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2741 Tue 11 Sep 2018 LESSON (84) Tue 11Sep 2007 Do Good Be Mindful - Awakened One with Awareness (AOA) TIPITAKA
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2741 Tue 11 Sep 2018 LESSON (84) Tue 11Sep 2007 Do Good Be Mindful - Awakened One with Awareness (AOA) TIPITAKA

http://vipassana24.com/treasury-of-truth-illustrated-dhammapada/

http://vipassana24.com/

NOVEMBER 14, 2017 BY BEHAPPY
Treasury of Truth: Illustrated Dhammapada
Treasury of Truth

Illustrated Dhammapada

Ven . Weragoda Sarada Maha Thero

Verse 1. Suffering Follows The Evil-Doer

Verse 2. Happiness Follows The Doer of Good

Verse 3. Uncontrolled Hatred Leads to Harm

Verse 4. Overcoming Anger

Verse 5. Hatred is Overcome Only by Non-hatred

Verse 6. Recollection of Death Brings Peace

Verse 7. Laziness Defeats Spirituality

Verse 8. Spiritual Strength is Undefeatable

Verse 9. Those Who Do Not Deserve the Stained Robe

Verse 10. The Virtuous Deserve the Stained Robe

Verse 11. False Values Bar Spiritual Progress

Verse 12. Truth Enlightens

Verse 13. Lust Penetrates Untrained Mind

Verse 14. The Disciplined Mind Keeps Lust Away

Verse 15. Sorrow Springs From Evil Deeds

Verse 16. Good Deeds Bring Happiness

Verse 17. Evil Action Leads to Torment

Verse 18. Virtuous Deeds Make One Rejoice

Verse 19. Fruits of Religious Life Through Practice

Verse 20. Practice Ensures Fulfilment

Verse 21. Freedom Is Difficult

Verse 22. Freedom Is Difficult

Verse 23. Freedom Is Difficult

Verse 24. Glory Of The Mindful Increase

Verse 25. Island Against Floods

Verse 26. Treasured Mindfulness

Verse 27. Meditation Leads To Bliss

Verse 28. The Sorrowless View The World

Verse 29. The Mindful One Is Way Ahead Of Others

Verse 30. Mindfulness Made Him Chief Of Gods

Verse 31. The Heedful Advance

Verse 32. The Heedful Advances To Nibbana

Verse 33. The Wise Person Straightens The Mind

Verse 34. The Fluttering Mind

Verse 35. Restrained Mind Leads To Happiness

Verse 36. Protected Mind Leads To Happiness

Verse 37. Death’s Snare Can Be Broken By Tamed Mind

Verse 38. Wisdom Does Not Grow If the Mind Wavers

Verse 39. The Wide-Awake Is Unfrightened

Verse 40. Weapons To Defeat Death

Verse 41. Without The Mind, Body Is Worthless

Verse 42. All Wrong Issue Out Of Evil Mind

Verse 43. Well-Trained Mind Excels People

Verse 44. The Garland-Maker

Verse 45. The Seeker Understands

Verse 46. Who Conquers Death

Verse 47. Pleasure Seeker Is Swept Away

Verse 48. Attachment To Senses If Folly

Verse 49. The Monk In The Village

Verse 50. Look Inwards And Not At Others

Verse 51. Good Words Attract Only Those Who Practice

Verse 52. Good Words Profit Only Those Who Practise

Verse 53. Those Born Into This World Must Acquire Much Merit

Verse 54. Fragrance of Virtue Spreads Everywhere

Verse 55. Fragrance Of Virtue Is The Sweetest Smell

Verse 56. Fragrance Of Virtue Wafts To Heaven

Verse 57. Death Cannot Trace The Path Of Arahats

Verse 58. Lotus Is Attractive Though In A Garbage Heap

Verse 59. Arahats Shine Wherever They Are

Verse 60. Samsara Is Long To The Ignorant

Verse 61. Do Not Associate With The Ignorant

Verse 62. Ignorance Brings Suffering

Verse 63. Know Reality Be Wise

Verse 64. The Ignorant Cannot Benefit From The Wise

Verse 65. Profit From The Wise

Verse 66. A Sinner Is One’s Own Foe

Verse 67. Do What Brings Happiness

Verse 68. Happiness Results From Good Deeds

Verse 69. Sin Yields Bitter Results

Verse 70. The Unconditioned Is The Highest Achievement

Verse 71. Sin Is Like Sparks Of Fire Hidden In Ashes

Verse 72. The Knowledge Of The Wicked Splits His Head

Verse 73. Desire For Pre-Eminence

Verse 74. The Ignorant are Ego-Centred

Verse 75. Path To Liberation

Verse 76. Treasure The Advice Of The Wise

Verse 77. The Virtuous Cherish Good Advice

Verse 78. In The Company Of The Virtuous

Verse 79. Living Happily In The Dhamma

Verse 80. The Wise Control Themselves

Verse 81. The Wise Are Steadfast

Verse 82. The Wise Are Happy

Verse 83. The Wise Are Tranquil

Verse 84. The Wise Live Correctly

Verse 85. A Few Reach The Other Shore

Verse 86. Those Who Follow The Dhamma Are Liberated

Verse 87. Liberation Through Discipline

Verse 88. Purify Your mind

Verse 89. Arahats Are Beyond Worldliness

Verse 90. Passion’s Fever Gone

Verse 91. Saints Are Non-Attached

Verse 92. Blameless Is The Nature Of Saints

Verse 93. Arahat’s State Cannot Be Traced

Verse 94. The Gods Adore Arahats

Verse 95. Arahats Are Noble

Verse 96. The Tranquillity Of The Saints

Verse 97. Exalted Are The Unblemished

Verse 98. Dwelling Of The Unblemished Is Alluring

Verse 99. The Passionless Delight In Forests

Verse 100. One Pacifying Word Is Noble

Verse 101. One Useful Verse Is Better Than A Thousand Useless Verses

Verse 102. A Dhamma-Word Is Noble

Verse 103. Self-Conquest Is The Highest Victory

Verse 104. Victory Over Oneself Is Unequalled

Verse 105. Victory Over Self Cannot Be Undone

Verse 106. The Greatest Offering

Verse 107. Even Brief Adoration Of An Arahat Is Fruitful

Verse 108. Worshipping An Unblemished Individual Is Noble

Verse 109. Saluting Venerables Yields Four Benefits

Verse 110. Virtuous Life Is Noble

Verse 111. A Wise One’s Life Is Great

Verse 112. The Person Of Effort Is Worthy

Verse 113. Who Knows Reality Is Great

Verse 114. The Seer Of The Deathless Is A Worthy One

Verse 115. Life Of One Who Knows The Teaching is Noble

Verse 116. Never Hesitate To Do Good

Verse 117. Do No Evil Again And Again

Verse 118. Accumulated Merit Leads To Happiness

Verse 119. Evil Seems Sweet Until It Ripens

Verse 120. Good May Seem Bad Until Good Mature

Verse 121. Take Not Evil Lightly

Verse 122. Merit Grows Little By Little

Verse 123. Shun Evil As Poison

Verse 124. Evil Results From Bad Intentions

Verse 125. Wrong Done To Others Returns To Doer

Verse 126. Those Who Pass Away

Verse 127. Shelter Against Death

Verse 128. No Escape From Death

Verse 129. Of Others Think Of As Your Own Self

Verse 130. To All Life Is Dear

Verse 131. Those Who Do Not Receive Happiness

Verse 132. Those Who Do Not Receive Happiness

Verse 133. Retaliation Brings Unhappiness

Verse 134. Tranquillity Should Be Preserved

Verse 135. Decay And Death Terminate Life

Verse 136. Results Of Evil Torment The Ignorant

Verse 137. The Evil Results of Hurting The Pious

Verse 138. Evil Results Of Hurting Harmless Saints

Verse 139. Harming The Holy Is Disastrous

Verse 140. Woeful States In The Wake Of Evil Doing

Verse 141. Practices That Will Not Lead To Purity

Verse 142. Costumes Do Not Mar Virtue

Verse 143. Avoid Evil Through Shame

Verse 144. Effort Is Necessary To Avoid Suffering

Verse 145. Those Who Restrain Their Own Mind

Verse 146. One Pacifying Word Is Noble

Verse 147. Behold The True Nature Of The Body

Verse 148. Life Ends In Death

Verse 149. A Sight That Stops Desire

Verse 150. The Body Is A City Of Bones

Verse 151. Buddha’s Teaching Never Decays

Verse 152. Body Fattens – Mind Does Not

Verse 153. Seeing The Builder of The House

Verse 154. Thy Building Material Is Broken

Verse 155. Regrets In Old Age

Verse 156. Nostalgia For Past Glory

Verse 157. Safeguard Your Own Self

Verse 158. Giver Advice While Being Virtuous Yourself

Verse 159. Discipline Yourself Before You Do Others

Verse 160. One Is One’s Best Saviour

Verse 161. The Unwise Person Comes To Grief On His Own

Verse 162. Evil Action Crushes The Doer

Verse 163. Doing Good Unto One’s Own Self Is Difficult

Verse 164. The Wicked Are Self-Destructive

Verse 165. Purity, Impurity Self-Created

Verse 166. Help Others – But Promote One’s Own Good

Verse 167. Do Not Cultivate The Worldly

Verse 168. The Righteous Are Happy – Here And Hereafter

Verse 169. Behave According To The Teaching

Verse 170. Observe The Impermanence Of Life

Verse 171. The Disciplined Are Not Attached To The Body

Verse 172. The Diligent Illumine The World

Verse 173. Evil Is Overcome By Good

Verse 174. Without Eye of Wisdom, This World Is Blind

Verse 175. The Wise Travel Beyond The Worldly

Verse 176. A Liar Can Commit Any Crime

Verse 177. Happiness Through Partaking In Good Deeds

Verse 178. Being Stream-Winner Is Supreme

Verse 179. The Buddha Cannot Be Tempted

Verse 180. The Buddha Cannot Be Brought Under Sway

Verse 181. Gods And Men Adore The Buddha

Verse 182. Four Rare Opportunities

Verse 183. The Instructions Of The Buddha

Verse 184. Patience Is A Great Ascetic Virtue

Verse 185. Noble Guidelines

Verse 186. Sensual Pleasures Never Satiated

Verse 187. Shun Worldly Pleasures

Verse 188. Fear Stricken Masses

Verse 189. Those Refuges Do Not Help

Verse 190. Seeing Four Noble Truths

Verse 191. The Noble Path

Verse 192. The Refuge That Ends All Suffering

Verse 193. Rare Indeed Is Buddha’s Arising

Verse 194. Four Factors of Happiness

Verse 195. Worship Those Who Deserve Adoration

Verse 196. Worship Brings Limitless Merit

Verse 197. Happiness

Verse 198. Without Sickness Among The Sick

Verse 199. Not Anxious Among The Anxious

Verse 200. Happily They Live – Undefiled

Verse 201. Happy About Both Victory And Defeat

Verse 202. Happiness Tranquilizes

Verse 203. Worst Disease And Greatest Happiness

Verse 204. Four Supreme Acquisitions

Verse 205. The Free Are The Purest

Verse 206. Pleasant Meetings

Verse 207. Happy Company

Verse 208. The Good And The Wise

Verse 209. Admiration of Self-Seekers

Verse 210. Not Seeing The Liked And Seeing The Unliked Are Both Painful

Verse 211. Not Bound By Ties Of Defilements

Verse 212. The Outcome Of Endearment

Verse 213. Sorrow And Fear Arise Due To Loved Ones

Verse 214. The Outcome Of Passion

Verse 215. The Outcome Of Lust

Verse 216. Sorrow And Fear Arise Due To Miserliness

Verse 217. Beloved Of The Masses

Verse 218. The Person With Higher Urges

Verse 219. The Fruits Of Good Action

Verse 220. Good Actions Lead To Good Results

Verse 221. He Who Is Not Assaulted By Sorrow

Verse 222. The Efficient Charioteer

Verse 223. Four Forms Of Victories

Verse 224. Three Factors Leading To Heaven

Verse 225. Those Harmless One Reach The Deathless

Verse 226. Yearning For Nibbana

Verse 227. There Is No One Who Is Not Blamed

Verse 228. No One Is Exclusively Blamed Or Praised

Verse 229. Person Who Is Always Praise-Worthy

Verse 230. Person Who Is Like Solid Gold

Verse 231. The Person Of Bodily Discipline

Verse 232. Virtuous Verbal Behaviour

Verse 233. Discipline Your Mind

Verse 234. Safeguard The Three Doors

Verse 235. Man At The Door Of Death

Verse 236. Get Immediate Help

Verse 237. In The Presence Of King Of Death

Verse 238. Avoid The Cycle Of Existence

Verse 239. Purify Yourself Gradually

Verse 240. One’s Evil Ruins One’s Own Self

Verse 241. Causes Of Stain

Verse 242. Ignorance Is The Greatest Taint

Verse 243. Ignorance The Worst Taint

Verse 244. The Shameless Life Is Easy

Verse 245. For A Modest Person Life Is Hard

Verse 246. Wrong Deeds To Avoid

Verse 247. Precepts The Lay Person Should Follow

Verse 248. These Precepts Prevent Suffering

Verse 249. The Envious Are Not At Peace

Verse 250. The Unenvious Are At Peace

Verse 251. Craving Is The Worst Flood

Verse 252. Easy To See Are The Faults Of Others

Verse 253. Seeing Others Faults

Verse 254. Nothing Is Eternal Other Than Nibbana

Verse 255. The Buddha Has No Anxiety

Verse 256. The Just And The Impartial Judge Best

Verse 257. Firmly Rooted In The Law

Verse 258. Who Speaks A Lot Is Not Necessarily Wise

Verse 259. Those Who Know Speak Little

Verse 260. Grey Hair Alone Does Not Make An Elder

Verse 261. The Person Full Of Effort Is The True Elder

Verse 262. Who Gives Up Jealousy Is Good-Natured

Verse 263. Who Uproots Evil Is The Virtuous One

Verse 264. Shaven Head Alone Does Not Make A Monk

Verse 265. Who Give Up Evil Is True Monk

Verse 266. One Is Not A Monk Merely By Begging Alms Food

Verse 267. The Holy Life Makes a Monk

Verse 268. Silence Alone Does Not Make A Sage

Verse 269. Only True Wisdom Makes a Sage

Verse 270. True Ariyas Are Harmless

Verse 271. A Monk Should Destroy All Passions

Verse 272. Blemishes Should Be Given Up To Reach Release

Verse 273. The Eight-fold Path Is Best

Verse 274. The Only Path To Purity

Verse 275. The Path To End Suffering

Verse 276. Buddhas Only Shows The Way

Verse 277. Conditioned Things Are Transient

Verse 278. All Component Things Are Sorrow

Verse 279. Everything Is Soul-less

Verse 280. The Lazy Miss The Path

Verse 281. Purify Your Thoughts, Words And Deeds

Verse 282. Way To Increase Wisdom

Verse 283. Shun Passion

Verse 284. Attachment To Women

Verse 285. Path To Peace

Verse 286. The Fear Of Death

Verse 287. Death Takes Away The Attached

Verse 288. No Protection When Needed

Verse 289. The Path To The Deathless

Verse 290. Give Up A Little, Achieve Much

Verse 291. When Anger Does Not Abate

Verse 292. How Blemishes Increase

Verse 293. Mindfulness Of Physical Reality

Verse 294. The Destroyer Who Reaches Nibbana

Verse 295. The ‘Killer’ Who Goes Free

Verse 296. Reflect On The Virtues Of The Buddha

Verse 297. Reflect On The Virtues Of The Dhamma

Verse 298. Reflect On The Virtues Of The Sangha

Verse 299. Reflect On The Real Nature of the Body

Verse 300. Reflect On Harmlessness

Verse 301. The Mind That Takes Delight in Meditation

Verse 302. Samsara – Journey

Verse 303. He Is Honoured Everywhere

Verse 304. The Virtuous Are Seen

Verse 305. Discipline Yourself In Solitude

Verse 306. Liars Suffer Tortures Of Hell

Verse 307. Evil Men Get Born In Bad States

Verse 308. Food Fit For Sinners

Verse 309. The Man Who Covets Another’s Wife

Verse 310. Shun Adultery

Verse 311. Wrong Monastic Life Leads To Bad States

Verse 312. Three Things That Will Not Yield Good Results

Verse 313. Do Merit With Commitment

Verse 314. Good Deeds Never Make You Repent

Verse 315. Guard The Mind

Verse 316. False Beliefs Lead To Hell

Verse 317. Fear And Fearlessness In Wrong Places

Verse 318. Right And Wrong

Verse 319. Right Understanding

Verse 320. The Buddha’s Endurance

Verse 321. The Disciplined Animal

Verse 322. The Most Disciplined Animal

Verse 323. The Right Vehicle To Nibbana

Verse 324. The Bound Elephant

Verse 325. The Slothful, Greedy Sleeper Returns to Samsara, Over and Over

Verse 326. Restrain Mind As A Mahout An Elephant In Rut

Verse 327. The Elephant Mired

Verse 328. Cherish The Company Of The Good

Verse 329. The Lonely Recluse

Verse 330. For The Solitary The Needs Are Few

Verse 331. The Blessed

Verse 332. Blessing To Be An Arahat

Verse 333. Four Forms Of Blessing

Verse 334. The Increase Of Craving

Verse 335. How Craving Increases

Verse 336. Escaping Craving

Verse 337. Uprooting Craving

Verse 338. Craving Uneradicated Brings Suffering Over and Over

Verse 339. Caught In The Currents Of Craving

Verse 340. The Creeper of Craving

Verse 341. Bliss Does Not Come Through Craving

Verse 342. The Bonds That Entrap Men

Verse 343. Nibbana By Shunning Craving

Verse 344. Freed From Craving Runs Back To Craving

Verse 345. Bonds Of Attachment

Verse 346. Bonds Are Strong, But The Wise Get Rid Of Them

Verse 347. Spider Web Of Passion

Verse 348. Reaching The Further Shore

Verse 349. Craving Tightens Bonds

Verse 350. He Cuts Off Bonds Of Mara

Verse 351. The Person Who Has Reached The Goal

Verse 352. The Man Of Great Wisdom

Verse 353. Buddha Is Teacherless

Verse 354. The Conquest Of All Suffering

Verse 355. Wealth Destroys The Ignorant

Verse 356. Those Without The Bane Of Passion

Verse 357. Those Without The Bane Of Ill-Will

Verse 358. Those Without The Bane Of Illusion

Verse 359. Those Without The Bane Of Greed

Verse 360. Sense Discipline

Verse 361. Suffering End With All-Round Discipline

Verse 362. The True Monk

Verse 363. The Ideal Monk

Verse 364. The Monk Abides in Dhamma

Verse 365. Accept What One Receives

Verse 366. The Gods Adore Virtuous Monks

Verse 367. He Is A Monk Who Has No Attachment

Verse 368. The Monk Who Radiates Loving-Kindness Radiates Peace

Verse 369. Give Up Lust And Hatred

Verse 370. Flood-Crosser Is One Who Has Giver Up The Fetters

Verse 371. Meditate Earnestly

Verse 372. There Is No Wisdom In Those Who Do Not Think

Verse 373. He Who Is Calm Experiences Transcendental Joy

Verse 374. He Is Happy Who Reflects On Rise And Fall

Verse 375. A Wise Monk Possess His Cardinal Virtues

Verse 376. A Monk Should Be Cordial In All His Ways

Verse 377. Cast Off Lust And Hatred

Verse 378. He Is Peaceful Who Is Free From All Worldly Things

Verse 379. He Who Guards Himself Lives Happily

Verse 380. Your Are Your Own Saviour

Verse 381. With Joy And Faith Try To Win Your Goal

Verse 382. Even A Young Monk, If Devoted, Can Illuminate The Whole World

Verse 383. Be A Knower Of The Deathless

Verse 384. Cultivate Concentration

Verse 385. The Unfettered Person Is A Brahmana

Verse 386. Who Is Contemplative And Pure Is A Brahmin

Verse 387. The Buddha Shines Day And Night

Verse 388. He Who Had Discarded All Evil Is Holy

Verse 389. Harm Not An Arahat

Verse 390. An Arahat Does Not Retaliate

Verse 391. The Well-Restrained Is Truly A Brahmin

Verse 392. Honour To Whom Honour Is Due

Verse 393. One Does Not Become A Brahmin Merely By Birth

Verse 394. Be Pure Within

Verse 395. Who Meditates Alone in the Forest Is A Brahmana

Verse 396. Non-Possessive And The Non-Attached Person Is A Brahmana

Verse 397. A Brahmana Is He Who Has Destroyed All Fetters

Verse 398. A Brahmana Is He Who Has No Hatred

Verse 399. A Brahmana Is He Who Is Patient

Verse 400. A Brahmana Is He Who Is Not Wrathful

Verse 401. He Is A Brahmana Who Clings Not To Sensual Pleasures

Verse 402. A Brahmana Is He Who Has Laid The Burden Aside

Verse 403. A Brahmana Is He Who Has Reached His Ultimate Goal

Verse 404. A Brahmana Is He Who Has No Intimacy With Any

Verse 405. A Brahmana Is He Who Is Absolutely Harmless

Verse 406. A Brahmana Is He Who Is Friendly Amongst The Hostile

Verse 407. A Brahmana Is He Who Has Discarded All Passions

Verse 408. A Brahmana Is He Who Gives Offence To None

Verse 409. A Brahmana Is He Who Steals Not

Verse 410. A Brahmana Is He Who Is Desireless

Verse 411. In Whom There Is No Clinging

Verse 412. Above Both Good And Evil

Verse 413. Learning The Charm

Verse 414. The Tranquil Person

Verse 415. Freed From Temptation

Verse 416. The Miracle Rings

Verse 417. Beyond All Bonds

Verse 418. The Person Whose Mind Is Cool

Verse 419. Diviner Of Rebirth

Verse 420. Destroy Unknown

Verse 421. He Yearns For Nothing

Verse 422. He Who Is Rid Of Defilements

Verse 423. The Giver And Receiver Of Alms

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Verse 423. The Giver And Receiver Of Alms
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Verse 420. Destroy Unknown
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Verse 417. Beyond All Bonds
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Verse 414. The Tranquil Person
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May all beings be happy

http://vipassana24.com/verse-33-the-wise-person-straightens-the-mind/

Verse 33. The Wise Person Straightens The Mind
Mind agitated, wavering,
hard to guard and hard to check,
one of wisdom renders straight
as arrow-maker a shaft.

Explanation: In the Dhammapada there are several references to the craftsmanship of the fletcher. The Buddha seems to have observed the process through which a fletcher transforms an ordinary stick into an efficient arrow-shaft. The disciplining of the mind is seen as being a parallel process. In this stanza the Buddha says that the wise one straightens and steadies the vacillating mind that is difficult to guard, like a fletcher straightening an arrow-shaft.

The Story of Venerable Meghiya (Verses 33 & 34)

While residing on the Calika Mountain, the Buddha spoke these verses, with reference to Venerable Meghiya.

Once, by reason of attachment to the three evil thoughts, lust, hatred, delusion, Venerable Meghiya was unable to practice Exertion in this mango-grove and returned to the Buddha. The Buddha said to him, “Meghiya, you committed a grievous fault. I asked you to remain, saying to you, ‘I am now alone, Meghiya. Just wait until some other monk appears’ But despite my request, you went your way. A monk should never leave me alone and go his way when I ask him to remain. A monk should never be controlled thus by his thoughts. As for thoughts, they are flighty, and a man ought always to keep them under his own control.”

At the conclusion of the stanzas Meghiya was established in the fruit of conversion and many other monks in the fruits of the second and third paths.

http://vipassana24.com/verse-34-the-fluttering-mind/

Verse 34. The Fluttering Mind As fish from watery home is drawn and cast upon the land, even so flounders this mind while Mara’s Realm abandoning. Explanation: When making an effort to abandon the realm of Mara (evil), the mind begins to quiver like a fish taken out of the water and thrown on land.http://vipassana24.com/verse-33-the-wise-person-straightens-the-mind/

Verse 35. Restrained Mind Leads To Happiness The mind is very hard to check and swift, it falls on what it wants. The training of the mind is good, a mind so tamed brings happiness. Explanation: The mind is exceedingly subtle and is difficult to be seen. It attaches on whatever target it wishes. The wise guard the mind. The guarded mind brings bliss.

http://vipassana24.com/verse-35-restrained-mind-leads-to-happiness/

The Story of a Certain Monk (Verse 35)

While residing at the Jetavana Monastery, the Buddha spoke this verse, with reference to a certain monk.

On one occasion, sixty monks, after obtaining a meditation topic from the Buddha, went to Matika village, at the foot of a mountain. There, Matikamata, mother of the village headman, offered them alms-food; she also built a monastery for them, so that they could stay in the village during the rainy season. One day she asked the group of monks to teach her the practice of meditation. They taught her how to meditate on the thirty-two constituents of the body leading to the awareness of the decay and dissolution of the body. Matikamata practiced with diligence and attained the three maggas (paths) and phalas (fruits) together with analytical insight and mundane supernormal powers, even before the monks did.

Rising from the bliss of the magga and phala she looked with the divine power of sight (dibbacakkhu) and saw that the monks had not attained any of the Maggas yet. She also learnt that those monks had enough potentiality for the attainment of arahatship, but they needed proper food. So, she prepared good, choice food for them. With proper food and right effort, the monks developed right concentration and eventually attained arahatship.

At the end of the rainy season, the monks returned to the Jetavana Monastery, where the Buddha was in residence.

They reported to the Buddha that all of them were in good health and in comfortable circumstances and that they did not have to worry about food. They also mentioned Matikamata, who was aware of their thought and prepared and offered them the very food they wished for.

A certain monk, hearing them talking about Matikamata, decided that he, too, would go to that village. So, taking one meditation topic from the Buddha he arrived at the village monastery. There, he found that everything he wished for was sent to him by Matikamata, the lay-devotee. When he wished her to come she personally came to the monastery, bringing along choice food with her. After taking the food, he asked her if she knew the thoughts of others, but she evaded his question and replied, “People who can read the thoughts of others behave in such and such a way” Then, the monk thought, “Should I, like an ordinary worldling, entertain any impure thoughts, she is sure to find out.” He therefore got scared of the lay-devotee and decided to return to the Jetavana Monastery. He told the Buddha that he could not stay in Matika village because he was afraid that the lay-devotee might detect impure thoughts in him. The Buddha then asked him to observe just one thing; that is, to control his mind. The Buddha also told the monk to return to Matika village monastery, and not to think of anything else, but the object of his meditation only. The monk went back. The lay-devotee offered him good food as she had done to others before, so that he might be able to practice meditation without worry. Within a short time, he, too, attained arahatship.

Commentary

dunniggahassa, yatthakamanipatino: hard to control; focusing upon wherever it likes and on whatever it wishes. These two are given as characteristics of the mind. The mind is so quick and swift it is so difficult to get hold of it. Because it is nimble no one can restrain it unless the person is exceptionally disciplined. The other quality of the mind referred to in this stanza is its capacity to alight on anything it wishes. This is also a characteristic of the mind making it extremely difficult to keep in check. Our emotions are impersonal processes. They are not what we do. That is why they are difficult to control. It is only by not identifying with them that they can be stopped. By identifying with them, we give them strength. By calm observation as they come and go, they cease. They cannot be stopped by fighting with them.

Thank you so much 🙏

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All the above information is very useful

Verse 36. Protected Mind Leads To Happiness The mind is very hard to see and find, it falls on what it wants. One who’s wise should guard the mind, a guarded mind brings happiness. Explanation: The mind moves about so fast it is difficult to get hold of it fully. It is swift. It has a way of focusing upon whatever it likes. It is good and of immense advantage to tame the mind. The tame mind brings bliss.

The Story of a Certain Disgruntled Monk (Verse 36)

While residing at the Jetavana Monastery, the Buddha spoke this verse, with reference to a young disgruntled monk who was the son of a banker.

While the Buddha was in residence at Savatthi, a certain banker’s son approached an elder who resorted to his house for alms and said to him, “Venerable, I desire to obtain release from suffering. Tell me some way by which I can obtain release from suffering” The elder replied, “Peace be unto you, brother. If you desire release from suffering, give alms-food, give fortnightly food, give lodging during the season of the rains, give bowls and robes and the other requisites. Divide your possessions into three parts: with one portion carry on your business; with another portion support son and wife; dispense the third portion in alms in the religion of the Buddha.”

“Very well, Venerable,” said the banker’s son, and did all in the prescribed order. Having done it, he returned to the elder and asked him, “Venerable, is there anything else I ought to do?” “Brother, take upon yourself the three refuges and the five precepts.” The banker’s son did so, and then asked whether there was anything else he ought to do. “Yes,” replied the elder, “Take upon yourself the ten precepts.” “Very well, Venerable,” said the banker’s son, and took upon himself the ten precepts. Because the banker’s son had in this manner performed works of merit, one after another, he came to be called Anupubba. Again he asked the elder, “Venerable, is there anything else I ought to do?” The elder replied, “Yes, become a monk.” The banker’s son immediately retired from the world and became a monk.

Now he had a teacher who was versed in the Abhid-hamma and a preceptor who was versed in the Vinaya. After he had made a full profession, whenever he approached his teacher, the latter repeated questions found in the Abhid-hamma, “In the religion of the Buddha it is lawful to do this, it is unlawful to do that.” And whenever he approached his preceptor, the latter repeated questions found in the Vinaya, “In the Religion of the Buddha it is lawful to do this, it is unlawful to do that; this is proper, this is improper.” After a time he thought to himself, “Oh what a wearisome task this is! I became a monk in order to obtain release from suffering, but here there is not even room for me to stretch out my hands. It is possible, however, to obtain release from suffering, even if one lives the householder’s. I should become a householder once more.”

The Buddha said, “Monk, are you discontented?” “Yes, Venerable, I became a monk in order to obtain release from suffering. But here there is not even room for me to stretch my hands. It is possible for me to obtain release from suffering as a householder.” The Buddha said, “Monk, if you can guard one thing, it will not be necessary for you to guard the rest.” “What is that, Venerable?” “Can you guard your thoughts?” “I can, Venerable.” “Then guard your thoughts alone.”

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Verse 37. Death’s Snare Can Be Broken By Tamed Mind Drifting far, straying all alone, formless, recumbent in a cave. They will be free from Mara’s bonds who restrain this mind. Explanation: The mind is capable of travelling vast distances – up or down, north or south, east or west – in any direction. It can travel to the past or the future. It roams about all alone. It is without any perceptible forms. If an individual were to restrain the mind fully, he will achieve freedom from the bonds of death

The Story of Monk Sangharakkhita (Verse 37)

While residing at the Jetavana Monastery, the Buddha spoke this verse, with reference to the nephew of the monk Sangharakkhita.

Once there lived in Savatthi a senior monk by the name of Sangharakkhita. When his sister gave birth to a son, she named the child after the monk and he came to be known as Sangharakkhita Bhagineyya. The nephew Sangharakkhita, in due course, was admitted into the Sangha. While the young monk was staying in a village monastery he was offered two sets of robes, and he intended to offer one to his uncle, monk Sangharakkhita. At the end of the rainy season he went to his uncle to pay respect to him and offered the robe to the monk. But, the uncle declined to accept the robe, saying that he had enough. Although he repeated his request, the monk would not accept it. The young monk felt disheartened and thought that since his uncle was so unwilling to share the requisites with him, it would be better for him to leave the Sangha and live the life of a layman.

From that point, his mind wandered and a train of thoughts followed. He thought that after leaving the Sangha he would sell the robe and buy a she-goat; that the she-goat would breed quickly and soon he would make enough money to enable him to marry; his wife would give birth to a son. He would take his wife and child in a small cart to visit his

uncle at the monastery. On the way, he would say that he would carry the child; she would tell him to drive the cart and not to bother about the child. He would insist and grab the child from her; between them the child would fall on the cart-track and the wheel would pass over the child. He would get so furious with his wife that he would strike her with the goading-stick.

At that time he was fanning the monk with a palmyrah fan and he absent-mindedly struck the head of the monk with the fan. The monk, knowing the thoughts of the young monk, said, ” You were unable to beat your wife; why have you beaten an old monk?” Young Sangharakkhita was very much surprised and embarrassed at the words of the old monk; he also became extremely frightened. So he fled. Young monks and novices of the monastery chased after him, caught him, and finally brought him to the presence of the Buddha.

When told about the experience, the Buddha said that the mind has the ability to think of an object even though it might be far away, and that one should strive hard for liberation from the bondage of passion, ill will and ignorance. After the Buddha recited the stanza near the end of the discourse, the young monk attained sotapatti fruition.

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Verse 38. Wisdom Does Not Grow If the Mind Wavers One of unsteady mind, who doesn’t know True Dhamma, who is of wavering confidence wisdom fails to win. Explanation: If the mind of a person keeps on wavering, and if a person does not know the doctrine, if one’s enthusiasm keeps on fluctuating or flagging,, the wisdom of such a person does not grow.

The Story of Monk Cittahattha (Verses 38 & 39)

While residing at the Jetavana Monastery, the Buddha spoke these verses, with reference to the monk Cittahattha.

A certain youth of a respectable family, a herdsman, living at Savatthi, went into the forest to look for an ox that was lost. During midday, he saw the ox and released the herds, and being oppressed by hunger and thirst, he thought to himself, “1 can surely get something to eat from the noble monks” So he entered the monastery, went to the monks, bowed to them, and stood respectfully on one side. Now at that time the food which remained over and above to the monks who had eaten lay in the vessel used for refuse. When the monks saw that youth, exhausted by hunger as he was, they said to him, “Here is food; take and eat it.” (When a Buddha is living in the world, there is always a plentiful supply of rice-porridge, together with various sauces). So the youth took and ate as much food as he needed drank water, washed his hands, and then bowed to the monks and asked them, “Venerable, did you go to some house by invitation today?” “No, lay disciple; monks always receive food in this way.”

The youth thought to himself, “No matter how busy and active we may be, though we work continually both by night and by day, we never get rice-porridge so deliciously seasoned. But these monks, according to their own statement, eat it continually. Why should I remain a layman any longer? I will become a monk.” Accordingly he approached the monks and asked to be received into the Sangha. The monks said to him, “Very well, lay disciple” and received him into the Sangha. After making his full profession, he performed all the various major and minor duties; and in but a few days, sharing in the rich offerings which accrue in the Buddha’s Dispensation, he became fat and comfortable.

Then he thought to himself, “Why should I live on food obtained by making the alms-round? I will become a layman once more” So back he went and entered his house. After working in his house for only a few days, his body became thin and weak. Thereupon he said to himself, “Why should I endure this suffering any longer? I will become a monk.” So back he went and re-ordained. But after spending a few days as a monk, becoming discontented again, went back to lay-life.

“Why should I live the life of a layman any longer? I will become a monk.” So saying, he went to the monks, bowed, and asked to be received into the Sangha. Because he had been with them, the monks received him into the Sangha once more. In this manner he entered the Sangha and left it again six times in succession. The monks said to themselves, “This man lives under the sway of his thoughts.” So they gave him the name Thought-Controlled, elder Cittahattha.

As he was thus going back and forth, his wife became pregnant. The seventh time he returned from the forest with his farming implements he went to the house, put his implements away, and entered his own room, saying to himself, “I will put on my yellow robe again.” Now his wife happened to be in bed and asleep at the time. Her undergarment had fallen off, saliva was flowing from her mouth, she was snoring, her mouth was wide open; she appeared to him like a swollen corpse. Grasping the thought, “All that is in this world is transitory, is involved in suffering,” he said to himself, “To think that because of her, all the time I have been a monk, I have been unable to continue steadfast in the monastic life!” Straightaway, taking his yellow robe, he ran out of the house, binding the robe about his belly as he ran.

Now his mother-in-law lived in the same house with him. When she saw him departing in this way, she said to herself, “This renegade, who but this moment returned from the forest, is running from the house, binding his yellow robe about him as he runs, and is making for the monastery. What is the meaning of this?” Entering the house and seeing her daughter asleep, she knew at once, “It was because he saw her sleeping that he became disgusted, and went away.” So she shook her daughter and said to her, “Rise, your husband saw you asleep, became disgusted, and went away. He will not be your husband henceforth.” “Begone, mother. What does it matter whether he has gone or not? He will be back again in but a few days.”

As Cittahattha proceeded on his way, repeating the words, “All that is in this world is transitory, is involved in suffering,” he obtained the fruit of conversion (sotapatti phala). Continuing his journey, he went to the monks, bowed to them, and asked to be received into the Sangha. “No,” said the monks, “we cannot receive you into the Sangha. Why should you become a monk? Your head is like a grindstone.” “Venerable, receive me into the Sangha just this once.” Because he had helped them, they received him into the Sangha. After a few days he attained ara-hatship, together with the supernatural faculties.

Thereupon they said to him, “Brother Cittahattha, doubtless you alone will decide when it is time for you to go away again; you have remained here a long while this time.” “Venerables, when I was attached to the world, I went away; but now I have put away attachment to the world; I have no longer any desire to go away” The monks went to the Buddha and said, “Venerable, we said such and such to this monk, and he said such and such to us in reply. He utters falsehood, says what is not true” The Buddha replied, “Yes, monks, when my son’s mind was unsteady, when he knew not the good law, then he went and came. But now he has renounced both good and evil.”

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Verse 39. The Wide-Awake Is Unfrightened One of unflooded mind, a mind that is not battered, abandoning evil, merit too, no fear for One Awake. Explanation: For the person who’s mind is not dampened by passion, unaffected by ill-will and who has risen above both good and evil, there is no fear because he is wide-awake. The Story of Monk Cittahattha (Verses 38 & 39)

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Verse 40. Weapons To Defeat Death Having known this urn-like body, made firm this mind as fortress town, with wisdom-weapon one fights Mara while guarding booty, unattached. Explanation: It is realistic to think of the body as vulnerable, fragile, frail and easily disintegrated. In fact, one must consider it as a clay vessel. The mind should be thought of as a city. One has to be perpetually mindful to protect the city. Forces of evil have to be fought with the weapons of wisdom. After the battle, once you have achieve victory, live without being attached to the mortal self.

The Story of Five Hundred Monks (Verse 40)

While residing at the Jetavana Monastery, the Buddha spoke this verse, with reference to five hundred monks.

Five hundred monks from Savatthi, after obtaining a meditation topic from the Buddha, travelled for a distance of one hundred leagues away from Savatthi and came to a large forest grove, a suitable place for meditation practice. The guardian spirits of the trees dwelling in that forest thought that if those monks were staying in the forest, it would not be proper for them to live with their families.

They descended from the trees, thinking that the monks would stop there only for one night. But the monks were still there at the end of a fortnight; then it occurred to them that the monks might be staying there till the end of the vassa. In that case, they and their families would have to be living on the ground for a long time. So, they decided to frighten away the monks, by making ghostly sounds and frightful apparitions. They showed up with bodies without heads, and with heads without bodies. The monks were very upset and left the place and returned to the Buddha, to whom they related everything.

On hearing their account, the Buddha told them that this had happened because previously they went without any protection and that they should go back there armed with suitable protection. So saying, the Buddha taught them the protective discourse Metta Sutta at length (Loving-Kindness) beginning with the following stanza:

Karaniyamattha kusalena –

yam tarn santam padam abhisamecca

sakko uju ca suju ca –

suvaco c’assa mudu anatimani.

“He who is skilled in (acquiring)

what is good and beneficial,

(mundane as well as supramundane),

aspiring to attain perfect peace (Nibbana)

should act (thus):

He should be efficient, upright, perfectly upright,

compliant, gentle and free from conceit”

The monks were instructed to recite the sutta from the time they came to the outskirts of the forest grove and to enter the monastery reciting it. The monks returned to the forest grove and did as they were told.

The guardian spirits of the trees receiving loving-kindness from the monks reciprocated by welcoming them and not harming them. There were no more ghostly sounds and frightening sights. Thus left in peace, the monks meditated on the body and came to realize its fragile and impermanent nature.

From the Jetavana monastery, the Buddha, by his supernormal power, learned about the progress of the monks and sent forth his radiance making them feel his presence. To them he said, “Monks just as you have realized, the body is, indeed, impermanent and fragile like an earthen jar.”

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Verse 41. Without The Mind, Body Is Worthless Not long alas, and it will lie this body, here upon the earth. Discarded, void of consciousness, useless as a rotten log. Explanation: Soon, this body, without consciousness, discarded like a decayed worthless log, will lie on the earth.

The Story of Tissa, the Monk with a Stinking Body (Verse 41)

While residing at the Jetavana Monastery, the Buddha spoke this verse, with reference to the monk Tissa.

After taking a meditation topic from the Buddha, monk Tissa was diligently practicing meditation when he was afflicted with a disease. Small boils appeared all over his body and these developed into big sores. When these sores burst, his upper and lower robes became sticky and stained with body fluids, and his body was stinking. For this reason, he was known as Putigattatissa, Tissa the thera with a stinking body.

Now the Buddha never failed to survey the world twice a day. At dawn he surveyed the world, looking from the rim of the world towards the perfumed chamber. Now at this time the Venerable Putigatta Tissa appeared within the net of the Buddha’s sight.

The Buddha, knowing that the monk Tissa was ripe for arahatship, thought to himself, ‘This monk has been abandoned by his associates; at the present time he has no other refuge than me.” Accordingly the Buddha departed from the perfumed chamber, and pretending to be making the rounds of the monastery, went to the hall where the fire was kept. He washed the boiler, placed it on the brazier, waited in the fire-room for the water to boil, and when he knew it was hot, went and took hold of the end of the bed where that monk was lying.

At that time the monks said to the Buddha, ‘Tray depart, Venerable; we will carry him out for you’ So saying, they took up the bed and carried Tissa into the fire-room. The Buddha caused the monks to take Tissa’s upper garment, wash it thoroughly in hot water, and lay it in the sunshine to dry. Then he went, and taking his stand near Tissa, moistened his body with warm water and bathed him.

At the end of his bath his upper garment was dry. The Buddha caused him to be clothed in his upper garment and washed thoroughly his under garment in hot water and laid in the sun to dry. As soon as the water had evaporated from his body, his under garment was dry. Thereupon Tissa put on his under garment and, with body refreshed and mind tranquil, lay down on the bed. The Buddha took his stand at Tissa’s pillow and said to him, “Monk, consciousness will depart from you, your body will become useless and, like a log, will lie on the ground.” At the end of the discourse monk Tissa attained arahatship together with analytical insight, and soon passed away.

The Story of Tissa, the Monk with a Stinking Body (Verse 41)

While residing at the Jetavana Monastery, the Buddha spoke this verse, with reference to the monk Tissa.

After taking a meditation topic from the Buddha, monk Tissa was diligently practicing meditation when he was afflicted with a disease. Small boils appeared all over his body and these developed into big sores. When these sores burst, his upper and lower robes became sticky and stained with body fluids, and his body was stinking. For this reason, he was known as Putigattatissa, Tissa the thera with a stinking body.

Now the Buddha never failed to survey the world twice a day. At dawn he surveyed the world, looking from the rim of the world towards the perfumed chamber. Now at this time the Venerable Putigatta Tissa appeared within the net of the Buddha’s sight.

The Buddha, knowing that the monk Tissa was ripe for arahatship, thought to himself, ‘This monk has been abandoned by his associates; at the present time he has no other refuge than me.” Accordingly the Buddha departed from the perfumed chamber, and pretending to be making the rounds of the monastery, went to the hall where the fire was kept. He washed the boiler, placed it on the brazier, waited in the fire-room for the water to boil, and when he knew it was hot, went and took hold of the end of the bed where that monk was lying.

At that time the monks said to the Buddha, ‘Tray depart, Venerable; we will carry him out for you’ So saying, they took up the bed and carried Tissa into the fire-room. The Buddha caused the monks to take Tissa’s upper garment, wash it thoroughly in hot water, and lay it in the sunshine to dry. Then he went, and taking his stand near Tissa, moistened his body with warm water and bathed him.

At the end of his bath his upper garment was dry. The Buddha caused him to be clothed in his upper garment and washed thoroughly his under garment in hot water and laid in the sun to dry. As soon as the water had evaporated from his body, his under garment was dry. Thereupon Tissa put on his under garment and, with body refreshed and mind tranquil, lay down on the bed. The Buddha took his stand at Tissa’s pillow and said to him, “Monk, consciousness will depart from you, your body will become useless and, like a log, will lie on the ground.” At the end of the discourse monk Tissa attained arahatship together with analytical insight, and soon passed away.

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Verse 42. All Wrong Issue Out Of Evil Mind Whatever foe may do to foe, or haters those they hate the ill-directed mind indeed can do one greater harm. Explanation: When one bandit see another, he attacks the second bandit. In the same way, one person sees someone he hates, he also does harm to the hated person. But what the badly deployed mind does to the possessor of that mind is far worse than what a bandit would do to another bandit or what one hater will do to another hater.

The Story of Nanda, the Herdsman (Verse 42)

While on a visit to a village in the kingdom of Kosala, the Buddha spoke this verse, with reference to Nanda, the herdsman.

Nanda was a herdsman who looked after the cows of Anathapindika. Although only a herdsman, he had some means of his own. Occasionally, he would go to the house of Anathapindika and there he sometimes met the Buddha and listened to his discourses. Nanda requested the Buddha to pay a visit to his house. But the Buddha did not go to Nanda’s house immediately, saying that it was not yet time.

After some time, while travelling with his followers, the Buddha went off his route to visit Nanda, knowing that the time had come for Nanda to receive his teaching properly. Nanda respectfully received the Buddha and his followers; he served them milk and milk products and other choice foods for seven days. On the last day, after hearing the discourse given by the Buddha, Nanda attained sotapatti fruition. As the Buddha was leaving that day, Nanda carrying the bowl of the Buddha, followed him for some distance, paid obeisance and turned back to go home.

At that instant, a stray arrow shot by a hunter, killed him. Later the monks, who were following the Buddha, saw Nanda lying dead. They reported the matter to the Buddha, saying, “Venerable, because you came here, Nanda who made great offerings to you and accompanied you on your return was killed as he was turning back to go home.” To them, the Buddha replied, “Monks, whether I came here or not, there was no escape from death for him because of his previous kamma.”

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Verse 43. Well-Trained Mind Excels People What one’s mother, what one’s father, whatever other kin may do, the well directed mind indeed can do greater good. Explanation: Well directed thoughts can help a person better than one’s father or one’s mother.

The Story of Soreyya (Verse 43)

While residing at the Jetavana Monastery, the Buddha spoke this verse, with reference to Soreyya, the son of a rich man of the city of Soreyya. On one occasion, Soreyya accompanied by a friend and some attendants was going out in a carriage for a bath. At that moment, monk Mahakaccayana was adjusting his robes outside the city, as he was going into the city of Soreyya for alms-food. The youth Soreyya, seeing the youthful complexion of the monk, thought, “How I wish the monk were my wife, so that the complexion of my wife would be like his” As the wish arose in him, his sex changed and he became a woman. Very much ashamed, he got down from the carriage and ran away, taking the road to Taxila. His companions looked for him, but they could not find him.

Soreyya, now a woman, offered her signet ring to some people going to Taxila, to allow her to go with them in their carriage. Upon arrival at Taxila, her companions told a young rich man of Taxila about the lady who came along with them. The young rich man, finding her to be very beautiful and of a suitable age for him, married her. As a result of this marriage two sons were born; there were also two sons from the previous marriage of Soreyya as a man.

One day, a rich man’s son from the city of Soreyya came to Taxila with a caravan of five hundred carts. Lady Soreyya, recognizing him to be an old friend, sent for him. The man from Soreyya was surprised that he was invited, because he did not know the lady who invited him. He told the Lady Soreyya that he did not know her, and asked her whether she knew him.

She answered that she knew him and also enquired after the health of her family and other people in the city of Soreyya. The man from Soreyya next told her about the rich man’s son who disappeared mysteriously while going for a bath.

Then the Lady Soreyya revealed her identity and related all that had happened, about the wrongful thoughts with regard to monk Mahakaccayana, about the change of sex, and her marriage to the young rich man of Taxila. The man from the city of Soreyya then advised the Lady Soreyya to ask pardon from the monk. Monk Mahakaccayana was accordingly invited to the home of Soreyya and alms-food was offered to him. After the meal, the Lady Soreyya was brought to the presence of the monk, and the man from Soreyya told the monk that the lady was at one time the son of a rich man from Soreyya. He then explained to the monk how Soreyya was turned into a female on account of his wrongful thoughts towards the respected monk.

Lady Soreyya then respectfully asked pardon of Monk Mahakaccayana. The monk then said, “Get up, I forgive you” As soon as these words were spoken, the woman was changed back to a man. Soreyya then pondered how within a single existence and with a single body he had undergone change of sex and how sons were born to him. And feeling very weary and repulsive of all these things, he decided to leave the householder’s life and joined the sangha under the monk.

After that, he was often asked, “Whom do you love more, the two sons you had as a man or the other two you had as a woman?” To those, he would answer that his love for those borne as a woman was greater. This question was put to him so often, he felt very much annoyed and ashamed. So he stayed by himself and, with diligence, contemplated the decay and dissolution of the body. He soon attained arahatship together with the analytical insight. When the old question was next put to him he replied that he had no affection for any one in particular. Other monks hearing him thought he must be telling a lie. When it was reported about Soreyya giving a different answer, the Buddha said, “My son is not telling lies, he is speaking the truth.”

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