Free Online JC PURE INSPIRATION to Attain NIBBĀNA the Eternal Bliss and for free birds 🐦 🦢 🦅 to grow fruits 🍍 🍊 🥑 🥭 🍇 🍌 🍎 🍉 🍒 🍑 🥝 vegetables 🥦 🥕 🥗 🥬 🥔 🍆 🥜 🪴 🌱 🎃 🫑 🍅🍜 🧅 🍄 🍝 🥗 🥒 🌽 🍏 🫑 🌳 🍓 🍊 🥥 🌵 🍈 🌰 🇧🇧 🫐 🍅 🍐 🫒 Youniversity
Kushinara NIBBĀNA Bhumi Pagoda White Home, Puniya Bhumi Bengaluru, Prabuddha Bharat International.
Categories:

Archives:
Meta:
July 2022
M T W T F S S
« Jun    
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031
01/09/22
𝓛𝓔𝓢𝓢𝓞𝓝 4309 Mon 10 Jan 2022 Vidhā Sutta — Conceit — Jhanas-Mental Development- Non-returner-The Practice of Loving-Kindness (Metta)
Filed under: General, Theravada Tipitaka , Plant raw Vegan Broccoli, peppers, cucumbers, carrots
Posted by: site admin @ 5:03 am
𝓛𝓔𝓢𝓢𝓞𝓝 4309 Mon 10 Jan 2022

Vidhā Sutta
— Conceit —
 Jhanas-Mental Development- Non-returner-The Practice of Loving-Kindness (Metta)



May all Sentient and Non-Sentient beings be ever happy, well and secure!
May all live long!
May all havew calm,quiet,alert,attentive and equanimity mind with a clear understanding that everything is changing!
Kushinara Nibbana Bhumi Pagoda
A 18ft Dia Patanjali Yogic Mindful Meditation Lab
at
White Home
668, 5A main Road,
8th Cross HAL III Stage
Punya Bhumi Bengaluru
Magadhi Karnataka
Prabudha Bharat International
https://lnkd.in/gGS4kgTE
WhatsApp : 944926443
TO OVERCOME HUNGER the worst kind of illness-GROW Vegan Vegetable and dwarf Fruit bearing plants in pots.





Top 10 Healthiest Vegetables to Include in Your Vegan Diet


Public

Tree >> Sutta Piṭaka >> Saṃyutta Nikāya >> Jhāna Saṃyutta
SN 53.36 (S v 306)
Vidhā Sutta
— Conceit —
[vidhā]
The
jhānas are recommended to get rid of the three types of conceit, which
are related to comparing oneself with others. It makes it plain that if
there is any hierarchy in the Sangha, it is only for practical purposes,
and it is not to be taken as being representative of any reality. It is
not quite clear whether this is one sutta repeating 16 times the same
thing, or 16 suttas grouped together, or 4 suttas containing each 4
repetitions.

(Direct knowledge)
There
are, bhikkhus, these three types of conceit. Which three? The conceit
‘I am superior’, the conceit ‘I am equal’, the conceit ‘I am inferior’.
These, bhikkhus, are the three types of conceit. For the direct
knowledge of these three types of conceit, bhikkhus, the four jhānas are
to be developed. Which four? Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, detached from
sensuality, detached from unwholesome states, having entered in the
first jhāna, abides therein, with thoughts and mental associations, with
rapture and pleasantness born of detachment, founded on detachment,
founded on disenchantment, founded on cessation, resulting in
relinquishment. With the stilling of thoughts and mental associations,
having entered in the second jhāna, he abides therein with inner
tanquilization, unification of the mind, without thoughts nor mental
associations, with rapture and pleasantness born of concentration,
founded on detachment, founded on disenchantment, founded on cessation,
resulting in relinquishment. With the fading away of rapture, abides in
equanimity, mindfulness and thorough understanding, he experiences in
the body the pleasantness which the noble ones describe: ‘one who is
equanimous and mindful dwells in [this] pleasantness’, having entered in
the third jhāna, he abides therein, founded on detachment, founded on
disenchantment, founded on cessation, resulting in relinquishment.
Abandoning pleasantness and abandoning unpleasantness, mental
pleasantness and mental unpleasantness having previously disappeared,
without pleasantness nor unpleasantness, with the purity of equanimity
and mindfulness, having entered in the fourth jhāna, he abides therein,
founded on detachment, founded on disenchantment, founded on cessation,
resulting in relinquishment. For the direct knowledge of these three
types of conceit, bhikkhus, the four jhānas are to be developed.
There
are, bhikkhus, these three types of conceit. Which three? The conceit
‘I am superior’, the conceit ‘I am equal’, the conceit ‘I am inferior’.
These, bhikkhus, are the three types of conceit. For the direct
knowledge of these three types of conceit, bhikkhus, the four jhānas are
to be developed. Which four? Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, detached from
sensuality, detached from unwholesome states, having entered in the
first jhāna, abides therein, with thoughts and mental associations, with
rapture and pleasantness born of detachment, resulting in the removal
of craving, resulting in the removal of aversion, resulting in the
removal of delusion. With the stilling of thoughts and mental
associations, having entered in the second jhāna, he abides therein with
inner tanquilization, unification of the mind, without thoughts nor
mental associations, with rapture and pleasantness born of
concentration, resulting in the removal of craving, resulting in the
removal of aversion, resulting in the removal of delusion. With the
fading away of rapture, abides in equanimity, mindfulness and thorough
understanding, he experiences in the body the pleasantness which the
noble ones describe: ‘one who is equanimous and mindful dwells in [this]
pleasantness’, having entered in the third jhāna, he abides therein,
resulting in the removal of craving, resulting in the removal of
aversion, resulting in the removal of delusion. Abandoning pleasantness
and abandoning unpleasantness, mental pleasantness and mental
unpleasantness having previously disappeared, without pleasantness nor
unpleasantness, with the purity of equanimity and mindfulness, having
entered in the fourth jhāna, he abides therein, resulting in the removal
of craving, resulting in the removal of aversion, resulting in the
removal of delusion. For the direct knowledge of these three types of
conceit, bhikkhus, the four jhānas are to be developed.
There
are, bhikkhus, these three types of conceit. Which three? The conceit
‘I am superior’, the conceit ‘I am equal’, the conceit ‘I am inferior’.
These, bhikkhus, are the three types of conceit. For the direct
knowledge of these three types of conceit, bhikkhus, the four jhānas are
to be developed. Which four? Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, detached from
sensuality, detached from unwholesome states, having entered in the
first jhāna, abides therein, with thoughts and mental associations, with
rapture and pleasantness born of detachment, merging into the
deathless, aiming at the deathless, resulting in the deathless. With the
stilling of thoughts and mental associations, having entered in the
second jhāna, he abides therein with inner tanquilization, unification
of the mind, without thoughts nor mental associations, with rapture and
pleasantness born of concentration, merging into the deathless, aiming
at the deathless, resulting in the deathless. With the fading away of
rapture, abides in equanimity, mindfulness and thorough understanding,
he experiences in the body the pleasantness which the noble ones
describe: ‘one who is equanimous and mindful dwells in [this]
pleasantness’, having entered in the third jhāna, he abides therein,
merging into the deathless, aiming at the deathless, resulting in the
deathless. Abandoning pleasantness and abandoning unpleasantness, mental
pleasantness and mental unpleasantness having previously disappeared,
without pleasantness nor unpleasantness, with the purity of equanimity
and mindfulness, having entered in the fourth jhāna, he abides therein,
merging into the deathless, aiming at the deathless, resulting in the
deathless. For the direct knowledge of these three types of conceit,
bhikkhus, the four jhānas are to be developed.

There
are, bhikkhus, these three types of conceit. Which three? The conceit
‘I am superior’, the conceit ‘I am equal’, the conceit ‘I am inferior’.
These, bhikkhus, are the three types of conceit. For the direct
knowledge of these three types of conceit, bhikkhus, the four jhānas are
to be developed. Which four? Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, detached from
sensuality, detached from unwholesome states, having entered in the
first jhāna, abides therein, with thoughts and mental associations, with
rapture and pleasantness born of detachment, bending down towards
Nibbāna, sloping towards Nibbāna, inclining to Nibbāna. With the
stilling of thoughts and mental associations, having entered in the
second jhāna, he abides therein with inner tanquilization, unification
of the mind, without thoughts nor mental associations, with rapture and
pleasantness born of concentration, bending down towards Nibbāna,
sloping towards Nibbāna, inclining to Nibbāna. With the fading away of
rapture, abides in equanimity, mindfulness and thorough understanding,
he experiences in the body the pleasantness which the noble ones
describe: ‘one who is equanimous and mindful dwells in [this]
pleasantness’, having entered in the third jhāna, he abides therein,
bending down towards Nibbāna, sloping towards Nibbāna, inclining to
Nibbāna. Abandoning pleasantness and abandoning unpleasantness, mental
pleasantness and mental unpleasantness having previously disappeared,
without pleasantness nor unpleasantness, with the purity of equanimity
and mindfulness, having entered in the fourth jhāna, he abides therein,
bending down towards Nibbāna, sloping towards Nibbāna, inclining to
Nibbāna. For the direct knowledge of these three types of conceit,
bhikkhus, the four jhānas are to be developed.

There are, bhikkhus, these three types of conceit. Which three? The
conceit ‘I am superior’, the conceit ‘I am equal’, the conceit ‘I am
inferior’. These, bhikkhus, are the three types of conceit. For the direct knowledge of these three types of conceit, bhikkhus, the four jhānas are to be developed. Which four? Here, bhikkhus, a
bhikkhu, detached from sensuality, detached from unwholesome states,
having entered in the first jhāna, abides therein, with thoughts and
mental associations, with rapture and pleasantness born of detachment
, bending down towards Nibbāna, sloping towards Nibbāna, inclining to Nibbāna.
With
the stilling of thoughts and mental associations, having entered in the
second jhāna, he abides therein with inner tanquilization, unification
of the mind, without thoughts nor mental associations, with rapture and
pleasantness born of concentration
, bending down towards Nibbāna, sloping towards Nibbāna, inclining to Nibbāna.
With
the fading away of rapture, abides in equanimity, mindfulness and
thorough understanding, he experiences in the body the pleasantness
which the noble ones describe: ‘one who is equanimous and mindful dwells
in [this] pleasantness’, having entered in the third jhāna, he abides
therein
, bending down towards Nibbāna, sloping towards Nibbāna, inclining to Nibbāna.
Abandoning
pleasantness and abandoning unpleasantness, mental pleasantness and
mental unpleasantness having previously disappeared, without
pleasantness nor unpleasantness, with the purity of equanimity and
mindfulness, having entered in the fourth jhāna, he abides therein
, bending down towards Nibbāna, sloping towards Nibbāna, inclining to Nibbāna.
For the direct knowledge of these three types of conceit, bhikkhus, the four jhānas are to be developed.


(Complete understanding)
There
are, bhikkhus, these three types of conceit. Which three? The conceit
‘I am superior’, the conceit ‘I am equal’, the conceit ‘I am inferior’.
These, bhikkhus, are the three types of conceit. For the complete
understanding of these three types of conceit, bhikkhus, the four jhānas
are to be developed. Which four? Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, detached
from sensuality, detached from unwholesome states, having entered in the
first jhāna, abides therein, with thoughts and mental associations,
with rapture and pleasantness born of detachment, founded on detachment,
founded on disenchantment, founded on cessation, resulting in
relinquishment. With the stilling of thoughts and mental associations,
having entered in the second jhāna, he abides therein with inner
tanquilization, unification of the mind, without thoughts nor mental
associations, with rapture and pleasantness born of concentration,
founded on detachment, founded on disenchantment, founded on cessation,
resulting in relinquishment. With the fading away of rapture, abides in
equanimity, mindfulness and thorough understanding, he experiences in
the body the pleasantness which the noble ones describe: ‘one who is
equanimous and mindful dwells in [this] pleasantness’, having entered in
the third jhāna, he abides therein, founded on detachment, founded on
disenchantment, founded on cessation, resulting in relinquishment.
Abandoning pleasantness and abandoning unpleasantness, mental
pleasantness and mental unpleasantness having previously disappeared,
without pleasantness nor unpleasantness, with the purity of equanimity
and mindfulness, having entered in the fourth jhāna, he abides therein,
founded on detachment, founded on disenchantment, founded on cessation,
resulting in relinquishment. For the complete understanding of these
three types of conceit, bhikkhus, the four jhānas are to be developed.

There
are, bhikkhus, these three types of conceit. Which three? The conceit
‘I am superior’, the conceit ‘I am equal’, the conceit ‘I am inferior’.
These, bhikkhus, are the three types of conceit. For the complete
understanding of these three types of conceit, bhikkhus, the four jhānas
are to be developed. Which four? Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, detached
from sensuality, detached from unwholesome states, having entered in the
first jhāna, abides therein, with thoughts and mental associations,
with rapture and pleasantness born of detachment, resulting in the
removal of craving, resulting in the removal of aversion, resulting in
the removal of delusion. With the stilling of thoughts and mental
associations, having entered in the second jhāna, he abides therein with
inner tanquilization, unification of the mind, without thoughts nor
mental associations, with rapture and pleasantness born of
concentration, resulting in the removal of craving, resulting in the
removal of aversion, resulting in the removal of delusion. With the
fading away of rapture, abides in equanimity, mindfulness and thorough
understanding, he experiences in the body the pleasantness which the
noble ones describe: ‘one who is equanimous and mindful dwells in [this]
pleasantness’, having entered in the third jhāna, he abides therein,
resulting in the removal of craving, resulting in the removal of
aversion, resulting in the removal of delusion. Abandoning pleasantness
and abandoning unpleasantness, mental pleasantness and mental
unpleasantness having previously disappeared, without pleasantness nor
unpleasantness, with the purity of equanimity and mindfulness, having
entered in the fourth jhāna, he abides therein, resulting in the removal
of craving, resulting in the removal of aversion, resulting in the
removal of delusion. For the complete understanding of these three types
of conceit, bhikkhus, the four jhānas are to be developed.

There
are, bhikkhus, these three types of conceit. Which three? The conceit
‘I am superior’, the conceit ‘I am equal’, the conceit ‘I am inferior’.
These, bhikkhus, are the three types of conceit. For the complete
understanding of these three types of conceit, bhikkhus, the four jhānas
are to be developed. Which four? Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, detached
from sensuality, detached from unwholesome states, having entered in the
first jhāna, abides therein, with thoughts and mental associations,
with rapture and pleasantness born of detachment, merging into the
deathless, aiming at the deathless, resulting in the deathless. With the
stilling of thoughts and mental associations, having entered in the
second jhāna, he abides therein with inner tanquilization, unification
of the mind, without thoughts nor mental associations, with rapture and
pleasantness born of concentration, merging into the deathless, aiming
at the deathless, resulting in the deathless. With the fading away of
rapture, abides in equanimity, mindfulness and thorough understanding,
he experiences in the body the pleasantness which the noble ones
describe: ‘one who is equanimous and mindful dwells in [this]
pleasantness’, having entered in the third jhāna, he abides therein,
merging into the deathless, aiming at the deathless, resulting in the
deathless. Abandoning pleasantness and abandoning unpleasantness, mental
pleasantness and mental unpleasantness having previously disappeared,
without pleasantness nor unpleasantness, with the purity of equanimity
and mindfulness, having entered in the fourth jhāna, he abides therein,
merging into the deathless, aiming at the deathless, resulting in the
deathless. For the complete understanding of these three types of
conceit, bhikkhus, the four jhānas are to be developed.

There
are, bhikkhus, these three types of conceit. Which three? The conceit
‘I am superior’, the conceit ‘I am equal’, the conceit ‘I am inferior’.
These, bhikkhus, are the three types of conceit. For the complete
understanding of these three types of conceit, bhikkhus, the four jhānas
are to be developed. Which four? Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, detached
from sensuality, detached from unwholesome states, having entered in the
first jhāna, abides therein, with thoughts and mental associations,
with rapture and pleasantness born of detachment, bending down towards
Nibbāna, sloping towards Nibbāna, inclining to Nibbāna. With the
stilling of thoughts and mental associations, having entered in the
second jhāna, he abides therein with inner tanquilization, unification
of the mind, without thoughts nor mental associations, with rapture and
pleasantness born of concentration, bending down towards Nibbāna,
sloping towards Nibbāna, inclining to Nibbāna. With the fading away of
rapture, abides in equanimity, mindfulness and thorough understanding,
he experiences in the body the pleasantness which the noble ones
describe: ‘one who is equanimous and mindful dwells in [this]
pleasantness’, having entered in the third jhāna, he abides therein,
bending down towards Nibbāna, sloping towards Nibbāna, inclining to
Nibbāna. Abandoning pleasantness and abandoning unpleasantness, mental
pleasantness and mental unpleasantness having previously disappeared,
without pleasantness nor unpleasantness, with the purity of equanimity
and mindfulness, having entered in the fourth jhāna, he abides therein,
bending down towards Nibbāna, sloping towards Nibbāna, inclining to
Nibbāna. For the complete understanding of these three types of conceit,
bhikkhus, the four jhānas are to be developed.

(Abandoning)
There
are, bhikkhus, these three types of conceit. Which three? The conceit
‘I am superior’, the conceit ‘I am equal’, the conceit ‘I am inferior’.
These, bhikkhus, are the three types of conceit. For the abandoning of
these three types of conceit, bhikkhus, the four jhānas are to be
developed. Which four? Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, detached from
sensuality, detached from unwholesome states, having entered in the
first jhāna, abides therein, with thoughts and mental associations, with
rapture and pleasantness born of detachment, founded on detachment,
founded on disenchantment, founded on cessation, resulting in
relinquishment. With the stilling of thoughts and mental associations,
having entered in the second jhāna, he abides therein with inner
tanquilization, unification of the mind, without thoughts nor mental
associations, with rapture and pleasantness born of concentration,
founded on detachment, founded on disenchantment, founded on cessation,
resulting in relinquishment. With the fading away of rapture, abides in
equanimity, mindfulness and thorough understanding, he experiences in
the body the pleasantness which the noble ones describe: ‘one who is
equanimous and mindful dwells in [this] pleasantness’, having entered in
the third jhāna, he abides therein, founded on detachment, founded on
disenchantment, founded on cessation, resulting in relinquishment.
Abandoning pleasantness and abandoning unpleasantness, mental
pleasantness and mental unpleasantness having previously disappeared,
without pleasantness nor unpleasantness, with the purity of equanimity
and mindfulness, having entered in the fourth jhāna, he abides therein,
founded on detachment, founded on disenchantment, founded on cessation,
resulting in relinquishment. For the abandoning of these three types of
conceit, bhikkhus, the four jhānas are to be developed.

There
are, bhikkhus, these three types of conceit. Which three? The conceit
‘I am superior’, the conceit ‘I am equal’, the conceit ‘I am inferior’.
These, bhikkhus, are the three types of conceit. For the abandoning of
these three types of conceit, bhikkhus, the four jhānas are to be
developed. Which four? Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, detached from
sensuality, detached from unwholesome states, having entered in the
first jhāna, abides therein, with thoughts and mental associations, with
rapture and pleasantness born of detachment, resulting in the removal
of craving, resulting in the removal of aversion, resulting in the
removal of delusion. With the stilling of thoughts and mental
associations, having entered in the second jhāna, he abides therein with
inner tanquilization, unification of the mind, without thoughts nor
mental associations, with rapture and pleasantness born of
concentration, resulting in the removal of craving, resulting in the
removal of aversion, resulting in the removal of delusion. With the
fading away of rapture, abides in equanimity, mindfulness and thorough
understanding, he experiences in the body the pleasantness which the
noble ones describe: ‘one who is equanimous and mindful dwells in [this]
pleasantness’, having entered in the third jhāna, he abides therein,
resulting in the removal of craving, resulting in the removal of
aversion, resulting in the removal of delusion. Abandoning pleasantness
and abandoning unpleasantness, mental pleasantness and mental
unpleasantness having previously disappeared, without pleasantness nor
unpleasantness, with the purity of equanimity and mindfulness, having
entered in the fourth jhāna, he abides therein, resulting in the removal
of craving, resulting in the removal of aversion, resulting in the
removal of delusion. For the abandoning of these three types of conceit,
bhikkhus, the four jhānas are to be developed.

There
are, bhikkhus, these three types of conceit. Which three? The conceit
‘I am superior’, the conceit ‘I am equal’, the conceit ‘I am inferior’.
These, bhikkhus, are the three types of conceit. For the abandoning of
these three types of conceit, bhikkhus, the four jhānas are to be
developed. Which four? Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, detached from
sensuality, detached from unwholesome states, having entered in the
first jhāna, abides therein, with thoughts and mental associations, with
rapture and pleasantness born of detachment, merging into the
deathless, aiming at the deathless, resulting in the deathless. With the
stilling of thoughts and mental associations, having entered in the
second jhāna, he abides therein with inner tanquilization, unification
of the mind, without thoughts nor mental associations, with rapture and
pleasantness born of concentration, merging into the deathless, aiming
at the deathless, resulting in the deathless. With the fading away of
rapture, abides in equanimity, mindfulness and thorough understanding,
he experiences in the body the pleasantness which the noble ones
describe: ‘one who is equanimous and mindful dwells in [this]
pleasantness’, having entered in the third jhāna, he abides therein,
merging into the deathless, aiming at the deathless, resulting in the
deathless. Abandoning pleasantness and abandoning unpleasantness, mental
pleasantness and mental unpleasantness having previously disappeared,
without pleasantness nor unpleasantness, with the purity of equanimity
and mindfulness, having entered in the fourth jhāna, he abides therein,
merging into the deathless, aiming at the deathless, resulting in the
deathless. For the abandoning of these three types of conceit, bhikkhus,
the four jhānas are to be developed.

There
are, bhikkhus, these three types of conceit. Which three? The conceit
‘I am superior’, the conceit ‘I am equal’, the conceit ‘I am inferior’.
These, bhikkhus, are the three types of conceit. For the abandoning of
these three types of conceit, bhikkhus, the four jhānas are to be
developed. Which four? Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, detached from
sensuality, detached from unwholesome states, having entered in the
first jhāna, abides therein, with thoughts and mental associations, with
rapture and pleasantness born of detachment, bending down towards
Nibbāna, sloping towards Nibbāna, inclining to Nibbāna. With the
stilling of thoughts and mental associations, having entered in the
second jhāna, he abides therein with inner tanquilization, unification
of the mind, without thoughts nor mental associations, with rapture and
pleasantness born of concentration, bending down towards Nibbāna,
sloping towards Nibbāna, inclining to Nibbāna. With the fading away of
rapture, abides in equanimity, mindfulness and thorough understanding,
he experiences in the body the pleasantness which the noble ones
describe: ‘one who is equanimous and mindful dwells in [this]
pleasantness’, having entered in the third jhāna, he abides therein,
bending down towards Nibbāna, sloping towards Nibbāna, inclining to
Nibbāna. Abandoning pleasantness and abandoning unpleasantness, mental
pleasantness and mental unpleasantness having previously disappeared,
without pleasantness nor unpleasantness, with the purity of equanimity
and mindfulness, having entered in the fourth jhāna, he abides therein,
bending down towards Nibbāna, sloping towards Nibbāna, inclining to
Nibbāna. For the abandoning of these three types of conceit, bhikkhus,
the four jhānas are to be developed.

There are, bhikkhus, these three types of conceit. Which three? The
conceit ‘I am superior’, the conceit ‘I am equal’, the conceit ‘I am
inferior’. These, bhikkhus, are the three types of conceit. For the
complete exhaustion of these three types of conceit, bhikkhus, the four jhānas are to be developed. Which four? Here, bhikkhus, a
bhikkhu, detached from sensuality, detached from unwholesome states,
having entered in the first jhāna, abides therein, with thoughts and
mental associations, with rapture and pleasantness born of detachment
, bending down towards Nibbāna, sloping towards Nibbāna, inclining to Nibbāna.
With
the stilling of thoughts and mental associations, having entered in the
second jhāna, he abides therein with inner tanquilization, unification
of the mind, without thoughts nor mental associations, with rapture and
pleasantness born of concentration
, bending down towards Nibbāna, sloping towards Nibbāna, inclining to Nibbāna.
With
the fading away of rapture, abides in equanimity, mindfulness and
thorough understanding, he experiences in the body the pleasantness
which the noble ones describe: ‘one who is equanimous and mindful dwells
in [this] pleasantness’, having entered in the third jhāna, he abides
therein
, bending down towards Nibbāna, sloping towards Nibbāna, inclining to Nibbāna.
Abandoning
pleasantness and abandoning unpleasantness, mental pleasantness and
mental unpleasantness having previously disappeared, without
pleasantness nor unpleasantness, with the purity of equanimity and
mindfulness, having entered in the fourth jhāna, he abides therein
, bending down towards Nibbāna, sloping towards Nibbāna, inclining to Nibbāna.
For the complete exhaustion of these three types of conceit, bhikkhus, the four jhānas are to be developed.



(Complete exhaustion)
There
are, bhikkhus, these three types of conceit. Which three? The conceit
‘I am superior’, the conceit ‘I am equal’, the conceit ‘I am inferior’.
These, bhikkhus, are the three types of conceit. For the complete
exhaustion of these three types of conceit, bhikkhus, the four jhānas
are to be developed. Which four? Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, detached
from sensuality, detached from unwholesome states, having entered in the
first jhāna, abides therein, with thoughts and mental associations,
with rapture and pleasantness born of detachment, founded on detachment,
founded on disenchantment, founded on cessation, resulting in
relinquishment. With the stilling of thoughts and mental associations,
having entered in the second jhāna, he abides therein with inner
tanquilization, unification of the mind, without thoughts nor mental
associations, with rapture and pleasantness born of concentration,
founded on detachment, founded on disenchantment, founded on cessation,
resulting in relinquishment. With the fading away of rapture, abides in
equanimity, mindfulness and thorough understanding, he experiences in
the body the pleasantness which the noble ones describe: ‘one who is
equanimous and mindful dwells in [this] pleasantness’, having entered in
the third jhāna, he abides therein, founded on detachment, founded on
disenchantment, founded on cessation, resulting in relinquishment.
Abandoning pleasantness and abandoning unpleasantness, mental
pleasantness and mental unpleasantness having previously disappeared,
without pleasantness nor unpleasantness, with the purity of equanimity
and mindfulness, having entered in the fourth jhāna, he abides therein,
founded on detachment, founded on disenchantment, founded on cessation,
resulting in relinquishment. For the complete exhaustion of these three
types of conceit, bhikkhus, the four jhānas are to be developed.


There
are, bhikkhus, these three types of conceit. Which three? The conceit
‘I am superior’, the conceit ‘I am equal’, the conceit ‘I am inferior’.
These, bhikkhus, are the three types of conceit. For the complete
exhaustion of these three types of conceit, bhikkhus, the four jhānas
are to be developed. Which four? Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, detached
from sensuality, detached from unwholesome states, having entered in the
first jhāna, abides therein, with thoughts and mental associations,
with rapture and pleasantness born of detachment, resulting in the
removal of craving, resulting in the removal of aversion, resulting in
the removal of delusion. With the stilling of thoughts and mental
associations, having entered in the second jhāna, he abides therein with
inner tanquilization, unification of the mind, without thoughts nor
mental associations, with rapture and pleasantness born of
concentration, resulting in the removal of craving, resulting in the
removal of aversion, resulting in the removal of delusion. With the
fading away of rapture, abides in equanimity, mindfulness and thorough
understanding, he experiences in the body the pleasantness which the
noble ones describe: ‘one who is equanimous and mindful dwells in [this]
pleasantness’, having entered in the third jhāna, he abides therein,
resulting in the removal of craving, resulting in the removal of
aversion, resulting in the removal of delusion. Abandoning pleasantness
and abandoning unpleasantness, mental pleasantness and mental
unpleasantness having previously disappeared, without pleasantness nor
unpleasantness, with the purity of equanimity and mindfulness, having
entered in the fourth jhāna, he abides therein, resulting in the removal
of craving, resulting in the removal of aversion, resulting in the
removal of delusion. For the complete exhaustion of these three types of
conceit, bhikkhus, the four jhānas are to be developed.


There
are, bhikkhus, these three types of conceit. Which three? The conceit
‘I am superior’, the conceit ‘I am equal’, the conceit ‘I am inferior’.
These, bhikkhus, are the three types of conceit. For the complete
exhaustion of these three types of conceit, bhikkhus, the four jhānas
are to be developed. Which four? Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, detached
from sensuality, detached from unwholesome states, having entered in the
first jhāna, abides therein, with thoughts and mental associations,
with rapture and pleasantness born of detachment, merging into the
deathless, aiming at the deathless, resulting in the deathless. With the
stilling of thoughts and mental associations, having entered in the
second jhāna, he abides therein with inner tanquilization, unification
of the mind, without thoughts nor mental associations, with rapture and
pleasantness born of concentration, merging into the deathless, aiming
at the deathless, resulting in the deathless. With the fading away of
rapture, abides in equanimity, mindfulness and thorough understanding,
he experiences in the body the pleasantness which the noble ones
describe: ‘one who is equanimous and mindful dwells in [this]
pleasantness’, having entered in the third jhāna, he abides therein,
merging into the deathless, aiming at the deathless, resulting in the
deathless. Abandoning pleasantness and abandoning unpleasantness, mental
pleasantness and mental unpleasantness having previously disappeared,
without pleasantness nor unpleasantness, with the purity of equanimity
and mindfulness, having entered in the fourth jhāna, he abides therein,
merging into the deathless, aiming at the deathless, resulting in the
deathless. For the complete exhaustion of these three types of conceit,
bhikkhus, the four jhānas are to be developed.

Pāḷi
(Abhiññā)
Tisso
imā, bhikkhave, vidhā. Katamā tisso? ‘Seyyohamasmī’ti vidhā,
‘sadisohamasmī’ti vidhā, ‘hīnohamasmī’ti vidhā. Imā kho, bhikkhave,
tisso vidhā. Imāsaṃ kho, bhikkhave, tissannaṃ vidhānaṃ abhiññāya cattāro
jhānā bhāvetabbā. Katame cattāro? Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu vivicc·eva
kāmehi vivicca akusalehi dhammehi savitakkaṃ savicāraṃ vivekajaṃ
pīti·sukhaṃ paṭhamaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati, vivekanissitaṃ
virāganissitaṃ nirodhanissitaṃ vossaggapariṇāmiṃ. Vitakka·vicārānaṃ
vūpasamā ajjhattaṃ sampasādanaṃ cetaso ekodi·bhāvaṃ avitakkaṃ avicāraṃ
samādhi·jaṃ pīti·sukhaṃ dutiyaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati,
vivekanissitaṃ virāganissitaṃ nirodhanissitaṃ vossaggapariṇāmiṃ. Pītiyā
ca virāgā upekkhako ca viharati sato ca sampajāno, sukhañca kāyena
paṭisaṃvedeti yaṃ taṃ ariyā ācikkhanti: ‘upekkhako satimā
sukha·vihārī’ti tatiyaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati, vivekanissitaṃ
virāganissitaṃ nirodhanissitaṃ vossaggapariṇāmiṃ. Sukhassa ca pahānā
dukkhassa ca pahānā pubbeva somanassa·domanassānaṃ atthaṅgamā
adukkham·asukhaṃ upekkhā·sati·pārisuddhiṃ catutthaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja
viharati, vivekanissitaṃ virāganissitaṃ nirodhanissitaṃ
vossaggapariṇāmiṃ. Imāsaṃ kho, bhikkhave, tissannaṃ vidhānaṃ abhiññāya
cattāro jhānā bhāvetabbā.

Tisso
imā, bhikkhave, vidhā. Katamā tisso? ‘Seyyohamasmī’ti vidhā,
‘sadisohamasmī’ti vidhā, ‘hīnohamasmī’ti vidhā. Imā kho, bhikkhave,
tisso vidhā. Imāsaṃ kho, bhikkhave, tissannaṃ vidhānaṃ abhiññāya cattāro
jhānā bhāvetabbā. Katame cattāro? Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu vivicc·eva
kāmehi vivicca akusalehi dhammehi savitakkaṃ savicāraṃ vivekajaṃ
pīti·sukhaṃ paṭhamaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati,
rāga·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ dosa·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ moha·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ.
Vitakka·vicārānaṃ vūpasamā ajjhattaṃ sampasādanaṃ cetaso ekodi·bhāvaṃ
avitakkaṃ avicāraṃ samādhi·jaṃ pīti·sukhaṃ dutiyaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja
viharati, rāga·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ dosa·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ
moha·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ. Pītiyā ca virāgā upekkhako ca viharati sato ca
sampajāno, sukhañca kāyena paṭisaṃvedeti yaṃ taṃ ariyā ācikkhanti:
‘upekkhako satimā sukha·vihārī’ti tatiyaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati,
rāga·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ dosa·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ moha·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ.
Sukhassa ca pahānā dukkhassa ca pahānā pubbeva somanassa·domanassānaṃ
atthaṅgamā adukkham·asukhaṃ upekkhā·sati·pārisuddhiṃ catutthaṃ jhānaṃ
upasampajja viharati, rāga·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ dosa·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ
moha·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ. Imāsaṃ kho, bhikkhave, tissannaṃ vidhānaṃ
abhiññāya cattāro jhānā bhāvetabbā.

Tisso
imā, bhikkhave, vidhā. Katamā tisso? ‘Seyyohamasmī’ti vidhā,
‘sadisohamasmī’ti vidhā, ‘hīnohamasmī’ti vidhā. Imā kho, bhikkhave,
tisso vidhā. Imāsaṃ kho, bhikkhave, tissannaṃ vidhānaṃ abhiññāya cattāro
jhānā bhāvetabbā. Katame cattāro? Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu vivicc·eva
kāmehi vivicca akusalehi dhammehi savitakkaṃ savicāraṃ vivekajaṃ
pīti·sukhaṃ paṭhamaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati, amatogadhaṃ
amataparāyanaṃ amatapariyosānaṃ. Vitakka·vicārānaṃ vūpasamā ajjhattaṃ
sampasādanaṃ cetaso ekodi·bhāvaṃ avitakkaṃ avicāraṃ samādhi·jaṃ
pīti·sukhaṃ dutiyaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati, amatogadhaṃ
amataparāyanaṃ amatapariyosānaṃ. Pītiyā ca virāgā upekkhako ca viharati
sato ca sampajāno, sukhañca kāyena paṭisaṃvedeti yaṃ taṃ ariyā
ācikkhanti: ‘upekkhako satimā sukha·vihārī’ti tatiyaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja
viharati, amatogadhaṃ amataparāyanaṃ amatapariyosānaṃ. Sukhassa ca
pahānā dukkhassa ca pahānā pubbeva somanassa·domanassānaṃ atthaṅgamā
adukkham·asukhaṃ upekkhā·sati·pārisuddhiṃ catutthaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja
viharati, amatogadhaṃ amataparāyanaṃ amatapariyosānaṃ. Imāsaṃ kho,
bhikkhave, tissannaṃ vidhānaṃ abhiññāya cattāro jhānā bhāvetabbā.

Tisso
imā, bhikkhave, vidhā. Katamā tisso? ‘Seyyohamasmī’ti vidhā,
‘sadisohamasmī’ti vidhā, ‘hīnohamasmī’ti vidhā. Imā kho, bhikkhave,
tisso vidhā. Imāsaṃ kho, bhikkhave, tissannaṃ vidhānaṃ abhiññāya cattāro
jhānā bhāvetabbā. Katame cattāro? Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu vivicc·eva
kāmehi vivicca akusalehi dhammehi savitakkaṃ savicāraṃ vivekajaṃ
pīti·sukhaṃ paṭhamaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati, nibbānaninnaṃ
nibbānapoṇaṃ nibbānapabbhāraṃ. Vitakka·vicārānaṃ vūpasamā ajjhattaṃ
sampasādanaṃ cetaso ekodi·bhāvaṃ avitakkaṃ avicāraṃ samādhi·jaṃ
pīti·sukhaṃ dutiyaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati, nibbānaninnaṃ
nibbānapoṇaṃ nibbānapabbhāraṃ. Pītiyā ca virāgā upekkhako ca viharati
sato ca sampajāno, sukhañca kāyena paṭisaṃvedeti yaṃ taṃ ariyā
ācikkhanti: ‘upekkhako satimā sukha·vihārī’ti tatiyaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja
viharati, nibbānaninnaṃ nibbānapoṇaṃ nibbānapabbhāraṃ. Sukhassa ca
pahānā dukkhassa ca pahānā pubbeva somanassa·domanassānaṃ atthaṅgamā
adukkham·asukhaṃ upekkhā·sati·pārisuddhiṃ catutthaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja
viharati, nibbānaninnaṃ nibbānapoṇaṃ nibbānapabbhāraṃ. Imāsaṃ kho,
bhikkhave, tissannaṃ vidhānaṃ abhiññāya cattāro jhānā bhāvetabbā.

(Pariññā)
Tisso
imā, bhikkhave, vidhā. Katamā tisso? ‘Seyyohamasmī’ti vidhā,
‘sadisohamasmī’ti vidhā, ‘hīnohamasmī’ti vidhā. Imā kho, bhikkhave,
tisso vidhā. Imāsaṃ kho, bhikkhave, tissannaṃ vidhānaṃ pariññāya cattāro
jhānā bhāvetabbā. Katame cattāro? Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu vivicc·eva
kāmehi vivicca akusalehi dhammehi savitakkaṃ savicāraṃ vivekajaṃ
pīti·sukhaṃ paṭhamaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati, vivekanissitaṃ
virāganissitaṃ nirodhanissitaṃ vossaggapariṇāmiṃ. Vitakka·vicārānaṃ
vūpasamā ajjhattaṃ sampasādanaṃ cetaso ekodi·bhāvaṃ avitakkaṃ avicāraṃ
samādhi·jaṃ pīti·sukhaṃ dutiyaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati,
vivekanissitaṃ virāganissitaṃ nirodhanissitaṃ vossaggapariṇāmiṃ. Pītiyā
ca virāgā upekkhako ca viharati sato ca sampajāno, sukhañca kāyena
paṭisaṃvedeti yaṃ taṃ ariyā ācikkhanti: ‘upekkhako satimā
sukha·vihārī’ti tatiyaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati, vivekanissitaṃ
virāganissitaṃ nirodhanissitaṃ vossaggapariṇāmiṃ. Sukhassa ca pahānā
dukkhassa ca pahānā pubbeva somanassa·domanassānaṃ atthaṅgamā
adukkham·asukhaṃ upekkhā·sati·pārisuddhiṃ catutthaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja
viharati, vivekanissitaṃ virāganissitaṃ nirodhanissitaṃ
vossaggapariṇāmiṃ. Imāsaṃ kho, bhikkhave, tissannaṃ vidhānaṃ pariññāya
cattāro jhānā bhāvetabbā.

Tisso
imā, bhikkhave, vidhā. Katamā tisso? ‘Seyyohamasmī’ti vidhā,
‘sadisohamasmī’ti vidhā, ‘hīnohamasmī’ti vidhā. Imā kho, bhikkhave,
tisso vidhā. Imāsaṃ kho, bhikkhave, tissannaṃ vidhānaṃ pariññāya cattāro
jhānā bhāvetabbā. Katame cattāro? Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu vivicc·eva
kāmehi vivicca akusalehi dhammehi savitakkaṃ savicāraṃ vivekajaṃ
pīti·sukhaṃ paṭhamaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati,
rāga·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ dosa·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ moha·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ.
Vitakka·vicārānaṃ vūpasamā ajjhattaṃ sampasādanaṃ cetaso ekodi·bhāvaṃ
avitakkaṃ avicāraṃ samādhi·jaṃ pīti·sukhaṃ dutiyaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja
viharati, rāga·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ dosa·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ
moha·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ. Pītiyā ca virāgā upekkhako ca viharati sato ca
sampajāno, sukhañca kāyena paṭisaṃvedeti yaṃ taṃ ariyā ācikkhanti:
‘upekkhako satimā sukha·vihārī’ti tatiyaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati,
rāga·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ dosa·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ moha·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ.
Sukhassa ca pahānā dukkhassa ca pahānā pubbeva somanassa·domanassānaṃ
atthaṅgamā adukkham·asukhaṃ upekkhā·sati·pārisuddhiṃ catutthaṃ jhānaṃ
upasampajja viharati, rāga·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ dosa·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ
moha·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ. Imāsaṃ kho, bhikkhave, tissannaṃ vidhānaṃ
pariññāya cattāro jhānā bhāvetabbā.
Tisso
imā, bhikkhave, vidhā. Katamā tisso? ‘Seyyohamasmī’ti vidhā,
‘sadisohamasmī’ti vidhā, ‘hīnohamasmī’ti vidhā. Imā kho, bhikkhave,
tisso vidhā. Imāsaṃ kho, bhikkhave, tissannaṃ vidhānaṃ pariññāya cattāro
jhānā bhāvetabbā. Katame cattāro? Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu vivicc·eva
kāmehi vivicca akusalehi dhammehi savitakkaṃ savicāraṃ vivekajaṃ
pīti·sukhaṃ paṭhamaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati, amatogadhaṃ
amataparāyanaṃ amatapariyosānaṃ. Vitakka·vicārānaṃ vūpasamā ajjhattaṃ
sampasādanaṃ cetaso ekodi·bhāvaṃ avitakkaṃ avicāraṃ samādhi·jaṃ
pīti·sukhaṃ dutiyaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati, amatogadhaṃ
amataparāyanaṃ amatapariyosānaṃ. Pītiyā ca virāgā upekkhako ca viharati
sato ca sampajāno, sukhañca kāyena paṭisaṃvedeti yaṃ taṃ ariyā
ācikkhanti: ‘upekkhako satimā sukha·vihārī’ti tatiyaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja
viharati, amatogadhaṃ amataparāyanaṃ amatapariyosānaṃ. Sukhassa ca
pahānā dukkhassa ca pahānā pubbeva somanassa·domanassānaṃ atthaṅgamā
adukkham·asukhaṃ upekkhā·sati·pārisuddhiṃ catutthaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja
viharati, amatogadhaṃ amataparāyanaṃ amatapariyosānaṃ. Imāsaṃ kho,
bhikkhave, tissannaṃ vidhānaṃ pariññāya cattāro jhānā bhāvetabbā.

Tisso
imā, bhikkhave, vidhā. Katamā tisso? ‘Seyyohamasmī’ti vidhā,
‘sadisohamasmī’ti vidhā, ‘hīnohamasmī’ti vidhā. Imā kho, bhikkhave,
tisso vidhā. Imāsaṃ kho, bhikkhave, tissannaṃ vidhānaṃ pariññāya cattāro
jhānā bhāvetabbā. Katame cattāro? Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu vivicc·eva
kāmehi vivicca akusalehi dhammehi savitakkaṃ savicāraṃ vivekajaṃ
pīti·sukhaṃ paṭhamaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati, nibbānaninnaṃ
nibbānapoṇaṃ nibbānapabbhāraṃ. Vitakka·vicārānaṃ vūpasamā ajjhattaṃ
sampasādanaṃ cetaso ekodi·bhāvaṃ avitakkaṃ avicāraṃ samādhi·jaṃ
pīti·sukhaṃ dutiyaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati, nibbānaninnaṃ
nibbānapoṇaṃ nibbānapabbhāraṃ. Pītiyā ca virāgā upekkhako ca viharati
sato ca sampajāno, sukhañca kāyena paṭisaṃvedeti yaṃ taṃ ariyā
ācikkhanti: ‘upekkhako satimā sukha·vihārī’ti tatiyaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja
viharati, nibbānaninnaṃ nibbānapoṇaṃ nibbānapabbhāraṃ. Sukhassa ca
pahānā dukkhassa ca pahānā pubbeva somanassa·domanassānaṃ atthaṅgamā
adukkham·asukhaṃ upekkhā·sati·pārisuddhiṃ catutthaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja
viharati, nibbānaninnaṃ nibbānapoṇaṃ nibbānapabbhāraṃ. Imāsaṃ kho,
bhikkhave, tissannaṃ vidhānaṃ pariññāya cattāro jhānā bhāvetabbā.


Tisso
imā, bhikkhave, vidhā. Katamā tisso? ‘Seyyohamasmī’ti vidhā,
‘sadisohamasmī’ti vidhā, ‘hīnohamasmī’ti vidhā. Imā kho, bhikkhave,
tisso vidhā. Imāsaṃ kho, bhikkhave, tissannaṃ vidhānaṃ parikkhayāya
cattāro jhānā bhāvetabbā. Katame cattāro? Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu
vivicc·eva kāmehi vivicca akusalehi dhammehi savitakkaṃ savicāraṃ
vivekajaṃ pīti·sukhaṃ paṭhamaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati,
rāga·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ dosa·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ moha·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ.
Vitakka·vicārānaṃ vūpasamā ajjhattaṃ sampasādanaṃ cetaso ekodi·bhāvaṃ
avitakkaṃ avicāraṃ samādhi·jaṃ pīti·sukhaṃ dutiyaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja
viharati, rāga·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ dosa·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ
moha·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ. Pītiyā ca virāgā upekkhako ca viharati sato ca
sampajāno, sukhañca kāyena paṭisaṃvedeti yaṃ taṃ ariyā ācikkhanti:
‘upekkhako satimā sukha·vihārī’ti tatiyaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati,
rāga·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ dosa·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ moha·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ.
Sukhassa ca pahānā dukkhassa ca pahānā pubbeva somanassa·domanassānaṃ
atthaṅgamā adukkham·asukhaṃ upekkhā·sati·pārisuddhiṃ catutthaṃ jhānaṃ
upasampajja viharati,
rāga·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ dosa·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ
moha·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ. Imāsaṃ kho, bhikkhave, tissannaṃ vidhānaṃ
parikkhayāya cattāro jhānā bhāvetabbā.
(Parikkhaya)
Tisso
imā, bhikkhave, vidhā. Katamā tisso? ‘Seyyohamasmī’ti vidhā,
‘sadisohamasmī’ti vidhā, ‘hīnohamasmī’ti vidhā. Imā kho, bhikkhave,
tisso vidhā. Imāsaṃ kho, bhikkhave, tissannaṃ vidhānaṃ parikkhayāya
cattāro jhānā bhāvetabbā. Katame cattāro? Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu
vivicc·eva kāmehi vivicca akusalehi dhammehi savitakkaṃ savicāraṃ
vivekajaṃ pīti·sukhaṃ paṭhamaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati,
vivekanissitaṃ virāganissitaṃ nirodhanissitaṃ vossaggapariṇāmiṃ.
Vitakka·vicārānaṃ vūpasamā ajjhattaṃ sampasādanaṃ cetaso ekodi·bhāvaṃ
avitakkaṃ avicāraṃ samādhi·jaṃ pīti·sukhaṃ dutiyaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja
viharati, vivekanissitaṃ virāganissitaṃ nirodhanissitaṃ
vossaggapariṇāmiṃ. Pītiyā ca virāgā upekkhako ca viharati sato ca
sampajāno, sukhañca kāyena paṭisaṃvedeti yaṃ taṃ ariyā ācikkhanti:
‘upekkhako satimā sukha·vihārī’ti tatiyaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati,
vivekanissitaṃ virāganissitaṃ nirodhanissitaṃ vossaggapariṇāmiṃ.
Sukhassa ca pahānā dukkhassa ca pahānā pubbeva somanassa·domanassānaṃ
atthaṅgamā adukkham·asukhaṃ upekkhā·sati·pārisuddhiṃ catutthaṃ jhānaṃ
upasampajja viharati, vivekanissitaṃ virāganissitaṃ nirodhanissitaṃ
vossaggapariṇāmiṃ. Imāsaṃ kho, bhikkhave, tissannaṃ vidhānaṃ
parikkhayāya cattāro jhānā bhāvetabbā.

Tisso
imā, bhikkhave, vidhā. Katamā tisso? ‘Seyyohamasmī’ti vidhā,
‘sadisohamasmī’ti vidhā, ‘hīnohamasmī’ti vidhā. Imā kho, bhikkhave,
tisso vidhā. Imāsaṃ kho, bhikkhave, tissannaṃ vidhānaṃ parikkhayāya
cattāro jhānā bhāvetabbā. Katame cattāro? Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu
vivicc·eva kāmehi vivicca akusalehi dhammehi savitakkaṃ savicāraṃ
vivekajaṃ pīti·sukhaṃ paṭhamaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati, amatogadhaṃ
amataparāyanaṃ amatapariyosānaṃ. Vitakka·vicārānaṃ vūpasamā ajjhattaṃ
sampasādanaṃ cetaso ekodi·bhāvaṃ avitakkaṃ avicāraṃ samādhi·jaṃ
pīti·sukhaṃ dutiyaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati, amatogadhaṃ
amataparāyanaṃ amatapariyosānaṃ. Pītiyā ca virāgā upekkhako ca viharati
sato ca sampajāno, sukhañca kāyena paṭisaṃvedeti yaṃ taṃ ariyā
ācikkhanti: ‘upekkhako satimā sukha·vihārī’ti tatiyaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja
viharati, amatogadhaṃ amataparāyanaṃ amatapariyosānaṃ. Sukhassa ca
pahānā dukkhassa ca pahānā pubbeva somanassa·domanassānaṃ atthaṅgamā
adukkham·asukhaṃ upekkhā·sati·pārisuddhiṃ catutthaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja
viharati, amatogadhaṃ amataparāyanaṃ amatapariyosānaṃ. Imāsaṃ kho,
bhikkhave, tissannaṃ vidhānaṃ parikkhayāya cattāro jhānā bhāvetabbā.

Tisso
imā, bhikkhave, vidhā. Katamā tisso? ‘Seyyohamasmī’ti vidhā,
‘sadisohamasmī’ti vidhā, ‘hīnohamasmī’ti vidhā. Imā kho, bhikkhave,
tisso vidhā. Imāsaṃ kho, bhikkhave, tissannaṃ vidhānaṃ parikkhayāya
cattāro jhānā bhāvetabbā. Katame cattāro? Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu
vivicc·eva kāmehi vivicca akusalehi dhammehi savitakkaṃ savicāraṃ
vivekajaṃ pīti·sukhaṃ paṭhamaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati,
nibbānaninnaṃ nibbānapoṇaṃ nibbānapabbhāraṃ. Vitakka·vicārānaṃ vūpasamā
ajjhattaṃ sampasādanaṃ cetaso ekodi·bhāvaṃ avitakkaṃ avicāraṃ
samādhi·jaṃ pīti·sukhaṃ dutiyaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati,
nibbānaninnaṃ nibbānapoṇaṃ nibbānapabbhāraṃ. Pītiyā ca virāgā upekkhako
ca viharati sato ca sampajāno, sukhañca kāyena paṭisaṃvedeti yaṃ taṃ
ariyā ācikkhanti: ‘upekkhako satimā sukha·vihārī’ti tatiyaṃ jhānaṃ
upasampajja viharati, nibbānaninnaṃ nibbānapoṇaṃ nibbānapabbhāraṃ.
Sukhassa ca pahānā dukkhassa ca pahānā pubbeva somanassa·domanassānaṃ
atthaṅgamā adukkham·asukhaṃ upekkhā·sati·pārisuddhiṃ catutthaṃ jhānaṃ
upasampajja viharati, nibbānaninnaṃ nibbānapoṇaṃ nibbānapabbhāraṃ.
Imāsaṃ kho, bhikkhave, tissannaṃ vidhānaṃ parikkhayāya cattāro jhānā
bhāvetabbā.

There
are, bhikkhus, these three types of conceit. Which three? The conceit
‘I am superior’, the conceit ‘I am equal’, the conceit ‘I am inferior’.
These, bhikkhus, are the three types of conceit. For the complete
exhaustion of these three types of conceit, bhikkhus, the four jhānas
are to be developed. Which four? Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, detached
from sensuality, detached from unwholesome states, having entered in the
first jhāna, abides therein, with thoughts and mental associations,
with rapture and pleasantness born of detachment, bending down towards
Nibbāna, sloping towards Nibbāna, inclining to Nibbāna. With the
stilling of thoughts and mental associations, having entered in the
second jhāna, he abides therein with inner tanquilization, unification
of the mind, without thoughts nor mental associations, with rapture and
pleasantness born of concentration, bending down towards Nibbāna,
sloping towards Nibbāna, inclining to Nibbāna. With the fading away of
rapture, abides in equanimity, mindfulness and thorough understanding,
he experiences in the body the pleasantness which the noble ones
describe: ‘one who is equanimous and mindful dwells in [this]
pleasantness’, having entered in the third jhāna, he abides therein,
bending down towards Nibbāna, sloping towards Nibbāna, inclining to
Nibbāna. Abandoning pleasantness and abandoning unpleasantness, mental
pleasantness and mental unpleasantness having previously disappeared,
without pleasantness nor unpleasantness, with the purity of equanimity
and mindfulness, having entered in the fourth jhāna, he abides therein,
bending down towards Nibbāna, sloping towards Nibbāna, inclining to
Nibbāna. For the complete exhaustion of these three types of conceit,
bhikkhus, the four jhānas are to be developed.

(Pahāna)
Tisso
imā, bhikkhave, vidhā. Katamā tisso? ‘Seyyohamasmī’ti vidhā,
‘sadisohamasmī’ti vidhā, ‘hīnohamasmī’ti vidhā. Imā kho, bhikkhave,
tisso vidhā. Imāsaṃ kho, bhikkhave, tissannaṃ vidhānaṃ pahānāya cattāro
jhānā bhāvetabbā. Katame cattāro? Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu vivicc·eva
kāmehi vivicca akusalehi dhammehi savitakkaṃ savicāraṃ vivekajaṃ
pīti·sukhaṃ paṭhamaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati, vivekanissitaṃ
virāganissitaṃ nirodhanissitaṃ vossaggapariṇāmiṃ. Vitakka·vicārānaṃ
vūpasamā ajjhattaṃ sampasādanaṃ cetaso ekodi·bhāvaṃ avitakkaṃ avicāraṃ
samādhi·jaṃ pīti·sukhaṃ dutiyaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati,
vivekanissitaṃ virāganissitaṃ nirodhanissitaṃ vossaggapariṇāmiṃ. Pītiyā
ca virāgā upekkhako ca viharati sato ca sampajāno, sukhañca kāyena
paṭisaṃvedeti yaṃ taṃ ariyā ācikkhanti: ‘upekkhako satimā
sukha·vihārī’ti tatiyaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati, vivekanissitaṃ
virāganissitaṃ nirodhanissitaṃ vossaggapariṇāmiṃ. Sukhassa ca pahānā
dukkhassa ca pahānā pubbeva somanassa·domanassānaṃ atthaṅgamā
adukkham·asukhaṃ upekkhā·sati·pārisuddhiṃ catutthaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja
viharati, vivekanissitaṃ virāganissitaṃ nirodhanissitaṃ
vossaggapariṇāmiṃ. Imāsaṃ kho, bhikkhave, tissannaṃ vidhānaṃ pahānāya
cattāro jhānā bhāvetabbā.

Tisso
imā, bhikkhave, vidhā. Katamā tisso? ‘Seyyohamasmī’ti vidhā,
‘sadisohamasmī’ti vidhā, ‘hīnohamasmī’ti vidhā. Imā kho, bhikkhave,
tisso vidhā. Imāsaṃ kho, bhikkhave, tissannaṃ vidhānaṃ pahānāya cattāro
jhānā bhāvetabbā. Katame cattāro? Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu vivicc·eva
kāmehi vivicca akusalehi dhammehi savitakkaṃ savicāraṃ vivekajaṃ
pīti·sukhaṃ paṭhamaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati,
rāga·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ dosa·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ moha·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ.
Vitakka·vicārānaṃ vūpasamā ajjhattaṃ sampasādanaṃ cetaso ekodi·bhāvaṃ
avitakkaṃ avicāraṃ samādhi·jaṃ pīti·sukhaṃ dutiyaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja
viharati, rāga·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ dosa·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ
moha·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ. Pītiyā ca virāgā upekkhako ca viharati sato ca
sampajāno, sukhañca kāyena paṭisaṃvedeti yaṃ taṃ ariyā ācikkhanti:
‘upekkhako satimā sukha·vihārī’ti tatiyaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati,
rāga·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ dosa·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ moha·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ.
Sukhassa ca pahānā dukkhassa ca pahānā pubbeva somanassa·domanassānaṃ
atthaṅgamā adukkham·asukhaṃ upekkhā·sati·pārisuddhiṃ catutthaṃ jhānaṃ
upasampajja viharati, rāga·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ dosa·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ
moha·vinaya·pariyosānaṃ. Imāsaṃ kho, bhikkhave, tissannaṃ vidhānaṃ
pahānāya cattāro jhānā bhāvetabbā.
Tisso
imā, bhikkhave, vidhā. Katamā tisso? ‘Seyyohamasmī’ti vidhā,
‘sadisohamasmī’ti vidhā, ‘hīnohamasmī’ti vidhā. Imā kho, bhikkhave,
tisso vidhā. Imāsaṃ kho, bhikkhave, tissannaṃ vidhānaṃ pahānāya cattāro
jhānā bhāvetabbā. Katame cattāro? Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu vivicc·eva
kāmehi vivicca akusalehi dhammehi savitakkaṃ savicāraṃ vivekajaṃ
pīti·sukhaṃ paṭhamaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati, amatogadhaṃ
amataparāyanaṃ amatapariyosānaṃ. Vitakka·vicārānaṃ vūpasamā ajjhattaṃ
sampasādanaṃ cetaso ekodi·bhāvaṃ avitakkaṃ avicāraṃ samādhi·jaṃ
pīti·sukhaṃ dutiyaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati, amatogadhaṃ
amataparāyanaṃ amatapariyosānaṃ. Pītiyā ca virāgā upekkhako ca viharati
sato ca sampajāno, sukhañca kāyena paṭisaṃvedeti yaṃ taṃ ariyā
ācikkhanti: ‘upekkhako satimā sukha·vihārī’ti tatiyaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja
viharati, amatogadhaṃ amataparāyanaṃ amatapariyosānaṃ. Sukhassa ca
pahānā dukkhassa ca pahānā pubbeva somanassa·domanassānaṃ atthaṅgamā
adukkham·asukhaṃ upekkhā·sati·pārisuddhiṃ catutthaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja
viharati, amatogadhaṃ amataparāyanaṃ amatapariyosānaṃ. Imāsaṃ kho,
bhikkhave, tissannaṃ vidhānaṃ pahānāya cattāro jhānā bhāvetabbā.

Tisso
imā, bhikkhave, vidhā. Katamā tisso? ‘Seyyohamasmī’ti vidhā,
‘sadisohamasmī’ti vidhā, ‘hīnohamasmī’ti vidhā. Imā kho, bhikkhave,
tisso vidhā. Imāsaṃ kho, bhikkhave, tissannaṃ vidhānaṃ pahānāya cattāro
jhānā bhāvetabbā. Katame cattāro? Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu vivicc·eva
kāmehi vivicca akusalehi dhammehi savitakkaṃ savicāraṃ vivekajaṃ
pīti·sukhaṃ paṭhamaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati, nibbānaninnaṃ
nibbānapoṇaṃ nibbānapabbhāraṃ. Vitakka·vicārānaṃ vūpasamā ajjhattaṃ
sampasādanaṃ cetaso ekodi·bhāvaṃ avitakkaṃ avicāraṃ samādhi·jaṃ
pīti·sukhaṃ dutiyaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja viharati, nibbānaninnaṃ
nibbānapoṇaṃ nibbānapabbhāraṃ. Pītiyā ca virāgā upekkhako ca viharati
sato ca sampajāno, sukhañca kāyena paṭisaṃvedeti yaṃ taṃ ariyā
ācikkhanti: ‘upekkhako satimā sukha·vihārī’ti tatiyaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja
viharati, nibbānaninnaṃ nibbānapoṇaṃ nibbānapabbhāraṃ. Sukhassa ca
pahānā dukkhassa ca pahānā pubbeva somanassa·domanassānaṃ atthaṅgamā
adukkham·asukhaṃ upekkhā·sati·pārisuddhiṃ catutthaṃ jhānaṃ upasampajja
viharati, nibbānaninnaṃ nibbānapoṇaṃ nibbānapabbhāraṃ. Imāsaṃ kho,
bhikkhave, tissannaṃ vidhānaṃ pahānāya cattāro jhānā bhāvetabbā.

Bodhi leaf





The Practice of Loving-kindness
The Wretchedness of Anger
1. From the Anguttara Nikaya, 7:60
(spoken by the Buddha)
Bhikkhus, seven things gratifying and helpful to an enemy befall one who is angry, whether a woman or a man. What are the seven?
Here,
bhikkhus, an enemy wishes thus for his enemy: “Let him be ugly.” Why is
that? No enemy relishes an enemy’s beauty. Now when this person is
angry, a prey to anger, ruled by anger, be he ever so well bathed, and
well anointed, with hair and beard trimmed, and clothed in white, yet he
is ugly through his being a prey to anger. This is the first thing
gratifying and helpful to an enemy that befalls one who is angry,
whether a woman or a man.
Also
an enemy wishes thus for his enemy: “Let him lie in pain.” Why is that?
No enemy relishes an enemy’s lying in comfort. Now when this person is
angry, a prey to anger, ruled by anger, for all he may lie on a couch
spread with rugs, blankets and counterpanes with a deerskin cover, a
canopy and red cushions for the head and feet, yet he lies only in pain
through his being a prey to anger. This is the second thing gratifying
to an enemy that befalls one who is angry, whether a woman or a man.
Also
an enemy wishes thus for his enemy: “Let him have no prosperity.” Why
is that? No enemy relishes an enemy’s prosperity. Now when this person
is angry, prey to anger, ruled by anger, he mistakes bad for good and he
mistakes good for bad, and each being taken wrongly in the other’s
sense, these things for long conduce to his harm and suffering, through
his being a prey to anger. This is the third thing gratifying and
helpful to an enemy that befalls one who is angry, whether a woman or a
man.
Also
an enemy wishes thus for his enemy: “Let him not be rich.” Why is that?
No enemy relishes an enemy’s having riches. Now when a person is angry,
a prey to anger, should he have riches gained by endeavor, built up by
the strength of his arm, earned by sweat, lawful and lawfully acquired,
yet the king’s treasury gathers (in fines) through his being a prey to
anger. This is the fourth thing gratifying and helpful to an enemy that
befalls one who is a prey to anger, whether a woman or a man.
Also
an enemy wishes thus for his enemy: “Let him not be famous.” Why is
that? No enemy relishes an enemy’s having fame. Now when a person is
angry, a prey to anger, ruled by anger, what fame he may have acquired
by diligence he loses through his being a prey to anger. This is the
fifth thing gratifying and helpful to an enemy that befalls one who is a
prey to anger, whether a woman or a man.
Also
an enemy wishes thus for his enemy: “Let him have no friends.” Why is
that? No enemy relishes and enemy’s having friends. Now when this person
is angry, a prey to anger, ruled by anger, the friends he may have, his
companions, relatives and kin, will keep away from him through his
being a prey to anger. This is the sixth thing gratifying and helpful to
an enemy that befalls one who is a prey to anger, whether a woman or a
man.
Also
an enemy wishes thus for his enemy: “Let him on the dissolution of the
body, after death, reappear in a state of deprivation, in a bad
destination, in perdition, even in hell.” Why is that? No enemy relishes
an enemy’s going to a good destination. Now when this person is angry, a
prey to anger, ruled by anger, he misconducts himself in body, speech
and mind, and by his misconduct in body, speech and mind, on the
dissolution of the body, after death, he reappears in a state of
deprivation, in a bad destination, in perdition, even in hell, through
his being a prey to anger. This is the seventh thing gratifying and
helpful to an enemy that befalls one who is angry, whether a woman or a
man.
When anger does possess a man;
He looks ugly; he lies in pain;
What benefit he may come by
He misconstrues as a mischance;
He loses property (through fines)
Because he has been working harm
Through acts of body and speech
By angry passion overwhelmed;
The wrath and rage that madden him
Gain him a name of ill-repute;
His fellows, relatives and kin
Will seek to shun him from afar;
And anger fathers misery:
This fury does so cloud the mind
Of man that he cannot discern
This fearful inner danger.
An angry man no meaning knows,
No angry man sees the Dhamma,
So wrapped in darkness, as if blind,
Is he whom anger dogs.
Someone a man in anger hurts;
But, when his anger is later spent
With difficulty or with ease,
He suffers as if seared by fire.
His look betrays the sulkiness
Of some dim smoky smoldering glow.
Whence may flare up an anger-blaze
That sets the world of men aflame.
He has no shame or conscience curb,
No kindly words come forth from him,
There is no island refuge for
The man whom anger dogs.
Such acts as will ensure remorse,
Such as are far from the true Dhamma:
It is of these that I would tell,
So harken to my words.
Anger makes man a parricide,
Anger makes him a matricide,
Anger can make him slay the saint
As he would kill the common man.
Nursed and reared by a mother’s care,
He comes to look upon the world,
Yet the common man in anger kills
The being who gave him life.
No being but seeks his own self’s good,
None dearer to him than himself,
Yet men in anger kill themselves,
Distraught for reasons manifold:
For crazed they stab themselves with daggers,
In desperation swallow poison,
Perish hanged by ropes, or fling
Themselves over a precipice.
Yet how their life-destroying acts
Bring death unto themselves as well,
That they cannot discern, and that
Is the ruin anger breeds.
This secret place, with anger’s aid,
Is where mortality sets the snare.
To blot it out with discipline,
With vision, strength, and understanding,
To blot each fault out one by one,
The wise man should apply himself,
Training likewise in the true Dhamma;
“Let smoldering be far from us.”
Then rid of wrath and free from anger,
And rid of lust and free from envy,
Tamed, and with anger left behind,
Taintless, they reach Nibbana.

Loving Kindness Meditation
UNH Health & Wellness
9.38K subscribers
Meditative Practice for College Students
This
meditation will guide you to a deeper appreciation for self and the
world around you. Useful for anyone who desires inner peace as well as
general relaxation.
Written and read by Kathleen Grace-Bishop; Music Performed by Cynthia Chatis.
Loving Kindness Meditation
Meditative
Practice for College StudentsThis meditation will guide you to a deeper
appreciation for self and the world around you. Useful for anyone who
desi…




How to get rid of Anger

2. From the Dhammapada, vv. 3-5, and Majjhima Nikaya, Sutta 128
(spoken by the Buddha).

“He abused me, he beat me,
He worsted me, he robbed me.”
Hate never is allayed in men
That cherish suchlike enmity.
“He abused me, he beat me,
He worsted me, he robbed me.”
Hate surely is allayed in men
Who cherish no such enmity.
For enmity by enmity
Is never in this world allayed;
It is allayed by amity —
That is an ancient principle.

3. From the Anguttara Nikaya, 5:161
(spoken by the Buddha)

Bhikkhus,
there are these five ways of removing annoyance, by which annoyance can
be entirely removed by a bhikkhu when it arises in him. What are the
five?

Loving-kindness
can be maintained in being towards a person with whom you are annoyed:
this is how annoyance with him can be removed. Compassion can be
maintained in being towards a person with whom you are annoyed; this too
is how annoyance with him can be removed. Onlooking equanimity can be
maintained in being towards a person with whom you are annoyed; this too
is how annoyance with him can be removed. The forgetting and ignoring
of a person with whom you are annoyed can be practiced; this too is how
annoyance with him can be removed. Ownership of deeds in a person with
whom you are annoyed can be concentrated upon thus: “This good person is
owner of his deeds, heir to his deeds, his deeds are the womb from
which he is born, his deeds are his kin for whom he is responsible, his
deeds are his refuge, he is heir to his deeds, be they good or bad.”
This too is how annoyance with him can be removed. These are the five
ways of removing annoyance, by which annoyance can be entirely removed
in a bhikkhu when it arises in him.

Sayings Of The Buddha - ANGER - Full Chapter 17 | Dhammapada
My Evolving Wisdom
976 subscribers
Sayings Of The Buddha - ANGER - Full Chapter 17 | Dhammapada
———
From:
Dhammapada - The Way of Truth
*Translated from the Pali by Sangharakshita
Sayings Of The Buddha - ANGER - Full Chapter 17 | Dhammapada


Public


Loving-kindness and its Rewards

4. From the Majjhima Nikaya, Sutta 21
(spoken by the Buddha)

Bhikkhus,
there are five modes of speech that others may use when they address
you. Their speech may be timely or untimely, true or untrue, gentle or
harsh, for good or harm, and may be accompanied by thoughts of
loving-kindness or by inner hate.

Suppose
a man came with a hoe and a basket, and he said, “I shall make this
great earth to be without earth”; and he dug here and there and strewed
here and there, and spat here and there and relieved himself here and
there, saying “Be without earth, be without earth.” What do you think,
bhikkhus, would that man make this great earth to be without earth? —
No, venerable sir. Why is that? Because this great earth is deep and
measureless; it cannot possibly be made to be without earth. So the man
would reap weariness and disappointment.

Suppose
a man came with lak or gamboge or indigo or carmine, and he said, “I
shall draw pictures, I shall make pictures appear, on this empty space.”
What do you think, bhikkhus, would that man draw pictures, would he
make pictures appear, on that empty space? — No, venerable sir. Why is
that? Because that empty space is formless and invisible; he cannot
possibly draw pictures, make pictures appear there. So the man would
reap weariness and disappointment.

So
too, bhikkhus, there are these five modes of speech that others may use
when they address you. Their speech may be timely or untimely, true or
untrue, gentle or harsh, for good or for harm, and may be accompanied by
thoughts of loving-kindness or by inner hate. Now this is how you
should train yourselves here: “Our minds will remain unaffected, we
shall utter no bad words, we shall abide friendly and compassionate,
with thoughts of loving-kindness and no inner hate. We shall abide with
loving-kindness in our hearts extending to that person, and we shall
dwell extending it to the entire world as our object, with our hearts
abundant, exalted, measureless in loving-kindness, without hostility or
ill-will.” That is how you should train yourselves.

Even
were bandits savagely to sever you limb from limb with a two-handled
saw, he who entertaineth hate on that account in his heart would not be
one who carried out my teaching.

Bhikkhus, you should keep this instruction on the Simile of the Saw constantly in mind.

5. From the Itivuttaka, Sutta 27
(spoken by the Buddha)

Bhikkhus,
whatever kinds of worldly merit there are, all are not worth one
sixteenth part of the heart-deliverance of loving-kindness; in shining
and beaming and radiance the heart-deliverance of loving-kindness far
excels them.

Just
as whatever light there is of stars, all is not worth one sixteenth
part of the moon’s; in shining and beaming and radiance the moon’s light
far excels it; and just as in the last month of the Rains, in the
Autumn when the heavens are clear, the sun as it climbs the heavens
drives all darkness from the sky with its shining and beaming and
radiance; and just as, when night is turning to dawn, the morning star
is shining and beaming and radiating; so too, whatever kinds of worldly
merit there are, all are not worth one sixteenth part of the
heart-deliverance of loving-kindness; in shining and beaming and
radiance the heart-deliverance of loving-kindness far excels them.

6. From the Anguttara Nikaya, 11:16
(spoken by the Buddha)

Bhikkhus,
when the heart-deliverance of loving-kindness is maintained in being,
made much of, used as one’s vehicle, used as one’s foundation,
established, consolidated, and properly managed, then eleven blessings
can be expected. What are the eleven?

A
man sleeps in comfort; he wakes in comfort; he dreams no evil dreams;
he is dear to human beings; he is dear to non-human beings; the gods
guard him; no fire or poison or weapon harms him; his mind can be
quickly concentrated; the expression of his face is serene; he dies
without falling into confusion; and, even if he fails to penetrate any
further, he will pass on to the world of High Divinity, to the Brahma
world.

7. From the Samyutta Nikaya, 20:3
(spoken by the Buddha)

Bhikkhus,
just as clans with many women and few men are readily ruined by robbers
and bandits, so too any bhikkhu who has not maintained in being and
made much of the heart-deliverance of loving-kindness is readily ruined
by non-human beings. And just as clans with few women and many men are
not readily ruined by robbers and bandits; so too any bhikkhu who
maintains in being and makes much of the heart-deliverance of
loving-kindness is not readily ruined by non-human beings. So, bhikkhus,
you should train in this way: The heart-deliverance of loving-kindness
will be maintained in being and made much of by us, used as our vehicle,
used as our foundation, established, consolidated, and properly
managed. That is how you should train.

8. From the Anguttara Nikaya, 1:53-55, 386
(spoken by the Buddha)

Bhikkhus,
if a bhikkhu cultivates loving-kindness for as long as a fingersnap, he
is called a bhikkhu. He is not destitute of jhana meditation, he
carries out the Master’s teaching, he responds to advice, and he does
not eat the country’s alms food in vain. So what should be said of those
who make much of it?

9. From the Digha Nikaya, Sutta 33
(spoken by the arahant Sariputta)

Here,
friends, a bhikkhu might say: “When the heart-deliverance of
loving-kindness is maintained in being and made much of by me, used as
my vehicle, used as my foundation, established, consolidated, and
properly managed, ill-will nevertheless still invades my heart and
remains.” He should be told: “Not so. Let the worthy one not say so. Let
him not misrepresent the Blessed One. It is not good to misrepresent
the Blessed One. The Blessed One would not express it thus.” Friends, it
is impossible, it cannot happen, that when the heart-deliverance of
loving-kindness is maintained in being and made much of, used as one’s
vehicle, used as one’s foundation, established, consolidated, and
properly managed, ill-will can invade the heart and remain; for this,
that is to say, the heart-deliverance of loving-kindness, is the escape
from ill-will.

The Way of the Noble
Tai Tran
1.28K subscribers
Notes
1) This quotation is from the Brahma Suttas of the Samyutta Nikaya VI. 2. 3.
Brahma Sahampati visits the Buddha, who was living with the Magadhese at Andhakavinda.
He notices a large assemblage of monks seated in front and on either side of the Buddha.
Among them are a large number of arahants (saints), and also a numerically larger number of those who have reached “the Stream,
the Holy Way”, the subject of this essay.
2) It is Insight Wisdom (vipassanañana) that helps to reveal phenomenal existence as it really is:
its impermanency (anicca), its imperfectness (dukkha) and its impersonality (anatta).
3) Samyutta Nikaya II 28, 29
4) The Basic Position of Sila by Miss I. B. Horner, published by the Bauddha Sahitya abha.
5) Majjhima Nikaya I 173. Also Samyutta Nikaya 15:1; 15:3; 15:13.
😎 Maha parinibbana Sutta, Digha Nikaya Sutta 16.
7) Dhammapada v. 78
😎 Ibid. Verse 79
9) Ibid. Verse 364
10) Samyutta Nikaya 46: 2
11) Vinaya Mahavagga p.10
12) Majjhima Nikaya I 479
13) Udana p. 67
14) Dhammapada v. 275
15) The four phases of a lunar month. The Sinhala term for Uposatha days
16) Maha Parinibbana Sutta, Digha Nikaya 16, D II 108
17) Another term for Noble disciples.
18) The raison d’etre of the Buddhadhamma is the Four Noble Truths.
It is only by a clear understanding and perception of the Four Noble Truths that one can call a halt to the process of Becoming.
“By not seeing the Aryan Truths as they really are,
Long is the path that is traversed through many a birth,
When these are grasped, the cause of rebirth is removed,
The root of sorrow is uprooted, and then there is no more birth.”
—(Maha Parinibbana Sutta)
19) Dhammapada Verse 188
20) Ibid. Verse 189
21) Ibid. Verse 103
22) Ibid. Verse 105
23) While admitting that the monasticrules (patimokkha) are more exacting and demanding so far as monks are concerned,
however, the fact remains that the precepts laid down by the Buddha for monk or layman have one underlying motive behind them,
namely, the successful walk on the way resulting in the purification of vision.
The initial step to gain this all too important vision is morality (sila) consisting in purity of body’s actions,
in purity of speech and in purity of living.
Those who criticize the negative aspects of the precepts should be told of the dynamics of the Dhamma.
For example the Buddhadhamma breathes the spirit of loving kindness and compassion toward all living beings;
the spirit of charity (dana) instead of stealing; the spirit of chastity instead of unbridled passion;
the spirit of reconciliation instead of slander; the spirit of truth instead of lying etc.
It should be noted that the ten unwholesome actions (dasaakusala kamma patha) have their corresponding wholesome actions
(dasa kusala kamma patha).
24) The Four Great Efforts are
(i) the Effort to avoid the arising of evil, unwholesome things that have not yet arisen,
(ii) the Effort to overcome the evil, unwholesome things that have already arisen,
(iii) the Effort to arouse wholesome things that have not yet arisen,
(iv) the Effort to maintain the wholesome things that have already arisen, and to bring them to growth,
to maturity and to perfection.
25) It is by employing the technique called Mental Development (bhavana) that mental tranquility is produced.
Mental tranquility is the precursor to the development of Wisdom (paññabhavana) or clear Insight (vipassanabhavana).
For further information please read Chapter 4 of Fundamentals of Buddhism by the late Venerable Ñanatiloka Maha Thera.
26) The Seven Stages of Purity are
(i) Purity of Morality (silavisuddhi),
(ii) Purity of Mind (cittavisuddhi),
(iii) Purity of Views (ditthivisuddhi),
(iv) Purity consisting in overcoming all doubts (kankhavitaranavisuddhi),
(v) Purity of Insight regarding the Right and Wrong Path (maggamaggañanadassanavisuddhi),
(vi) Purity of Insight regarding the Path of Progress (patipadañanadassanavisuddhi) and
(vii) Purity of Insight into the Four Paths of Holiness ñanadassanavisuddhi).
27) Cankerless. It is by totally destroying the Cankers (asava), also called the floods (ogha),
that the anagamin attains the state of an Arahant. Vide:
The Four Cankers, Bodhi Leaf No. 34, by the present writer.
28)The Dhammasangani lists twenty soul-theories.
Also see: The Truth of Anatta by Dr. Malalasekera (The Wheel publication No. 94)
29) It is by totally destroying the cankers (asava), also called the floods (ogha),
that the Anagami attains the state of an Arahant.
See The Four Cankers – Bodhi Leaves No. B. 34 by the present writer.
30) Dhammapada v 178
31) Majjhima Nikaya I 190-19
The Way of the Noble
Notes1)
This quotation is from the Brahma Suttas of the Samyutta Nikaya VI. 2.
3. Brahma Sahampati visits the Buddha, who was living with the Magadhese
at An…


Public

Loving-kindness as a Contemplation

10. Metta Sutta
From the Sutta-nipata, vv. 143-152
(spoken by the Buddha)

What should be done by one skillful in good
So as to gain the State of Peace is this:
Let him be able, and upright and straight,
Easy to speak to, gentle, and not proud,
Contented too, supported easily,
With few tasks, and living very lightly;
His faculties serene, prudent, and modest,
Unswayed by the emotions of the clans;
And let him never do the slightest thing
That other wise men might hold blamable.
(And let him think:) “In safety and in bliss
May creatures all be of a blissful mind.
Whatever breathing beings there may be.
No matter whether they are frail or firm,
With none excepted, be they long or big
Or middle-sized, or be they short or small
Or thick, as well as those seen or unseen,
Or whether they are dwelling far or near,
Existing or yet seeking to exist.

May creatures all be of a blissful mind.
Let no one work another one’s undoing
Or even slight him at all anywhere:
And never let them wish each other ill
Through provocation or resentful thought.”
And just as might a mother with her life
Protect the son that was her only child,
So let him then for every living thing
Maintain unbounded consciousness in being;
And let him too with love for all the world
Maintain unbounded consciousness in being
Above, below, and all round in between,
Untroubled, with no enemy or foe.

And while he stands or walks or while he sits
Or while he lies down, free from drowsiness,
Let him resolve upon this mindfulness:
This is Divine Abiding here, they say.
But when he has no trafficking with views,
Is virtuous, and has perfected seeing,
And purges greed for sensual desires,
He surely comes no more to any womb.

11. Methodical Practice: from the Patisambhidamagga
(traditionally ascribed to the arahant Sariputta)

The
heart-deliverance of loving-kindness is practiced with unspecified
extension, with specified extension, and with directional extension.

That
with unspecified extension is practiced in five ways as follows: May
all beings be freed from enmity, distress and anxiety, and may they
guide themselves to bliss.
May
all breathing things… all creatures… all persons… May all those
who are embodied be freed from enmity, distress and anxiety, and may
they guide themselves to bliss.
That
with specified extension is practiced in seven ways as follows: May all
women be freed from enmity, distress and anxiety, and may they guide
themselves to bliss. May all men… all Noble Ones… all who are not
Noble Ones… all deities… all human beings… may all those in the
states of deprivation be freed from enmity, distress and anxiety, and
may they guide themselves to bliss.

That with directional extension is practiced in ten ways as follows:
May
all beings in the eastern direction be freed from enmity, distress and
anxiety, and may they guide themselves to bliss. May all beings in the
western direction… in the northern direction… in the southern
direction… in the eastern intermediate direction… in the western
intermediate direction… in the northern intermediate direction… in
the southern intermediate direction… in the downward direction… May
all those in the upward direction be freed from enmity, distress and
anxiety, and may they guide themselves to bliss.
May all breathing things…
May all creatures…
May all persons…
May all who are embodied…
May all women…
May all men…
May all Noble Ones…
May all who are not Noble Ones…
May all deities…
May all human beings…
May
all those in the states of deprivation in the eastern direction be
freed from enmity, distress and anxiety, and may they guide themselves
to bliss… May all those in states of deprivation in the upward
direction be freed from enmity, distress, anxiety, and may they guide
themselves to bliss.

12. From the Abhidhamma Pitaka, Appamannavibhanga
(traditionally ascribed to the Buddha)

And
how does a bhikkhu abide with his heart imbued with loving-kindness
extending over one direction? Just as he would feel friendliness on
seeing a dearly beloved person, so he extends loving-kindness to all
creatures.
Metta Loving Kindness (Eng.)


Public

As practiced without Insight in the Four Truths

13. From the Majjhima Nikaya, Sutta 99
(spoken by the Buddha)

“Master
Gotama, I have heard it said that the Monk Gotama teaches the path to
the retinue of the High Divinity. It would be good if Master Gotama
would teach me that.”
“Then listen and attend carefully to what I shall say.”

“Even so, sir,” the student Subha Todeyyaputta replied. The Blessed One said this.

“And
what is the path to the retinue of the High Divinity? Here a bhikkhu
abides with his heart imbued with loving-kindness extending over one
quarter, likewise the second quarter, likewise the third quarter,
likewise the fourth quarter, and so above, below, around, and everywhere
and to all as to himself; he abides with his heart abundant, exalted,
measureless in loving-kindness, without hostility or ill-will, extending
over the all-encompassing world. While this heart-deliverance of
loving-kindness is maintained in being in this way, no action restricted
by limited measurement is found there, none persists there. Just as a
vigorous trumpeter could easily make himself heard in the four
directions, so too when the heart-deliverance of loving-kindness is
maintained in being in this way no action restricted by limited
measurement is found there, none persists there. This is a path to the
retinue of the High Divinity.”

The Middle Length Discourses: Sutta 1 - Mulapariyāya Sutta: The Root Of All Things

Candana Bhikkhu
813 subscribers

In
these series of Sutta recitations, this time, presenting the vastly
rich Middle-Length Discourses/Sayings (MN - Majjhima Nikaya) of the
Buddha, I used several sources in my attempt to present a more complete
version of each of the suttas. Therefore, I worked to include vast
sections of suttas that were omitted from several of the extant editions
of the MN, due to their repetitive and “drill-like” formulation,
originally found in the earliest versions of the Majjhima Nikaya. This
almost algorithmic style of repeating statements found in many of these
and other suttas within the other Nikayas, help the meditator to
penetrate into the deeper layers of understanding of the world, as one
becomes able to ‘see things as they truly come to be’ (yathā bhutaṃ
pajānāti), which is a necessary step in the experiencing of Nibbāna, as
explained by Lord Buddha. This in itself has been a crucial part of the
decision to make these suttas available to both the novice and the
advanced student of Buddhist meditative practice, according to the
earliest known Teachings available of the Buddha.

Please
Note: It is my wish that after the countless hours of preparing and
making these recordings freely available, you the listener will become
encouraged to obtain the actual hardcopy editions of this and the other
Nikayas, as made available by the following authors, from their
respective publishers. It is to my teachers and these translators of the
Buddha’s Words that I am utterly indebted, for their enormous efforts
in making them available in the first place and presenting them to us.

These are:
I. B. Horner. (1993). The Middle Length Sayings. Pali Text Society
Ñāṇamoli,
B. & Bodhi, B. (2001). The Middle Length Discourses of the Buddha: A
new translation of the Majjhima Nikāya. Oxford, United Kingdom: Pali
Text Society in Association with Wisdom Publications.

Ñāṇananda, K. B. (1971). Concept & Reality. Kandy, Sri Lanka: Theravada Tipitaka Press.

Ñāṇananda, K. B. (2010). Nibbāna: the mind stilled. Kandy, Sri Lanka: Theravada Tipitaka Press.
Punnaji,
M. (2011). Ariyamagga Bhavana I & II: the Sublime Eightfold Way -
Tranquility of Mind. Kuala Lampur, Malaysia: Sasana Abhiwurdhi Wardhana
Society.
Vimalaramsi, B. (2014). The Dhamma Leaf Series. Dhamma Sukha Meditation Center. Annapolis: MO.

About this project:

Over
the past 30+ years, in my quest for understanding the Dhamma, i.e. the
Teachings of Lord Buddha, I have dedicated countless hours studying the
suttas found in the Pali Canon of the Theravada Tradition (Words of the
Elders) as I sat at the feet of many a great teacher, trying to learn
and grasp the meaning behind the words.

In
these difficult times, however, where time itself has become truly
constricted in its abundance, the curious and struggling minds of
individuals do not necessarily have the same luxuries of sitting down
and reading the Nikayas, let alone exploring their meaning, something
that was enjoyed only a generation or two earlier.

Instead,
one becomes hesitant to even pick up one of the Nikayas given their
massive volume, therefore, the danger of their inaccessibility (by
shying away from reading the Pali Nikayas) looms in the horizon; this,
while considering that many newcomers to the Dhamma are often petrified
to tackle the wonderful exploration that would otherwise be awaiting
them in those voluminous pages.

Thus,
as one of my own students expressed of her apprehension despite her
love for the Dhamma, to pick up one these precious texts, I saw it
necessary for posterity to go ahead and transfer these words onto audio.
I realize the amount of work, time and energy this would take, but the
necessity for making the Dhamma available in an age of scarcity of time
where most of our time is spent driving, sitting long hours in commute,
etc., becomes all the more relevant, if not imperative.

Being
a Dhamma Teacher means nothing if there is no Dhamma available, which
means that is available whether through being read, studied, and in this
case, heard and listened to.

To
this end, I am dedicating my time and energy to do my small part and
record the precious words of Lord Buddha onto these audio files for
posterity, hoping that listeners would become able to taste them and
realize their fruits (through daily practice), by listening to and
understanding the wonderful gems within the words of Lord Buddha that
have survived the test of time during the last 2600 years.

Mettacittena,
“Candana” (Garbis J. Bartanian, Doctor of Buddhist Ministry (DBMin), LMFT).
The Middle Length Discourses: Sutta 1 - Mulapariyāya Sutta: The Root Of All Things


Public


As practiced with Insight in the Four Truths

14. From the Anguttara Nikaya, 4:125
(spoken by the Buddha)

Here,
bhikkhus, a certain person abides with his heart imbued with
loving-kindness extending over one quarter, likewise the second quarter,
likewise the third quarter, likewise the fourth quarter, and so above,
below, around, and everywhere, and to all as to himself; he abides with
his heart abundant, exalted, measureless in loving-kindness, without
hostility or ill-will, extending over the all-encompassing world.

He
finds gratification in that, finds it desirable and looks to it for his
well-being; steady and resolute thereon, he abides much in it, and if
he dies without losing it, he reappears among the gods of a High
Divinity’s retinue.

Now
the gods of a High Divinity’s retinue have a life-span of one aeon. An
ordinary person (who has not attained the Noble Eightfold Path) stays
there for his life-span; but after he has used up the whole life-span
enjoyed by those gods, he leaves it all, and (according to what his past
deeds may have been) he may go down even to hell, or to an animal womb,
or to the ghost realm. But one who has given ear to the Perfect One
stays there (in that heaven) for his life-span, and after he has used up
the whole life-span enjoyed by those gods, he eventually attains
complete extinction of lust, hate and delusion in that same kind of
heavenly existence.

It
is this that distinguishes, that differentiates, the wise hearer who is
ennobled (by attainment of the Noble Path) from the unwise ordinary
man, when, that is to say, there is a destination for reappearance
(after death, but an arahant has made an end of birth).

15. From the Anguttara Nikaya, 4:126
(spoken by the Buddha)

Here, bhikkhus, a certain person abides with his heart imbued with loving-kindness extending… over the all-encompassing world.

Now
whatever therein (during that state of contemplation) exists
classifiable as form, classifiable as a feeling (of pleasure, pain, or
neutrality), classifiable as perception, classifiable as determinative
acts, or classifiable as consciousness, such ideas he sees as
impermanent, as liable to suffering, as a disease, as a cancer, as a
barb, as a calamity, as an affliction, as alien, as being worn away, as
void, as not-self. On the dissolution of the body, after death, he
reappears (as a non-returner) in the retinue of the Gods of the Pure
Abodes (where there are only those who have reached the Noble Path and
where extinction of greed, hate and delusion is reached in less than
seven lives without return to this world). And this kind of reappearance
is not shared by ordinary men (who have not reached the Noble Eightfold
Path).

Buddhist Beliefs: The Four Noble Truths

Mindah-Lee Kumar (The Enthusiastic Buddhist)
40.7K subscribers
The
Four Noble Truths and the Noble Eightfold Path are fundamental
teachings in Buddhism. They are considered equally important among all
the Buddhist schools and are central to the core of Buddhist beliefs.
Sometimes Buddhists are criticized for always talking about suffering
(because of the First Noble Truth); yet the majority of Buddhist
teachers I’ve come across, if not all, are the most peaceful and joyous
people I’ve ever met. So surely, there is more to Buddhism than just
suffering.

In
this video I explain how the Buddha taught the 4 Noble Truths to show
us how we can move from a state of unrest to attaining an everlasting
peace and happiness, known as nirvana or nibbana. But first, like any
good physician, before prescribing the medicine, the Buddha had to
diagnose our problems and show us why we feel less than one hundred
percent happy most of the time, and what we can do to fix this.

Suggested Reading:
An excellent article by Ajahn Brahm: Joy at last to know there is no happiness in the world
CONNECT WITH ME HERE:
Membership site for more teachings and support:
Sutta used in this video:
“Dhammacakkappavattana
Sutta: Setting Rolling the Wheel of Truth” (SN 56.11), translated from
the Pali by Ñanamoli Thera. Access to Insight, 14 June 2010, http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipita… . Retrieved on 21 September 2013.
Buddhist Beliefs: The Four Noble Truths
The
Four Noble Truths and the Noble Eightfold Path are fundamental
teachings in Buddhism. They are considered equally important among all
the Buddhist school…



Leave a Reply