Analytic Insight Net - FREE Online Tipiṭaka Law Research & Practice University
in
 112 CLASSICAL LANGUAGES
Paṭisambhidā Jāla-Abaddha Paripanti Tipiṭaka nīti Anvesanā ca Paricaya Nikhilavijjālaya ca ñātibhūta Pavatti Nissāya 
http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org anto 112 Seṭṭhaganthāyatta Bhāsā
Categories:

Archives:
Meta:
October 2019
M T W T F S S
« Sep    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031  
09/19/19
LESSON 3126 Fri 20 Sep 2019 DO GOOD BE MINDFUL Propagate TIPITAKA BUDDHA AND HIS DHAMMA Suttas word by word and the Constitution of our Country - Complete Course on our Dhamma and Polity for the welfare, happiness and peace of all Awakened Aboriginal Societies and for their Eternal Bliss as Final Goal. When a just born baby is kept isolated without anyone communicating with the baby, after a few days it will speak and human natural (Prakrit) language known as Classical Magahi Magadhi/Classical Chandaso language/Magadhi Prakrit/Classical Hela Basa (Hela Language)/Classical Pali which are the same. Buddha spoke in Magadhi. All the 7111 languages and dialects are off shoot of Classical Magahi Magadhi. Hence all of them are Classical in nature (Prakrit) of Human Beings, just like all other living spieces have their own natural languages for communication. 111 languages are translated by https://translate.google.com *SMARANANJALI* We the president and members of Maha Bodhi Society, Bengaluru invite you with family and friends to share merits and participate in the programs marking the 6th death anniversary of our beloved and respected teacher Bada Bhanteji *Most Ven. Dr. Acharya Buddharakkhita* The founder-president of Maha Bodhi Society, Bengaluru and its sister organisations on *21st, 22nd and 23rd September 2019 (Saturday, Sunday and Monday)* Migajāla Sutta-Book Two, Part IV—Call from Home1. *Suddhodana and the Last Look*Buddha;s quotes in 98) Classical Tajik-тоҷикӣ классикӣ, Natural Human Languagre in12) դասական հայերեն-դասական հայերեն,
Filed under: General, Vinaya Pitaka, Sutta Pitaka, Abhidhamma Pitaka, Tipiṭaka, ಅಭಿಧಮ್ಮಪಿಟಕ, ವಿನಯಪಿಟಕ, ತಿಪಿಟಕ (ಮೂಲ)
Posted by: site admin @ 4:05 pm

LESSON 3126 Fri 20 Sep 2019
DO GOOD BE MINDFUL Propagate TIPITAKA BUDDHA AND HIS DHAMMA Suttas
word by word and the Constitution of our Country - Complete Course on
our Dhamma and Polity for the welfare, happiness and peace of all
Awakened Aboriginal Societies and for their Eternal Bliss as Final Goal.

When
a just born baby is kept isolated without anyone communicating with the
baby, after a few days it will speak and human natural (Prakrit)
language known as
Classical Magahi Magadhi/Classical Chandaso language/Magadhi Prakrit/Classical Hela Basa (Hela Language)/Classical Pali which are the same. Buddha spoke in Magadhi. All the 7111 languages and dialects are off shoot of Classical
Magahi Magadhi. Hence all of them are Classical in nature (Prakrit) of
Human Beings, just like all other living spieces have their own natural
languages for communication. 111 languages are translated by
https://translate.google.com


*SMARANANJALI*

We
the president and members of Maha Bodhi Society, Bengaluru invite you
with family and friends to share merits and participate in the programs
marking the 6th death anniversary of our beloved and respected teacher
Bada Bhanteji

*Most Ven. Dr. Acharya Buddharakkhita*



The founder-president of Maha Bodhi Society, Bengaluru and its sister organisations
on *21st, 22nd and 23rd September 2019 (Saturday, Sunday and Monday)*

Migajāla Sutta-Book Two, Part IV—Call
from Home
1. *Suddhodana and the Last Look*Buddha;s quotes in 98) Classical Tajik-тоҷикӣ классикӣ,

Natural Human Languagre in12) դասական հայերեն-դասական հայերեն,

http://www.buddha-vacana.org/sutta/majjhima/mn043.html


SN 35.64 (S iv 37)

Migajāla Sutta

{excerpt}


— For Migajāla —


Some neophytes (and we may often count ourselves among them)
sometimes want to believe that it is possible to delight in sensual
pleasures without giving rise to attachment nor suffering. The Buddha
teaches Migajāla that this is downright impossible.




Note: info·bubbles on every Pali word




Pāḷi



English




atha kho āyasmā migajālo yena bhagavā ten·upasaṅkami; upasaṅkamitvā bhagavantaṃ abhivādetvā ekam·antaṃ nisīdi. ekam·antaṃ nisinno kho āyasmā migajālo bhagavantaṃ etad·avoca:


Then the venerable Migajāla approached the Bhagavā; having approached
the Bhagavā, having paid homage to him, he sat down to one side. Sitting
to one side, Migajāla said to the Bhagavā:


sādhu me, bhante, bhagavā saṃkhittena dhammadesetu, yam·ahaṃ bhagavato dhammasutvā eko vūpakaṭṭho appamatto ātāpī pahitatto vihareyyanti.

It would be good, Bhante, if the Bhagavā would teach me the Dhamma in
brief, so that having heard the Dhamma from the Bhagavā, I may dwell by
myself, secluded, assiduous, zealous and resolute.


santi kho, migajāla, cakkhu·viññeyyā rūpā iṭṭhā kantā manāpā piya·rūpā kām·ūpasaṃhitā rajanīyā. tañ·ce bhikkhu abhinandati abhivadati ajjhosāya tiṭṭhati. tassa taṃ abhinandato abhivadato ajjhosāya tiṭṭhato uppajjati nandī. nandi·samudayā dukkha·samudayo, migajālā·ti vadāmi.

There are, Migajāla, forms cognizable by the eye which are pleasing,
enjoyable, charming, agreeable, connected with sensuality, enticing. And
a bhikkhu delights in them, welcomes them and clings to them. In one
who delights in them, welcomes them and clings to them, delight arises.
And I say, Migajāla: the arising of delight is the arising of suffering.

santi ca kho, migajāla, sota·viññeyyā saddā iṭṭhā kantā manāpā piya·rūpā kām·ūpasaṃhitā rajanīyā. tañ·ce bhikkhu abhinandati abhivadati ajjhosāya tiṭṭhati. tassa taṃ abhinandato abhivadato ajjhosāya tiṭṭhato uppajjati nandī. nandi·samudayā dukkha·samudayo, migajālā·ti vadāmi.


There are, Migajāla, sounds cognizable by the ear which are pleasing,
enjoyable, charming, agreeable, connected with sensuality, enticing. And
a bhikkhu delights in them, welcomes them and clings to them. In one
who delights in them, welcomes them and clings to them, delight arises.
And I say, Migajāla: the arising of delight is the arising of suffering.

santi ca kho, migajāla, ghāṇa·viññeyyā gandhā iṭṭhā kantā manāpā piya·rūpā kām·ūpasaṃhitā rajanīyā. tañ·ce bhikkhu abhinandati abhivadati ajjhosāya tiṭṭhati. tassa taṃ abhinandato abhivadato ajjhosāya tiṭṭhato uppajjati nandī. nandi·samudayā dukkha·samudayo, migajālā·ti vadāmi.


There are, Migajāla, odors cognizable by the nose which are pleasing,
enjoyable, charming, agreeable, connected with sensuality, enticing. And
a bhikkhu delights in them, welcomes them and clings to them. In one
who delights in them, welcomes them and clings to them, delight arises.
And I say, Migajāla: the arising of delight is the arising of suffering.

santi ca kho, migajāla, jivhā·viññeyyā rasā iṭṭhā kantā manāpā piya·rūpā kām·ūpasaṃhitā rajanīyā. tañ·ce bhikkhu abhinandati abhivadati ajjhosāya tiṭṭhati. tassa taṃ abhinandato abhivadato ajjhosāya tiṭṭhato uppajjati nandī. nandi·samudayā dukkha·samudayo, migajālā·ti vadāmi.


There are, Migajāla, tastes cognizable by the tongue which are pleasing,
enjoyable, charming, agreeable, connected with sensuality, enticing.
And a bhikkhu delights in them, welcomes them and clings to them. In one
who delights in them, welcomes them and clings to them, delight arises.
And I say, Migajāla: the arising of delight is the arising of
suffering.

santi ca kho, migajāla, kāya·viññeyyā phoṭṭhabbā iṭṭhā kantā manāpā piya·rūpā kām·ūpasaṃhitā rajanīyā. tañ·ce bhikkhu abhinandati abhivadati ajjhosāya tiṭṭhati. tassa taṃ abhinandato abhivadato ajjhosāya tiṭṭhato uppajjati nandī. nandi·samudayā dukkha·samudayo, migajālā·ti vadāmi.


There are, Migajāla, bodily phenomena cognizable by the body which are
pleasing, enjoyable, charming, agreeable, connected with sensuality,
enticing. And a bhikkhu delights in them, welcomes them and clings to
them. In one who delights in them, welcomes them and clings to them,
delight arises. And I say, Migajāla: the arising of delight is the
arising of suffering.

santi ca kho, migajāla, mano·viññeyyā dhammā iṭṭhā kantā manāpā piya·rūpā kām·ūpasaṃhitā rajanīyā. tañ·ce bhikkhu abhinandati abhivadati ajjhosāya tiṭṭhati. tassa taṃ abhinandato abhivadato ajjhosāya tiṭṭhato uppajjati nandī. nandi·samudayā dukkha·samudayo, migajālā·ti vadāmi.


There are, Migajāla, mental phenomena cognizable by the mind which are
pleasing, enjoyable, charming, agreeable, connected with sensuality,
enticing. And a bhikkhu delights in them, welcomes them and clings to
them. In one who delights in them, welcomes them and clings to them,
delight arises. And I say, Migajāla: the arising of delight is the
arising of suffering.

santi kho, migajāla, cakkhu·viññeyyā rūpā iṭṭhā kantā manāpā piya·rūpā kām·ūpasaṃhitā rajanīyā. tañ·ce bhikkhu n·ābhinandati n·ābhivadati n·ājjhosāya tiṭṭhati. tassa taṃ an·abhinandato an·abhivadato an·ajjhosāya tiṭṭhato nandī nirujjhati. nandi·nirodhā dukkha·nirodho, migajālā·ti vadāmi.


There are, Migajāla, forms cognizable by the eye which are pleasing,
enjoyable, charming, agreeable, connected with sensuality, enticing. And
a bhikkhu does not delight in them, welcome them nor cling to them. In
one who does not delight in them, welcome them nor cling to them,
delight ceases. And I say, Migajāla: the cessation of delight is the
cessation of suffering.

santi ca kho, migajāla, sota·viññeyyā saddā iṭṭhā kantā manāpā piya·rūpā kām·ūpasaṃhitā rajanīyā. tañ·ce bhikkhu n·ābhinandati n·ābhivadati n·ājjhosāya tiṭṭhati. tassa taṃ an·abhinandato an·abhivadato an·ajjhosāya tiṭṭhato nandī nirujjhati. nandi·nirodhā dukkha·nirodho, migajālā·ti vadāmi.


There are, Migajāla, sounds cognizable by the ear which are pleasing,
enjoyable, charming, agreeable, connected with sensuality, enticing. And
a bhikkhu does not delight in them, welcome them nor cling to them. In
one who does not delight in them, welcome them nor cling to them,
delight ceases. And I say, Migajāla: the cessation of delight is the
cessation of suffering.

santi ca kho, migajāla, ghāṇa·viññeyyā gandhā iṭṭhā kantā manāpā piya·rūpā kām·ūpasaṃhitā rajanīyā. tañ·ce bhikkhu n·ābhinandati n·ābhivadati n·ājjhosāya tiṭṭhati. tassa taṃ an·abhinandato an·abhivadato an·ajjhosāya tiṭṭhato nandī nirujjhati. nandi·nirodhā dukkha·nirodho, migajālā·ti vadāmi.


There are, Migajāla, odors cognizable by the nose which are pleasing,
enjoyable, charming, agreeable, connected with sensuality, enticing. And
a bhikkhu does not delight in them, welcome them nor cling to them. In
one who does not delight in them, welcome them nor cling to them,
delight ceases. And I say, Migajāla: the cessation of delight is the
cessation of suffering.

santi ca kho, migajāla, jivhā·viññeyyā rasā iṭṭhā kantā manāpā piya·rūpā kām·ūpasaṃhitā rajanīyā. tañ·ce bhikkhu n·ābhinandati n·ābhivadati n·ājjhosāya tiṭṭhati. tassa taṃ an·abhinandato an·abhivadato an·ajjhosāya tiṭṭhato nandī nirujjhati. nandi·nirodhā dukkha·nirodho, migajālā·ti vadāmi.


There are, Migajāla, tastes cognizable by the tongue which are pleasing,
enjoyable, charming, agreeable, connected with sensuality, enticing.
And a bhikkhu does not delight in them, welcome them nor cling to them.
In one who does not delight in them, welcome them nor cling to them,
delight ceases. And I say, Migajāla: the cessation of delight is the
cessation of suffering.

santi ca kho, migajāla, kāya·viññeyyā phoṭṭhabbā iṭṭhā kantā manāpā piya·rūpā kām·ūpasaṃhitā rajanīyā. tañ·ce bhikkhu n·ābhinandati n·ābhivadati n·ājjhosāya tiṭṭhati. tassa taṃ an·abhinandato an·abhivadato an·ajjhosāya tiṭṭhato nandī nirujjhati. nandi·nirodhā dukkha·nirodho, migajālā·ti vadāmi.


There are, Migajāla, bodily phenomena cognizable by the body which are
pleasing, enjoyable, charming, agreeable, connected with sensuality,
enticing. And a bhikkhu does not delight in them, welcome them nor cling
to them. In one who does not delight in them, welcome them nor cling to
them, delight ceases. And I say, Migajāla: the cessation of delight is
the cessation of suffering.

santi ca kho, migajāla, mano·viññeyyā dhammā iṭṭhā kantā manāpā piya·rūpā kām·ūpasaṃhitā rajanīyā. tañ·ce bhikkhu n·ābhinandati n·ābhivadati n·ājjhosāya tiṭṭhati. tassa taṃ an·abhinandato an·abhivadato an·ajjhosāya tiṭṭhato nandī nirujjhati. nandi·nirodhā dukkha·nirodho, migajālā·ti vadāmi.


There are, Migajāla, mental phenomena cognizable by the mind which are
pleasing, enjoyable, charming, agreeable, connected with sensuality,
enticing. And a bhikkhu does not delight in them, welcome them nor cling
to them. In one who does not delight in them, welcome them nor cling to
them, delight ceases. And I say, Migajāla: the cessation of delight is
the cessation of suffering.



(the last paragraph is the usual formula describing the attainment of arahantship)


பின்னர்
மரியாதைக்குரிய மிகாஜலா பகவையை அணுகினார்; பகவையை அணுகி, அவருக்கு மரியாதை
செலுத்தி, அவர் ஒரு பக்கம் அமர்ந்தார். ஒரு பக்கத்தில் உட்கார்ந்து,
மிகாஜலா பகவரிடம் கூறினார்:
- பக்தே, தர்மத்தை சுருக்கமாக எனக்குக்
கற்பித்தால் நல்லது, பாண்டே, அதனால் பகவாவிடமிருந்து தர்மத்தைக் கேட்டதால்,
நான் தனியாகவும், தனிமையாகவும், ஆர்வமாகவும், ஆர்வமாகவும், உறுதியுடனும்
வாழலாம்.
- மிகாஜாலா, கண்ணால் அறியக்கூடிய வடிவங்கள் உள்ளன, அவை
மகிழ்வளிக்கும், சுவாரஸ்யமானவை, அழகானவை, ஏற்றுக்கொள்ளக்கூடியவை,
சிற்றின்பத்துடன் இணைக்கப்பட்டவை, கவர்ந்திழுக்கின்றன. ஒரு பிக்கு
அவர்களில் மகிழ்ச்சி அடைகிறார், அவர்களை வரவேற்று அவர்களை
ஒட்டிக்கொள்கிறார். அவற்றில் மகிழ்ச்சி அடைந்து, அவர்களை வரவேற்று,
அவர்களுடன் ஒட்டிக்கொண்டிருக்கும் ஒருவருக்கு, மகிழ்ச்சி எழுகிறது. நான்
சொல்கிறேன், மிகாஜலா: மகிழ்ச்சியை எழுப்புவது துன்பத்தின் எழுச்சி.

மிகாஜாலா, காது மூலம் அறியக்கூடிய ஒலிகள் உள்ளன, அவை மகிழ்வளிக்கும்,
சுவாரஸ்யமானவை, அழகானவை, ஏற்றுக்கொள்ளக்கூடியவை, சிற்றின்பத்துடன்
இணைக்கப்பட்டவை, கவர்ந்திழுக்கின்றன. ஒரு பிக்கு அவர்களில் மகிழ்ச்சி
அடைகிறார், அவர்களை வரவேற்று அவர்களை ஒட்டிக்கொள்கிறார். அவற்றில்
மகிழ்ச்சி அடைந்து, அவர்களை வரவேற்று, அவர்களுடன் ஒட்டிக்கொண்டிருக்கும்
ஒருவருக்கு, மகிழ்ச்சி எழுகிறது. நான் சொல்கிறேன், மிகாஜலா: மகிழ்ச்சியை
எழுப்புவது துன்பத்தின் எழுச்சி.
மிகாஜாலா, மூக்கால் உணரக்கூடிய
நாற்றங்கள் உள்ளன, அவை மகிழ்வளிக்கும், சுவாரஸ்யமானவை, அழகானவை,
ஏற்றுக்கொள்ளக்கூடியவை, சிற்றின்பத்துடன் இணைக்கப்பட்டவை,
கவர்ந்திழுக்கின்றன. ஒரு பிக்கு அவர்களில் மகிழ்ச்சி அடைகிறார், அவர்களை
வரவேற்று அவர்களை ஒட்டிக்கொள்கிறார். அவற்றில் மகிழ்ச்சி அடைந்து, அவர்களை
வரவேற்று, அவர்களுடன் ஒட்டிக்கொண்டிருக்கும் ஒருவருக்கு, மகிழ்ச்சி
எழுகிறது. நான் சொல்கிறேன், மிகாஜலா: மகிழ்ச்சியை எழுப்புவது துன்பத்தின்
எழுச்சி.
மிகாஜலா, நாவால் அறியக்கூடிய சுவைகள் உள்ளன, அவை
மகிழ்வளிக்கும், சுவாரஸ்யமானவை, அழகானவை, ஏற்றுக்கொள்ளக்கூடியவை,
சிற்றின்பத்துடன் இணைக்கப்பட்டவை, கவர்ந்திழுக்கின்றன. ஒரு பிக்கு
அவர்களில் மகிழ்ச்சி அடைகிறார், அவர்களை வரவேற்று அவர்களை
ஒட்டிக்கொள்கிறார். அவற்றில் மகிழ்ச்சி அடைந்து, அவர்களை வரவேற்று,
அவர்களுடன் ஒட்டிக்கொண்டிருக்கும் ஒருவருக்கு, மகிழ்ச்சி எழுகிறது. நான்
சொல்கிறேன், மிகாஜலா: மகிழ்ச்சியை எழுப்புவது துன்பத்தின் எழுச்சி.

மிகாஜாலா, உடலால் அறியக்கூடிய உடல் நிகழ்வுகள் உள்ளன, அவை மகிழ்வளிக்கும்,
சுவாரஸ்யமானவை, அழகானவை, ஏற்றுக்கொள்ளக்கூடியவை, சிற்றின்பத்துடன்
இணைக்கப்பட்டவை, கவர்ந்திழுக்கின்றன. ஒரு பிக்கு அவர்களில் மகிழ்ச்சி
அடைகிறார், அவர்களை வரவேற்று அவர்களை ஒட்டிக்கொள்கிறார். அவற்றில்
மகிழ்ச்சி அடைந்து, அவர்களை வரவேற்று, அவர்களுடன் ஒட்டிக்கொண்டிருக்கும்
ஒருவருக்கு, மகிழ்ச்சி எழுகிறது. நான் சொல்கிறேன், மிகாஜலா: மகிழ்ச்சியை
எழுப்புவது துன்பத்தின் எழுச்சி.
மிகாஜாலா, மனதினால் உணரக்கூடிய மன
நிகழ்வுகள் உள்ளன, அவை மகிழ்வளிக்கும், சுவாரஸ்யமானவை, அழகானவை,
ஏற்றுக்கொள்ளக்கூடியவை, சிற்றின்பத்துடன் இணைக்கப்பட்டவை,
கவர்ந்திழுக்கின்றன. ஒரு பிக்கு அவர்களில் மகிழ்ச்சி அடைகிறார், அவர்களை
வரவேற்று அவர்களை ஒட்டிக்கொள்கிறார். அவற்றில் மகிழ்ச்சி அடைந்து, அவர்களை
வரவேற்று, அவர்களுடன் ஒட்டிக்கொண்டிருக்கும் ஒருவருக்கு, மகிழ்ச்சி
எழுகிறது. நான் சொல்கிறேன், மிகாஜலா: மகிழ்ச்சியை எழுப்புவது துன்பத்தின்
எழுச்சி.
மிகாஜலா, கண்ணால் அறியக்கூடிய வடிவங்கள் உள்ளன, அவை
மகிழ்வளிக்கும், சுவாரஸ்யமானவை, அழகானவை, ஏற்றுக்கொள்ளக்கூடியவை,
சிற்றின்பத்துடன் இணைக்கப்பட்டவை, கவர்ந்திழுக்கின்றன. ஒரு பிக்கு அவர்களை
மகிழ்விப்பதில்லை, அவர்களை வரவேற்பதில்லை, அவர்களுடன் ஒட்டிக்கொள்வதில்லை.
அவர்களை மகிழ்விக்காத, அவர்களை வரவேற்கவோ, ஒட்டிக்கொள்ளவோ ​​இல்லாத
ஒருவருக்கு, மகிழ்ச்சி நின்றுவிடும். நான் சொல்கிறேன், மிகாஜலா:
மகிழ்ச்சியை நிறுத்துவதே துன்பத்தை நிறுத்துவதாகும்.
மிகாஜாலா, காது
மூலம் அறியக்கூடிய ஒலிகள் உள்ளன, அவை மகிழ்வளிக்கும், சுவாரஸ்யமானவை,
அழகானவை, ஏற்றுக்கொள்ளக்கூடியவை, சிற்றின்பத்துடன் இணைக்கப்பட்டவை,
கவர்ந்திழுக்கின்றன. ஒரு பிக்கு அவர்களை மகிழ்விப்பதில்லை, அவர்களை
வரவேற்பதில்லை, அவர்களுடன் ஒட்டிக்கொள்வதில்லை. அவர்களை மகிழ்விக்காத,
அவர்களை வரவேற்கவோ, ஒட்டிக்கொள்ளவோ ​​இல்லாத ஒருவருக்கு, மகிழ்ச்சி
நின்றுவிடும். நான் சொல்கிறேன், மிகாஜலா: மகிழ்ச்சியை நிறுத்துவதே
துன்பத்தை நிறுத்துவதாகும்.
மிகாஜாலா, மூக்கால் உணரக்கூடிய நாற்றங்கள்
உள்ளன, அவை மகிழ்வளிக்கும், சுவாரஸ்யமானவை, அழகானவை,
ஏற்றுக்கொள்ளக்கூடியவை, சிற்றின்பத்துடன் இணைக்கப்பட்டவை,
கவர்ந்திழுக்கின்றன. ஒரு பிக்கு அவர்களை மகிழ்விப்பதில்லை, அவர்களை
வரவேற்பதில்லை, அவர்களுடன் ஒட்டிக்கொள்வதில்லை. அவர்களை மகிழ்விக்காத,
அவர்களை வரவேற்கவோ, ஒட்டிக்கொள்ளவோ ​​இல்லாத ஒருவருக்கு, மகிழ்ச்சி
நின்றுவிடும். நான் சொல்கிறேன், மிகாஜலா: மகிழ்ச்சியை நிறுத்துவதே
துன்பத்தை நிறுத்துவதாகும்.
மிகாஜலா, நாவால் அறியக்கூடிய சுவைகள்
உள்ளன, அவை மகிழ்வளிக்கும், சுவாரஸ்யமானவை, அழகானவை,
ஏற்றுக்கொள்ளக்கூடியவை, சிற்றின்பத்துடன் இணைக்கப்பட்டவை,
கவர்ந்திழுக்கின்றன. ஒரு பிக்கு அவர்களை மகிழ்விப்பதில்லை, அவர்களை
வரவேற்பதில்லை, அவர்களுடன் ஒட்டிக்கொள்வதில்லை. அவர்களை மகிழ்விக்காத,
அவர்களை வரவேற்கவோ, ஒட்டிக்கொள்ளவோ ​​இல்லாத ஒருவருக்கு, மகிழ்ச்சி
நின்றுவிடும். நான் சொல்கிறேன், மிகாஜலா: மகிழ்ச்சியை நிறுத்துவதே
துன்பத்தை நிறுத்துவதாகும்.
மிகாஜாலா, உடலால் அறியக்கூடிய உடல்
நிகழ்வுகள் உள்ளன, அவை மகிழ்வளிக்கும், சுவாரஸ்யமானவை, அழகானவை,
ஏற்றுக்கொள்ளக்கூடியவை, சிற்றின்பத்துடன் இணைக்கப்பட்டவை,
கவர்ந்திழுக்கின்றன. ஒரு பிக்கு அவர்களை மகிழ்விப்பதில்லை, அவர்களை
வரவேற்பதில்லை, அவர்களுடன் ஒட்டிக்கொள்வதில்லை. அவர்களை மகிழ்விக்காத,
அவர்களை வரவேற்கவோ, ஒட்டிக்கொள்ளவோ ​​இல்லாத ஒருவருக்கு, மகிழ்ச்சி
நின்றுவிடும். நான் சொல்கிறேன், மிகாஜலா: மகிழ்ச்சியை நிறுத்துவதே
துன்பத்தை நிறுத்துவதாகும்.
மிகாஜாலா, மனதினால் உணரக்கூடிய மன
நிகழ்வுகள் உள்ளன, அவை மகிழ்வளிக்கும், சுவாரஸ்யமானவை, அழகானவை,
ஏற்றுக்கொள்ளக்கூடியவை, சிற்றின்பத்துடன் இணைக்கப்பட்டவை,
கவர்ந்திழுக்கின்றன. ஒரு பிக்கு அவர்களை மகிழ்விப்பதில்லை, அவர்களை
வரவேற்பதில்லை, அவர்களுடன் ஒட்டிக்கொள்வதில்லை. அவர்களை மகிழ்விக்காத,
அவர்களை வரவேற்கவோ, ஒட்டிக்கொள்ளவோ ​​இல்லாத ஒருவருக்கு, மகிழ்ச்சி
நின்றுவிடும். நான் சொல்கிறேன், மிகாஜலா: மகிழ்ச்சியை நிறுத்துவதே
துன்பத்தை நிறுத்துவதாகும்.


buddha-vacana.org
Some
neophytes (and we may often count ourselves among them) sometimes want
to believe that it is possible to delight in sensual pleasures without
giving rise to attachment nor suffering. The Buddha teaches Migajāla
that this is downright impossible.
Book Two, Part IV—Call
from Home

1. *Suddhodana and the Last Look*
– 2. *Meeting Yeshodhara and Rahula* — 3.
*Reception by the Sakyas* — 4. *Last
attempt to make Him a Householder
* — 5. *The
Buddha’s answer
* — 6. *The Minister’s reply*
– 7. *The Buddha’s Determination*


 



§ 1. Suddhodana and the Last Look

    1. After the conversion of Sariputta and Moggallana,
the Lord stayed in Rajagraha for two months.

    2. Having heard that the Lord was residing at Rajagraha,
Suddhodana, his father, sent word to him saying, “I wish to see my son
before I die. Others have had the benefit of his doctrine, but not his
father nor his relatives.”

    3. The man with whom the message was sent was Kaludayin,
the son of one of the courtiers of Suddhodana.

    4. And the messenger, on arrival, said, “O world-honoured
Tathagata, your father looks for your coming, as the lily longs for the
rising of the sun.”

    5. The Blessed One consented to the request of his
father and set out on the journey to his father’s house, accompanied by
a large number of his disciples.

    6. The Lord journeyed by slow stages. But Kaludayin
went ahead of him to inform Suddodhana that the Blessed One was coming
and was on his way.

    7. Soon the tidings spread in the Sakya country.
“Prince Siddharth, who wandered forth from home into homelessness to obtain
enlightenment, having attained his purpose, is coming home to Kapilavatsu.”
This was on the lips of every one.

    8. Suddhodana and Mahaprajapati went out with their
relatives and ministers to meet their son. When they saw their son from
afar, they were struck with his beauty and dignity and his lustre and they
rejoiced in their heart, but they could find no words to utter.

    9. This indeed was their so ; these were the features
of Siddharth! How near was the great Samana to their heart, and yet what
a distance lay between them! That noble muni was no longer Siddharth their
son; he was now the Buddha, the Blessed One, the Holy One, Lord of Truth
and Teacher of Mankind!

    10. Suddhodana, considering the religious dignity
of their son, descended from the chariot; and having saluted him first,
said, “It is now seven years since  we saw you. How we have longed
for this moment.”

    11. Then the Buddha took a seat opposite his father,
and the king eagerly gazed at his son. He longed to call him by his name
but he dared not. “Siddharth,” he exclaimed silently in his heart, “Siddharth,
come back to your old father and be his son again.” But seeing the determination
of his son, he suppressed his sentiments. Desolation overcame him and Mahaprajapati.

    12. Thus the father sat face to face with his son,
rejoicing in his sadness and sad in his rejoicing. Well may he be proud
of his son, but his pride broke down at the idea that his great son would
never be his heir.

    13. “I would offer thee my kingdom,” said the king, 
but if I did, thou would[st] account it but as ashes.”

    14. And the Lord said, “I know that the king’s heart
is full of love, and that for his son’s sake he feels deep grief. But let
the ties of love that bind you to the son whom you lost, embrace with equal
kindness all your fellow-beings, and you will receive in his place a greater
one than your son Siddharth; you will receive one who is the teacher of
truth, the preacher of righteousness; and the bringer of peace and of Nirvana
will enter into your heart.”

    15. Suddhodana trembled with joy when he heard the
melodious words of his son, the Buddha, and clasping his hands, exclaimed
with tears in his eyes, “Wonderful is the change! The overwhelming sorrow
has passed away. At first my sorrowing heart was heavy, but now I reap
the fruit of your great renunciation. It was right that moved by your mighty
sympathy, you should reject the pleasures of power and achieve your noble
purpose in religious devotion. Having found the path, you can now preach
your Dhamma to all that yearn for deliverance.”

    16. Suddhodana returned to his house, while the
Buddha remained in the grove with his companions.

    17. The next morning the Blessed Lord took his bowl
and set out to beg for his food in Kapilavatsu.

    18. And the news spread, “Siddharth is going from
house to house to receive alms, in the city where he used to ride in a
chariot attended by his retinue. His robe is like a red cloud, and he holds
in his hand an earthen bowl.”

    19. On hearing the strange rumour, Suddhodana went
forth in great hase and exclaimed, “Why do you disgrace me thus? Do you
not know that I can easily supply you and your Bhikkus with food?”

    20. And the Lord replied, “It is the custom of my
Order.”

    21. “But how can this be? You are not one of them
that ever begged for food.”

    22. “Yes, father,” rejoined the Lord, “You and your
race may claim descent from kings; my descent is from the Buddhas of old.
They begged their food, and always lived on alms.”

    23. Suddhodana made no reply, and the Blessed One
continued, “It is customary, when one has found a hidden treasure, for
him to make an offering of the most precious jewel to his father. Suffer
me, therefore, to offer you this treasure of mine which is the Dhamma.”

    24. And the Blessed Lord told his father, “If you
free yourself from dreams, if you open your mind to truth, if you be energetic,
if you practise righteousness, you will find eternal bliss.”

    25. Suddhodana heard the words in silence and replied,
“My son! What thou say[e]st will I endeavour to fulfil.”

http://www.columbia.edu/itc/mealac/pritchett/00ambedkar/ambedkar_buddha/02_4.html
புத்தகம் இரண்டு, பகுதி IV Home வீட்டிலிருந்து அழைப்பு

1. * சுத்தோதனாவும் கடைசி தோற்றமும் * - 2. * யேசோதரா மற்றும் ராகுலாவைச் சந்தித்தல் * - 3. * சாக்கியர்களின் வரவேற்பு * - 4. * அவரை ஒரு வீட்டுக்காரராக்க கடைசி முயற்சி * - 5. * புத்தரின் பதில் * - 6. * அமைச்சரின் பதில் * - 7. * புத்தரின் தீர்மானம் *
 

§ 1. சுத்தோதனா மற்றும் கடைசி தோற்றம்

    1. சரிபுட்டா மற்றும் மொகல்லானா ஆகியோரின் மாற்றத்திற்குப் பிறகு, இறைவன் ராஜகிரகத்தில் இரண்டு மாதங்கள் தங்கியிருந்தார்.
    2. இறைவன் ராஜகிரகத்தில் வசிக்கிறான் என்று கேள்விப்பட்டதும், அவருடைய தந்தை சுத்தோதனா, “நான் இறப்பதற்கு முன் என் மகனைப் பார்க்க விரும்புகிறேன். மற்றவர்கள் அவருடைய கோட்பாட்டின் பலனைப் பெற்றிருக்கிறார்கள், ஆனால் அவருடைய தந்தையோ அல்லது உறவினர்களோ அல்ல . “
    3. செய்தி அனுப்பப்பட்ட நபர் சுத்தோதனாவின் பிரபுக்களில் ஒருவரின் மகன் கலுடாயின் ஆவார்.
    4. மேலும், தூதர், “உலக மரியாதைக்குரிய ததகதா, சூரியன் உதயமாக லில்லி ஏங்குவதைப் போல, உங்கள் தந்தை உங்கள் வருகையைத் தேடுகிறார்” என்று கூறினார்.
    5. ஆசீர்வதிக்கப்பட்டவர் தனது தந்தையின் வேண்டுகோளுக்கு சம்மதித்து, தந்தையார் வீட்டிற்குப் பயணம் மேற்கொண்டார், அவருடன் ஏராளமான சீடர்களும் சென்றனர்.
    6. இறைவன் மெதுவான கட்டங்களில் பயணம் செய்தார். ஆனால், ஆசீர்வதிக்கப்பட்டவர் வருவதாகவும், அவர் சென்று கொண்டிருப்பதாகவும் சுத்தோதனனுக்கு தெரிவிக்க கலுதாயின் அவருக்கு முன்னால் சென்றார்.
    7. விரைவில் சக்யா நாட்டில் செய்தி பரவியது. “அறிவொளியைப் பெறுவதற்காக வீட்டிலிருந்து வீடற்ற நிலையில் அலைந்து திரிந்த இளவரசர் சித்தார்த், தனது நோக்கத்தை அடைந்துவிட்டு, கபிலவாட்சு வீட்டிற்கு வருகிறார்.” இது ஒவ்வொருவரின் உதட்டிலும் இருந்தது.
    8. சுத்தோதனாவும் மகாபிராஜபதியும் தங்கள் மகனைச் சந்திக்க உறவினர்கள் மற்றும் அமைச்சர்களுடன் வெளியே சென்றனர். அவர்கள் தங்கள் மகனை தூரத்திலிருந்தே பார்த்தபோது, ​​அவருடைய அழகு, க ity ரவம் மற்றும் அவரது காந்தி ஆகியவற்றால் அவர்கள் தாக்கப்பட்டார்கள், அவர்கள் இதயத்தில் மகிழ்ச்சியடைந்தார்கள், ஆனால் அவர்களால் சொல்ல வார்த்தைகள் கிடைக்கவில்லை.
    9. இது உண்மையில் அவர்களுடையது; இவை சித்தார்தின் அம்சங்கள்! பெரிய சமனா அவர்களின் இதயத்திற்கு எவ்வளவு அருகில் இருந்தது, இன்னும் அவர்களுக்கு இடையே எவ்வளவு தூரம் இருந்தது! அந்த உன்னத முனி இனி அவர்களின் மகன் சித்தார்த் அல்ல; அவர் இப்போது புத்தர், ஆசீர்வதிக்கப்பட்டவர், பரிசுத்தர், சத்தியத்தின் இறைவன் மற்றும் மனிதகுல போதகர்!
    10. சுத்தோதனா, தங்கள் மகனின் மத கண்ணியத்தை கருத்தில் கொண்டு, தேரில் இருந்து இறங்கினார்; முதலில் அவருக்கு வணக்கம் செலுத்தி, “நாங்கள் உன்னைப் பார்த்து இப்போது ஏழு ஆண்டுகள் ஆகின்றன, இந்த தருணத்திற்காக நாங்கள் எப்படி ஏங்கினோம்” என்று கூறினார்.
    11. பின்னர் புத்தர் தன் தந்தையின் எதிரே ஒரு இருக்கை எடுத்தார், ராஜா ஆவலுடன் தன் மகனைப் பார்த்தார். அவர் தனது பெயரால் அவரை அழைக்க ஏங்கினார், ஆனால் அவர் தைரியம் கொடுக்கவில்லை. “சித்தார்த்,” அவர் மனதில் அமைதியாக, “சித்தார்த், உங்கள் பழைய தந்தையிடம் திரும்பி வந்து மீண்டும் அவருடைய மகனாக இருங்கள்” என்று கூச்சலிட்டார். ஆனால் தனது மகனின் உறுதியைப் பார்த்து, அவர் தனது உணர்வுகளை அடக்கினார். பாழானது அவனையும் மகாபிராஜபதியையும் வென்றது.
    12. இவ்வாறு தந்தை தன் மகனுடன் நேருக்கு நேர் அமர்ந்து, சோகத்தில் மகிழ்ச்சியடைந்து, சந்தோஷத்தில் சோகமாக இருந்தார். அவர் தனது மகனைப் பற்றி பெருமிதம் கொள்ளட்டும், ஆனால் அவரது பெரிய மகன் ஒருபோதும் தனது வாரிசாக இருக்க மாட்டார் என்ற எண்ணத்தில் அவரது பெருமை உடைந்தது.
    13. “என் ராஜ்யத்தை நான் உனக்கு வழங்குவேன்” என்று ராஜா சொன்னார், ஆனால் நான் செய்தால், அதை சாம்பலாகக் கருதுவீர்கள். “
    14. அதற்கு கர்த்தர் சொன்னார், “ராஜாவின் இருதயம் அன்பினால் நிறைந்தது என்பதையும், அவருடைய மகனுக்காக அவர் ஆழ்ந்த வருத்தத்தை உணருகிறார் என்பதையும் நான் அறிவேன். ஆனால், நீங்கள் இழந்த மகனுடன் உங்களைப் பிணைக்கும் அன்பின் உறவுகள் சமமான தயவுடன் தழுவிக்கொள்ளட்டும் உங்கள் சக மனிதர்கள் அனைவருமே, அவருடைய இடத்தில் உங்கள் மகன் சித்தார்த்தை விட பெரியவரை நீங்கள் பெறுவீர்கள்; சத்தியத்தைக் கற்பிப்பவர், நீதியைப் போதிப்பவர், சமாதானத்தையும் நிர்வாணத்தையும் கொண்டுவருபவர் உங்கள் இதயத்திற்குள் நுழைவார்கள் . “
    15. சுதோதனா தனது மகன் புத்தரின் மெல்லிசை வார்த்தைகளைக் கேட்டு, கைகளை இறுகப் பற்றிக் கேட்டபோது, ​​கண்களில் கண்ணீருடன் கூச்சலிட்டு, “மாற்றம் அற்புதம்! மிகுந்த துக்கம் கடந்துவிட்டது. முதலில் என் துக்கமான இதயம் இருந்தது கனமான, ஆனால் இப்போது நான் உங்கள் மகத்தான துறவறத்தின் பலனை அறுவடை செய்கிறேன்.உங்கள் வலிமைமிக்க அனுதாபத்தால் நகர்த்தப்பட்டது சரியானது, நீங்கள் அதிகாரத்தின் இன்பங்களை நிராகரிக்க வேண்டும் மற்றும் மத பக்தியில் உங்கள் உன்னத நோக்கத்தை அடைய வேண்டும். பாதையை கண்டுபிடித்த பிறகு, நீங்கள் இப்போது உங்கள் தம்மத்தை பிரசங்கிக்க முடியும் விடுதலைக்காக ஏங்குகிற அனைவருக்கும். “
    16. சுத்தோதனா தனது வீட்டிற்குத் திரும்பினார், அதே நேரத்தில் புத்தர் தனது தோழர்களுடன் தோப்பில் இருந்தார்.
    17. மறுநாள் காலையில், ஆசீர்வதிக்கப்பட்ட இறைவன் தனது கிண்ணத்தை எடுத்துக்கொண்டு கபிலவாட்சுவில் தனது உணவுக்காக பிச்சை எடுக்க புறப்பட்டார்.
    18. மேலும் செய்தி பரவியது, “சித்தார்த் வீடு வீடாகச் சென்று பிச்சை எடுப்பதற்காக, அவர் திரும்பி வந்த ஒரு தேரில் சவாரி செய்த நகரத்தில். அவரது அங்கி ஒரு சிவப்பு மேகம் போன்றது, அவர் கையில் ஒரு மண் கிண்ணம். “
    19. விசித்திரமான வதந்தியைக் கேட்டதும், சுத்தோதனா மிகுந்த உற்சாகத்துடன் வெளியேறி, “நீ ஏன் என்னை இழிவுபடுத்துகிறாய்? உன்னையும் உன் பிக்கஸையும் என்னால் எளிதில் உணவு வழங்க முடியும் என்று உங்களுக்குத் தெரியாதா?”
    20. அதற்கு கர்த்தர், “இது என் கட்டளைப்படி” என்று பதிலளித்தார்.
    21. “ஆனால் இது எப்படி இருக்க முடியும்? நீங்கள் எப்போதும் உணவுக்காக கெஞ்சியவர்களில் ஒருவரல்ல.”
    22. “ஆமாம், தந்தையே,” நீங்களும் உங்கள் இனமும் ராஜாக்களிடமிருந்து வந்தவர்கள் என்று கூறலாம்; என் வம்சாவளி பழங்கால புத்தர்களிடமிருந்து வந்தது. அவர்கள் தங்கள் உணவைக் கெஞ்சினார்கள், எப்போதும் பிச்சைக்காரர்களாக வாழ்ந்தார்கள். “

23. சுத்தோதனா எந்த பதிலும் அளிக்கவில்லை, ஆசீர்வதிக்கப்பட்டவர் தொடர்ந்தார், “ஒரு மறைக்கப்பட்ட புதையலைக் கண்டறிந்ததும், அவர் தனது தந்தைக்கு மிகவும் விலைமதிப்பற்ற நகையை பிரசாதம் கொடுப்பது வழக்கம். ஆகவே, இதை உங்களுக்கு வழங்க என்னை அனுபவித்து விடுங்கள் என்னுடைய புதையல் இது தர்மம். “
     24. மேலும் ஆசீர்வதிக்கப்பட்ட இறைவன் தன் தந்தையிடம், “நீங்கள் கனவுகளிலிருந்து விடுபட்டால், சத்தியத்திற்கு உங்கள் மனதைத் திறந்தால், நீங்கள் ஆற்றல் மிக்கவராக இருந்தால், நீதியைக் கடைப்பிடித்தால், நீங்கள் நித்திய ஆனந்தத்தைக் காண்பீர்கள்” என்று கூறினார்.
     25. சுத்தோதனா அந்த வார்த்தைகளை ம silence னமாகக் கேட்டு, “என் மகனே! நீ சொல்வதை நிறைவேற்ற முயற்சிப்பேன்” என்று பதிலளித்தார்.


98) Classical Tajik-тоҷикӣ классикӣ,

https://www.youtube.com/watch…
Shoista Mullodzhanova Tajik Classic Estrada Songs Ш. Муллоджанова Таджикская

bnwwf91
5.01K subscribers
Classic Tajik Songs (”Intizor” “Darvoz” and “Muhabbat”) sung by the
legendary Shashmaqom singer and People’s Artist of the Tajik SSR,
Shoista (Shushana) Rubenovna Mullodzhanova. She is renowned as one of
the greatest singers in the USSR if not all Tajikistan. To this day, her
recordings and songs are protected in the archives of the Republic of
Tajikistan.

Sadly, Shoista Rubenovna Mullodzhanova died of heart
failure in Forest Hills, New York, USA on Thursday, June 24, 2010 and
was buried on Sunday, June 28, 2010 (Tammuz 15) at the Jewish Cemetery
in Long Island, New York, USA. Such a great voice, such an awesome
talent, such a terrible loss. Худованд раҳмат кунад ӯро, ҳамеша
меҳрубону азиз дар дили мо, ҳаргиз фаромӯш намекунем номию овози ӯ. Ёди ӯ
доим дар хотираи мо!

ETERNAL MEMORY TO HER - SHOISTA RUBENOVNA
MULLODZHANOVA - THE QUEEN OF SHASHMAQOM - THE NIGHTINGALE OF THE EAST -
THE PRIDE AND JOY OF THE BUKHARIAN JEWISH AND CENTRAL ASIAN PEOPLE.


Поет песни (”Интизор” “Дарвоз” и “Мухаббат”) легендарная певица
Шашмаком а так же Народная артистка Таджикской ССР, ШОИСТА (ШУШАНА)
РУБЕНОВНА МУЛЛОДЖАНОВА. Она была одна из самых легендарных певицах в
истории Таджикистана а так же СССР. Ее песни и записи защищены даже в
этот день в Национальном архиве Республики Таджикистан. За всю свою
творческую деятельность, за неустанной вклад в развитие классической и
народной культуры республики она была удостоена звания народной артистки
Таджикской ССР, Ордена Ленина, Знака Почета и Трудового Красного
Знамени, стала обладательницей премии Всемирного фестиваля молодежи и
студентов в Москве в 1957 году, была Ветераном Великой Отечественной
войны. После эмиграции в США в 1993 году Шоиста Муллоджанова стала
солисткой ансамбля “Шашмаком” Нью-Йорка и объездила 24 страны мира.


К сожалению, великая Шоиста Рубеновна Муллоджанова скончалась 24 июня,
2010 г. в больнице района Форест Хиллс Квинс в городе Нью Йорке, США.
Она была похоронена 28 июня 2010 г. (15 таммуз по еврейскому календарю) в
на еврейском кладбище района Лонг Айланд в штате Нью Йорка. Такой
громкий голос, такой огромный талант, такие страшные потери. Худованд
раҳмат кунад ӯро, ҳамеша меҳрубону азиз дар дили мо, ҳаргиз фаромӯш
намекунем номию овози ӯ. Ёди ӯ доим дар хотираи мо!

Легендарная
певица оставила нам свое искусство, свой великий голос, щедро открытые и
воспитанные ею таланты — то, над чем трудилась она всю свою жизнь.


ВЕЧНАЯ ПАМЯТЬ ЕЙ - ШОИСТЕ РУБЕНОВНЕ МУЛЛОДЖАНОВЕ - КОРОЛЕВА ШАШМАКОМА -
СОЛОВЕЙ ВОСТОКА - ГОРДОСТЬ БУХАРСКО-ЕВРЕЙСКОГО И СРЕДНЕАЗИАТСКОГО
НАРОДА
Category
Entertainment
Music in this video
Learn more
Listen ad-free with YouTube Premium
Song
Intizoram
Artist
Folk Instrument Ensemble, Shoista Mullodzhanova
Album
Ziyadullo Shakhidi
Licensed to YouTube by
Believe Music (on behalf of Music 2 Business); ООО ‘М2′ / ‘M2′ LLC

98) Classical Tajik-тоҷикӣ классикӣ,
98) Классикии тоҷикӣ-тоҷикӣ классикӣ,


Вақте ки кӯдаки навзод дар алоҳидагӣ нигоҳ дошта мешавад, вале ҳеҷ кас
бо кӯдак муошират намекунад, пас аз чанд рӯз он ҳамчун забони классикии
Чандасо / Magadhi Prakrit / Hela Basa сухан хоҳад ронд Классикаи Пали,
ки ҳамонҳоянд. Буддо дар Маҷади сухан гуфт. Ҳама 7111 забон ва лаҳҷаҳои
классикии Магҳаи Маҷади ҳастанд. Ҳамин тавр, ҳамаи онҳо табиати классикӣ
мебошанд (ба монанди ҳама забонҳои зинда забонҳои табиии муошират).


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T79pzdsL_RI
How Does an Armenian Song Sound Like?

Ibrahim Siawash
869 subscribers
Armenian is one if the oldest languages tracing back to 400 AD. The
sound is just so mystical. I was in a trance listening to it.
Amazing !
Category
People & Blogs

12) դասական հայերեն-դասական հայերեն,

http://wisdomquotes.com/buddha-quotes/

150 Բուդդայի մեջբերումներ, որոնք ձեզ ավելի իմաստուն կդարձնեն (արագ)

Բուդդան այնտեղ մեջբերում է վախը մեկի համար, որի միտքը չի լցվում ցանկությունների իմաստությամբ

Վախ չկա այն մարդու համար, ում միտքը լցված չէ ցանկություններով: Բուդդա

Բուդդայի մեջբերումները մշակում են ձեր սեփական փրկությունը, կախված չէ ուրիշների իմաստությունից

Աշխատեք ձեր սեփական փրկությունը: Չեն կախված ուրիշներից: Բուդդա Կտտացրեք թվիթեր

Բուդդան մեջբերում է ձեր օջախի իմաստության հետ արժե անել որևէ բան

Եթե ​​ինչ-որ բան արժե անել, արա դա ամբողջ սրտով: Բուդդա Կտտացրեք թվիթեր


Բուդդան մեջբերում է, որ մարդը իմաստուն չի կոչվում, քանի որ նա նորից է
խոսում և խոսում, բայց եթե նա խաղաղ սիրող և անվախ է, ապա ճշմարտության մեջ
նա կոչվում է իմաստուն իմաստության մեջբերումներ

Մարդը
իմաստուն չի կոչվում, քանի որ նա նորից է խոսում և խոսում: բայց եթե նա
խաղաղ է, սիրող և անվախ, ապա ճշմարտության մեջ նա իմաստուն է կոչվում:
Բուդդա

Բուդդայի մեջբերումները ոչ մեկին չեն փնտրում սրբավայր, բացի ձեր ինքնասիրությունից

Որևէ մեկում մի փնտրեք սրբարան, բացի ձեր անձից: Բուդդա

Բուդդայի մեջբերումներից ոչ ոք մեզ չի փրկում, բայց ինքներս էլ կարող ենք ինքներս մեզ հետ քայլենք իմաստության ուղով


Ոչ ոք մեզ չի փրկում, բայց ինքներս մեզ: Ոչ ոք չի կարող և ոչ ոք չի
կարող: Մենք ինքներս պետք է գնանք ուղիով: Բուդդա Կտտացրեք թվիթեր


Բուդդայի մեջբերումները ապրում են մաքուր անշահախնդիր կյանքով, ոչ ոք չպետք
է հաշվի, որ ոչ մեկը, ոչ էլ պատկանում է առատ իմաստության

Մաքուր անշահախնդիր կյանքով ապրելու համար ոչինչ չպետք է համարվի որպես սեփական անձ ՝ առատության մեջ: Բուդդա Կտտացրեք թվիթեր

Բուդդան մեջբերում է այն ամենը, ինչ մենք ենք, արդյունք է այն, ինչ մենք մտածեցինք իմաստության մեջբերումներով

Այն ամենը, ինչ մենք ենք, մեր մտածածի արդյունքն է: Բուդդա Կտտացրեք թվիթեր

Բուդդայի մեջբերումները չեն պահում ուրիշների ուշադրությունը, երբ նրանց օգնության կարիքն ունեն, ովքեր կհետևեն մեզ իմաստությանը

Եթե ​​մենք չկարողանանք ուրիշներին հետևել, երբ նրանց օգնության կարիքը լինի, ո՞վ է մեզ հետևելու: Բուդդա

Բուդդան մեջբերում է մեկին, ով ճշմարտություն է գործում, ուրախությամբ այս աշխարհը

Նա, ով ճշմարտության վրա է գործում, երջանիկ է այս աշխարհում և դրանից դուրս: Բուդդա

Բուդդայի լավագույն մեջբերումները

Տվեք, նույնիսկ եթե դուք ունեք ընդամենը մի քիչ:

Նույնիսկ մահից չի վախենա մեկը, ով իմաստուն կերպով ապրել է:

Ոռոգիչներ ջրանցքների ջրերը; fletchers ուղղել նետերը. հյուսները փայտ են թեքում; իրենք են իմաստուն վարպետը:

Կաթիլով կաթիլը լցվում է ջրի ամանի մեջ: Նմանապես, իմաստուն մարդը, այն քիչ-քիչ հավաքելով, ինքն իրեն լավով է լցնում:

Ամենամեծ նվերը մարդկանց լուսավորություն հաղորդելն է, այն կիսելն է: Այն պետք է լինի ամենամեծը:

Եթե ​​դուք իմանայիք այն, ինչ ես գիտեմ տալու ուժի մասին, չէիք թողնի, որ մեկ կերակուր անցնի առանց որևէ ձևի բաժանելու:

Տառապանքի արմատը կցորդն է:


Լռեցրեք զայրացած մարդուն սիրով: Լռեցեք բարեգործ մարդուն բարությամբ:
Լռեցեք թշվառին առատաձեռնությամբ: Լռեցեք ստախոսին ճշմարտության հետ:

Կարծիք ունեցող մարդիկ պարզապես շրջում են միմյանց անհանգստացնելու շուրջ:

Նույնիսկ եթե ամուր ժայռը քամուց անսխալ է, այնպես էլ իմաստուններն անխորտակվում են գովաբանությամբ կամ մեղադրելով:

Դուք ինքներդ պետք է ձգտեք: Բուդդաները միայն ցույց են տալիս ճանապարհը: Կտտացրեք թվիթին

Ոչինչ չի կարող ձեզ վնաս հասցնել այնքան, որքան ձեր սեփական մտքերը անկառավարելի են:

Մտածեք … մի հետաձգեք, որից հետո չզղջաք դրա համար:

Հազար խոռոչ բառերից ավելի լավը մի բառ է, որը խաղաղություն է բերում:

Հասկանալը լավ ասված բառերի սրտամկանն է:

Չարիք գործելուց, բարին զարգացնելուց, սիրտը մաքրելուց. Սա Բուդդայի ուսմունքն է:

Ուրախություն խորհրդածության և մենության մեջ: Կազմեք ինքներդ ձեզ, եղեք երջանիկ: Դուք փնտրող եք:

Այսօր սրտանց արեք այն, ինչ պետք է արվի: Ով գիտի? Վաղը գալիս է մահը:

Այն, ինչ դու ես, այն է, ինչ դու եղել ես: Դու կլինես այն, ինչ հիմա անում ես:

Եթե ​​առաջարկում եք խոսել, միշտ հարցրեք ինքներդ ձեզ, ճի՞շտ է, արդյոք անհրաժեշտ է, բարի է:


Եթե ​​հոգևոր ճանապարհով չես գտնում որևէ մեկին, միայնակ քայլիր: (Սա
Բուդդայի իմ նախընտրած մեջբերումներից մեկն է: Թողեք պատասխան և ասեք, թե
որն է ձերնը:)

Մաս 2. Բուդդայի մեջբերումները, որոնք կան…
Ոգեշնչող Բուդդայի մեջբերումներ

Դադարեցրեք, դադարեցրեք: Մի խոսիր. Վերջնական ճշմարտությունը նույնիսկ մտածելը չէ: Կտտացրեք թվիթին

Մենք այն ենք, ինչ մտածում ենք: Այն ամենը, ինչ մենք ծագում ենք մեր մտքերով: Մեր մտքերով մենք ստեղծում ենք աշխարհը:


Asիշտ ինչպես մեծ օվկիանոսը ունի մեկ համ, աղի համը, այնպես որ այս
ուսմունքը և կարգապահությունն ունեն մեկ համ ՝ ազատագրման համ:


Նա, ում այլևս գոյություն չունի դառնալու հավերժ փափագը և ծարավը. ինչպե՞ս
կարող ես հետևել, որ Արթնացել է մեկը, աննկատ և անսահման միջակայքում:

Կայունությունը ամենադժվար առարկաներից մեկն է, բայց համբերատար է այն մեկը, ով համբերում է, որ գալիս է վերջնական հաղթանակը:


Երկար է գիշերը նրա համար, ով արթուն է. երկար է մի մղոն նրան, ով
հոգնած է. երկար է կյանքը այն հիմարների համար, ովքեր չգիտեն իրական
օրենքը:

Ինչ էլ որ լինի թանկարժեք զարդը երկնային աշխարհներում, զարթոնքի հետ համեմատելի ոչինչ չկա:


Մեր կյանքը ձևավորվում է մեր մտքով. մենք դառնում ենք այն, ինչ
մտածում ենք: Ուրախությունը հետևում է մաքուր մտքին, ինչպես ստվերը, որը
երբեք չի հեռանում:
Նուրբ ծաղիկների նման, նայելու համար գեղեցիկ, բայց առանց հոտի, բարի բառերը անպտուղ են մարդու մեջ, որը չի գործում դրանց համաձայն:


Հավերժականության մասին մեր տեսությունները նույնքան արժեքավոր են,
որքան այն հավակները, որոնք իր կեղևով իր ճանապարհը չփորձած հավը կարող է
ձևավորվել արտաքին աշխարհի:

Գաղափարը, որը մշակվում և գործի դրվում է, ավելի կարևոր է, քան գաղափարը, որը գոյություն ունի միայն որպես գաղափար:

Այնքան շատ սուրբ խոսքեր, որոնք կարդում ես, որքան էլ որ դու շատ ես խոսում, ինչ բարիք կանի քեզ, եթե չես գործում նրանց վրա:

Քաոսը բնորոշ է բոլոր բարդ բաներին: Ձգտեք ջանասիրությամբ:

Բուդդայի կարճ մեջբերումներ

Կցորդը տառապանքի է հանգեցնում:

Թող բոլոր էակները երջանիկ մտքեր ունենան:

Ծնվել է բոլոր էակների համար անհանգստանալու պատճառով:

Ես հրաշքն եմ:

Մի բանկա լցնում է կաթիլով կաթիլով:

Յուրաքանչյուր մարդ իր սեփական առողջության կամ հիվանդության հեղինակն է:

Սուր դանակի պես լեզուն… Սպանվում է առանց արյուն քաշելու:

Theանապարհը երկնքում չէ: Theանապարհը սրտում է: Կտտացրեք թվիթին

Բուդդայի մեջբերումները կյանքի, ընտանիքի և բարեկամության մասին

Ապրեք ամեն արարք ամբողջությամբ, կարծես դա ձեր վերջինն էր: Կտտացրեք թվիթին

Առաքինությունն ավելի շատ հետապնդվում է ամբարիշտների կողմից, քան այն սիրված է բարու կողմից:

Ոչինչ երբեք ամբողջովին մենակ գոյություն չունի. ամեն ինչ կապված է մնացած ամեն ինչի հետ:

Մաքուրությունը կամ կեղտը կախված են ինքն իրենից: Ոչ ոք չի կարող մեկ ուրիշը մաքրել:

Աջակցել մորը և հայրիկին, փայփայել կնոջն ու երեխային և ունենալ հասարակ ապրուստի ապահովում. սա է հաջողությունը:

Մի պահ կարող է փոխվել մի օր, մի օր կարող է փոխել կյանքը, իսկ մեկ կյանքը կարող է փոխել աշխարհը:


Նա, ով գիտի, որ կյանքը հոսում է, առանց մաշվածության և մաշկի
զգացողություն չի զգում, կարիք չունի փոխհատուցման կամ վերանորոգման:


Անկեղծ ու չար ընկերն ավելի շատ վախենալու է, քան վայրի գազանը. մի
վայրի գազան կարող է պատել ձեր մարմնին, բայց չար ընկերը կվիրավորի ձեր
միտքը:

Ինչ խոսքեր էլ որ մենք ընտրենք `մարդկանց հոգածությամբ
ընտրելու դեպքում, դրանք կլսվեն և դրանց վրա կզգան լավի կամ հիվանդության
համար:

Պարապ լինելը մահվան կարճ ճանապարհ է, և ջանասեր լինելը կյանքի ձև է. հիմար մարդիկ պարապ են, իմաստուն մարդիկ ՝ ջանասեր:

Եթե ​​փնտրողը չգտնի ավելի լավը կամ հավասար ուղեկիցը, թող վճռականորեն անցնի միանձնյա դասընթաց:

Եթե ​​մենք հստակ տեսնեինք մեկ ծաղկի հրաշքը, մեր ամբողջ կյանքը փոխվում էր:

Բուդդայի մեջբերումներ սիրո և երախտագիտության մասին

Իսկական սերը ծնվում է հասկանալուց:

Rառագայթել անսահման սեր ամբողջ աշխարհի հանդեպ:

Դուք, ինքներդ ձեզ, նույնքան տիեզերքի ցանկացած ոք, արժանի եք ձեր սերն ու ջերմությունը:

Ամբիցիան սիրո պես է, անհամբեր և թե ուշացումների, և թե մրցակիցների համար:

Սերը մարդու ներսի հոգու մեծ պարգևն է մեկ ուրիշին, այնպես որ երկուսն էլ կարող են լինել ամբողջ:

Թող բոլոր էակների համար համակողմանի մտքերը լինեն ձերնը:


Մենք կզարգացնենք և կզարգացնենք մտքի ազատագրումը սիրալիրությամբ,
կդարձնենք այն մեր տրանսպորտային միջոցը, կդարձնենք այն մեր հիմքը,
կայունացնենք այն, կկատարենք ինքներս դրանում և լիովին կկատարենք այն:

Ատելությունը ցանկացած պահի չի դադարում ատելությունից: Ատելությունը դադարում է սիրո միջով: Սա անփոփոխ օրենք է:

Նա, ով սիրում է 50 մարդ, ունի 50 վատություն. նա, ով ոչ մեկին չի սիրում, ոչ մի խնդիր էլ չունի:

Բարությունը պետք է դառնա կյանքի բնական ճանապարհը, այլ ոչ թե բացառություն:

Խոսեք միայն ողջունելի խոսքի, խոսքի մասին: Խոսքը, երբ դա ոչ մի վատություն չի բերում ուրիշներին, հաճելի բան է:

Մեկը չի կոչվում այն ​​ազնվական, որը վնասում է կենդանի էակներին: Կենդանի արարածներին չվնասելով `կոչվում է ազնվական:

Խորապես սովորված և հմուտ լինելը, լավ պատրաստվածությունը և լավ խոսված բառերը օգտագործելը. Սա հաջողություն է:


Asիշտ այնպես, ինչպես մայրը կպաշտպանի իր միակ զավակին իր կյանքով,
այնպես էլ թույլ տա, որ մեկը զարգացնի անսահման սեր բոլոր էակների
նկատմամբ:

Նրանց մեջ կենդանի էակների համար համակրանք չկա. Ճանաչեք նրան որպես հեռացած:


Եկեք վեր կենանք և շնորհակալ լինենք, քանի որ եթե մենք այսօր շատ բան
չէինք սովորել, համենայն դեպս մի փոքր սովորեցինք, և եթե մի փոքր
չսովորեցինք, գոնե չէինք հիվանդանում, և եթե հիվանդանայինք գոնե մենք
չմեռանք; ուրեմն, եկեք բոլորս շնորհակալ լինենք:

Բուդդայի մեջբերումներ մտքում և յուրովի տիրապետելու ձեզ

Նա ունակ է, ով կարծում է, որ կարող է:

Մարդու սեփական միտքն է, ոչ թե նրա թշնամին կամ թշնամին, որը նրան գայթակղեցնում է չար ճանապարհներից:

Ուրախություն ժառանգականության մեջ: Լավ պահպանի՛ր ձեր մտքերը:


Ամեն ինչ հիմնված է մտքի վրա, առաջնորդվում է մտքով, ձևավորվում է
մտքով: Եթե ​​խոսեք և վարվեք աղտոտված մտքով, ապա տառապանքները կհետևեն
ձեզ, քանի որ օքսքարտի անիվները հետևում են եզի հետքին:

Ոչինչ չկա այնքան անհնազանդ, որքան չբացահայտված միտքը, և չկա կարգին միտքն այնքան հնազանդ:


Միտք, որն անխռով մնացել է բախտի անսխալներից, ազատված վշտից, մաքրված
պղծություններից, ազատագրված վախից `սա ամենամեծ օրհնությունն է:


Իմացեք գետերից ՝ ճեղքվածքների և ճեղքվածքների միջով. Փոքրիկ ալիքներով
նրանք աղմկոտ հոսում են, իսկ մեծ հոսքը լռում է: Այն, ինչ լրիվ չէ, աղմուկ է
բարձրացնում: Այն, ինչ լցված է, հանգիստ է:

Դուք փնտրող եք: Ուրախություն ձեռքերի և ոտքերի ձեր խոսքերի և մտքերի վարպետության մեջ:
Տեսեք դրանք ՝ հառաչելով իրենց իմ իմաստով, ինչպես ձկները չորացրած հոսքի
պզտիկների մեջ - և, տեսնելով դա, ապրում են ոչ մի հանքով, չլինելով
կցորդներ դառնալու պետությունների համար:

‘Ինչպես ես եմ, սրանք
էլ են: Ինչպես որ սրանք են, ես էլ եմ »: Ինքներդ ձեզ զուգահեռ գծեք, ոչ էլ
սպանեք, ոչ էլ ստիպեք ուրիշներին սպանել:

Բոլոր փորձառություններին նախորդում է միտքը ՝ ունենալով միտքը որպես իրենց տերը, որը ստեղծվել է մտքով:


Լավ առողջություն ունենալու, իրական ընտանիքի երջանկություն բերելու,
բոլորի համար խաղաղություն բերելու համար նախ պետք է կարգապահություն
իրականացնել և վերահսկել սեփական միտքը: Եթե ​​մարդը կարողանա վերահսկել իր
միտքը, ապա նա կարող է գտնել Լուսավորության ճանապարհը, և ողջ
իմաստությունն ու առաքինությունը, բնականաբար, կգան նրա մոտ:

Բոլոր սխալ գործողությունները ծագում են մտքի պատճառով: Եթե ​​միտքը փոխակերպվում է, կարո՞ղ է մնալ սխալ գործողություններ:


Այն, ինչ մենք այսօր ենք, գալիս է երեկվա մեր մտքերից, և մեր ներկա
մտքերը կառուցում են վաղվա մեր կյանքը. Մեր կյանքը մեր մտքի ստեղծումն է:

Նա, ով ինքն է նվաճել, շատ ավելի մեծ հերոս է, քան նա, ով հազար անգամ հաղթել է հազար մարդու:


Տրանսցենդենտալ ինտելեկտը բարձրանում է այն ժամանակ, երբ մտավոր միտքը
հասնում է իր սահմանին, և եթե իրերն իրական և էական բնույթ են կրում, ապա
նրա մտածողության գործընթացները պետք է անցնեն ճանաչողականության որոշ
բարձրագույն ֆակուլտետ դիմելու միջոցով:

Ես չեմ դիտարկի ուրիշի սխալը գտնելու մտադրությունը. Դասընթաց, որը պետք է դիտարկել:


Արտաքին աշխարհը միայն մտքի գործունեության դրսևորում է, և միտքը այն
ընկալում է որպես արտաքին աշխարհ `պարզապես խտրականության և կեղծ
բանականության սովորության պատճառով: Աշակերտը պետք է սովորություն ունենա
ճշմարտորեն նայելու իրերը:

Միտքը նախորդում է բոլոր մտավոր վիճակները: Միտքը նրանց գլխավորն է. նրանք բոլորն էլ մտածող են:

Եթե ​​մաքուր մտքով մարդը խոսում է կամ գործում է երջանկություն, հետևում է նրան, ինչպես իր ոչ հեռավոր ստվերը:

Մեջբերումներ Բուդդայի կողմից երջանկության և ուրախության մասին

Երջանկության ճանապարհ չկա. Երջանկությունը ուղին է: Կտտացրեք թվիթին

Երջանկությունը գալիս է այն ժամանակ, երբ ձեր աշխատանքը և բառերը օգտակար են ձեզ և մյուսներին:

Լուսավորյալը, ջանայի մտադրությամբ, պետք է ուրախություն գտնի անտառում, ծառի ստորոտում պետք է պարապի ժանա:


Հազարավոր մոմեր կարելի է մեկ մոմից թեթևացնել, և մոմի կյանքը չի
կրճատվի: Երջանկությունը երբեք չի նվազում `բաժանվելու միջոցով:

Այն իրերի բնույթով է, որ անձը ուրախություն է առաջացնում մարդու մեջ ՝ զերծ զղջումից:

Ձեր սիրտը դրեք լավ գործեր անելու վրա: Դա արեք կրկին ու կրկին, և դուք կլցվեք ուրախությամբ:


Մի՛ անցեք անցյալում, մի երազեք ապագայի մասին, միտքը կենտրոնացրեք
ներկա պահի վրա: Տե՛ս նաև. 10 հուշումներ ՝ ապրելու ներկայի մեջ սկսելու
համար

Եթե ​​մարդը լավ բան անի, թող դա անի նորից ու նորից: Թող նա այնտեղ հաճույք գտնի, քանզի երանելի է բարի կուտակում:


Մենք ձևավորվում և ձևավորվում ենք մեր մտքերով: Նրանք, ում միտքը
ձևավորվում է անձնազոհ մտքերով, ուրախություն են հաղորդում, երբ նրանք
խոսում են կամ գործում: Ուրախությունը հետևում է նրանց այնպիսի ստվերի պես,
որը նրանց երբեք չի թողնում:

Մեջբերումներ ՝ ըստ Բուդդայի ՝ Մեդիտացիայի և հոգևորի մասին

Asիշտ ինչպես մոմը չի կարող վառվել առանց կրակի, տղամարդիկ չեն կարող ապրել առանց հոգևոր կյանքի: Կտտացրեք թվիթին

Խորապես նայելով կյանքին, ինչպես և այս պահի դրությամբ, հաշտարարը բնակվում է կայունության և ազատության մեջ:


Մեդիտացիան իմաստություն է բերում. միջնորդության բացակայությունը
թողնում է տգիտությունը: Լավ իմացեք, թե ինչն է ձեզ առաջ տանում և ինչն է
ձեզ հետ պահում և ընտրեք այն ուղին, որը տանում է դեպի իմաստություն:

Ինչ էլ որ վանականը շարունակի հետապնդել իր մտածողությունը և խորհել, դա դառնում է նրա իրազեկման հակում:

Մեջբերումներ Բուդդայի մասին ՝ խաղաղության, ներողամտության և թողնելով

Վճռականորեն մարզվեք ինքներդ ձեզ ՝ խաղաղություն հաստատելու համար: Կտտացրեք թվիթին


Իրոք, ամբողջովին չորացած իմաստունը ամեն կերպ հանգստանում է. ոչ մի
իմաստ ցանկություն չի պահպանում նրան, ում հրդեհները սառչվել են, վառելիքից
զուրկ: Բոլոր հավելվածները խզվել են, սիրտը ցավից հեռացել է. հանգիստ, նա
հանգստանում է ամենադյուրին հանգստությամբ: Մտքը գտել է իր ճանապարհը դեպի
խաղաղություն:

Նա, ով նստում է միայնակ, քնում է միայնակ և
միայնակ քայլում, ով համառ է և ինքն իրեն ենթարկվում է միայնակ,
ուրախություն կգտնի անտառի մենության մեջ:

Մի շեղվեք այն, ինչ ձեզ տրված է, և մի՛ հասնեք այն մարդկանց, ինչը տրված է ուրիշներին, որպեսզի չխանգարեն ձեր անդորրը:

Նրանք, ովքեր վրդովված մտքերից զերծ են, անպայման խաղաղություն են գտնում: Կտտացրեք թվիթին

Մեջբերումներ Բուդդայի իմաստության և առաքինությունների մասին

Հիմարը, ով գիտի, որ հիմար է, շատ ավելի իմաստուն է: Կտտացրեք թվիթին

Ինչ էլ որ ծագի բնույթ ունի, դադարի բնույթ ունի:

Միասնությունը կարող է դրսևորվել միայն Երկուականով: Միասնությունն ինքնին և Միասնության գաղափարն արդեն երկուսն են:


Ո՞րն է տղամարդու կամ կնոջ համար համապատասխան պահվածքը այս աշխարհի
մեջ, որտեղ յուրաքանչյուր մարդ կառչում է իր բեկորներից: Ո՞րն է պատշաճ
բարևը մարդկանց միջև, քանի որ նրանք անցնում են միմյանց այս ջրհեղեղի մեջ:

Ինքներդ հետևելիս դիտում ես ուրիշներին: Երբ հետևում ես ուրիշներին, հետևում ես ինքդ քեզ:


About This Website
youtube.com
Armenian is one if the oldest languages tracing back to 400 AD. The…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vDgMTVnUnIU
The Armenian Language & its Place in the Indo-European Linguistic Family

Library of Congress
106K subscribers
Charles de Lamberterie discusses the history of the Armenian language as part of the 17th Annual Vardanants Day celebration.

Speaker Biography: Charles de Lamberterie is a linguist specializing in the Indo-European Armenian and Greek languages.

For transcript, captions, and more information, visit http://www.loc.gov/today/cyberlc/feat
Category
Education
Թող ոչ մեկը թույլ չտա ուրիշների մեղքը: թող ոչ ոք չտեսնի ուրիշների
բացթողումներն ու հանձնաժողովները: Բայց թող մեկը տեսնի իր իսկ արարքները,
արված և չեղյալ հայտարարված:

Իսկական վարպետն ապրում է ճշմարտությամբ, բարության և զսպվածության, ոչ բռնության, չափավորության և մաքրության մեջ:

Ոչ մի բառով կամ գործով մի վիրավորեք: Կերեք չափավորությամբ: Ապրեք
ձեր սրտում: Փնտրեք ամենաբարձր գիտակցությունը: Վարպետորեն ինքներդ ձեզ
օրենքին համապատասխան: Սա արթնացողների պարզ ուսմունքն է:

Կյանքն այնպիսին է, ինչպիսին է եղնիկի լարը, եթե այն չափազանց ամուր է, այն
չի նվագի, եթե շատ չամրացված է, այն կախված է, բայց լարվածությունը, որը
ստեղծում է գեղեցիկ ձայնը, մեջտեղում է:

Մի հավատացեք որևէ
բանի, պարզապես այն պատճառով, որ դուք լսել եք այն: Մի հավատացեք որևէ
բանի, պարզապես այն մասին, որ շատերի կողմից խոսվում և ասվում է: Մի
հավատացեք որևէ բանի, պարզապես այն գտնված է ձեր կրոնական գրքերում: Ոչ մի
բանի չհավատաք միայն ձեր ուսուցիչների և երեցների հեղինակությանը: Մի
հավատացեք ավանդույթներին, քանի որ դրանք հանձնվել են շատ սերունդների
համար: Բայց դիտելուց և վերլուծելուց հետո, երբ գտնում ես, որ որևէ բան
համաձայն է բանականության հետ և նպաստում է մեկի և բոլորի բարիքին և
օգուտին, ապա ընդունիր այն և ապրիր դրանով:

Asիշտ ինչպես
գանձերը բացվում են երկրից, այնպես էլ առաքինությունը երևում է բարի
գործերից, և իմաստությունը հայտնվում է մաքուր և խաղաղ մտքից: Մարդկային
կյանքի լաբիրինթոսով անվտանգ քայլելու համար հարկավոր է իմաստության լույս և
առաքինության առաջնորդություն:

Իմաստունները իրենց մտքով ձևավորում են խոսքը ՝ այն մաղելով որպես հացահատիկ, մաղելով մաղով:

Առաքինությունները, ինչպես մուսաները, միշտ խմբում են երևում: Լավ սկզբունքը երբեք կրծքագեղձի մեջ մենակ չի գտնվել:

Quotes by Buddha On Karma And Nibbana

Ինչ-որ մեկը, ով Բոդդիսատվայի մեքենայի մեջ է մտել, պետք է որոշի, որ.
«Ես պետք է բոլոր արարածները տանեմ դեպի նիրվանա, այն նիրվանայի այն
տիրույթում, որը ոչինչ չի թողնում»: Ո՞րն է նիրվանայի այս ոլորտը, որը
ոչինչ չի թողնում:

Մեջբերումներ Բուդդայի մասին փոփոխության, ձախողման և տառապանքի մասին

Ոչինչ հավերժ չէ, բացի փոփոխությունից:

Կրքի պես կրակ չկա, չկա ատելության պես շնաձուկ, չկա հիմարության պես որոգայթ, չկա ագահության պես տագնապ:

Նախկինում և այժմ, դա միայն տառապանքն է, որը ես նկարագրում եմ, և տառապանքի դադարեցումը:

Նա, ով կարող է բորբոքել իր բարկությունը հենց որ առաջանա, քանի որ
ժամանակին հակաթույն կստուգի օձի թույնը, որն այդքան արագ տարածվում է, -
նման վանականը հրաժարվում է այստեղից և դրանից դուրս, ինչպես օձը թափում է
իր մաշված մաշկը:

Թող որ կյանք ունեցող բոլոր մարդիկ փրկվեն տառապանքներից:

Հեշտ է տեսնել ուրիշների մեղքերը, բայց դժվար է տեսնել սեփական
սխալները: Մեկը ցույց է տալիս ուրիշների մեղքերը քամու պես քամոտի պես,
բայց մեկը թաքցնում է սեփական մեղքերը, քանի որ խորամանկ խաղատուն թաքցնում
է իր զառախաղը:

Բուդդայի մեջբերումներ վախի մասին

Նրանք, ովքեր կցված են «ես եմ» հասկացությանը և դիտում են, որ աշխարհը շրջում է աշխարհով վիրավորող մարդկանց: Կտտացրեք թվիթին

Կասկածից ավելի սովորական բան չկա: Կասկածը առանձնացնում է մարդկանց:
Դա թույն է, որը փչացնում է բարեկամությունը և փչացնում հաճելի
հարաբերությունները: Դա փուշ է, որը նյարդայնացնում և ցավում է. դա թուր է,
որը սպանում է:

Ծարավից մղված տղամարդիկ վազում են որսացող
նապաստակի պես. ուրեմն թող շտապող մարդը դուրս գա ծարավից ՝ ձգտելով իր
համար կրքոտությունից:

Երբ մարդը չարիքին չսիրելու
զգացողություն ունի, երբ հանդարտ զգացողություն ունի, հաճույք է գտնում
լսել լավ ուսմունքները. երբ մեկը ունի այդ զգացողությունները և գնահատում է
դրանք, մեկը վախից ազատվում է:

Այն պահից, երբ մենք զայրույթ ենք զգում, մենք արդեն դադարել ենք ձգտել ճշմարտության և սկսել ենք ձգտել ինքներս մեզ:

Բուդդայի Մեջբերումները Զայրույթի և Խանդի մասին

Դուք չեք պատժվի ձեր զայրույթի համար, դուք կպատժվեք ձեր զայրույթից: Կտտացրեք թվիթին

Հագեք ձեր էգոն որպես չամրացված հագուստի պես:

Ոմանք չեն հասկանում, որ մենք պետք է մեռնենք, բայց նրանք, ովքեր գիտակցում են դա, լուծում են իրենց վեճերը:

Ատելությունը երբեք չի հանդարտվում ատելությամբ այս աշխարհում: Միայն
ատելությամբ հանդարտվում է ատելությունը: Սա հավերժական օրենք է:

Բոլորը դողում են բռնությունից. բոլորը վախենում են մահից: Իրեն ուրիշի տեղը դնելիս չպետք է սպանեք, ոչ էլ ստիպեք մեկին սպանել:

Ես չեմ վիճում աշխարհի հետ; ավելի շուտ, այն աշխարհն է, որը վիճում է ինձ հետ:

Նրանք մեղադրում են լռության մեջ գտնվողներին, մեղադրում են նրանց,
ովքեր շատ են խոսում, մեղադրում են նրանց, ովքեր խոսում են չափավորության
մեջ: Աշխարհում չկա մեկը, ով մեղավոր չէ:

Նրանք, ովքեր ընկալում են ընկալումներն ու տեսակետները, թափառում են աշխարհը վիրավորող մարդկանց:

Ով չի բռնում հայացքից զայրացած ինչ-որ մեկին, դժվար է հաղթել մարտում:

Զայրույթը երբեք չի վերանա այնքան ժամանակ, քանի դեռ վրդովմունքի
մասին մտքերը փայփայում են մտքում: Զայրույթը անհետանում է հենց այն պահից,
երբ կմոռանան վրդովմունքի մասին մտքերը:

Մի գերագնահատեք ձեր ստացածը և ոչ էլ նախանձեք ուրիշներին: Նա, ով նախանձում է ուրիշներին, մտքի խաղաղություն չի ստանում:
§ 15. աքսորի առաջարկ

1. Հաջորդ օրը Սենապատին կանչեց Սաքյա Սանգի մեկ այլ հանդիպում, որպեսզի Սանգի կողմից դիտարկվի մոբիլիզացիայի իր ծրագիրը:
2. Երբ Սանգը հանդիպեց, նա առաջարկեց, որ իրեն թույլ տրվի հրահանգել
հռչակելու զենք, որը կոչ է անում զենք օգտագործել, Կոլիասի դեմ մղվող
պատերազմի համար, յուրաքանչյուր Սակիյա 20-ից 50 տարեկան:
3.
Հանդիպմանը մասնակցում էին երկու կողմերը `նրանք, ովքեր Սանգի նախորդ
հանդիպմանը քվեարկել էին պատերազմի հռչակման օգտին, ինչպես նաև դեմ
քվեարկողներին:
4. Նրանց օգտին քվեարկածների համար դժվարություն
չկար Սենապատիի առաջարկը ընդունել: Դա նրանց ավելի վաղ ընդունած որոշման
բնական հետևանք էր:
5. Բայց դեմ քվեարկած փոքրամասնությունը
դիմակայելու խնդիր ուներ: Նրանց խնդիրն այն էր. Մեծամասնության որոշմանը
ներկայացնելը կամ չներկայացնելը:
6. փոքրամասնությունը վճռականորեն
չներկայացրեց մեծամասնությանը: Դա է պատճառը, որ նրանք որոշել էին ներկա
լինել հանդիպմանը: Դժբախտաբար, նրանցից ոչ մեկը համարձակություն չուներ
այդքան բացահայտ ասել: Միգուցե նրանք գիտեին մեծամասնությանը դիմակայելու
հետևանքները:
7. Տեսնելով, որ նրա կողմնակիցները լռում են,
Սիդհարթը ոտքի կանգնեց և դիմելով Սանգհին ՝ ասաց. «Ընկերներ, դուք կարող եք
անել այն, ինչ ցանկանում եք: Դուք ձեր կողմից մեծամասնություն ունեք, բայց
ես ցավում եմ, որ ասում եմ, որ ես դեմ կլինեմ ձեր որոշմանը ես չեմ միանա
ձեր բանակին և չեմ մասնակցելու պատերազմին »:
8. Սենապատին,
պատասխանելով Սիդհարթ Գաուտամային, ասաց. «Հիշո՞ւմ եք այն երդումները,
որոնք դուք վերցրել եք, երբ ընդունվել եք Սանգիի անդամությանը: Եթե դրանցից
որևէ մեկը կոտրեք, ինքներդ ձեզ կհայտնեք հասարակության ամոթի մեջ»:

9. Սիդհարթը պատասխանեց. «Այո, ես պարտավորվել եմ իմ մարմնով, մտքով և
փողով պաշտպանել Սաքյասի լավագույն շահերը: Բայց ես չեմ կարծում, որ այս
պատերազմը բխում է Սաքյանների շահերից: ինձ նախքան Սաքյասի լավագույն
շահերը »:
10. Սիդհարթը զգուշացրեց Սանխին ՝ հիշեցնելով այն մասին,
թե ինչպես են Սաքիաները [= դարձել] Կոսալայի թագավորի վասալները ՝ Կոլիասի
հետ իրենց վեճերի պատճառով: «Դժվար չէ պատկերացնել, - ասաց նա, - որ այս
պատերազմը նրան ավելի մեծ կարգի կտա ՝ Սաքյասի ազատությունը հետագա
իջեցնելու համար»:
11. Սենապատին զայրացավ և, դիմելով Սիդհարթին,
ասաց. «Ձեր պերճախոսությունը ձեզ չի օգնի: Դուք պետք է հնազանդվեք Սանխի
մեծամասնության որոշմանը: Դուք, երևի, հաշվի եք առնում այն ​​փաստը, որ
Սանգհը չունի իրավասություն հրամայել հանցագործին: կախել կամ աքսորել նրան
առանց Կոսալասի թագավորի սանկցիայի, և որ Կոսալասի թագավորը թույլտվություն
չի տա, եթե երկու նախադասություններից որևէ մեկը քո դեմ Սանգի կողմից
ընդունված լինի »:
12. «Բայց հիշեք, որ Սանգը ձեզ պատժելու այլ
եղանակներ ունի: Սանգը կարող է սոցիալական բոյկոտ հայտարարել ձեր ընտանիքի
դեմ, իսկ Սանգը կարող է բռնագրավել ձեր ընտանիքի հողերը: Սրա համար սանգը
պարտադիր չէ ձեռք բերել թագավորի թույլտվությունը: Կոսալաները »:

13. Սիդհարթը գիտակցեց հետևանքների մասին, որոնք կհետևեն, եթե նա շարունակի
իր ընդդիմությունը Սանգիին Կոլիասի դեմ պատերազմի իր ծրագրում: Նա երեք
տարբերակ ուներ հաշվի առնելու `միանալ ուժերին և մասնակցել պատերազմին:
համաձայնել կախվել կամ աքսորվել. և թույլ տալ, որ իր ընտանիքի անդամները
դատապարտվեն սոցիալական բոյկոտի և գույքի բռնագրավման:
14. Նա
հաստատակամ էր առաջինը չընդունելու հարցում: Ինչ վերաբերում է երրորդին, նա
զգում էր, որ դա աներևակայելի էր: Իրավիճակի պայմաններում նա զգաց, որ
երկրորդ այլընտրանքը լավագույնն է:
15. Ըստ այդմ, Սիդհարթը խոսեց
Սանգխի հետ: «Խնդրում եմ, մի պատժեք իմ ընտանիքին: Մի խանգարեք նրանց`
սոցիալական բոյկոտի ենթարկելով: Թույլ տվեք, որ ես միայն տառապեմ իմ սխալի
համար: Դատապարտիր ինձ մահվան կամ աքսորի, ում էլ ուզում ես: Ես պատրաստ եմ
դա ընդունելու և խոստանում եմ, որ չեմ դիմելու Կոսալասի թագավորին »:
Բուդդայի մեջբերումներ հաջողության, համբերության և ուժի մասին

Ոչ կրակը, ոչ քամին, ոչ ծնունդը, ոչ էլ մահը չեն կարող ջնջել մեր բարի գործերը: Կտտացրեք թվիթին

Եթե ​​գտնեք իմաստուն քննադատ ՝ ձեր սխալները մատնանշելու համար, հետևեք նրան, քանի որ կուղեկցեիք թաքնված գանձը:

Որպես մարտադաշտում գտնվող փիղ դիմադրում է շրջապատող սլաքներից
արձակված նետերին, այնպես որ ես նույնպես պետք է դիմանամ չարաշահման:

Գովաբանությունն ու մեղքը, շահը և կորուստը, հաճույքն ու վիշտը գալիս
են և գնում են քամու պես: Երջանիկ լինելու համար հանգստացեք հսկա ծառի պես
նրանց բոլորի մեջ:

Անջատողականության մեջ է աշխարհի ամենամեծ դժբախտությունը. կարեկցանքի մեջ է աշխարհում իրական ուժը:

Եղեք լամպ ձեզ համար: Եղեք ձեր սեփական ապաստանը: Ոչ մի ուրիշին փնտրիր: Ամեն ինչ պետք է անցնի: Ձգտեք ջանասիրաբար: Մի հանձնվեք

Ավելի լավ է ապրել մի օր, տեսնելով իրերի վերելքն ու անկումը, քան
հարյուր տարի ապրելը, առանց երբևէ տեսնելու իրերի վերելքն ու անկումը:

Եթե ​​ուղղությունը չես փոխում, կարող ես ավարտվել այնտեղ, ուր գնում ես:

Բուդդայի մեջբերումներ առողջության մասին

Առողջությունը ամենամեծ նվերն է, գոհունակությունը ամենամեծ
հարստությունը, հավատարմությունը լավագույն հարաբերությունները: Բուդդա

Մարմինը լավ առողջության մեջ պահելը պարտականություն է… հակառակ դեպքում մենք չենք կարողանա ուժեղ և պարզ պահել միտքը:

Առանց առողջության կյանքը կյանք չէ. դա միայն տառապանքի և տառապանքի վիճակ է `մահվան պատկեր:

Առողջության գաղտնիքը ինչպես մտքի, այնպես էլ մարմնի համար `ոչ թե
անցյալի համար սգալն է, ապագայի մասին չմտածելը, ապագան կանխատեսելը, այլ
ներկա պահը իմաստուն և անկեղծորեն ապրելը:

Բուդդայի մեջբերումներ ճշմարտության մասին

Նրանք, ովքեր չեն կարողացել աշխատել ճշմարտության ուղղությամբ, բաց են թողել ապրելու նպատակը: Կտտացրեք թվիթին

Սովորեցրեք այս եռակի ճշմարտությունը բոլորին. Առատաձեռն սիրտը, բարի
խոսքը և ծառայության ու կարեկցանքի կյանքը `մարդկությունը թարմացնող բաներ
են:

Երկու ճշմարտություն կա, որ կարելի է կատարել ճշմարտության ճանապարհին … չշարունակելով և չսկսվել:

Հանգստացնողներն ասում են, որ լավը ասվածը լավն է. երկրորդ, որ պետք է
ասել, թե ինչն է ճիշտ, ոչ թե անարդար: երրորդ ՝ ինչն է հաճելի, ոչ հաճելի;
չորրորդ ՝ ինչն է ճշմարիտ, ոչ կեղծ:

Նվաճեք զայրացածին
`չվիրավորվելով. նվաճել ամբարիշտներին բարությամբ. նվաճել գարշահոտությունը
առատաձեռնությամբ, իսկ ստախոսը ՝ ճշմարտություն ասելով:

Երեք բան չի կարելի երկար թաքցնել ՝ արևը, լուսինը և ճշմարտությունը:

http://www.dsbcproject.org/


title

title
  • (626) 571-8811 ext.321
  • sanskrit@uwest.edu



MAIN INTRODUCTION

The University of the West is
engaged in a ground-breaking project to gather, digitize and distribute
the original Sanskrit scriptures of the Buddhist faith. Although
Buddhism disappeared from its Indian homeland about eight centuries ago,
many of its sacred texts are still preserved in Nepal. Since 2003, with
the collaboration of Kathmandu’s Nagarjuna Institute, these texts are
again being brought to the world. The …

Read More



MANUSCRIPT

List of Manuscript Gallery


https://www.britannica.com/biography/Maha-Maya

Buddha


founder of Buddhism




Alternative Titles:
Śākyamuni, Gautama Buddha, Gotama Buddha, Sage of the Śākyas, Shaka, Shaka Nyorai, Shakyamuni, Siddhartha Gautama, Siddhattha


Buddha,
(Sanskrit: “Awakened One”)clan name (Sanskrit) Gautama or (Pali)
Gotama, personal name (Sanskrit) Siddhartha or (Pali) Siddhatta, (born c. 6th–4th century bce, Lumbini, near Kapilavastu, Shakya republic, Kosala kingdom [now in Nepal]—died, Kusinara, Malla republic, Magadha kingdom [now Kasia, India]), the founder of Buddhism, one of the major religions and philosophical systems of southern and eastern Asia and of the world. Buddha is one of the many epithets of a teacher who lived in northern India sometime between the 6th and the 4th century before the Common Era.

His followers, known as Buddhists, propagated the religion that is known today as Buddhism. The title buddha
was used by a number of religious groups in ancient India and had a
range of meanings, but it came to be associated most strongly with the
tradition of Buddhism and to mean an enlightened
being, one who has awakened from the sleep of ignorance and achieved
freedom from suffering. According to the various traditions of Buddhism,
there have been buddhas in the past and there will be buddhas in the
future. Some forms of Buddhism hold that there is only one buddha for
each historical age; others hold that all beings will eventually become
buddhas because they possess the buddha nature (tathagatagarbha).

All
forms of Buddhism celebrate various events in the life of the Buddha
Gautama, including his birth, enlightenment, and passage into nirvana. In some countries the three events are observed on the same day, which is called Wesak in Southeast Asia.
In other regions the festivals are held on different days and
incorporate a variety of rituals and practices. The birth of the Buddha
is celebrated in April or May, depending upon the lunar date, in these
countries. In Japan, which does not use a lunar calendar, the Buddha’s birth is celebrated on April 8. The celebration there has merged with a native Shintō ceremony into the flower festival known as Hanamatsuri.

00:00

02:45




General considerations

The clan name of the historical figure referred to as the Buddha (whose life is known largely through legend) was Gautama (in Sanskrit) or Gotama (in Pali), and his given name was Siddhartha (Sanskrit: “he who achieves his aim”) or Siddhatta (in Pali). He is frequently called Shakyamuni,
“the sage of the Shakya clan.” In Buddhist texts, he is most commonly
addressed as Bhagavat (often translated as “Lord”), and he refers to
himself as the Tathagata,
which can mean either “one who has thus come” or “one who has thus
gone.” Information about his life derives largely from Buddhist texts,
the earliest of which were not committed to writing until shortly before
the beginning of the Common Era, several centuries after his death. The
events of his life set forth in these texts cannot be regarded with
confidence as historical, although his historical existence is accepted
by scholars. He is said to have lived for 80 years, but there is
considerable uncertainty concerning the date of his death. Traditional
sources on the date of his death or, in the language of the tradition,
“passage into nirvana,” range from 2420 bce to 290 bce.
Scholarship in the 20th century limited this range considerably, with
opinion generally divided between those who placed his death about 480 bce and those who placed it as much as a century later.



Get unlimited access to all of Britannica’s trusted content.
Start Your Free Trial Today


Historical context

The Buddha was born in Lumbini (Rummin-dei), near Kapilavastu (Kapilbastu) on the northern edge of the Ganges River basin, an area on the periphery of the civilization of North India, in what is today southern Nepal. Scholars speculate that during the late Vedic period
the peoples of the region were organized into tribal republics, ruled
by a council of elders or an elected leader; the grand palaces described
in the traditional accounts of the life of the Buddha are not evident
among the archaeological remains. It is unclear to what extent these
groups at the periphery of the social order of the Ganges basin were
incorporated into the caste system, but the Buddha’s family is said to have belonged to the warrior (Kshatriya) caste. The central Ganges basin was organized into some 16 city-states, ruled by kings, often at war with each other.

The rise of these cities of central India, with their courts and
their commerce, brought social, political, and economic changes that are
often identified as key factors in the rise of Buddhism and other
religious movements of the 6th and 5th centuries bce. Buddhist texts identify a variety of itinerant teachers who attracted groups of disciples. Some of these taught forms of meditation, Yoga, and asceticism and set forth philosophical views, focusing often on the nature of the person and the question of whether human actions (karma)
have future effects. Although the Buddha would become one of these
teachers, Buddhists view him as quite different from the others. His
place within the tradition, therefore, cannot be understood by focusing
exclusively on the events of his life and times (even to the extent that
they are available). Instead, he must be viewed within the context of Buddhist theories of time and history.

According to Buddhist doctrine, the universe is the product of karma, the law of the cause and effect
of actions, according to which virtuous actions create pleasure in the
future and nonvirtuous actions create pain. The beings of the universe
are reborn without beginning in six realms: as gods, demigods, humans,
animals, ghosts, and hell beings. The actions of these beings create not
only their individual experiences but the domains in which they dwell.
The cycle of rebirth, called samsara
(literally “wandering”), is regarded as a domain of suffering, and the
ultimate goal of Buddhist practice is to escape from that suffering. The
means of escape remains unknown until, over the course of millions of
lifetimes, a person perfects himself, ultimately gaining the power to
discover the path out of samsara and then compassionately revealing that
path to the world.

A
person who has set out on the long journey to discover the path to
freedom from suffering, and then to teach it to others, is called a bodhisattva.
A person who has discovered that path, followed it to its end, and
taught it to the world is called a buddha. Buddhas are not reborn after
they die but enter a state beyond suffering called nirvana (literally
“passing away”). Because buddhas appear so rarely over the course of
time and because only they reveal the path to liberation (moksha) from suffering (dukkha), the appearance of a buddha in the world is considered a momentous event in the history of the universe.

The story of a particular buddha begins before his birth and extends beyond his death. It encompasses
the millions of lives spent on the bodhisattva path before the
achievement of buddhahood and the persistence of the buddha, in the form
of both his teachings and his relics, after he has passed into nirvana.
The historical Buddha is regarded as neither the first nor the last
buddha to appear in the world. According to some traditions he is the
7th buddha; according to another he is the 25th; according to yet
another he is the 4th. The next buddha, named Maitreya,
will appear after Shakyamuni’s teachings and relics have disappeared
from the world. The traditional accounts of the events in the life of
the Buddha must be considered from this perspective.



Sources of the life of the Buddha

Accounts of the life of the Buddha appear in many forms. Perhaps the earliest are those found in the collections of sutras (Pali: suttas),
discourses traditionally attributed to the Buddha. In the sutras, the
Buddha recounts individual events in his life that occurred from the
time that he renounced his life as a prince until he achieved
enlightenment six years later. Several accounts of his enlightenment
also appear in the sutras. One Pali text, the Mahaparinibbana-sutta
(“Discourse on the Final Nirvana”), describes the Buddha’s last days,
his passage into nirvana, his funeral, and the distribution of his
relics. Biographical accounts in the early sutras provide little detail
about the Buddha’s birth and childhood, although some sutras contain a
detailed account of the life of a prehistoric buddha, Vipashyin.

Another category of early Buddhist literature, the vinaya (concerned ostensibly with the rules of monastic discipline),
contains accounts of numerous incidents from the Buddha’s life but
rarely in the form of a continuous narrative; biographical sections that
do occur often conclude with the conversion of one of his early
disciples, Shariputra.
While the sutras focus on the person of the Buddha (his previous lives,
his practice of austerities, his enlightenment, and his passage into
nirvana), the vinaya literature tends to emphasize his career as a teacher and the conversion of his early disciples. The sutras and vinaya
texts, thus, reflect concerns with both the Buddha’s life and his
teachings, concerns that often are interdependent; early biographical
accounts appear in doctrinal discourses, and points of doctrine and
places of pilgrimage are legitimated through their connection to the life of the Buddha.

Near the beginning of the Common Era, independent accounts of the
life of the Buddha were composed. They do not recount his life from
birth to death, often ending with his triumphant return to his native
city of Kapilavastu (Pali: Kapilavatthu),
which is said to have taken place either one year or six years after his
enlightenment. The partial biographies add stories that were to become
well-known, such as the child prince’s meditation under a rose-apple
tree and his four momentous chariot rides outside the city.

These accounts typically make frequent reference to events from the
previous lives of the Buddha. Indeed, collections of stories of the
Buddha’s past lives, called Jatakas, form one of the early categories of Buddhist literature. Here, an event reminds the Buddha of an event in a past life. He relates that story in order to illustrate a moral
maxim, and, returning to the present, he identifies various members of
his audience as the present incarnations of characters in his past-life
tale, with himself as the main character.

The Jataka stories (one Pali collection contains 547 of
them) have remained among the most popular forms of Buddhist literature.
They are the source of some 32 stone carvings at the 2nd-century bce stupa at Bharhut in northeastern Madhya Pradesh
state; 15 stupa carvings depict the last life of the Buddha. Indeed,
stone carvings in India provide an important source for identifying
which events in the lives of the Buddha were considered most important
by the community. The Jataka stories are also well-known beyond India; in Southeast Asia, the story of Prince Vessantara (the Buddha’s penultimate
reincarnation)—who demonstrates his dedication to the virtue of charity
by giving away his sacred elephant, his children, and finally his
wife—is as well-known as that of his last lifetime.

Lives of the Buddha that trace events from his birth to his death appeared in the 2nd century ce. One of the most famous is the Sanskrit poem Buddhacharita (“Acts of the Buddha”) by Ashvaghosa. Texts such as the Mulasarvastivada Vinaya (probably dating from the 4th or 5th century ce)
attempt to gather the many stories of the Buddha into a single
chronological account. The purpose of these biographies in many cases is
less to detail the unique deeds of Shakyamuni’s life than to
demonstrate the ways in which the events of his life conform to a
pattern that all buddhas of the past have followed. According to some,
all past buddhas had left the life of the householder after observing
the four sights, all had practiced austerities, all had achieved
enlightenment at Bodh Gaya, all had preached in the deer park at Sarnath, and so on.

The life of the Buddha was written and rewritten in India and across
the Buddhist world, elements added and subtracted as necessary. Sites
that became important pilgrimage places but that had not been mentioned
in previous accounts would be retrospectively sanctified by the addition
of a story about the Buddha’s presence there. Regions that Buddhism
entered long after his death—such as Sri Lanka, Kashmir, and Burma (now Myanmar)—added narratives of his magical visitations to accounts of his life.

No single version of the life of the Buddha would be accepted by all
Buddhist traditions. For more than a century, scholars have focused on
the life of the Buddha, with the earliest investigations attempting to
isolate and identify historical elements amid the many legends. Because of the centuries that had passed between the actual life and the composition
of what might be termed a full biography, most scholars abandoned this
line of inquiry as unfruitful. Instead they began to study the
processes—social, political, institutional, and doctrinal—responsible
for the regional differences among the narratives of the Buddha. The
various uses made of the life of the Buddha are another topic of
interest. In short, the efforts of scholars have shifted from an attempt
to derive authentic information about the life of the Buddha to an
effort to trace stages in and the motivations for the development of his
biography.

It is important to reiterate
that the motivation to create a single life of the Buddha, beginning
with his previous births and ending with his passage into nirvana,
occurred rather late in the history of Buddhism. Instead, the
biographical tradition of the Buddha developed through the synthesis of a
number of earlier and independent fragments. And biographies of the
Buddha have continued to be composed over the centuries and around the
world. During the modern period, for example, biographies have been
written that seek to demythologize the Buddha and to emphasize his role
in presaging modern ethical
systems, social movements, or scientific discoveries. What follows is
an account of the life of the Buddha that is well-known, yet synthetic,
bringing together some of the more famous events from various accounts
of his life, which often describe and interpret these events
differently.


Previous lives

Many biographies of the Buddha begin not with his birth in his last
lifetime but in a lifetime millions of years before, when he first made
the vow to become a buddha. According to a well-known version, many
aeons ago there lived a Brahman named (in some accounts) Sumedha, who realized that life is characterized by suffering and then set out to find a state beyond death.
He retired to the mountains, where he became a hermit, practiced
meditation, and gained yogic powers. While flying through the air one
day, he noticed a great crowd around a teacher, whom Sumedha learned was
the buddha Dipamkara. When he heard the word buddha he was
overcome with joy. Upon Dipamkara’s approach, Sumedha loosened his
yogin’s matted locks and laid himself down to make a passage across the
mud for the Buddha. Sumedha reflected that were he to practice the
teachings of Dipamkara he could free himself from future rebirth in that
very lifetime. But he concluded that it would be better to delay his
liberation in order to traverse
the longer path to buddhahood; as a buddha he could lead others across
the ocean of suffering to the farther shore. Dipamkara paused before
Sumedha and predicted that many aeons hence this yogin with matted locks
would become a buddha. He also prophesied Sumedha’s name in his last
lifetime (Gautama) and the names of his parents and chief disciples and described the tree under which the future Buddha would sit on the night of his enlightenment.

Over the subsequent aeons, the bodhisattva would renew his vow in the presence of each of the buddhas who came after Dipamkara, before becoming the buddha Shakyamuni himself. Over the course of his lifetimes as a bodhisattva, he accumulated merit (punya) through the practice of 6 (or 10) virtues. After his death as Prince Vessantara, he was born in the Tusita Heaven, whence he surveyed the world to locate the proper site of his final birth.



Birth and early life

He determined that he should be born the son of the king Shuddhodana of the Shakya clan, whose capital was Kapilavastu. Shortly thereafter, his mother, the queen Maha Maya, dreamed that a white elephant had entered her womb. Ten lunar months later, as she strolled in the garden of Lumbini,
the child emerged from under her right arm. He was able to walk and
talk immediately. A lotus flower blossomed under his foot at each step,
and he announced that this would be his last lifetime. The king summoned
the court astrologers to predict the boy’s future. Seven agreed that he
would become either a universal monarch (chakravartin)
or a buddha; one astrologer said that there was no doubt, the child
would become a buddha. His mother died seven days after his birth, and
so he was reared by his mother’s sister, Mahaprajapati.
As a young child, the prince was once left unattended during a
festival. Later in the day he was discovered seated in meditation under a
tree, whose shadow had remained motionless throughout the day to
protect him from the sun.

The prince enjoyed an opulent life; his father shielded him from exposure to the ills of the world, including old age,
sickness, and death, and provided him with palaces for summer, winter,
and the rainy season, as well as all manner of enjoyments (including in
some accounts 40,000 female attendants). At age 16 he married the
beautiful princess Yashodhara. When the prince was 29, however, his life
underwent a profound change. He asked to be taken on a ride through the
city in his chariot. The king gave his permission but first had all the
sick and old people removed from the route. One old man escaped notice.
Not knowing what stood before him, the prince was told that this was an
old man. He was informed, also, that this was not the only old man in
the world; everyone—the prince, his father, his wife, and his
kinsmen—would all one day grow old. The first trip was followed by three
more excursions beyond the palace walls. On these trips he saw first a
sick person, then a corpse being carried to the cremation ground, and
finally a mendicant
seated in meditation beneath a tree. Having been exposed to the various
ills of human life, and the existence of those who seek a state beyond
them, he asked the king for permission to leave the city and retire to
the forest. The father offered his son anything if he would stay. The
prince asked that his father ensure that he would never die, become ill,
grow old, or lose his fortune. His father replied that he could not.
The prince retired to his chambers, where he was entertained by
beautiful women. Unmoved by the women, the prince resolved to go forth
that night in search of a state beyond birth and death.

When he had been informed seven days earlier that his wife had given
birth to a son, he said, “A fetter has arisen.” The child was named Rahula,
meaning “fetter.” Before the prince left the palace, he went into his
wife’s chamber to look upon his sleeping wife and infant son. In another
version of the story, Rahula had not yet been born on the night of the
departure from the palace. Instead, the prince’s final act was to
conceive his son, whose gestation period extended over the six years of
his father’s search for enlightenment. According to these sources,
Rahula was born on the night that his father achieved buddhahood.

The prince left Kapilavastu and the royal life behind and entered the
forest, where he cut off his hair and exchanged his royal robes for the
simple dress of a hunter. From that point on he ate whatever was placed
in his begging bowl. Early in his wanderings he encountered Bimbisara, the king of Magadha and eventual patron of the Buddha, who, upon learning that the ascetic
was a prince, asked him to share his kingdom. The prince declined but
agreed to return when he had achieved enlightenment. Over the next six
years, the prince studied meditation and learned to achieve deep states
of blissful concentration. But he quickly matched the attainments of his
teachers and concluded that despite their achievements, they would be
reborn after their death. He next joined a group of five ascetics
who had devoted themselves to the practice of extreme forms of
self-mortification. The prince also became adept at their practices,
eventually reducing his daily meal to one pea. Buddhist art often
represents him seated in the meditative posture in an emaciated form,
with sunken eyes and protruding ribs. He concluded that mortification of
the flesh is not the path to liberation from suffering and rebirth and
accepted a dish of rice and cream from a young woman.



The enlightenment

His companions remained convinced of the efficacy of asceticism
and abandoned the prince. Now without companions or a teacher, the
prince vowed that he would sit under a tree and not rise until he had
found the state beyond birth and death. On the full moon of May, six
years after he had left his palace, he meditated until dawn. Mara,
the god of desire, who knew that the prince was seeking to put an end
to desire and thereby free himself from Mara’s control, attacked him
with wind, rain, rocks, weapons, hot coals, burning ashes, sand, mud,
and darkness. The prince remained unmoved and meditated on love, thus
transforming the hail of fury into a shower of blossoms. Mara then sent
his three beautiful daughters, Lust, Thirst, and Discontent, to tempt
the prince, but he remained impassive. In desperation, Mara challenged
the prince’s right to occupy the spot of earth upon which he sat,
claiming that it belonged to him instead. Then, in a scene that would
become the most famous depiction of the Buddha in Asian art, the prince,
seated in the meditative posture, stretched out his right hand and
touched the earth. By touching the earth, he was asking the goddess of
the earth to confirm that a great gift that he had made as Prince
Vessantara in his previous life had earned him the right to sit beneath
the tree. She assented with a tremor, and Mara departed.

The prince sat in meditation through the night. During the first
watch of the night, he had a vision of all of his past lives,
recollecting his place of birth, name, caste, and even the food he had
eaten. During the second watch of the night, he saw how beings rise and
fall through the cycle of rebirth as a consequence of their past deeds.
In the third watch of the night, the hours before dawn, he was
liberated. Accounts differ as to precisely what it was that he
understood. According to some versions it was the four truths: of
suffering, the origin of suffering, the cessation of suffering, and the
path to the cessation of suffering. According to others it was the
sequence of dependent origination: how ignorance leads to action and
eventually to birth, aging, and death, and how when ignorance is
destroyed, so also are birth, aging, and death. Regardless of their
differences, all accounts agree that on this night he became a buddha,
an awakened one who had roused himself from the slumber of ignorance and
extended his knowledge throughout the universe.

The experience of that night was sufficiently profound that the
prince, now the Buddha, remained in the vicinity of the tree up to seven
weeks, savouring his enlightenment. One of those weeks was rainy, and
the serpent king came and spread his hood above the Buddha to protect
him from the storm, a scene commonly depicted in Buddhist art. At the
end of seven weeks, two merchants approached him and offered him honey
and cakes. Knowing that it was improper for a buddha to receive food in
his hands, the gods of the four directions each offered him a bowl. The
Buddha magically collapsed the four bowls into one and received the gift
of food. In return, the Buddha plucked some hairs from his head and
gave them to the merchants.


The first disciples

He was unsure as to what to do next, since he knew that what he had
understood was so profound that it would be difficult for others to
fathom. The god Brahma
descended from his heaven and asked him to teach, pointing out that
humans are at different levels of development, and some of them would
benefit from his teaching. Consequently, the Buddha concluded that the
most suitable students would be his first teachers of meditation, but he
was informed by a deity that they had died. He thought next of his five
former comrades in the practice of asceticism. The Buddha determined through his clairvoyance that they were residing in a deer park in Sarnath, outside Varanasi (Banaras). He set out on foot, meeting along the way a wandering ascetic with whom he exchanged greetings. When he explained to the man that he was enlightened and so was unsurpassed even by the gods, the man responded with indifference.

Reclining Buddha, Polonnaruwa, Sri Lanka.

Read More on This Topic
Buddhism
…from the teachings of the
Buddha (Sanskrit: “Awakened One”), a teacher who lived in northern India between the mid-6th…

Although the five ascetics had agreed to ignore the Buddha because he had given up self-mortification, they were compelled by his charisma
to rise and greet him. They asked the Buddha what he had understood
since they left him. He responded by teaching them, or, in the language
of the tradition, he “set the wheel of the dharma in motion.” (Dharma
has a wide range of meanings, but here it refers to the doctrine or
teaching of the buddhas.) In his first sermon, the Buddha spoke of the
middle way between the extremes of self-indulgence and
self-mortification and described both as fruitless. He next turned to
what have come to be known as the “Four Noble Truths,”
perhaps more accurately rendered as “four truths for the [spiritually]
noble.” As elaborated more fully in other discourses, the first is the
truth of suffering, which holds that existence in all the realms of
rebirth is characterized by suffering. The sufferings particular to
humans are birth, aging, sickness, death, losing friends, encountering
enemies, not finding what one wants, finding what one does not want. The
second truth identifies the cause of this suffering as nonvirtue,
negative deeds of body, speech, and mind that produce the karma that
fructifies in the future as physical and mental pain. These deeds are
motivated by negative mental states, called klesha (afflictions), which include desire, hatred, and ignorance, the false belief that there is a permanent and autonomous self amidst the impermanent constituents of mind and body. The third truth is the truth of cessation, the postulation of a state beyond suffering, called nirvana.
If the ignorance that motivates desire and hatred can be eliminated,
negative deeds will not be performed and future suffering will not be
produced. Although such reasoning would allow for the prevention of
future negative deeds, it does not seem to account for the vast store of
negative karma accumulated in previous lifetimes that is yet to bear
fruit. However, the insight into the absence of self, when cultivated
at a high level of concentration, is said to be so powerful that it
also destroys all seeds for future lifetimes. Cessation entails the
realization of both the destruction of the causes of suffering and the
impossibility of future suffering. The presence of such a state,
however, remains hypothetical without a method for attaining it, and the fourth truth, the path, is that method. The path was delineated in a number of ways, often as the three trainings in ethics, meditation, and wisdom. In his first sermon, the Buddha described the Eightfold Path
of correct view, correct attitude, correct speech, correct action,
correct livelihood, correct effort, correct mindfulness, and correct
meditation. A few days after the first sermon, the Buddha set forth the
doctrine of no-self (anatman), at which point the five ascetics became arhats, those who have achieved liberation from rebirth and will enter nirvana upon death. They became the first members of the sangha, the community of monks.



The post-enlightenment period

The Buddha soon attracted more disciples,
sometimes converting other teachers along with their followers. As a
result, his fame began to spread. When the Buddha’s father heard that
his son had not died following his great renunciation but had become a
buddha, the king sent nine successive delegations to his son to invite
him to return home to Kapilavastu. But instead of conveying the
invitation, they joined the disciples of the Buddha and became arhats.
The Buddha was persuaded by the 10th courier (who also became an arhat)
to return to the city, where he was greeted with disrespect by clan
elders. The Buddha, therefore, rose into the air, and fire and water
issued simultaneously from his body. This act caused his relatives to
respond with reverence. Because they did not know that they should
invite him for the noon meal, the Buddha went begging from door to door
instead of going to his father’s palace. This caused his father great chagrin, but the Buddha explained that this was the practice of the buddhas of the past.

His wife Yashodhara had remained faithful to him in his absence. She
would not go out to greet him when he returned to the palace, however,
saying that the Buddha should come to her in recognition of her virtue.
The Buddha did so, and, in a scene often recounted, she bowed before him
and placed her head on his feet. She eventually entered the order of
nuns and became an arhat. She sent their young son Rahula to his father
to ask for his patrimony, and the Buddha responded by having him
ordained as a monk. This dismayed the Buddha’s father, and he explained
to the Buddha the great pain that he had felt when the young prince had
renounced the world. He asked, therefore, that in the future a son be
ordained only with the permission of his parents. The Buddha made this
one of the rules of the monastic order.

The Buddha spent the 45 years after his enlightenment traveling with a group of disciples across northeastern India,
teaching the dharma to those who would listen, occasionally debating
with (and, according to the Buddhist sources, always defeating) masters
from other sects, and gaining followers from all social classes. To some
he taught the practice of refuge; to some he taught the five precepts
(not to kill humans, steal, engage in sexual misconduct, lie, or use
intoxicants); and to some he taught the practice of meditation. The
majority of the Buddha’s followers did not renounce the world, however,
and remained in lay life. Those who decided to go forth from the
household and become his disciples joined the sangha, the community of
monks. At the request of his widowed stepmother, Mahaprajapati, and
women whose husbands had become monks, the Buddha also established an
order of nuns. The monks were sent out to teach the dharma
for the benefit of gods and humans. The Buddha did the same: each day
and night he surveyed the world with his omniscient eye to locate those
that he might benefit, often traveling to them by means of his
supernormal powers.

It is said that in the early years the Buddha and his monks wandered
during all seasons, but eventually they adopted the practice of
remaining in one place during the rainy season (in northern India,
mid-July to mid-October). Patrons built shelters for their use, and the
end of the rainy season came to mark a special occasion for making
offerings of food and provisions (especially cloth for robes) to monks.
These shelters evolved into monasteries that were inhabited throughout
the year. The monastery of Jetavana in the city of Shravasti
(Savatthi), where the Buddha spent much of his time and delivered many
of the discourses, was donated to the Buddha by the wealthy banker
Anathapindada (Pali: Anathapindika).

The Buddha’s authority, even among his followers, did not go
unchallenged. A dispute arose over the degree of asceticism required of
monks. The Buddha’s cousin, Devadatta, led a faction that favoured more rigorous discipline than that counseled
by the Buddha, requiring, for example, that monks live in the open and
never eat meat. When the Buddha refused to name Devadatta as his
successor, Devadatta attempted to kill him three times. He first hired
assassins to eliminate the Buddha. Devadatta later rolled a boulder down
upon him, but the rock only grazed the Buddha’s toe. He also sent a
wild elephant to trample him, but the elephant stopped in his charge and
bowed at the Buddha’s feet. Another schism arose between monks of a
monastery over a minor infraction of lavatory etiquette. Unable to
settle the dispute, the Buddha retired to the forest to live with
elephants for an entire rainy season.



The death of the Buddha

Shortly before his death, the Buddha remarked to his attendant Ananda on three separate occasions that a buddha can, if requested, extend his life span for an aeon. Mara
then appeared and reminded the Buddha of his promise to him, made
shortly after his enlightenment, to pass into nirvana when his teaching
was complete. The Buddha agreed to pass away three months hence, at
which point the earth quaked. When Ananda asked the reason for the
tremor, the Buddha told him that there are eight occasions for an
earthquake, one of which was when a buddha relinquishes the will to
live. Ananda begged him not to do so, but the Buddha explained that the
time for such requests had passed; had he asked earlier, the Buddha
would have consented.

At age 80 the Buddha, weak from old age and illness,
accepted a meal (it is difficult to identify from the texts what the
meal consisted of, but many scholars believe it was pork) from a smith
named Chunda, instructing the smith to serve
him alone and bury the rest of the meal without offering it to the other
monks. The Buddha became severely ill shortly thereafter, and at a
place called Kusinara (also spelled Kushinagar; modern Kasia) lay down
on his right side between two trees, which immediately blossomed out of
season. He instructed the monk who was fanning him to step to one side,
explaining that he was blocking the view of the deities who had
assembled to witness his passing. After he provided instructions for his
funeral, he said that lay people should make pilgrimages to the place
of his birth, the place of his enlightenment, the place of his first
teaching, and the place of his passage into nirvana. Those who venerate
shrines erected at these places will be reborn as gods. The Buddha then
explained to the monks that after he was gone the dharma and the vinaya
(code of monastic conduct) should be their teacher. He also gave
permission to the monks to abolish the minor precepts (because Ananda
failed to ask which ones, it was later decided not to do so). Finally,
the Buddha asked the 500 disciples who had assembled whether they had
any last question or doubt. When they remained silent, he asked two more
times and then declared that none of them had any doubt or confusion
and were destined to achieve nirvana. According to one account, he then
opened his robe and instructed the monks to behold the body of a buddha,
which appears in the world so rarely. Finally, he declared that all
conditioned things are transient
and exhorted the monks to strive with diligence. These were his last
words. The Buddha then entered into meditative absorption, passing from
the lowest level to the highest, then from the highest to the lowest,
before entering the fourth level of concentration, whence he passed into
nirvana.


The Buddha’s relics

The Buddha had instructed his followers to cremate his body as the
body of a universal monarch would be cremated and then to distribute the
relics among various groups of his lay followers, who were to enshrine
them in hemispherical reliquaries called stupas. His body lay in a
coffin for seven days before being placed on a funeral pyre and was set
ablaze by the Buddha’s chief disciple,
Mahakashyapa, who had been absent at the time of the Buddha’s death.
After the Buddha’s cremation, his relics were entrusted to a group of
lay disciples,
but armed men arrived from seven other regions and demanded the relics.
In order to avert bloodshed, a monk divided the relics into eight
portions. According to tradition, 10 sets of relics were enshrined, 8
from portions of the Buddha’s remains, 1 from the pyre’s ashes, and 1
from the bucket used to divide the remains. The relics were subsequently
collected and enshrined in a single stupa. More than a century later, King Ashoka is said to have redistributed the relics in 84,000 stupas.

The stupa would become a reference point denoting the Buddha’s
presence in the landscape of Asia. Early texts and the archeological
record link stupa worship with the Buddha’s life and the key sites in
his career. Eight shrines are typically recommended for pilgrimage and
veneration. They are located at the place of his birth, his
enlightenment, his first turning of the wheel of dharma,
and his death, as well as sites in four cities where he performed
miracles. A stupa in Samkashya, for example, marked the site where the
Buddha descended to the world after teaching the dharma to his mother
(who died seven days after his birth) abiding in the Heaven of the Thirty-three Gods.

The importance given to the stupa suggests the persistence of the Buddha in the world despite his apparent passage into nirvana.
Two types of nirvana are commonly described. The first is called the
“nirvana with remainder,” which the Buddha achieved under the Bo tree,
when he destroyed all the seeds for future rebirth. This first nirvana
is therefore also called the final nirvana (or passing away) of the afflictions.
But the karma that had created his present life was still functioning
and would do so until his death. Thus, his mind and body during the rest
of his life were what was left over, the remainder, after he realized
nirvana. The second type of nirvana occurred at his death and is called
the “final nirvana of the aggregates (skandha)
of mind and body” or the “nirvana without remainder” because nothing
remained to be reborn after his death. Something, in fact, did remain:
the relics found in the ashes of the funeral pyre. A third nirvana,
therefore, is sometimes mentioned. According to Buddhist belief, there
will come a time in the far distant future when the teachings of Shakyamuni
Buddha will disappear from the world and the relics will no longer be
honoured. It is then that the relics that have been enshrined in stupas
around the world will break out of their reliquaries and magically
return to Bodh Gaya,
where they will assemble into the resplendent body of the Buddha,
seated in the lotus posture under the Bo tree, emitting rays of light
that illuminate
10,000 worlds. They will be worshiped by the gods one last time and
then will burst into flame and disappear into the sky. This third
nirvana is called the “final nirvana of the relics.” Until that time,
the relics of the Buddha are to be regarded as his living presence,
infused with all of his marvelous qualities. Epigraphic and literary
evidence from India
suggests that the Buddha, in the form of his stupas, not only was a
bestower of blessings, but was regarded as a legal person and an owner
of property. The relics of the Buddha were, essentially, the Buddha.



Images of the Buddha

The Buddha also remains in the world in the form of the texts that
contain his words and statues that depict his form. There is no
historical evidence of images of the Buddha being made during his
lifetime. Indeed, scholars of Indian art
have long been intrigued by the absence of an image of the Buddha on a
number of early stone carvings at Buddhist sites. The carvings depict
scenes in which obeisance is being paid, for example, to the footprints
of the Buddha. One scene, considered to depict the Buddha’s departure
from the palace, shows a riderless horse. Such works have led to the
theory that early Buddhism
prohibited depiction of the Buddha in bodily form but allowed
representation by certain symbols. The theory is based in part on the
lack of any instructions for depicting the Buddha in early texts. This
view has been challenged by those who suggest instead that the carvings
are not depictions of events from the life of the Buddha but rather
represent pilgrimages to and worship of important sites from the life of
the Buddha, such as the Bo tree.

Consecrated
images of the Buddha are central to Buddhist practice, and there are
many tales of their miraculous powers. A number of famous images, such
as the statue of Mahamuni
in Mandalay, Myanmar, derive their sanctity from the belief that the
Buddha posed for them. The consecration of an image of the Buddha often
requires elaborate rituals in which the Buddha is asked to enter the
image or the story of the Buddha’s life is told in its presence.
Epigraphic evidence from the 4th or 5th century indicates that Indian
monasteries usually had a room called the “perfumed chamber” that housed
an image of the Buddha and was regarded as the Buddha’s residence, with
its own contingent of monks.



The Mahayana tradition and the reconception of the Buddha

Some four centuries after the Buddha’s death, movements arose in
India, many of them centred on newly written texts (such as the Lotus Sutra) or new genres of texts (such as the Prajnaparamita
or Perfection of Wisdom sutras) that purported to be the word of the
Buddha. These movements would come to be designated by their adherents
as the Mahayana,
the “Great Vehicle” to enlightenment, in contradistinction to the
earlier Buddhist schools that did not accept the new sutras as authoritative (that is, as the word of the Buddha).

The Mahayana sutras offer different conceptions
of the Buddha. It is not that the Mahayana schools saw the Buddha as a
magical being whereas non-Mahayana schools did not. Accounts of the
Buddha’s wondrous powers abound throughout the literature. For example,
the Buddha is said to have hesitated before deciding to teach after his
enlightenment and only decides to do so after being implored by Brahma.
In a Mahayana sutra, however, the Buddha has no indecision at all, but
rather pretends to be swayed by Brahma’s request in order that all those
who worship Brahma will take refuge in the Buddha. Elsewhere, it was
explained that when the Buddha would complain of a headache or a
backache, he did so only to convert others to the dharma; because his
body was not made of flesh and blood, it was in fact impossible for him
to experience pain.

One of the most important Mahayana sutras for a new conception of the Buddha is the Lotus Sutra (Saddharmapundarika-sutra),
in which the Buddha denies that he left the royal palace in search of
freedom from suffering and that he found that freedom six years later
while meditating under a tree. He explains instead that he achieved
enlightenment innumerable billions of aeons ago and has been preaching
the dharma in this world and simultaneously in myriad
other worlds ever since. Because his life span is inconceivable to
those of little intelligence, he has resorted to the use of skillful
methods (upuya), pretending to renounce his princely life, practice austerities, and attain unsurpassed enlightenment. In fact, he was enlightened
all the while yet feigned these deeds to inspire the world. Moreover,
because he recognizes that his continued presence in the world might
cause those of little virtue to become complacent
about putting his teachings into practice, he declares that he is soon
to pass into nirvana. But this also is not true, because his life span
will not be exhausted for many more billions of aeons. He tells the
story of a physician who returns home to find his children ill from
having taken poison during his absence. He prescribes a cure, but only
some take it. He therefore leaves home again and spreads the rumour that
he has died. Those children who had not taken the antidote
then do so out of deference to their departed father and are cured. The
father then returns. In the same way, the Buddha pretends to enter
nirvana to create a sense of urgency in his disciples even though his
life span is limitless.


The doctrine of the three bodies

Such a view of the identity of the Buddha is codified in the doctrine of the three bodies (trikaya)
of the Buddha. Early scholastics speak of the Buddha as having a
physical body and a second body, called a “mind-made body” or an
“emanation body,” in which he performs miraculous feats such as visiting
his departed mother in the Heaven of the Thirty-three Gods and teaching
her the dharma. The question also was raised as to whom precisely the Buddhist should pay homage when honouring the Buddha. A term, dharmakaya,
was coined to describe a more metaphorical body, a body or collection
of all the Buddha’s good qualities or dharmas, such as his wisdom, his
compassion, his fortitude, his patience. This corpus of qualities was identified as the body of the Buddha to which one should turn for refuge.

All of this is recast in the Mahayana sutras. The emanation body (nirmanakaya)
is no longer the body that the Buddha employs to perform supernatural
feats; it is rather the only body to appear in this world and the only
body visible to ordinary humans. It is the Buddha’s emanation body that
was born as a prince, achieved enlightenment, and taught the dharma to
the world; that is, the visible Buddha is a magical display. The true
Buddha, the source of the emanations, was the dharmakaya, a term that still refers to the Buddha’s transcendent qualities but, playing on the multivalence of the term dharma, came to mean something more cosmic, an eternal principle of enlightenment and ultimate truth, described in later Mahayana treatises as the Buddha’s omniscient mind and its profound nature of emptiness.



The presence of multiple universes

Along with additional bodies of the Buddha, the Mahayana sutras also
revealed the presence of multiple universes, each with its own buddha.
These universes—called buddha fields, or pure lands—are
described as abodes of extravagant splendour, where the trees bear a
fruit of jewels, the birds sing verses of the dharma, and the
inhabitants devote themselves to its practice. The buddha fields became
preferred places for future rebirth. The buddhas who presided there
became objects of devotion, especially the buddha of infinite light, Amitabha, and his Western Paradise called Sukhavati. In the buddha fields, the buddhas often appear in yet a third form, the enjoyment body (sambhogakaya),
which was the form of a youthful prince adorned with the 32 major marks
and 80 minor marks of a superman. The former include patterns of a
wheel on the palms of his hands and the soles of his feet, elongated
earlobes, a crown protrusion (usnisa) on the top of his head, a circle of hair (urna)
between his brows, flat feet, and webbed fingers. Scholars have
speculated that this last attribute derives not from a textual source
but the inadequacies of early sculptors.

The marvelous physical and mental qualities of the Buddha were codified in numerous litanies
of praise and catalogued in poetry, often taking the form of a series
of epithets. These epithets were commented upon in texts, inscribed on
stupas, recited aloud in rituals, and contemplated in meditation. One of
the more famous is “thus gone, worthy, fully and completely awakened,
accomplished in knowledge and virtuous conduct, well gone, knower of
worlds, unsurpassed guide for those who need restraint, teacher of gods
and humans, awakened, fortunate.”


Donald S. Lopez


Maha Maya
mother of Gautama Buddha


Print


Feedback


https://cibs.ac.in/courses/sanskrit-buddhist-philosophy/



Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Leave a Reply