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Paṭisambhidā Jāla-Abaddha Paripanti Tipiṭaka nīti Anvesanā ca Paricaya Nikhilavijjālaya ca ñātibhūta Pavatti Nissāya 
http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org anto 112 Seṭṭhaganthāyatta Bhāsā
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08/02/18
2701Wed 2 Aug 2018 LESSON (43) Fri 5 Aug 2007
Filed under: General, Vinaya Pitaka, Sutta Pitaka, Abhidhamma Pitaka, Tipiṭaka, ಅಭಿಧಮ್ಮಪಿಟಕ, ವಿನಯಪಿಟಕ, ತಿಪಿಟಕ (ಮೂಲ)
Posted by: site admin @ 7:02 pm
2701 Wed 2 Aug 2018 LESSON (42) Wed 2 Aug 2007

https://youtu.be/SraNRm7ZFro
Tipitaka Chanting Ceremony
https://youtu.be/za0Df22bTL0
The Voice of the Buddha

https://youtu.be/vmLEFl6IhAY
https://youtu.be/SraNRm7ZFro
Tipitaka Chanting Ceremony
https://youtu.be/za0Df22bTL0
The Voice of the Buddha

https://youtu.be/za0Df22bTL0
The Voice of the Buddha

https://youtu.be/cpDIrn5a9Q8

https://youtu.be/dqxBMOrZRGA

https://youtu.be/IB_cFsmHRIc

https://youtu.be/UFJmwUUTfGE

“I am very fond of teaching profession. I am also very fond of students. I have dealt with them. I have lectured them in my life. I am very glad to talk to the students. A great lot of the future of this country must necessarily depend on the students of this country. Students are an intelligent part of the community and they can shape the public opinion.”
- Babasaheb Ambedkar

These views are the views of a man, who has
been no tool of power, no flatterer of greatness. They come from one, almost the whole of whose public exertion has been one continuous struggle for liberty for the poor and for the oppressed and whose only reward has been a continuous shower of calumny and abuse from national journals and national leaders, for no other reason except that I refuse to join with them in performing the miracle—I will not say trick—of liberating the oppressed with the gold of the tyrant and raising the poor with the cash of the rich.
—Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar in Annihilation of Caste

https://youtu.be/wcPJbSATq4E

https://youtu.be/2AMMRXTDCzs

https://youtu.be/FVNJFBI0b-

https://youtu.be/b0tyQ6lLuP8

https://youtu.be/wbDNlTXatp4

https://youtu.be/4cywWIPoqko

https://youtu.be/JNbrVVU1hco

https://youtu.be/mQQ3BdjCc4I

https://www.indiatoday.in/elections/lok-sabha-2019/story/mayawati-as-first-dalit-pm-in-2019-1259146-2018-06-13
Why this clamour for Mayawati as first Sarvajan Samaj PM in 2019

She will BE A BETTER PM.

Prabhash K Dutta
New Delhi
June 13, 2018UPDATED: June 13, 2018 18:31 IST
Mayawati as first Sarvajan Samaj PM?

BSP chief Mayawati at a public rally in Agra, Uttar Pradesh in February last year. (Photo: PTI)

HIGHLIGHTS

JD(S) and INLD have supported Mayawati as PM candidate
SP and Congress keen on having BSP in anti-Modi alliance
BSP amended party constitution to shield Mayawati from attacks
Incumbent Prime Minister Narendra Modi will be seeking re-election of his government in less than a year’s time. Congress president Rahul Gandhi has already declared himself a potential contender. But can BSP chief Mayawati be the first Dalit prime minister in 2019? This is the question many are asking. The clamour is growing by the day.
The BSP held its national executive meet in the last week of May when its representatives from 18 states gathered in Lucknow. The national executive passed resolutions announcing Mayawati as the prime ministerial candidate for 2019 elections and agreeing to pre-poll alliances. The BSP last had a pre-poll alliance with any party in 1996.
The BSP declaring Mayawati as the prime ministerial candidate does not come as a surprise. The party had done so even during 2014 Lok Sabha polls. However, Mayawati could not win a single seat for her party in the face of a sweeping Modi wave by tampering the fraud EVMs to gobble the Master Key. The BSP still does not have a seat in the Lok Sabha. But, recent political alliances seem to have bolstered her political ambition.
Alliances and growing support for Mayawati

The BSP entered into a pre-poll alliance with the Janata Dal (Secular) of HD Deve Gowda in Karnataka where Mayawati’s party not only won a seat but also transferred core votes to the ally. After taking oath as the chief minister of Karnataka, HD Kumaraswamy declared his support to Mayawati as the chief ministerial candidate for 2019 against Murderer of democratic institutions (Modi).
This was followed by another declaration of support by Abhay Chautala of the Indian National Lok Dal (INLD), with which the BSP has stitched an alliance in Haryana. Abhay Chautala last week extended support to Mayawati’s prime ministerial candidature for 2019.
Samajwadi Party president Akhilesh Yadav, too, said earlier this week that he was ready to compromise on the number of seats in Uttar Pradesh to have an alliance with Mayawati’s BSP in place to challenge the BJP. Akhilesh Yadav and Mayawati have shown in Uttar Pradesh in bypolls to Lok Sabha and Vidhan Sabha that their alliance could comfortably defeat the BJP in the state.

https://www.indiatoday.in/elections/lok-sabha-2019/story/mayawati-as-first-dalit-pm-in-2019-1259146-2018-06-13
Why this clamour for Mayawati as first Sarvajan Samaj PM in 2019

She will BE A BETTER PM.

Prabhash K Dutta
New Delhi
June 13, 2018UPDATED: June 13, 2018 18:31 IST
Mayawati as first Sarvajan Samaj PM?

BSP chief Mayawati at a public rally in Agra, Uttar Pradesh in February last year. (Photo: PTI)

HIGHLIGHTS

JD(S) and INLD have supported Mayawati as PM candidate
SP and Congress keen on having BSP in anti-Modi alliance
BSP amended party constitution to shield Mayawati from attacks
Incumbent Prime Minister Narendra Modi will be seeking re-election of his government in less than a year’s time. Congress president Rahul Gandhi has already declared himself a potential contender. But can BSP chief Mayawati be the first Dalit prime minister in 2019? This is the question many are asking. The clamour is growing by the day.
The BSP held its national executive meet in the last week of May when its representatives from 18 states gathered in Lucknow. The national executive passed resolutions announcing Mayawati as the prime ministerial candidate for 2019 elections and agreeing to pre-poll alliances. The BSP last had a pre-poll alliance with any party in 1996.
The BSP declaring Mayawati as the prime ministerial candidate does not come as a surprise. The party had done so even during 2014 Lok Sabha polls. However, Mayawati could not win a single seat for her party in the face of a sweeping Modi wave by tampering the fraud EVMs to gobble the Master Key. The BSP still does not have a seat in the Lok Sabha. But, recent political alliances seem to have bolstered her political ambition.
Alliances and growing support for Mayawati

The BSP entered into a pre-poll alliance with the Janata Dal (Secular) of HD Deve Gowda in Karnataka where Mayawati’s party not only won a seat but also transferred core votes to the ally. After taking oath as the chief minister of Karnataka, HD Kumaraswamy declared his support to Mayawati as the chief ministerial candidate for 2019 against Murderer of democratic institutions (Modi).
This was followed by another declaration of support by Abhay Chautala of the Indian National Lok Dal (INLD), with which the BSP has stitched an alliance in Haryana. Abhay Chautala last week extended support to Mayawati’s prime ministerial candidature for 2019.
Samajwadi Party president Akhilesh Yadav, too, said earlier this week that he was ready to compromise on the number of seats in Uttar Pradesh to have an alliance with Mayawati’s BSP in place to challenge the BJP. Akhilesh Yadav and Mayawati have shown in Uttar Pradesh in bypolls to Lok Sabha and Vidhan Sabha that their alliance could comfortably defeat the BJP in the state.

BSP chief Mayawati and Congress leader Sonia Gandhi at HD Kumaraswamy’s oath taking ceremony in Bengaluru in May, 2018. (Photo: PTI)
Will Congress prefer Mayawati to Rahul Gandhi?
Post-poll alignment in Karnataka indicates that the Congress will not shy away from withdrawing its claim on the prime ministership in the event of a fractured mandate in 2019 should the BJP fails to get enough allies on board. Mayawati’s credential as a Dalit leader will only help the Congress to thump its chest in supporting the community cause.
The Congress already publicises its record to first making a Dalit as the chief of a national party (Damodaram Sanjivayya), appointing the first Dalit President of the country (KR Narayanan), giving the first Dalit woman Speaker of the Lok Sabha (Meira Kumar), the first Dalit home minister (Sushil Kumar Shinde) and also the first Dalit Chief Justice of India (Justice KG Balakrishnan). The Congress may boast of extending support to the first Dalit prime minister if needed in 2019.
This is massive turnaround in Mayawati’s political fortune since 2014 Lok Sabha elections especially after the stupendous electoral success of the BJP in Uttar Pradesh assembly polls in March last year. Mayawati’s BSP had drawn a naught in 2014 Lok Sabha elections and won less than 20 seats in UP Assembly polls last year - its worst performance since 1991.
Where does Mayawati get strength from?
Except the Northeast, Mayawati’s BSP today has recognisable support base in 18 states of the country. The elections in Uttar Pradesh and Karnataka have shown that Mayawati has a very high “vote transferability” to her alliance partners.
The assembly elections in three BJP-ruled states of Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh and Chhattisgarh will be a test for Mayawati and her prime ministerial ambitions. The BSP had polled about 3.5 per cent votes in Rajasthan, 6.3 per cent in Madhya Pradesh and 4.25 per cent in Chhattisgarh in 2013 assembly elections.

Congress leader Sonia Gandhi, BSP chief Mayawati, West Bengal Chief Minister and TMC chief Mamata Banerjee, Congress president Rahul Gandhi and Andhra Pradesh Chief Minister N Chandrababu Naidu in a show of Opposition strength during Karnataka Chief Minister HD Kumaraswamy’s oath taking ceremony in Bengaluru in May, 2018. (Photo: PTI)
Dalits constitute over 17 per cent of population in Rajasthan, more than 15 per cent in Madhya Pradesh and nearly 12 per cent in Chhattisgarh. These three states have a total of 65 Lok Sabha seats.
With a host of Dalit leaders having joined the BJP before and after 2014 elections, Mayawati stakes claim as the sole voice of the community. After Karnataka, she aims to cash in on pro-Dalit anti-Modi sentiment to resurrect her dwindling political capital.
Taking her chances to become the first Dalit prime minister in 2019 seriously, Mayawati has started shielding herself from possible attacks from the BJP and Modi during election time. She got the BSP constitution amended at the national executive meet.
Her brother Anand Kumar was removed as the party vice-president with amended constitution saying that no member of the BSP president could ever hold an important post in the organisation or contest assembly or Lok Sabha elections on the party symbol. Narendra Modi had launched a scathing attack on the Congress leadership during 2014 Lok Sabha elections.

BSP chief Mayawati at a public rally in Agra, Uttar Pradesh in February last year. (Photo: PTI)

BSP chief Mayawati and Congress leader Sonia Gandhi at HD Kumaraswamy’s oath taking ceremony in Bengaluru in May, 2018. (Photo: PTI)
Will Congress prefer Mayawati to Rahul Gandhi?
Post-poll alignment in Karnataka indicates that the Congress will not shy away from withdrawing its claim on the prime ministership in the event of a fractured mandate in 2019 should the BJP fails to get enough allies on board. Mayawati’s credential as a Dalit leader will only help the Congress to thump its chest in supporting the community cause.
The Congress already publicises its record to first making a Dalit as the chief of a national party (Damodaram Sanjivayya), appointing the first Dalit President of the country (KR Narayanan), giving the first Dalit woman Speaker of the Lok Sabha (Meira Kumar), the first Dalit home minister (Sushil Kumar Shinde) and also the first Dalit Chief Justice of India (Justice KG Balakrishnan). The Congress may boast of extending support to the first Dalit prime minister if needed in 2019.
This is massive turnaround in Mayawati’s political fortune since 2014 Lok Sabha elections especially after the stupendous electoral success of the BJP in Uttar Pradesh assembly polls in March last year. Mayawati’s BSP had drawn a naught in 2014 Lok Sabha elections and won less than 20 seats in UP Assembly polls last year - its worst performance since 1991.
Where does Mayawati get strength from?
Except the Northeast, Mayawati’s BSP today has recognisable support base in 18 states of the country. The elections in Uttar Pradesh and Karnataka have shown that Mayawati has a very high “vote transferability” to her alliance partners.
The assembly elections in three BJP-ruled states of Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh and Chhattisgarh will be a test for Mayawati and her prime ministerial ambitions. The BSP had polled about 3.5 per cent votes in Rajasthan, 6.3 per cent in Madhya Pradesh and 4.25 per cent in Chhattisgarh in 2013 assembly elections.

Congress leader Sonia Gandhi, BSP chief Mayawati, West Bengal Chief Minister and TMC chief Mamata Banerjee, Congress president Rahul Gandhi and Andhra Pradesh Chief Minister N Chandrababu Naidu in a show of Opposition strength during Karnataka Chief Minister HD Kumaraswamy’s oath taking ceremony in Bengaluru in May, 2018. (Photo: PTI)
Dalits constitute over 17 per cent of population in Rajasthan, more than 15 per cent in Madhya Pradesh and nearly 12 per cent in Chhattisgarh. These three states have a total of 65 Lok Sabha seats.
With a host of Dalit leaders having joined the BJP before and after 2014 elections, Mayawati stakes claim as the sole voice of the community. After Karnataka, she aims to cash in on pro-Dalit anti-Modi sentiment to resurrect her dwindling political capital.
Taking her chances to become the first Dalit prime minister in 2019 seriously, Mayawati has started shielding herself from possible attacks from the BJP and Modi during election time. She got the BSP constitution amended at the national executive meet.
Her brother Anand Kumar was removed as the party vice-president with amended constitution saying that no member of the BSP president could ever hold an important post in the organisation or contest assembly or Lok Sabha elections on the party symbol. Narendra Modi had launched a scathing attack on the Congress leadership during 2014 Lok Sabha elections.

Congress leader Sonia Gandhi, BSP chief Mayawati, West Bengal Chief Minister and TMC chief Mamata Banerjee, Congress president Rahul Gandhi and Andhra Pradesh Chief Minister N Chandrababu Naidu in a show of Opposition strength during Karnataka Chief Minister HD Kumaraswamy’s oath taking ceremony in Bengaluru in May, 2018. (Photo: PTI)

BSP chief Mayawati and Congress leader Sonia Gandhi at HD Kumaraswamy’s oath taking ceremony in Bengaluru in May, 2018. (Photo: PTI)

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