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Buddhavacana (Buddha’s words) ep 1
Dosamolo Nirvana
2 subscribers
This video was created for revealing the dhamma by using Buddhavacana (Buddha’s words)
Credit music : Musketeers band covered by the PC
BUDDHAVACANA: The Buddhist Way of Life (for Lay devotees) In Assamese language & Khamti Language
MAHABODHI MYSORE
144 subscribers
Dhamma
Talks on ” The Buddhist Way of Life (For Lay Devotees) By Venerable
Bhikkhu Sivali Bhanteji. For the First time, we give opportunity to the
lay devotees to listen the Buddha’s teaching/advise to the lay people
Assamese Language. So, We will publish dhamma talks on various topic in
language like Hindi, English, Assamese & Taikhamti.
We
request the follower to subscribe and share the dhamma talk to
everyone, so that multitude get benefit from this dhamma talk.
MAHABODHI MYSORE
144 subscribers
Dhamma
Talks on ” The Buddhist Way of Life (For Lay Devotees) By Venerable
Bhikkhu Sivali Bhanteji. For the First time, we give opportunity to the
lay devotees to listen the Buddha’s teaching/advise to the lay people
Assamese Language. So, We will publish dhamma talks on various topic in
language like Hindi, English, Assamese & Taikhamti.
We request the follower to subscribe and share the dhamma talk to everyone, so that multitude get benefit from this dhamma talk.
BUDDHAVACANA: The Buddhist Way of Life (for Lay devotees) In Assamese language & Khamti Language
Dhamma
Talks on ” The Buddhist Way of Life (For Lay Devotees) By Venerable
Bhikkhu Sivali Bhanteji. For the First time, we give opportunity to the
lay devote…

https://www.buddha-vacana.org/alphabetical.html

Andhakavinda Sutta (AN 5.114) - enhanced translation

Aṅga Sutta (SN 55.50) - word by word

Āṇi Sutta (SN 20.7) - word by word

Anicca Sutta (SN 36.9) - enhanced translation

Aniccanibbānasappāya Sutta (SN 35.147) - word by word

Aññatitthiya Sutta (AN 3.69) - enhanced translation

Anuruddhamahāvitakka Sutta (AN 8.30) - few info·bubbles

Anusaya Sutta (AN 7.11) - plain texts

Anusaya Sutta (AN 7.12) - enhanced translation

Anussatiṭṭhāna Sutta (AN 6.25) - enhanced translation

Anutappiya Sutta (AN 6.15) - few info·bubbles



☸️Dhammapada☸️ - Treasury of Truth (Only Pali). “धम्मपदं” (पालि) डॉ. सीलवंस थेरो द्वारा सज्झायन
Bodhimaggo Vihara
2.19K subscribers
Chant by Ven. Seelavansa Thero.
Dhammapada with English Translation by Bhante Devananda Indiana Buddhist Temple
Indiana Buddhist Temple
2.63K subscribers
Dhammapada
is one of the best known books of the Pitaka. It is a collection of the
teachings of the Buddha expressed in clear, pithy verses. These verses
were culled from various discourses given by the Buddha in the course of
forty-five years of his teaching, as he travelled in the valley of the
Ganges (Ganga) and the sub-mountain tract of the Himalayas. These verses
are often terse, witty and convincing. Whenever similes are used, they
are those that are easily understood even by a child, e.g., the cart’s
wheel, a man’s shadow, a deep pool, flowers. Through these verses, the
Buddha exhorts one to achieve that greatest of all conquests, the
conquest of self; to escape from the evils of passion, hatred and
ignorance; and to strive hard to attain freedom from craving and freedom
from the round of rebirths. Each verse contains a truth (dhamma), an
exhortation, a piece of advice.
Chant-a-long
with Bhante Devananda, the Abbot of Indiana Buddhist Temple. The Temple
is located at 7528 Thompson Road Hoagland, IN, USA. Phone:
260-447-5269. Facebook Page: Indiana Buddhist Temple. Website:
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☸️Dhammapada☸️ - Treasury of Truth (Only Pali). “धम्मपदं” (पालि) डॉ. सीलवंस थेरो द्वारा सज्झायन

http://www.buddhanet.net/dhammapada/d_hell.htm


Verse 307. Evil Men Get Born In Bad States

Many who wear the yellow robe
are unrestrained in evil things,
these evil ones by evil deeds,
in hell do they arise.

Explanation: Many men wearing the yellow robe up to their
necks who have an evil disposition and are unrestrained in thought,
word and deed are reborn in hell on account of their evil deeds.


Verse 308. Food Fit For Sinners

Better to eat a ball of iron
glowing as flame of fire
than one should eat country’s alms
immoral and unrestrained.

Explanation: It is better for one to eat a red-hot lump of
iron burning like a flame than to eat alms-food offered by the people,
if one is without morality (sila) and unrestrained in thought, word
and deed.


Verse 309. The Man Who Covets Another’s Wife

Four things befall that heedless one
sleeping with one who’s wed:
demerit gained but not good sleep,

third is blame while fourth is hell.

Explanation: A thoughtless person, who goes to another man’s
wife, will suffer four evil results. Firstly, he will acquire demerit
- what is not meritorious. Secondly, he will not get enough comfortable
sleep. Thirdly, he will be disgraced. Fourthly, he will be born in
hell.


Verse 310. Shun Adultery

Demerit’s gained and evil birth,
scared man and women - brief their joy,
the king decrees a heavy doom:
so none should sleep with one who’s wed.

Explanation: Demerits will be acquired. The lowly state of
hell, will be his lot. Since both man and the woman are frightened,
their embrace will generate little pleasure. The king’s law will
impose severe punishment. Because of all these, a man will not covet
another’s wife.


Verse 311. Wrong Monastic Life Leads To Bad States

As blady grass when wrongly grasped
the hand does lacerate
so a mishandled monastic life
drags one off to hell.

Explanation: The blade of the kusa grass,
if held wrongly, will cut one’s hand. In the same way, if one were
to handle monastic life in the wrong way - against the grain - it will
pull the person down into hell.


 

Verse 312. Three Things That Will Not Yield Good Results

Whatever of kammas slacks,
whatever of vows corrupt,
a faltering in the holy life
never brings ample fruit.

Explanation: Some act of merit may get committed
casually. The practice of religious rite may be tainted. Higher life may
get led dubiously. All these will not yield high results.


Verse 313. Do Merit With Commitment

If there’s aught that should be done
let it be done then steadily,
in truth a slack monastic life
all the more stirs up the dust.

Explanation: If you do an act of merit do it with a sense
of commitment and concern. But, if the practice of monastic life is
casual, instead of reducing the dust, much dust will be smeared.


Verse 314. Good Deeds Never Make You Repent

Better an evil deed not done
for misdeed later on torments.
Better done is deed that’s good,

which done, does not torment.

Explanation: It is better not to do an evil deed; an evil
deed torments one later on. It is better to do a good deed as one
has not to repent for having done it.


Verse 315. Guard The Mind

Even as a border town
guarded within and without,
so should you protect yourselves.
Do not let this moment pass
for when this moment’s gone they grieve
sending themselves to hell.

Explanation: As a border town is guarded both inside and outside,
so guard yourself. Let not the moment go by. Those who miss this moment
has come to grief when they fall into hell.


Verse 316. False Beliefs Lead To Hell

They are ashamed where shame is not
but where is shame are not ashamed
so by embracing evil views
beings go to an evil birth.

Explanation: Those who are ashamed of what they should not
be ashamed of, and those who are unashamed of what they should be
ashamed of, all those who embrace false views go to woeful states.


Verse 317. Fear And Fearlessness In Wrong Places

They are afraid where fear is not
but where is fear are unafraid,
so by embracing evil views
beings go to an evil birth.

Explanation: There are some who are afraid of what they should
not fear. There are also some who are not afraid of what they should
really fear. They, all, who embrace false beliefs go to woeful states.


Verse 318. Right And Wrong

Faults they see where fault is not
but where is fault they see it not,
so by embracing evil views
beings go to an evil birth.

Explanation: Those who take what is correct as incorrect,
and those who take what is not correct as correct, both go to woeful
states when they depart because of their false beliefs.


Verse 319. Right Understanding

A fault they understand as such,
they know as well where fault is not,
so by embracing righteous views
beings go to a happy rebirth.

Explanation: They regard error as error, and what is right
as right. Those people who embrace right views go to heaven.

Verse 306. Liars Suffer Tortures Of Hell

With one denying truth there goes to hell
that one who having done says ‘I did not’.
Both of them are making kammas base
are equal after death.

Explanation: One who tells lies about others goes to hell;
one who has done evil and says “I did not do it”, also goes
to hell. Both of them are evil doers, suffer alike in their next existence.

http://www.buddhanet.net/dhammapada/d_great.htm

Treasury of Truth (Dhammapada) Chapter 23, The Great

Verse 320. The Buddha’s Endurance

Many folks are ill-behaved
but I shall endure abuse
as elephant in battle
arrows shot from a bow.

Explanation: I will endure the words of the unvirtuous, who
make statements that go beyond the limits of decency. This is just
as the elephant that endures arrows in battle.


Verse 321. The Disciplined Animal

The tusker tamed they lead in crowds,
the king he mounts the tamed,
noblest of humans are the tamed
who can endure abuse.

Explanation: It is the disciplined animal (elephant or horse)
that is led to a gathering. The king mounts a disciplined horse. Among
men the disciplined one is the greatest. He has endured the harsh
words of the people.


Verse 322. The Most Disciplined Animal

Excellent are mules when tamed
and thoroughbred from Sindh,
noble the elephant of state,
better still one tamed of self.

Explanation: When well trained, mules are useful. Sindu thoroughbreds
are outstanding among horses. Of great elephants those of the Kunjara
breed are the greatest. But, of all, the best is the person who has
trained himself.


Verse 323. The Right Vehicle To Nibbana

Surely not on mounts like these
one goes the Unfrequented Way
as one by self well-tamed
is tamed and by the taming goes.

Explanation: Indeed, not be any means of transport can one
go to the place one has never been before, but by thoroughly taming
oneself, the tamed one can get to that place - Nibbana.


Verse 324. The Bound Elephant

Hard to check the tusker Dhanapala,
in rut with temple running pungently,
bound, e’en a morsel he’ll not eat
for he recalls the elephant-forest longingly.

Explanation: The elephant, Dhanapala, deep
in rut and uncontrollable did not eat a morsel as he yearned for his native
forest and pined for his parents.


Verse 325. The Slothful, Greedy Sleeper Returns to Samsara, Over and Over

A sluggard stupid, steeped in gluttony,
who’s sleep-engrossed, who wallows as he lies,
like a great porker stuffed, engorged with swill,
comes ever and again into a womb.

Explanation: The stupid one who is lazy, gluttonous, and drowsy,
who just wallows like a well-fed pig, is subjected to repeated births.


Verse 326. Restrain Mind As A Mahout An Elephant In Rut

Formerly this wandering mind wandered
where it wished, where whim, where pleasure led.
Wisely this day I will restrain it

as trainer with hook an elephant in rut.

Explanation: In Buddhist literature the image of the elephant
being restrained is used as a parallel to the act of the spiritually
advanced person restraining himself.


Verse 327. The Elephant Mired

Do you delight in heedfulness
and guard your own mind well!
Draw yourselves from the evil way
as would elephant sunk in slough.

Explanation: Take delight in mindfulness, guard your mind
well. As an elephant stuck in mire pulls itself out, so also pull
yourself out of the mire of moral defilements.


Verse 328. Cherish The Company Of The Good

If for practice one finds a friend
prudent, well-behaved and wise,
mindful, joyful, live with him
all troubles overcoming.

Explanation: If you come upon a mature wise companion whose
ways are virtuous, you must associate with him as you can lead a happy
and alert life, overcoming all dangers.


Verse 329. The Lonely Recluse

If for practice one finds no friend
prudent, well-behaved and wise,
like king be leaving conquered land,
fare as lone elephant in the wilds.

Explanation: If you cannot find a wise, mature companion whose
ways are virtuous, you must go about life all alone like a king who,
abandoning his conquered kingdoms, lives in exile, or like the elephant
Matanga who roams the forest living in solitude.


Verse 330. For The Solitary The Needs Are Few

Better it is to live alone
for with a fool’s no fellowship,
no evil do, be free of care,
fare as lone elephant in the wilds.

Explanation: Leading a solitary life is more commendable.
One cannot keep company with ignorant ones. With only a limited number
of needs, let one lead a life of solitude, doing no wrong, like the
elephant Matanga.


Verse 331. The Blessed

Blest to have friends when one’s in need,
blest contentment with whatever is,
blessed is merit when life’s at an end,
abandoning all dukkha is blessedness.

Explanation: Friends in need are a comfort. Satisfaction with
whatever little you have is a comfort. Merit, at the end of one’s
days, is a comfort. It is a blessing, indeed, to eradicate all suffering.


Verse 332. Blessing To Be An Arahat

Respect for one’s mother brings happiness here
as well as respect for one’s father.
Here happiness comes from respecting the monks
and those of virtue excellent.

Explanation: In this world, motherhood is a blessing. In the
same way, fatherhood, too, is a blessing. Monkhood is a blessing.
Above all, arahathood is a blessing.




Verse 333. Four Forms Of Blessing

Bless is virtue till life’s end
and blest the faith standing firm,
blest the attainment of wisdom
and blest the non-doing of evils.

Explanation: Pursuit of virtue until old age and decay is
a blessing. The acquisition of wisdom is a blessing, It is a blessing
to refrain from unwholesomeness.

http://www.buddhanet.net/dhammapada/d_crave.htm


Verse 335. How Craving Increases

Whomsoever in this world
this wretched clinging craving routs
for such a one do sorrows grow
as grass well-soaked with rain.

Explanation: If some one is overcome by craving which is described
as lowly and poisonous, his sorrows grow as swiftly and profusely
as birana grass, after being exposed to repeated rains.


Verse 336. Escaping Craving

But whoever in the world
routs wretched craving hard to quell,
from such a one do sorrows fall
like water drops from lotus leaf.

Explanation: Craving is a lowly urge. It is difficult to escape
craving. But, in this world, if someone were to conquer craving, sorrow
will slip off from him like water off a lotus leaf.


Verse 337. Uprooting Craving

Prosperity to you, I say,
to all assembled here!
When needing grass’s fragrant root
so craving extirpate.
Don’t let Mara break you again
and again as a torrent a reed!

Explanation: All those here assembled, may you all be well.
I will advise you towards your well-being. The person who is keen
to get sweet-smelling usira roots must first dig up the birana grass
roots. In the same way, dig up the roots of craving. If you did that,
Mara - death - will not torture you over and over like a flood crushing
reed.


Verse 338. Craving Uneradicated Brings Suffering Over and Over

As tree though felled shoots up again
it its roots are safe and firm
so this dukkha grows again
while latent craving’s unremoved.

Explanation: Even when a tree has been cut down, it will grow
up again if its roots are strong and unharmed. Similarly, when traces
of craving remain, the suffering is likely to arise again and again.


Verse 339. Caught In The Currents Of Craving

For whom the six and thirty streams
so forceful flow to seeming sweet
floods of thought that spring from lust
sweep off such wrong viewholder.

Explanation: If in a person the thirty-six streams flow strongly
towards pleasurable thoughts, that person of depraved views will be
carried away on those current of craving.


Verse 340. The Creeper of Craving

Everywhere these streams are swirling,
up-bursting creepers rooted firm.
Seeing the craving-creeper there
with wisdom cut its root!

Explanation: The streams of craving flow towards objects everywhere.
As a result, a creeper springs up and flourishes. The wise, when they
see this creeper, should cut its root with wisdom.


Verse 341. Bliss Does Not Come Through Craving

To beings there are pleasures streaming
sticky with desire,
steeped in comfort, happiness seeking,
such ones do come to birth, decay.

Explanation: Craving arises in people like flowing streams.
These flow towards pleasure and sensual satisfaction. Such people
who are bent on pleasure will experience repeated cycles of birth
and decay.


Verse 342. The Bonds That Entrap Men

Who follow craving are assailed,
they tremble as the hare ensnared,
held fast by fetter and by bonds
so long they come to dukkha again.

Explanation: Surrounded by craving the masses tremble like
a hare caught in a trap. Shackled by ten fetter and seven sangas,
men and women suffer again and again over a long period of time.


Verse 343. Nibbana By Shunning Craving

Who follow craving are assailed,
they tremble as the hare ensnared,
so let a bhikkhu craving quell
whose aim is passionlessness

Explanation: Surrounded by craving the masses tremble like
a hare caught in a trap. Therefore, a monk desiring to attain detachment
- Nibbana - should shun craving.


Verse 344. Freed From Craving Runs Back To Craving

Who without woodness inclines to the wood.
Free in the wood to woodness returns.
Do now regard that person well
who free returns to fetter.

Explanation: Having left the forest of desire he takes to
the forest of the practice (i.e. the life of a monk); but when he
is free from the forest of desire he rushes back to that very forest.
Come, look at that man who having become free rushes back into that
very bondage.


Verse 345. Bonds Of Attachment

Neither of iron nor wood nor hemp
is bond so strong, proclaim the wise,
as passion’s yearn for sons, for wives,
for gems and ornaments.

Explanation: The yearning for sons and wives are a stronger
attachment than all the physical bonds made of iron, wood or hemp.
Therefore, consider how to deal with this basic desire with wisdom.


Verse 346. Bonds Are Strong, But The Wise Get Rid Of Them

That bond is strong, proclaim the wise,
down-dragging, pliable, hard to lose.
This passion severed, they wander forth
forsaking sensual pleasures.

Explanation: The wise agree that this is a strong bond. It
tends to deprave. Though this seems a lax knot, it is difficult to
untie it to be free. However difficult the process is, freeing themselves
from yearning for sensual pleasures, the wise leave household life
and become ascetics.


Verse 347. Spider Web Of Passion

Ensnared in passion back they fall
as spider on a self-spun web.
This passion severed, wander the wise
forsaking dukkha all.

Explanation: Beings who are infatuated with lust fall back
into the stream of craving they have generated, just as a spider does
in the web it has spun. The wise cutting off the bound of craving,
walk on resolutely, leaving all ills (dukkha) behind.


Verse 348. Reaching The Further Shore

Let go before, let go the after,
let go the middle, beyond the becoming.
With mind released in every way
you’ll come no more to birth, decay.

Explanation: Give up the past, give up the future, give up
the present. Having reached the end of existence, with a mind free
(of all conditioned things), you will not again undergo birth and
decay.


Verse 349. Craving Tightens Bonds

For one who’s crushed by thinking much
excessive lust from beauty’s sight,
for that one craving grows the more,
that one makes strong the bonds.

Explanation: In those whose minds are agitated and assailed
by doubts and suspicions, whose passions and sensualities are sharpened,
craving increases more and more. This makes the bonds tighter.


Verse 350. He Cuts Off Bonds Of Mara

But who delights in calming thoughts
develops constant mindfulness,
that one indeed will make an End,
will sever Mara’s bonds.

Explanation: He who is constantly engaged in dispelling the
doubts and suspicions that assail the mind, is earnest and ever alert,
looks on the world of reality as not pleasant. He will eradicate craving
and will cut off bonds of death.


Verse 351. The Person Who Has Reached The Goal

One who’s fearless, reached the End,
of craving and of blemish free,
who has becoming’s thorn plucked out,
has this, a final body.

Explanation: He has come to cessation. He has reached the
goal of his monastic life. He is free of fear, craving and is blemishless.
He has broken the thorns of existence. This is his final being.


Verse 352. The Man Of Great Wisdom

One of clinging-craving free,
who’s skilled in way of chanting,
knowing the wording-sequence,
of what precedes and follows,
possessed of final body,
one greatly wise, great person called.

Explanation: He is free of craving and devoid of grasping.
He is well versed in etymology and in usages. He is aware of characters
and their deployment into combinations. He knows the sequence of letters.
He knows the old dialect. This is his last body. That person is a
great wise man.


Verse 353. Buddha Is Teacherless

Beyond all beings, wise to all,
unsoiled by dhamma all am I,
left all and freed by craving’s end,
by self I’ve known, whom teacher call?

Explanation: I have overcome all, I know all, I am detached
from all, I have given up all; I am liberated from moral defilements
having eradicated craving. Having comprehended the four noble truths
by myself, whom shall I point out as my teacher.


Verse 354. The Conquest Of All Suffering

Gift of Dhamma surpasses all gifts,
the Dhamma, its taste all other tastes beats,
delight in the Dhamma bests other delights,
destruction of craving conquers all ill.

Explanation: The gift of Dhamma excels all others gifts; the
taste of Dhamma excels all other tastes; delight in the Dhamma excels
all other delights. The eradication of craving overcomes all ills.


Verse 355. Wealth Destroys The Ignorant

Riches ruin a foolish one
but not one seeking the Further Shore,
craving for wealth a foolish one
is ruined as if ruining others.

Explanation: Wealth destroys the foolish; but it cannot destroy
those who seek the other shore (i.e. Nibbana). By his craving for
wealth the fool destroys himself, as he would destroy others.


Verse 356. Those Without The Bane Of Passion

Weeds are a fault of fields,
lust’s a human fault,
thus offerings to the lustless
bear abundant fruit.

Explanation: Fields have grasses as their bane. The ordinary
masses have passion as their bane. Therefore, high yields are possible
only through what is given to the passionless ones.


Verse 357. Those Without The Bane Of Ill-Will

Weeds are a fault of fields,
hate’s a human fault,
hence offerings to the hateless
bear abundant fruit.

Explanation: Fields have weeds as their bane. The ordinary
masses have passion as their bane. Therefore, high yields are possible
only through what is given to those without ill-will.


Verse 358. Those Without The Bane Of Illusion

Weed are the fault of fields,
delusion, human’s faults,
so gifts to the undeluded
bear abundant fruit.

Explanation: Fields have weeds as their bane.
The ordinary masses have passion as their bane. Therefore, high yields
are possible only through what is given to the one without illusion.


Verse 359. Those Without The Bane Of Greed

Weed are the fault of fields,
delusion, human’s faults,
so gifts to the desireless
bear abundant fruit.

Explanation: Fields have weeds as their bane.
The ordinary masses have passion as their bane. Therefore, high yields
are possible only through what is given to the one without desire.

Verse 334. The Increase Of Craving

As creeping ivy craving grows
in one living carelessly.
Like this, one leaps from life to life
as ape in the forest seeking fruit.

Explanation: Man’s craving grows like the creeper maluva.
At the end, the creeper destroys the tree. Like the monkey that is
not happy with the fruit in the tree, the man of craving keeps on
jumping from one existence to another.

http://www.buddhanet.net/dhammapada/d_monks.htm


Verse 361. Suffering End With All-Round Discipline

Right is restraint in the body,
restraint in speech is right,
right is restraint in the mind,
everywhere restraint is right.
The bhikkhu everywhere restrained
is from all dukkha free.

Explanation: It is good to be disciplined in body. It is good
to be disciplined in words. It is good to be disciplined in mind.
The monk who is disciplined in all these areas will achieve freedom
from all suffering.


Verse 362. The True Monk

With hands controlled and feet controlled,
in speech as well as head controlled,
delighting in inward collectedness
alone, content, a bhikkhu’s called.

Explanation: He who controls his hands, controls his foot,
controls his speech, and has complete control of himself; who finds
delight in insight development practice and is calm; who stays alone
and is contented they call him a monk.


Verse 363. The Ideal Monk

Whatever bhikkhu tongue-controlled
speaks wisely and who is not proud,
who theory and practice can expound,
sweet as honey is his speech.

Explanation: The monk who controls his speech, who speaks
wisely with his mind composed, who explains the meaning of the Dhamma
- sweet are the words of that monk.


Verse 364. The Monk Abides in Dhamma

The bhikkhu who in Dhamma dwells,
in Dhamma delighting and pondering,
remembering the Dhamma - he
does not decline from Dhamma True.

Explanation: The monk who abides in the Dhamma, who delights
in the Dhamma, and is ever mindful of the Dhamma, does not fall away
from the Dhamma of the virtuous.


Verse 365. Accept What One Receives

He should not disdain his gains
nor live of others envious,
the bhikkhu who is envious
does not attain collectedness.

Explanation: Do not underestimate what you have received.
And again, do not expect what others have got. If a monk covets what
others have received, he will never attain tranquillity of mind.


Verse 366. The Gods Adore Virtuous Monks

Disdaining not his gains,
though little he receives,
pure of life and keen
that bhikkhu devas praise.

Explanation: The monk may have received only a little but
he does not under estimate what was given him. He is satisfied with
what he has received. Such a monk, who leads a pure livelihood, is
praised by deities.


Verse 367. He Is A Monk Who Has No Attachment

For whom there is no making ‘mine’
towards all name and form,
who does not grieve for what is not,
he’s truly ‘bhikkhu’ called.

Explanation: He has gone beyond all sense of his own name
and form. To him, there is no existence of I, my or mine. If his name
and form entity were to decay and deteriorate, he will not grieve.
Such a person is called a monk.


Verse 368. The Monk Who Radiates Loving-Kindness Radiates Peace

The bhikkhu in kindness abiding,
bright in the Buddha’s Teaching
can come to the Place of Peace,
the bliss of conditionedness ceased.

Explanation: The monk who extends loving-kindness to all,
takes delight in the Teaching of the Buddha, will attain the state
of bliss, the happiness of Nibbana, which denotes the pacifying of
the agitation of existence.


Verse 369. Give Up Lust And Hatred

O bhikkhu bail this boat,
when emptied it will swiftly go.
Having severed lust and hate
thus to Nibbana you’ll go.

Explanation: O monk, your boat must be emptied of the water
which, if accumulated, will sink it. Once the water is taken out and
the boat is emptied, both lust and hate gone, it will swiftly reach
its destination - Nibbana.


Verse 370. Flood-Crosser Is One Who Has Giver Up The Fetters

Five cut off and five forsake,
a further five then cultivate,
a bhikkhu from five fetter free
is called a ‘Forder of the flood.’

Explanation: One should break away from the five lower fetter.
One must get rid of the five higher fetters. One must cultivate the
five faculties. One must go beyond five attachments. A monk who has
achieved these is described as the one who has crossed the flood.


Verse 371. Meditate Earnestly

Meditate bhikkhu! Don’t be heedless!
Don’t let pleasures whirl the mind!
Heedless, do not gulp a glob of iron!
Bewail not when burning, ‘This is dukkha’!

Explanation: O monk, meditate and do not be indolent. Do not
allow your mind to loiter among sensual pleasures. If you allow it,
it will be like having iron balls forced down your throat in hell.
You will bewail your fate crying, “This is suffering,” Do
not allow it to happen.


Verse 372. There Is No Wisdom In Those Who Do Not Think

No concentration wisdom lacks,
no wisdom concentration lacks,
in whom are both these qualities
near to Nibbana is that one.

Explanation: For one who lacks meditation there is no wisdom.
Both meditation and wisdom are essential and cannot be had without
the other. If in a person, both wisdom and meditation are present,
he is close to Nibbana.


Verse 373. He Who Is Calm Experiences Transcendental Joy

The bhikkhu gone to a lonely place
who is of peaceful heart
in-sees Dhamma rightly,
knows all-surpassing joy.

Explanation: A monk who enters an empty house, whose mind
is at peace, and who is capable of seeing the reality of things, experiences
an ecstasy not known to ordinary minds.


Verse 374. He Is Happy Who Reflects On Rise And Fall

Whenever one reflects
on aggregates’ arise and fall
one rapture gains and joy.
‘Tis Deathless for Those-who-know.

Explanation: When the meditator reflects upon the raise and
the decay of the bodily aggregates he experiences a joy and ecstasy
which is a fore taste of Nibbana for those who know it.


Verse 375. A Wise Monk Possess His Cardinal Virtues

Here’s indeed the starting point
for the bhikkhu who is wise,
sense-controlled, contented too,
restrained to limit freedom ways,
in company of noble friends
who’re pure of life and keen.

Explanation: The joy experienced as a fore taste of Nibbana,
through the awareness of the rise and decay of the aggregates, is
the first step of the wise meditator. Guarding the senses, even-minded,
and disciplined in the principal code of morality and association
with good friends who are unrelaxed in their effort and are pure in
behaviour.


Verse 376. A Monk Should Be Cordial In All His Ways

One should be hospitable
and skilled in good behaviour,
thereby greatly joyful
come to dukkha’s end.

Explanation: One should be courteous and of pleasant behaviour.
One should be efficient in the conduct of the proper rites and rituals.
Through these, one acquires a vast quantum of ecstasy, leading him
to the ending of suffering.


Verse 377. Cast Off Lust And Hatred

Just as the jasmine sheds
its shrivelled flowers all,
O bhikkhus so should you
lust, aversion shed.

Explanation: The jasmine creeper casts off its withered flowers.
Exactly in that manner, O monks, cast off your passion and ill-will.


Verse 378. He Is Peaceful Who Is Free From All Worldly Things

That bhikkhu calmed of body, speech,
calmed and well-composed of mind,
who world-enjoyments has renounced,
‘one calmed’ indeed is truly called.

Explanation: For a monk to be wholly and completely tranquil,
he must be restrained in body and speech. This discipline derives
from restraint of mind. Then, when these three forms of restraints
have been achieved, the monk is automatically wholly and completely
tranquil.


Verse 379. He Who Guards Himself Lives Happily

By yourself exhort yourself!
By yourself restrain yourself!
So mindful and self-guarded too,
happily, bhikkhu, will you live.

Explanation: One’s own self must prod one’s self.
You must assess and examine yourself. O monk, this way, you must guard
yourself. Be perpetually mindful. This way, live in bliss.


Verse 380. Your Are Your Own Saviour

Oneself is refuge of oneself
and one is a haven for oneself,
therefore one should check oneself
as a merchant with a splendid horse.

Explanation: Your own self is your own refuge. You yourself
are your own guide. Therefore, exert discipline over yourself as a
merchant would cherish and retrain a noble horse.


Verse 381. With Joy And Faith Try To Win Your Goal

The bhikkhu full of joy and faith,
bright in the Buddha’s Teaching
can come to the Place of Peace,
the bliss of conditionedness ceased.

Explanation: His ecstasy is abundant. He takes delight in
the Teaching of the Buddha. Such a monk will reach the state of total
tranquillity - Nibbana - through the blissful ending of conditioning.




Verse 382. Even A Young Monk, If Devoted, Can Illuminate The Whole World

Surely that youthful bhikkhu who
strives in the Buddha’s Teaching
illuminates all this world
as moon when free from clouds.

Explanation: This is true. If a young monk exerts himself
strenuously in the Teaching of the Buddha, he will certainly illuminate
the world as brilliantly as a moon emerging from behind a dark cloud
that hid it for a while.

Verse 360. Sense Discipline

Right is restraint in the eye,
restraint in the ear is right,
right is restraint in the nose,
restraint in the tongue is right.

Explanation: It is good to be disciplined in the eye. It is
good to be disciplined in the ear. It is good to be disciplined in
the nose. To be disciplined in the tongue is good.

http://www.buddhanet.net/dhammapada/d_brahmi.htm




Verse 384. Cultivate Concentration

When by the twofold Dhamma
a Brahmin’s gone beyond
all the bonds of One-who-Knows
have wholly disappeared.

Explanation: When the brahmana - the seeker after the truth
- has understood the two states of concentration and insight through
and through, then in that person who knows these, all fetters wane,
diminish and fade away.




Verse 385. The Unfettered Person Is A Brahmana

For whom is found no near or far,
for whom’s no near or far,
free of fear and fetter-free,
that one I call a Brahmin True.

Explanation: To him there is no further shore. To him there
is no near shore. To him both these shores are non-existent. He is
free of anxiety and is freed of bonds. That person I describe as a
Brahmana.




Verse 386. Who Is Contemplative And Pure Is A Brahmin

Seated stainless, concentrated,
who’s work is done, who’s free of taints,
having attained the highest aim,
that one I call a Brahmin True.

Explanation: He is given to concentrated contemplation. He
is free of all blemishes - the dust that defiles a being. He sits
in solitude. All his spiritual tasks and obligations are done. He
has reached the highest goal. That person I describe as a brahmana.




Verse 387. The Buddha Shines Day And Night

The sun is bright by day,
the moon enlights the night,
armoured shines the warrior,
contemplative the Brahmin True.
But all day and night-time too
resplendent does the Buddha shine.

Explanation: The sun shines during the day. The moon beams
at night. The warrior glows only when he has his armour on. The brahmana
shines when he is concentrated on contemplation. All these people
have various times to shine. But the Buddha is radiant all day and
all night through his Enlightenment.




Verse 388. He Who Had Discarded All Evil Is Holy

By barring-out badness a ‘brahmin’ one’s
called
and one is a monk by conduct serene,
banishing blemishes out of oneself
therefore one’s known as ‘one who has left home’.

Explanation: One who has got rid of sinful action is called
brahmana. One of serene senses is called samana. A person is called
pabbajita because he has done away with all his faults.

Note: brahmano, samano, pabbajito: a brahmin, a monk a wandering
ascetic. These are all categories of priests in the religious landscape
of the Buddha’s day. They pursued a multitude of religious paths.
Here the Buddha explains who a real priest, monk or a brahmin is.




Verse 389. Harm Not An Arahat

One should not a brahmin beat
nor for that should He react.
Shame! Who would a Brahmin beat,
more shame for any should they react.

Explanation: No one should strike a brahmana - the pure saint.
The brahmana who has become a victim must refrain from attacking the
attacker in return, or show anger in return. Shame on him who attacks
a brahmana; greater shame on him who displays retaliatory anger.




Verse 390. An Arahat Does Not Retaliate

For brahmin no small benefit
when mind’s aloof from what is dear.
As much he turns away from harm
so much indeed does dukkha die.

Explanation: To the brahmana, the act of not returning hate
is not a minor asset - it is a great asset, indeed. If, there is in
a mind which usually takes delight in hateful acts, there is a change
for the better, it is not a minor victory. Each time the violent mind
ceases, suffering, too, subsides.




Verse 391. The Well-Restrained Is Truly A Brahmin

In whom there is no wrong-doing
by body, speech or mind,
in these three ways restrained,
that one I call a Brahmin True.

Explanation: If an individual is well guarded in body, speech
and in mind, and has done no wrong in these three areas, who is well
restrained, I call that person a true brahmana - the noble saint.




Verse 392. Honour To Whom Honour Is Due

From whom one knows the Dhamma
by Perfect Buddha taught
devoutly one should honour them
as brahmin sacred fire.

Explanation: If a seeker after truth were to learn the Word
of the Enlightened One from a teacher, that pupil must pay the Teacher
due respect, like a brahmin paying homage assiduously and with respect
to the sacrificial fire.




Verse 393. One Does Not Become A Brahmin Merely By Birth

By birth one is no brahmin,
by family, austerity.
In whom are truth and Dhamma too
pure is he, a Brahmin’s he.

Explanation: One does not become a brahmin by one’s matted
hair. Nor does one become a brahmin by one’s clan. Even one’s
birth will not make a brahmin. If one has realized the Truth., has
acquired the knowledge of the Teaching, if he is also pure, it is
such a person that I describe as a brahmin.




Verse 394. Be Pure Within

What’s the coiled hair for?
For what your cloak of skins?
Within you are acquisitive,
you decorate without.

Explanation: Of what use are your exterior sights of asceticism:
you matted hair, your leopard skin garment? Your outside you keep
clean and bright, while inside you are filled with defilements.




Verse 395. Who Meditates Alone in the Forest Is A Brahmana

One enduring rag-robes, lean,
with body o’er spread by veins,
lone in the woods who meditates,
that one I call a Brahmin True.

Explanation: He wears robs made of cast off rags. He is so
austere and lean that veins stand out in his body. All alone, he meditates
in the forest. Such a seeker if truth, I describe as a brahmano.




Verse 396. Non-Possessive And The Non-Attached Person Is A Brahmana

I call him a brahmin though
by womb-born mother’s lineage,
he’s just supercilious
if with sense of ownership,
owning nothing and unattached:
that one I call a Brahmin True.

Explanation: I would not call a person a brahmana merely because
he was born out of a brahmana mother’s womb. Nor would I call
a person a brahmin merely because he goes about addressing people
as sir. These people are full of defilements. I call a person a brahmin
who is free of faults and is not given to craving.




 

Verse 397. A Brahmana Is He Who Has Destroyed All Fetters

Who fetters all has severed
does tremble not at all,
who’s gone beyond all bond, unyoked,
that one I call a Brahmin True.

Explanation: He has got rid of all fetters; in consequence,
he is free of trepidation and is fearless. He has travelled beyond
all bonds. Disengaged from bonds, he is no longer tied to the world.
Such a person I describe as a brahmana.




Verse 398. A Brahmana Is He Who Has No Hatred

When cutting strap and reins,
the rope and bridle too,
tipping the shaft, he’s Waked,
that one I call a Brahmin True.

Explanation: He has got rid of the strap of ill-will. He has
freed himself from the thong of craving. He has escaped the large
shackle breaking all its links. These are the false views that curb
the people. He has taken off the cross-bar of ignorance. He has become
aware of the four noble truths. That person, I describe as a brahmana.




Verse 399. A Brahmana Is He Who Is Patient

Who angerless endures abuse.
Beating and imprisonment,
with patience’s power, an armed might:
that one I call a Brahmin True.

Explanation: He is abused and insulted. He is tortured, imprisoned
and bound up. But he endures all these without being provoked or without
losing his temper. Such an individual who has patience as his power
and his army, I describe as a true brahmano.




Verse 400. A Brahmana Is He Who Is Not Wrathful

Who’s angerless and dutiful,
of virtue full and free of lust,
who’s tamed, to final body come,
that one I call a Brahmin True.

Explanation: He is free of anger. He carefully performs his
religious duties and is mindful of the observances. He is disciplined
in terms of virtuous behaviour. He is restrained. This is the final
body he will occupy as he has ended his cycle of births. I call that
person a brahmana.




Verse 401. He Is A Brahmana Who Clings Not To Sensual Pleasures

Like water on a lotus leaf,
or mustard seed on needle point,
whoso clings not to sensual things,
that one I call a Brahmin True.

Explanation: The water does not get attached
to the surface of the lotus leaf. The mustard seed does not get attached
to the point of a needle. In the same way, the wise one’s mind does
not get attached to sensual pleasure. Such a non-attached person I describe
as the true brahmana .




Verse 402. A Brahmana Is He Who Has Laid The Burden Aside

Whoso in this world comes to know
cessation of all sorrow,
laid down the burden, freed from bonds,
that one I call a Brahmin True.

Explanation: He has become aware, in this world itself, the
end of suffering. He is unburdened: he has put down the load. He has
got disengaged from the bonds that held him. I call that person a
true brahmana.




Verse 403. A Brahmana Is He Who Has Reached His Ultimate Goal

Whose knowledge is deep, who’s wise,
who’s skilled in ways right and wrong,
having attained the highest aim,
that one I call a Brahmin True.

Explanation: He possesses profound wisdom. He is full of insight.
He is capable of discriminating the right path from the wrong path.
He has reached the highest state. I call that person a true brahmana.




Verse 404. A Brahmana Is He Who Has No Intimacy With Any

Aloof alike from laity
and those gone forth to homelessness,
who wanders with no home or wish,
that one I call a Brahmin True.

Explanation: He does not establish extensive contact either
with laymen or with the homeless. He is not attached to the way of
life of the householder. He is content with the bare minimum of needs.
I call that person a true brahmana.




Verse 405. A Brahmana Is He Who Is Absolutely Harmless

Who blows to beings has renounced
to trembling ones, to bold,
who causes not to kill nor kills,
that one I call a Brahmin True.

Explanation: He has discarded the rod and set aside the weapons.
He does not hurt neither the frightened, timid beings, nor stubborn,
fearless beings. I call that person a brahmana.




Verse 406. A Brahmana Is He Who Is Friendly Amongst The Hostile

Among the hostile, friendly,
among the violent, cool
detached amidst the passionate,
that one I call a Brahmin True.

Explanation: Being friendly even among the hostile. Free from
hostility, violence and passionate grasping, one emerges a true brahmin.




Verse 407. A Brahmana Is He Who Has Discarded All Passions

From whomever lust and hate,
conceit, contempt have dropped away,
as mustard seed from a point of a needle,
that one I call a Brahmin True.

Explanation: His mind does not accept such evils as lust,
ill-will, pride and ingratitude. In this, his mind is like a point
of a needle that just does not grasp a mustard seed. An individual
endowed with such a mind I describe as a brahmana.




Verse 408. A Brahmana Is He Who Gives Offence To None

Who utters speech instructive,
true and gentle too,
who gives offence to none,
that one I call a Brahmin True.

Explanation: His speech is true. His words are well-meaning,
constructive and not harsh. By his words he will not give offence
to anyone. Nor will his words provoke people. Such a person I declare
a true brahmana.




Verse 409. A Brahmana Is He Who Steals Not

Who in the world will never take
what is not given, long or short,
the great or small, the fair or foul,
that one I call a Brahmin True.

Explanation: In this world if there is some person who does
not take anything that is not given, whether long or short, minute
or large or good or bad, him I declare a true brahmana.




Verse 410. A Brahmana Is He Who Is Desireless

In whom there are no longings found
in this world or the next,
longingless and free from bonds,
that one I call Brahmin True.

Explanation: He has no yearnings either for this world or
for the next. He is free from earning and greed. He is disengaged
from defilements. Such a person I declare a fine brahmana.




Verse 411. In Whom There Is No Clinging

In whom there is no dependence found,
with Final Knowledge freed from doubt,
who’s plunged into the Deathless depths,
that one I call a Brahmin True.

Explanation: He has no attachments - no attachments can be
discovered in him. He has no spiritual doubts due to his right awareness,
He has entered the deathless - Nibbana. I describe him, a true brahmana.




Verse 412. Above Both Good And Evil

Here who’s gone beyond both bonds
to goodness and evil too,
is sorrowless, unsullied, pure
that one I call a Brahmin True.

Explanation: If any person in this world has travelled beyond
both good and the bad, and the attachments, and if he is without sorrow,
and is bereft of blemishes, and is pure, him I describe as a true
brahmana.




Verse 413. Learning The Charm

Who, like the moon, unblemished, pure,
is clear and limpid, and in whom
delights in being a consumed,
that one I call a Brahmin True.

Explanation: He is like the moon at the full - spotless and
free of blemishes. He is pure, calm, serene and exceptionally tranquil.
He is has got rid of the craving that takes delight in the cycle of
existence. That person I declare a true brahmana.




Verse 414. The Tranquil Person

Who’s passed this difficult path,
delusion’s bond, the wandering-on,
who’s crossed beyond , contemplative,
uncraving with no questioning doubt,
no clinging’s fuel so cool become,
that one I call a Brahmin true.

Explanation: He has crossed over the quagmire of passion.
He has gone beyond the difficult terrain of blemishes, that is hard
to traverse and has crossed the cycle of existence. He is fully and
totally reached the other shore. He is a meditator and is bereft of
craving. His spiritual doubts are resolved. He is no longer given
to grasping. He is cooled. Such a person I describe as a true brahmana.




Verse 415. Freed From Temptation

Who has abandoned lusting here
as homeless one renouncing all,
with lust and being quite consumed,
that one I call a Brahmin True.

Explanation: Rejecting pleasure, homeless he goes to life’s
journey’s end. Him, I call a Brahmin True.




Verse 416. The Miracle Rings

Who has abandoned lusting here
as homeless one renouncing all,
with lust and being quite consumed,
that one I call a Brahmin True.

Explanation: In this world, he has taken to the life of a
wandering ascetic. He has got rid of the craving to continue the cycle
of existence. I describe that person as a true brahmana.




Verse 417. Beyond All Bonds

Abandoned all human bonds
and gone beyond the bonds of gods,
unbound one is from every bond,
that one I call a Brahmin True.

Explanation: He has given up the bonds that bind him to humanity.
He has gone beyond the bonds of attachment to life in heaven as well.
This way, he is disengaged from all bonds. I declare such a person
a brahmana.




Verse 418. The Person Whose Mind Is Cool

Abandoned boredom and delight,
become quite cool and assetless,
a hero, All-worlds-Conqueror,
that one I call a Brahmin True.

Explanation: He has given up lust. He has also given up his
disgust for the practice of meditation. This way, he is both lustful
and lustres. He has achieved total tranquillity. He is devoid of the
blemishes that soil the hand. He has conquered all the world and is
full of effort. I call that person a brahmana.




Verse 419. Diviner Of Rebirth

Who knows how clutching creatures die
to reappear in many a mode,
unclutching then, sublime, Awake,
that one I call a Brahmin True.

Explanation: He knows the death and birth of beings in every
way. He is not attached to either birth or death. He has arrived at
the proper destination. He possesses the knowledge of the essences.
This person I describe as a brahmana.




Verse 420. Destroy Unknown

Whos destination is unknown
to humans, spirits or to gods,
pollutions stayed, an Arahant,
that one I call a Brahmin True.

Explanation: Their path, neither gods, nor spirits, nor humans
can fathom. Their taints are totally eradicated. They have attained
the higher spiritual state. This person I declare a brahmana.




Verse 421. He Yearns For Nothing

That one who’s free of everything
that’s past, that’s present, yet to be,
who nothing owns, who’s unattached,
that one I call a Brahmin True.

Explanation: Their path, neither gods, nor spirits, nor humans
can fathom. Their taints are totally eradicated. They have attained
the higher spiritual state. This person I declare a brahmana.




 

Verse 422. He Who Is Rid Of Defilements

One noble, most excellent, heroic too,
great sage and one who conquers all,
who’s faultless, washed, one Awake,
that one I call a Brahmin True.

Explanation: He is a great sage as he has
realized the essentials. He has conquered death. He is devoid of blemishes.
He has washed away all evil. He has awakener to the essentials. That person,
I describe as a brahmana.



Verse 423. The Giver And Receiver Of Alms

Who so does know of former lives
and sees the states of bliss and woe
and then who’s reached the end of births,
a sage supreme with wisdom keen,
complete in all accomplishments,
that one I call a Brahmin True.

Explanation: He knows his former existences. He has the capacity
to see heaven and hell - states of ecstasy and states of woe. He has
ended the cycle of existences. He has his higher awareness. He has
reached the state of a sage. He has achieved the final perfection.
Him I describe as a brahmana.

Verse 383. Be A Knower Of The Deathless

O brahmin, strive and cleave the stream,
desires of sense discarded,
knowing conditioned things decay
be Knower-of-the-Uncreated.

Explanation: Exert all you can and cut off the stream of existence.
Get rid of passion. Get to know the erosion of the condition things.
And, they become the knower of the uncreated - Nibbana.

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