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Vipassana Fellowship Meditation Thursday 6-12-2018 - Markers and Retreats Book Contemplation - Day 69 Page Friday - Friends and The Raft
Filed under: General, Vinaya Pitaka, Sutta Pitaka, Abhidhamma Pitaka, Tipiṭaka, ಅಭಿಧಮ್ಮಪಿಟಕ, ವಿನಯಪಿಟಕ, ತಿಪಿಟಕ (ಮೂಲ)
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Vipassana Fellowship Meditation

https://course.org/campus/mod/book/view.php?id=210


Thursday - Markers and Retreats

1. Markers and Retreats

MARKERS AS AIDS TO PRACTICE


It
can be very easy to get into a habit of squeezing the amount of time
available for meditation into ever-reducing slots in the day. This
really has to be avoided.

Determine that whenever possible your
meditation sittings will take place at a regular time and for a set
duration. Look on this as a minimum rather than a maximum commitment.

Meditation is not a chore which we have to slog our way through. It is a
major part of the path we have chosen to tread. Nurture it with time.


Many
religions and philosophical systems advocate keeping one day in each
week as special. If we have been brought up in the West this is usually
Sunday (Muslims would observe Friday, Jewish people observe Saturday as
the Sabbath).

Buddhism too has stressed the importance of Observance
Days (uposatha, or poya) and they can be an enormous help in ensuring
that we take an extended time each week to rededicate ourselves to this
path.

Traditionally the 4 phases of the lunar cycle determine when these
days fall.

In practical terms it may be easier to use the normal
holiday in your country as an Observance Day if this means you would
have more time for meditation practice, and reading, hearing and
reflecting upon the Dhamma..

There are several sites on the Web which
post the dates of the actual uposatha days each year and these include
details of the major Buddhist festivals.


RETREATS


Formal
retreats are an effective and beautiful way of developing our
meditation practice and our knowledge of the Dhamma. In most countries
there are now opportunities to sit formal retreats with experienced
meditation teachers from the Theravada tradition.

These may often be
conducted by monks and nuns attached to particular monasteries or by lay
people. Retreats can last from a weekend to three months or more
depending on our needs and availability of time.

They are also an
opportunity to meet fellow meditators. There are several sites on the
internet which list retreats by reputable teachers, in the Buddhist
tradition, including:


http://www.dharmanet.org

https://dharmanet.org/



http://www.dharma.org











  • Our Schedules

    Retreat Center





  • Teachers






  • Teachers






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  • Forest Refuge






  • Open

    January 1 – 31, 2019

    Annie Nugent & Caroline Jones

    Teachers







  • Open

    February 1 – 28, 2019

    Marcia Rose & Winnie Nazarko

    Teachers




  • Your Retreat – What to Expect


    Learn more



    Dharma Talks and Meditations

    Talks on the
    practice of meditation are a vital aspect of the IMS retreat experience
    and help to bring alive the Buddha’s teachings of freedom. At the
    Retreat Center, teachers offer talks on a daily basis. At the Forest
    Refuge, talks usually take place twice a week.

    Filter audio results by type.

    October 31, 2018

    Marcia Rose: Bowing from Arctic Dreams by Barry Lopez



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    The spirit of generosity guides all aspects of IMS’s vision and operations

    Generosity is the first
    of the ten parami, or qualities of character, that the Buddha taught his
    students to cultivate. The practice of generosity develops
    lovingkindness and compassion, deepens awareness of our
    interconnectedness and encourages non-attachment.





    Support our teachers and our centers

    Donate Now

    Thank you for your kindness!


    Our Schedules

    Retreat Center





  • Teachers






  • Teachers






  • Teachers






  • Teachers




  • Forest Refuge






  • Open

    January 1 – 31, 2019

    Annie Nugent & Caroline Jones

    Teachers







  • Open

    February 1 – 28, 2019

    Marcia Rose & Winnie Nazarko

    Teachers




  • Your Retreat – What to Expect


    Learn more



    Dharma Talks and Meditations

    Talks on the
    practice of meditation are a vital aspect of the IMS retreat experience
    and help to bring alive the Buddha’s teachings of freedom. At the
    Retreat Center, teachers offer talks on a daily basis. At the Forest
    Refuge, talks usually take place twice a week.

    Filter audio results by type.

    October 31, 2018

    Marcia Rose: Bowing from Arctic Dreams by Barry Lopez



    % buffered00:00
    42:11

    Meet Our Teachers


    View All

    Image of the buddha

    The spirit of generosity guides all aspects of IMS’s vision and operations

    Generosity is the first
    of the ten parami, or qualities of character, that the Buddha taught his
    students to cultivate. The practice of generosity develops
    lovingkindness and compassion, deepens awareness of our
    interconnectedness and encourages non-attachment.





    Support our teachers and our centers

    Donate Now

    Thank you for your kindness!


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    The
    best way to choose a retreat (if a choice is available) is to ask
    others who have attended retreats with the particular teacher or
    organisation. If this is not possible then try to read material produced
    by the teacher or group.

    We all have different needs and various
    prejudices to overcome and the teacher who is ‘perfect’ for one person
    is not always what another is looking for.

    It is healthy to bear in mind
    that a retreat is an opportunity for us to do some serious work and not
    necessarily for wisdom to be imparted directly to us by the individual
    sitting at the front!

    Look upon the retreat leader as a kalyana mitta - a
    good friend - with the experience to answer some of our questions and
    give advice.

    Show them respect even if you disagree with their views.
    Always remember that the decisions we make about our practice must be
    our own.


    It
    is best to be cautious of organisations that forbid contact with other
    groups and teachers; teachers who claim to have a special or ‘purer’
    technique than others, and retreats that are inordinately expensive.


    If
    there are no opportunities to engage in a formal retreat at a
    meditation centre we can always make the effort to conduct our own
    retreat. This takes discipline but can be very effective. A typical
    schedule would look something like this:


    04.30-05.00 Wake up mindfully

    05.00-05-15 Chanting / homage

    05.15-06.15 Seated Meditation

    06.15-06.45 Morning Tea

    06.45-07.30 Mindful movement (exercise)

    07.30-08.00 Breakfast

    08.00-09.00 Mindful working (physical work)

    09.15-10.15 Seated Meditation

    10.15-11.15 Dhamma study (reading texts, taped talks)

    11.15-12.00 Meditation (sitting or walking)

    12.00-13.00 Lunch (mindful eating and preparation)

    13.00-14.00 Rest

    14.00-15.00 Seated Meditation

    15.00-15.15 Standing Meditation (Choiceless Awareness)

    15.15-16.00 Meditation (sitting or walking)

    16.00-17.00 Afternoon Tea/Being in Nature

    17.00-17.45 Seated Meditation

    17.45-18.15 Being in Nature

    18.15-18.45 Chanting/Puja

    18.45-19.30 Seated Meditation

    19.30-20.00 Drink

    20.00-21.00 Dhamma - reading, reflection


    Note
    that it is usual to take the Eight Precepts whilst on retreat and that
    most people would not eat after midday (unless they had a medical
    condition such as diabetes). We also absent ourselves as far as possible
    from our usual concerns with work and family responsibilities.

    This
    time is for concentrated meditation practice and Dhamma reflection.
    Peaceful conditions where interruptions will be minimised are
    advantageous. Any simple activities we choose to undertake are done
    mindfully.


    If
    you are unable to visit a retreat centre or do not feel able to
    structure your own retreat effectively then consider asking a teacher to
    run a retreat for you.

    If there are a small number of your friends who
    are beginning to practice meditation then there are teachers who would
    be willing to come to you. Ordinarily you would only need to cover their
    expenses.

    https://course.org/campus/mod/page/view.php?id=211


    Contemplation - Day 69


    407. From
    whom lust, hatred,


    pride
    and contempt have fallen;


    like
    a mustard seed from a needlepoint,


    him,
    I call a brahmin.



    408. Uttering
    words gentle,


    instructive,
    true,


    offensive
    to no one,


    him,
    I call a brahmin.



    409. Taking
    nothing in this world


    that
    is not given


    -
    long or short -


    -
    small or great -


    -
    good or bad -


    him,
    I call a brahmin.



    410. Without
    longings


    in
    this world or the next;


    desireless
    and freed,


    him,
    I call a brahmin.



    411. Without
    longings,


    by
    knowledge free from doubts,


    having
    plunged into the Deathless,


    him,
    I call a brahmin.



    412. Good
    and bad ties transcended


    -
    sorrowless, stainless, pure -


    him,
    I call a brahmin.



    413. Spotless
    as the moon


    -
    pure, serene, undisturbed -


    -
    craving for existence extinguished -


    him,
    I call a brahmin.



    414. Having
    passed beyond existence,


    this
    mire so perilous and delusive,


    Crossing
    and gone beyond


    -
    meditative, free from craving and doubt,


    clinging
    to nothing -


    attaining
    Nibbana,


    him,
    I call a brahmin.



    Last modified: Thursday, 12 January 2017, 7:16 pm





    LESSON 2828  Thu 6  Dec  2018 PRACTICE BUDDHA VACANA for PEACE (PBVP)



    Do Good Be Mindful



    People all over the world may
    practice Buddha Vacana the words of the Buddha from Tipitaka for
    Bahujan Hitaya Bahujan Sukhaya I.e., for the welfare, happiness and
    peace for all societies and to attain Eternal Bliss as
    Final Goal.

    Tipitaka

    01) Classical Magahi Magadhi,
    02) Classical Chandaso language,

    03) Classical Magadhi Prakrit

    04) Classical Pali

    05) Classical Hela Basa


    06) Classical Deva Nagari,
    07) Classical Cyrillic
    08) Classical Afrikaans– Klassieke Afrikaans

    09) Classical Albanian-Shqiptare klasike,
    10) Classical Amharic-አንጋፋዊ አማርኛ,
    11) Classical Arabic-اللغة العربية الفصحى
    12) Classical Armenian-դասական հայերեն,
    13) Classical Azerbaijani- Klassik Azərbaycan,

    14) Classical Basque- Euskal klasikoa,
    15) Classical Belarusian-Класічная беларуская,

    16) Classical Bengali-ক্লাসিক্যাল বাংলা,
    17) Classical  Bosnian-Klasični bosanski,

    18) Classical Bulgaria- Класически българск,

    19) Classical  Catalan-Català clàssic
    20) Classical Cebuano-Klase sa Sugbo,

    21) Classical Chichewa-Chikale cha Chichewa,

    22) Classical Chinese (Simplified)-古典中文(简体),

    23) Classical Chinese (Traditional)-古典中文(繁體),

    24) Classical Corsican-Corsa Corsicana,
    25) Classical  Croatian-Klasična hrvatska,

    26) Classical  Czech-Klasická čeština,

    27) Classical  Danish-Klassisk dansk,Klassisk dansk,
    28) Classical  Dutch- Klassiek Nederlands,
    29) Classical English,
    30) Classical Esperanto-Klasika Esperanto,

    31) Classical Estonian- klassikaline eesti keel,
    32) Classical Filipino,
    33) Classical Finnish- Klassinen suomalainen,

    34) Classical French- Français classique,

    35) Classical Frisian- Klassike Frysk,
    36) Classical Galician-Clásico galego,

    37) Classical Georgian-კლასიკური ქართული,

    38) Classical German- Klassisches Deutsch,
    39) Classical Greek-Κλασσικά Ελληνικά,
    40) Classical Gujarati-ક્લાસિકલ ગુજરાતી,
    41) Classical Haitian Creole-Klasik kreyòl,
    42) Classical Hausa-Hausa Hausa,
    43) Classical Hawaiian-Hawaiian Hawaiian,
    44) Classical Hebrew- עברית קלאסית
    45) Classical Hindi- शास्त्रीय हिंदी,
    46) Classical Hmong- Lus Hmoob,
    47) Classical Hungarian-Klasszikus magyar,

    48) Classical Icelandic-Klassísk íslensku,

    49) Classical Igbo,
    50) Classical Indonesian-Bahasa Indonesia Klasik,

    51) Classical Irish-Indinéisis Clasaiceach,
    52) Classical Italian-Italiano classico,
    53) Classical Japanese-古典的なイタリア語,

    54) Classical Javanese-Klasik Jawa,
    55) Classical Kannada- ಶಾಸ್ತ್ರೀಯ ಕನ್ನಡ,

    56) Classical Kazakh-Классикалық қазақ,

    57) Classical Khmer- ខ្មែរបុរាណ,
    58) Classical Korean-고전 한국어,

    59) Classical Kurdish (Kurmanji)-Kurdî (Kurmancî),

    60) Classical Kyrgyz-Классикалык Кыргыз,
    61) Classical Lao-ຄລາສສິກລາວ,
    62) Classical Latin-LXII) Classical Latin,

    63) Classical Latvian-Klasiskā latviešu valoda,

    64) Classical Lithuanian-Klasikinė lietuvių kalba,
    65) Classical Luxembourgish-Klassesch Lëtzebuergesch,

    66) Classical Macedonian-Класичен македонски,
    67) Classical Malagasy,
    68) Classical Malay-Melayu Klasik,

    69) Classical Malayalam-ക്ലാസിക്കൽ മലയാളം,

    70) Classical Maltese-Klassiku Malti,
    71) Classical Maori-Maori Maori,
    72) Classical Marathi-क्लासिकल माओरी,

    73) Classical Mongolian-Сонгодог Монгол,

    74) Classical Myanmar (Burmese)-Classical မြန်မာ (ဗမာ),

    75) Classical Nepali-शास्त्रीय म्यांमार (बर्मा),
    76) Classical Norwegian-Klassisk norsk,

    77) Classical Pashto- ټولګی پښتو
    78) Classical Persian-کلاسیک فارسی
    79) Classical Polish-Język klasyczny polski,
    80) Classical Portuguese-Português Clássico,
    81) Classical Punjabi-ਕਲਾਸੀਕਲ ਪੰਜਾਬੀ,
    82) Classical Romanian-Clasic românesc,
    83) Classical Russian-Классический русский,
    84) Classical Samoan-Samoan Samoa,
    85) Classical Scots Gaelic-Gàidhlig Albannach Clasaigeach,

    86) Classical Serbian-Класични српски,
    87) Classical Sesotho-Seserbia ea boholo-holo,

    88) Classical Shona-Shona Shona,
    89) Classical Sindhi,
    90) Classical Sinhala-සම්භාව්ය සිංහල,

    91) Classical Slovak-Klasický slovenský,

    92) Classical Slovenian-Klasična slovenska,

    93) Classical Somali-Soomaali qowmiyadeed,

    94) Classical Spanish-Español clásico,
    95) Classical Sundanese-Sunda Klasik,

    96) Classical Swahili,
    97) Classical Swedish-Klassisk svensk,

    98) Classical Tajik-тоҷикӣ классикӣ,
    99) Classical Tamil-பாரம்பரிய இசைத்தமிழ் செம்மொழி,

    100) Classical Telugu- క్లాసికల్ తెలుగు,
    101) Classical Thai-ภาษาไทยคลาสสิก,
    102) Classical Turkish-Klasik Türk,

    103) Classical Ukrainian-Класичний український,

    104) Classical Urdu- کلاسیکی اردو
    105) Classical Uzbek-Klassik o’zbek,
    106) Classical Vietnamese-Tiếng Việt cổ điển,

    107) Classical Welsh-Cymraeg Clasurol,
    108) Classical Xhosa-IsiXhosa zesiXhosa,

    109) Classical Yiddish- קלאסישע ייִדיש
    110) Classical Yoruba-Yoruba Yoruba,
    111) Classical Zulu-I-Classical Zulu






    SARVA SAMAJ MEDIA

    for
    WELFARE, HAPPINESS AND PEACE
    of
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    for
    WELFARE, HAPPINESS AND PEACE
    of
    ALL SOCIETIES


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