the time of the disappearance of morality.” According to the tradition in Burma, the Sasana will last five thousand years. The five periods will occur twice. The first half of the Sasana has just passed, with each of the five periods lasting five hundred years. We are now in the second half, when these periods will be repeated, each lasting for another five hundred years.

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It is the duty of the government
to provide loans to the youth to start-up small enterprises apart from
distributing healthy seeds to the farmers by providing land to the
tillers with sufficient irrigation. The government servants must be
honest to implement these for the success of good governance.