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Do Good Purify Mind-Buddha’s 🤕 Own Words Satthusāsana Sutta — The Instruction of the Teacher —
Filed under: General, Theravada Tipitaka , Plant raw Vegan Broccoli, peppers, cucumbers, carrots
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Do Good Purify Mind-Buddha’s 🤕 Own Words

Satthusāsana Sutta

— The Instruction of the Teacher —

Gautama Buddha Siddhartha Shakyamuni | YOGA | ART | İndia | Buddism | Artesthetic #4 Aytan Mammadli

Gautama Buddha Siddhartha Shakyamuni | YOGA | ART | İndia | Buddism | Artesthetic #4 Aytan Mammadli
By Dione Team

Do Good Purify Mind-Buddha’s 🤕 Own Words

Satthusāsana Sutta

— The Instruction of the Teacher —

Of these dhammas,Upāli, of which you may know: ‘These dhammas are utterly conducive to nibbida,virāga,nirodha,upasama,abhiñña,to sambodhi,to Nibbāna, Upāli,you may definitely hold: ‘This is the Dhamma,Vinaya,instruction of the Teacher’.

Yaxşılıq edin Zehni Təmizləyin - Buddanın 🤕 Öz Sözləri

Satthusāsana Sutta

- Müəllimin göstərişi -

Bilə biləcəyiniz bu dhammalardan Upali: ‘Bu dhammalar nibbida, virağa, nirodha, upasama, abhiñña, sambodhi, Nibbana, Upali üçün tamamilə əlverişlidir, siz mütləq saxlaya bilərsiniz: ‘Bu, Dhamma, Vinaya, Müəllimin göstərişi’.

All the non-BSP chitpavan brahmin parties supported by parliament, executive, Supreme Court, Election Commission, media will continue to be selected by the fraud EVMs. Best solution is All Aboriginal Awakened Societies grow vegetables 🥦 🥕 🥗 and fruit 🍌 🍎 🍉 plants 🪴 🌱 in pots and lead happy 😃 lives like free 🐦🦢 🦅 birds.

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Heres How to Grow a Plentiful Vegetable Garden in a Container

Heres How to Grow a Plentiful Vegetable Garden in a Container
By picking the right plants, you can grow a fair amount of food in just a few large pots!

How to Grow a Plentiful Container Vegetable Garden

Here’s a little-known secret: Many vegetables actually do really well in containers. By picking the right plants, you can grow a fair amount of food in just a few large pots!

You don’t need to dig up a huge plot in your backyard to grow your own food. Even if you only have a small space available on your porch or patio, you can create an edible container garden. Growing vegetables in containers opens up tons of possibilities, and you can even plant and harvest exciting and tasty varieties you won’t normally find at the grocery store. To get started, just find a sunny spot to place your container and choose a few different veggies that you and your family like to eat. Soon you’ll have healthy, delicious produce growing right outside your door!

Right to grow vegetables 🥦 🥕 🥗 and fruits 🍌 🍎
🍉 in pots and backyard- relevant rules

Vegetable Container Garden Materials

Before you start planting, choose the containers you want to use. Both the type and size of container can affect the care your garden needs, so be sure to pick pots that will work for the space you have and the veggies you want to grow.

Type of Container

Not sure what type of container to grow your vegetables in? Don’t fret; typically, you’ll care more about this than your plants will. Most vegetables aren’t fussy about what kind of container they grow in. The only basic requirements are that the pot is large enough to hold the plant and that it has drainage holes so excess water can escape.

Related: These Fabric Grow Bags Are the Easiest Way to Start a Garden

In general, plants in terra cotta (clay) need more attention to watering than other types of pots, because of the porous nature of the material. Especially if you plan on moving your veggie garden around, try to choose a lightweight container; once it’s planted, it can get pretty heavy, especially after watering. Also think about the color. Dark colors absorb heat, so they may make the soil too warm for some vegetable crops in summer, especially in hot-summer areas. And avoid vegetable container gardens made of treated wood, as it may contain chemical compounds that could be absorbed by your vegetables.

Size of Container

When it comes to size, the bigger the pot is, the better, especially for beginners. The reason for this is that large pots hold more soil and will hold moisture longer so you don’t have to water as much. Look for containers that are at least 10 inches wide and 12 inches deep. And feel free to think beyond the typical round flower pot; half barrels, plastic-lined bushel baskets, and window boxes can work just as well.

Plants that grow tall or produce vines (like tomatoes and cucumbers) will be more productive if they’re grown with a support in the container. Something as simple as a wire cage inserted into the container at planting time will work. Use larger, heavier containers for trellised plants to minimize the risk of tipping.barrel with various plants surrounded by flowers

What Type of Soil to Use in Containers

While vegetables aren’t fussy about the kind of pot they’re in, they do need a potting mix that will allow water to drain well. Like most other container gardens, your veggies will do best in potting mixes made for containers. Fill the containers so the soil is at least 2-3 inches below the rim (that extra space at the top will give you room to water deeply without overflowing the container). Water the soil just before planting.

pouring soil into container garden

What Type of Soil to Use in Containers

While vegetables aren’t fussy about the kind of pot they’re in, they do need a potting mix that will allow water to drain well. Like most other container gardens, your veggies will do best in potting mixes made for containers. Fill the containers so the soil is at least 2-3 inches below the rim (that extra space at the top will give you room to water deeply without overflowing the container). Water the soil just before planting.

How to Plant Vegetables in Containers

Choosing the plants for your container garden is up to you; as a starting point, think about what you like to eat. Most vegetables have similar care needs (full sun and well-drained soil), but it’s also good to double-check that their needs are similar, especially if you’re planting multiple veggies in one container.

half barrel planter with vegetable plants

You can start your vegetable container garden at the same time you would plant in the garden. Depending on what types of vegetables you want to grow, you can start seeds in your containers, grow transplants from seeds started indoors, or purchase transplants from a garden center.

Test Garden Tip: Start container garden crops such as beans, corn, carrots, radishes, and spinach from seeds sown directly in the container.

All those 💥 power and money 💰 greed who are selected by the fraud EVMs are slaves to serve the aboriginal societies who are their bosses.

Ambedkar said tyranny of majority is no democracy. Indians must read him again

Ambedkar said tyranny of majority is no democracy. Indians must read him again
By Yogendra Yadav

Don’t just celebrate Ambedkar’s birthday. Follow the democracy he envisioned for India.

Departing from Western democratic imagination that foregrounds liberty, Ambedkar put equality and fraternity at the heart of democracy. “The roots of democracy lie not in the form of Government, Parliamentary or otherwise. A democracy is more than a form of Government. It is primarily a mode of associated living. The roots of Democracy are to be searched in the social relationship, in terms of associated life between the people who form a society.” [Prospects of Democracy in India, 1956] For this ideal, he turned to the Buddhist tradition. He insisted that Buddhist Sanghas were the models for parliamentary democracy.

Ambedkar said tyranny of majority is no democracy. Must read him again.

It is time we recovered some other, deeper, dimensions of his thought and secured a due place for him in the canons of intellectual history. His reflections on democracy qualify him as the first candidate for such a recovery.

Babasaheb Ambedkar was the first Indian, and arguably the only Indian in the 20th century, who offered a theory of radical democracy, a theory that can guide us in the 21st century. This needs to be remembered, because the celebration of his intellectual and political legacy tends to focus almost exclusively on his critique of caste-based injustice.

Ambedkar was not the first thinker to reflect on democracy. But he was the first one to offer original answers to the three basic questions that a theory of democracy must address. One, a theory must set out a norm, an ideal of what democracy should be like. Two, it must evaluate the current state of democracy in the light of its ideal and offer a critique. Three, it must spell out a path to a democratic ideal, from where we stand to where we should aim to be. Ambedkar’s answers were original because these were not drawn from some abstraction. His reflections were firmly located in the context.

Dr Ambedkar’s answers were strikingly different from the two ways of thinking about democracy that dominated his times. On the one hand were ‘liberals’ like Jawaharlal Nehru who expected the Western fairytale of democracy to be replayed in the country, albeit with a time lag. For them, Western democracies were the model towards which country had begun its journey by enacting a Constitution and holding free and fair elections. On the other hands were the critics, mostly from the Left, who thought that the democratic experiment in the country was a sham, nothing but a rule of the capitalist class cloaked in procedures of democracy. Gandhi, too, shared this disdain for Westminster-style democracy. Dr Ambedkar offered a theory of cautious and conditional optimism, an optimism drawn from the abstract promise of democracy and a caution rooted in the Indian context.

Substantive ideal of democracy

Ambedkar offered a substantive definition of democracy, radically different from the procedural definition that dominated the 20th-century theories of democracy. He was not unmindful of the procedural aspects of democracy, but for him, all these democratic mechanisms like elections and parliament were there for a purpose: “to bring about welfare of the people”. He went on to offer a definition of democracy for our times that would set him apart from the dominant theorists of democracy. For him, democracy was “a form and a method of government whereby revolutionary changes in the economic and social life of the people are brought about without bloodshed”. [Conditions Precedent for the Successful Working of Democracy, 1952]

Departing from Western democratic imagination that foregrounds liberty, Ambedkar put equality and fraternity at the heart of democracy. “The roots of democracy lie not in the form of Government, Parliamentary or otherwise. A democracy is more than a form of Government. It is primarily a mode of associated living. The roots of Democracy are to be searched in the social relationship, in terms of associated life between the people who form a society.” [Prospects of Democracy in India, 1956] For this ideal, he turned to the Buddhist tradition. He insisted that Buddhist Sanghas were the models for parliamentary democracy.

Critique of existing democracy

In the light of this ideal, Ambedkar offered a thoroughgoing critique of the existing societies that claimed to be democratic. Though his critique was general, his focus was, understandably, on Indian society. The “associated living” that democracy presupposes simply did not exist in India. Caste system has divided the Indian society into many parallel, self-contained communities that did not allow for the conversation and negotiation necessary for a healthy democracy. Thus Ambedkar’s critique of the caste system was not merely that it was unjust and oppressive for the “depressed classes”, but also that it fractured national unity and made democracy impossible.

Ambedkar turned this critique into a general theory of preconditions for a successful democracy. He reminded us, “democracy is not a plant that grows everywhere”. He would often cite the case of Italy and Germany where absence of social and economic democracy led to the failure of nascent political democracy. For him, the first and foremost condition for democracy was that there should be no glaring inequalities, that every citizen should enjoy equal treatment in everyday administration and governance. This needs to be backed up by popular acceptance of constitutional morality, widespread public conscience and the upholding of moral order in society. Finally, Ambedkar reminded us that there is no democracy without the existence of and respect for opposition, that tyranny of majority is antithetical to democracy.

Path to democratic future

Ambedkar had an unusual approach to making the transition from the present to the desired future. Unlike the social revolutionaries of his time, he did not advocate a violent or even non-violent overthrow of the existing democratic order. In fact, at one point he argued against continuation of satyagraha or civil disobedience in independent India. This might look disappointingly conservative for a radical theorist of democracy. But a closer look would show a more nuanced radicalism at work.

Ambedkar was the first serious student of social consequences of political institutions. He understood that every institutional design has a built-in drag, that it has consequences irrespective of the intent of those who designed it. Whether it was the choice of the parliamentary system over the presidential, or the role and powers of an elected panchayat in a village, or the formation of linguistic states or the partition of the country, Ambedkar brought a razor-sharp understanding of how each of these decisions would affect the most marginalised sections of society. The institutional design he proposed in States and Minorities showed a nuanced approach to using the political form of democracy for social transformation. Needless to say, none of his apparent moderation took away his resolute commitment to nothing short of annihilation of the caste order.

We don’t need to stretch our imagination far to anticipate what Ambedkar might have said about the continuation of inequalities, including caste inequalities, and on the rise of majoritarian democracy in today’s India. What does require careful reflection and imagination is turning these fragments of original thinking into a coherent theory of radical democracy for the 21st century. That is a task for those who take Babasaheb’s intellectual legacy seriously, beyond birthday celebrations.

Why BR Ambedkars three warnings in his last speech to the Constituent Assembly resonate even today

Why BR Ambedkars three warnings in his last speech to the Constituent Assembly resonate even today
By BR Ambedkar

On November 25, 1949, he spoke of the need to give up the grammar of anarchy, to avoid hero-worship, and to work towards a social – not just a political – democracy.

REPUBLIC DAY
Why BR Ambedkar’s three warnings in his last speech to the Constituent Assembly resonate even today
On November 25, 1949, he spoke of the need to give up the grammar of anarchy, to avoid hero-worship, and to work towards a social – not just a political – democracy.

Excerpts from the speech to the Constituent Assembly on November 25, 1949

On 26th January 1950, India will be an independent country. What would happen to her independence? Will she maintain her independence or will she lose it again? This is the first thought that comes to my mind. It is not that India was never an independent country. The point is that she once lost the independence she had. Will she lose it a second time? It is this thought which makes me most anxious for the future.

What perturbs me greatly is the fact that not only India has once before lost her independence, but she lost it by the infidelity and treachery of some of her own people.

In the invasion of Sindh by Mahommed-Bin-Kasim, the military commanders of King Dahar accepted bribes from the agents of Mahommed-Bin-Kasim and refused to fight on the side of their King. It was Jaichand who invited Mahommed Gohri to invade India and fight against Prithvi Raj and promised him the help of himself and the Solanki Kings. When Shivaji was fighting for the liberation of Hindus, the other Maratha noblemen and the Rajput Kings were fighting the battle on the side of Moghul Emperors. When the British were trying to destroy the Sikh Rulers, Gulab Singh, their principal commander sat silent and did not help to save the Sikh Kingdom. In 1857, when a large part of India had declared a war of independence against the British, the Sikhs stood and watched the event as silent spectators.

Will history repeat itself? It is this thought which fills me with anxiety. This anxiety is deepened by the realisation of the fact that in addition to our old enemies in the form of castes and creeds we are going to have many political parties with diverse and opposing political creeds. Will Indians place the country above their creed or will they place creed above country? I do not know. But this much is certain that if the parties place creed above country, our independence will be put in jeopardy a second time and probably be lost for ever. This eventuality we must all resolutely guard against. We must be determined to defend our independence with the last drop of our blood.

On the 26th of January 1950, India would be a democratic country in the sense that India from that day would have a government of the people, by the people and for the people. The same thought comes to my mind. What would happen to her democratic Constitution? Will she be able to maintain it or will she lose it again? This is the second thought that comes to my mind and makes me as anxious as the first.

Democratic system

It is not that India did not know what is Democracy. There was a time when India was studded with republics, and even where there were monarchies, they were either elected or limited. They were never absolute. It is not that India did not know Parliaments or parliamentary procedure.

A study of the Buddhist Bhikshu Sanghas discloses that not only there were Parliaments – for the Sanghas were nothing but Parliaments – but the Sanghas knew and observed all the rules of parliamentary procedure known to modern times. They had rules regarding seating arrangements, rules regarding Motions, Resolutions, Quorum, Whip, Counting of Votes, Voting by Ballot, Censure Motion, Regularisation, Res Judicata, etc. Although these rules of parliamentary procedure were applied by the Buddha to the meetings of the Sanghas, he must have borrowed them from the rules of the Political Assemblies functioning in the country in his time.

This democratic system India lost. Will she lose it a second time? I do not know. But it is quite possible in a country like India – where democracy from its long disuse must be regarded as something quite new – there is danger of democracy giving place to dictatorship. It is quite possible for this new born democracy to retain its form but give place to dictatorship in fact. If there is a landslide, the danger of the second possibility becoming actuality is much greater.

Three warnings

If we wish to maintain democracy not merely in form, but also in fact, what must we do?

The first thing in my judgement we must do is to hold fast to constitutional methods of achieving our social and economic objectives. It means we must abandon the bloody methods of revolution. It means that we must abandon the method of civil disobedience, non-cooperation and satyagraha. When there was no way left for constitutional methods for achieving economic and social objectives, there was a great deal of justification for unconstitutional methods. But where constitutional methods are open, there can be no justification for these unconstitutional methods. These methods are nothing but the Grammar of Anarchy and the sooner they are abandoned, the better for us.

The second thing we must do is to observe the caution which John Stuart Mill has given to all who are interested in the maintenance of democracy, namely, not “to lay their liberties at the feet of even a great man, or to trust him with power which enable him to subvert their institutions”. There is nothing wrong in being grateful to great men who have rendered life-long services to the country. But there are limits to gratefulness. As has been well said by the Irish Patriot Daniel O’Connel, no man can be grateful at the cost of his honour, no woman can be grateful at the cost of her chastity and no nation can be grateful at the cost of its liberty. This caution is far more necessary in the case of India than in the case of any other country. For in India, Bhakti or what may be called the path of devotion or hero-worship, plays a part in its politics unequalled in magnitude by the part it plays in the politics of any other country in the world. Bhakti in religion may be a road to the salvation of the soul. But in politics, Bhakti or hero-worship is a sure road to degradation and to eventual dictatorship.

The third thing we must do is not to be content with mere political democracy. We must make our political democracy a social democracy as well. Political democracy cannot last unless there lies at the base of it social democracy.

Social democracy

What does social democracy mean? It means a way of life which recognises liberty, equality and fraternity as the principles of life. These principles of liberty, equality and fraternity are not to be treated as separate items in a trinity. They form a union of trinity in the sense that to divorce one from the other is to defeat the very purpose of democracy.

Liberty cannot be divorced from equality, equality cannot be divorced from liberty. Nor can liberty and equality be divorced from fraternity. Without equality, liberty would produce the supremacy of the few over the many. Equality without liberty would kill individual initiative. Without fraternity, liberty would produce the supremacy of the few over the many. Without fraternity, liberty and equality could not become a natural course of things. It would require a constable to enforce them.

We must begin by acknowledging the fact that there is complete absence of two things in Indian Society. One of these is equality. On the social plane, we have in India a society based on the principle of graded inequality which we have a society in which there are some who have immense wealth as against many who live in abject poverty.

On the 26th of January 1950, we are going to enter into a life of contradictions. In politics we will have equality and in social and economic life we will have inequality. In politics we will be recognising the principle of one man one vote and one vote one value. In our social and economic life, we shall, by reason of our social and economic structure, continue to deny the principle of one man one value. How long shall we continue to live this life of contradictions? How long shall we continue to deny equality in our social and economic life? If we continue to deny it for long, we will do so only by putting our political democracy in peril. We must remove this contradiction at the earliest possible moment or else those who suffer from inequality will blow up the structure of political democracy which is Assembly has to laboriously built up.

The second thing we are wanting in is recognition of the principle of fraternity. What does fraternity mean? Fraternity means a sense of common brotherhood of all Indians – of Indians being one people. It is the principle which gives unity and solidarity to social life. It is a difficult thing to achieve. How difficult it is, can be realised from the story related by James Bryce in his volume on American Commonwealth about the United States of America.

The story is – I propose to recount it in the words of Bryce himself:

“Some years ago the American Protestant Episcopal Church was occupied at its triennial Convention in revising its liturgy. It was thought desirable to introduce among the short sentence prayers a prayer for the whole people, and an eminent New England divine proposed the words `O Lord, bless our nation’. Accepted one afternoon, on the spur of the moment, the sentence was brought up next day for reconsideration, when so many objections were raised by the laity to the word nation’ as importing too definite a recognition of national unity, that it was dropped, and instead there were adopted the words `O Lord, bless these United States.”

There was so little solidarity in the USA at the time when this incident occurred that the people of America did not think that they were a nation. If the people of the United States could not feel that they were a nation, how difficult it is for Indians to think that they are a nation?

A great delusion

I remember the days when politically minded Indians, resented the expression “the people of India”. They preferred the expression “the Indian nation.” I am of opinion that in believing that we are a nation, we are cherishing a great delusion. How can people divided into several thousands of castes be a nation? The sooner we realise that we are not as yet a nation in the social and psychological sense of the world, the better for us. For then only we shall realise the necessity of becoming a nation and seriously think of ways and means of realising the goal. The realisation of this goal is going to be very difficult – far more difficult than it has been in the United States. The United States has no caste problem. In India there are castes. The castes are anti-national. In the first place because they bring about separation in social life. They are anti-national also because they generate jealousy and antipathy between caste and caste. But we must overcome all these difficulties if we wish to become a nation in reality. For fraternity can be a fact only when there is a nation. Without fraternity, equality and liberty will be no deeper than coats of paint.

These are my reflections about the tasks that lie ahead of us. They may not be very pleasant to some. But there can be no gainsaying that political power in this country has too long been the monopoly of a few and the many are only beasts of burden, but also beasts of prey. This monopoly has not merely deprived them of their chance of betterment, it has sapped them of what may be called the significance of life. These down-trodden classes are tired of being governed. They are impatient to govern themselves. This urge for self-realisation in the down-trodden classes must no be allowed to devolve into a class struggle or class war. It would lead to a division of the House. That would indeed be a day of disaster. For, as has been well said by Abraham Lincoln, a House divided against itself cannot stand very long. Therefore the sooner room is made for the realisation of their aspiration, the better for the few, the better for the country, the better for the maintenance for its independence and the better for the continuance of its democratic structure. This can only be done by the establishment of equality and fraternity in all spheres of life. That is why I have laid so much stresses on them.

I do not wish to weary the House any further. Independence is no doubt a matter of joy. But let us not forget that this independence has thrown on us great responsibilities. By independence, we have lost the excuse of blaming the British for anything going wrong. If hereafter things go wrong, we will have nobody to blame except ourselves. There is great danger of things going wrong. Times are fast changing. People including our own are being moved by new ideologies. They are getting tired of Government by the people. They are prepared to have Governments for the people and are indifferent whether it is Government of the people and by the people. If we wish to preserve the Constitution in which we have sought to enshrine the principle of Government of the people, for the people and by the people, let us resolve not to be tardy in the recognition of the evils that lie across our path and which induce people to prefer Government for the people to Government by the people, nor to be weak in our initiative to remove them. That is the only way to serve the country. I know of no better.

Buddha the Awakened One ☝️with Awareness never 👎 believed in any soul. He said all are equal unlike manusmriti which profess 1st,2nd,3rd,4th rate athmas/souls and people without any soul so that all sorts of atrocities can be committed on them. The Ex CJI sathasivam had committed a grave error of judgement by ordering that the EVMs will be replaced in a phased manner as suggested by the ex CEC Sampath because of the cost of Rs 1600 crores involved in the entire replacement of the EVMs. Only in 8 out of 543 seats were replaced in 2014 Lok Sabha elections which helped the Free For All Murderer of democratic institutions (Modi) to gobble the Master Key. When the BJP was in opposition even the RSS favoured Paper Ballots but after it came to power they prefer EVMs and gave tickets to RSS cadres in support of its stealth 🥷 shadowy hindutva rashtra. His failures are because of He abdicated after leaving his wife though his wife’s name is also Yasoda to meet her husband Still, she keeps asking for the date.

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Buddha Quotes on Finding Peace of Mind | Pure Devine Energy | K. Umakrishnaaveni

Buddha Quotes on Finding Peace of Mind | Pure Devine Energy | K. Umakrishnaaveni
By Pure Devine Energy

Do Good Purify Mind-Buddha’s 🤕 Own Words

Satthusāsana Sutta

— The Instruction of the Teacher —

Of these dhammas,Upāli, of which you may know: ‘These dhammas are utterly conducive to nibbida,virāga,nirodha,upasama,abhiñña,to sambodhi,to Nibbāna, Upāli,you may definitely hold: ‘This is the Dhamma,Vinaya,instruction of the Teacher’.

Egin Good Purify Mind-Buddharen 🤕 Nork bere hitzak

Satthusāsana Sutta

—Irakaslearen instrukzioak—

Dhamma hauetaz, Upāli, zeina jakingo duzu: “Dhamma hauek guztiz aproposak dira nibbida, virāga, nirodha, upasama, abhiñña, sambodhi, Nibbāna, Upāli-ri, ziur esan dezakezu: “Hau da Dhamma, Vinaya, Irakaslearen instrukzioa’.

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জীবন বদলে দেওয়া গৌতম বুদ্ধের ৭ টি বাণী । Gautama Buddha Inspirational Quotes in Bengali

জীবন বদলে দেওয়া গৌতম বুদ্ধের ৭ টি বাণী । Gautama Buddha Inspirational Quotes in Bengali
By Success Window

Do Good Purify Mind-Buddha’s 🤕 Own Words

Satthusāsana Sutta

— The Instruction of the Teacher —

Of these dhammas,Upāli, of which you may know: ‘These dhammas are utterly conducive to nibbida,virāga,nirodha,upasama,abhiñña,to sambodhi,to Nibbāna, Upāli,you may definitely hold: ‘This is the Dhamma,Vinaya,instruction of the Teacher’.

ভাল করুন মন-বুদ্ধের 🤕 নিজের কথা শুদ্ধ করুন

সত্তুসাসন সুত্ত

- শিক্ষকের নির্দেশ -

এই ধম্মগুলির মধ্যে, উপালি, যার মধ্যে আপনি হয়তো জানেন: ‘এই ধম্মগুলি নিবিদা, বিরাগ, নিরোধ, উপসাম, অভিযান, সম্বোধি, নিব্বাণ, উপালি, আপনি অবশ্যই ধরে রাখতে পারেন: ‘এই ধম্ম, বিনয়, শিক্ষকের নির্দেশ’।

Buda kaze

Buda kaze
By Zvjezdana Prasina

Do Good Purify Mind-Buddha’s 🤕 Own Words

Satthusāsana Sutta

— The Instruction of the Teacher —

Of these dhammas,Upāli, of which you may know: ‘These dhammas are utterly conducive to nibbida,virāga,nirodha,upasama,abhiñña,to sambodhi,to Nibbāna, Upāli,you may definitely hold: ‘This is the Dhamma,Vinaya,instruction of the Teacher’.

Učinite dobro Pročistite um Budine 🤕 vlastite riječi

Satthusāsana Sutta

— Uputstvo učitelja —

Od ovih dhamma, Upāli, za koje možda znate: ‘Ove dhamme su u potpunosti pogodne za nibbida, virāga, nirodha, upasama, abhiñña, za sambodhi, za Nibbānu, Upāli, možete definitivno držati: ‘Ovo je Dhamma, Vinaya, uputstvo Učitelja’

20 Мъдри Мисли на Буда

20 Мъдри Мисли на Буда
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Do Good Purify Mind-Buddha’s 🤕 Own Words

Satthusāsana Sutta

— The Instruction of the Teacher —

Of these dhammas,Upāli, of which you may know: ‘These dhammas are utterly conducive to nibbida,virāga,nirodha,upasama,abhiñña,to sambodhi,to Nibbāna, Upāli,you may definitely hold: ‘This is the Dhamma,Vinaya,instruction of the Teacher’.

Направете добро, пречистете ума на 🤕 собствените думи на Буда

Саттусасана Сута

— Инструкцията на учителя —

От тези дхамми, Upāli, за които може би знаете: „Тези дхамми са напълно благоприятни за nibbida, virāga, nirodha, upasama, abhiñña, за самбодхи, за Nibbāna, Upāli, определено може да държите: „Това е Dhamma, Vinaya, инструкция на Учителя“. ако аз

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Meditative Mind ॐ Buddha Flute Music

Meditative Mind ॐ Buddha Flute Music
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Do Good Purify Mind-Buddha’s 🤕 Own Words

Satthusāsana Sutta

— The Instruction of the Teacher —

Of these dhammas,Upāli, of which you may know: ‘These dhammas are utterly conducive to nibbida,virāga,nirodha,upasama,abhiñña,to sambodhi,to Nibbāna, Upāli,you may definitely hold: ‘This is the Dhamma,Vinaya,instruction of the Teacher’.

Fes el bé, purifica les pròpies paraules de Buda 🤕

Satthusāsana Sutta

- La instrucció del mestre -

D’aquests dhammes, Upāli, dels quals potser coneixeu: “Aquests dhammes són totalment favorables a nibbida, virāga, nirodha, upasama, abhiñña, a sambodhi, a Nibbāna, Upāli, segurament podeu sostenir: “Aquest és el Dhamma, Vinaya, instrucció del Mestre’.

THIS MUSIC WILL PURIFY YOUR MIND ⭐ Yoji Water Purification ⭐ Buddhist Meditation Music, Buddha Music

THIS MUSIC WILL PURIFY YOUR MIND ⭐ Yoji Water Purification ⭐ Buddhist Meditation Music, Buddha Music
By Zen Moon - Relaxing Meditation Music Videos

Do Good Purify Mind-Buddha’s 🤕 Own Words

Satthusāsana Sutta

— The Instruction of the Teacher —

Of these dhammas,Upāli, of which you may know: ‘These dhammas are utterly conducive to nibbida,virāga,nirodha,upasama,abhiñña,to sambodhi,to Nibbāna, Upāli,you may definitely hold: ‘This is the Dhamma,Vinaya,instruction of the Teacher’.

Buhata ang Maayo Purify Mind-Buddha’s 🤕 Kaugalingong Pulong

Satthusana Sutta

- Ang Instruksyon sa Magtutudlo -

Niini nga mga dhamma, Upāli, diin mahimo nimong mahibal-an: ‘Kini nga mga dhamma hingpit nga makaayo sa nibbida,virāga,nirodha,upasama,abhiñña,sa sambodhi,ngadto sa Nibbāna, Upāli, mahimo nimong huptan: ‘Kini ang Dhamma,Vinaya, pagtudlo sa Magtutudlo’.

Forget the Past | Lord Buddha thoughts | Gautam Buddha Teaching

Forget the Past | Lord Buddha thoughts | Gautam Buddha Teaching
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Do Good Purify Mind-Buddha’s 🤕 Own Words

Satthusāsana Sutta

— The Instruction of the Teacher —

Of these dhammas,Upāli, of which you may know: ‘These dhammas are utterly conducive to nibbida,virāga,nirodha,upasama,abhiñña,to sambodhi,to Nibbāna, Upāli,you may definitely hold: ‘This is the Dhamma,Vinaya,instruction of the Teacher’.

Chitani Zabwino Koyeretsa Mind-Buddha’s 🤕 Mawu Omwe

Satthusasana Sutta

- Malangizo a Mphunzitsi -

Pa ma dhammas awa, Upāli, omwe mungadziwe: ‘Madhamma awa amathandizira kuti nibbida,virāga,nirodha,upasama,abhiñña, sambodhi,ku Nibbāna, Upāli,mutha kunena kuti: ‘Iyi ndi Dhamma, Vinaya, malangizo a Mphunzitsi’.

早晚唸2次,得菩薩保佑,消除災禍、帶來福報《觀世音菩薩祈禱文》佛曲、佛歌

早晚唸2次,得菩薩保佑,消除災禍、帶來福報《觀世音菩薩祈禱文》佛曲、佛歌
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Do Good Purify Mind-Buddha’s 🤕 Own Words

Satthusāsana Sutta

— The Instruction of the Teacher —

Of these dhammas,Upāli, of which you may know: ‘These dhammas are utterly conducive to nibbida,virāga,nirodha,upasama,abhiñña,to sambodhi,to Nibbāna, Upāli,you may definitely hold: ‘This is the Dhamma,Vinaya,instruction of the Teacher’.

行善净心-佛言🤕

念诵经

— 老师的教导 —

在这些法中,优婆利,你可能知道:‘这些法完全有利于涅槃、毗罗伽、涅槃、优婆夷、上菩提、证悟、涅槃、优婆利,你一定可以持有:‘这是法、律、老师的教导”。

普巴金剛心咒 Vajrakīlaya Mantra|佛曲|雨揚老師

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行善淨心-佛言🤕

念誦經

— 老師的教導 —

在這些法中,優婆利,你可能知道:‘這些法完全有利於涅槃、毘羅伽、涅槃、優婆夷、上菩提、證悟、涅槃、優婆利,你一定可以持有:‘這是法、律、老師的教導”。

La filosofia di Buddha in italiano

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Purificate u Bonu di a Mente-Buddha 🤕 Proprie Parolle

Satthusāsana Sutta

- L’istruzione di u maestru -

Di questi dhamma, Upāli, di quale pudete sapè: “Questi dhamma sò assai favurevuli à nibbida, virāga, nirodha, upasama, abhiñña, à sambodhi, à Nibbāna, Upāli, pudete definite: “Questu hè u Dhamma, Vinaya, istruzzioni di u Maestru’.

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Satthusāsana sutta

— Učiteljice upute —

Od ovih dhamma, Upāli, za koje možda znate: ‘Ove dhamme su u potpunosti pogodne za nibbida, virāga, nirodha, upasama, abhiñña, za sambodhi, za Nibbānu, Upāli, možete definitivno držati: ‘Ovo je Dhamma, Vinaya, uputa Učitelja’.

Budha- sestřih z filmu malý Budha

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Do Good Purify Mind-Buddha’s 🤕 Own Words

Satthusāsana Sutta

— The Instruction of the Teacher —

Of these dhammas,Upāli, of which you may know: ‘These dhammas are utterly conducive to nibbida,virāga,nirodha,upasama,abhiñña,to sambodhi,to Nibbāna, Upāli,you may definitely hold: ‘This is the Dhamma,Vinaya,instruction of the Teacher’.

Čiňte dobro čistit mysl – Buddhova 🤕 vlastní slova

Satthusāsana Sutta

— Pokyn učitele —

Z těchto dhamm, Upāli, o kterých možná víte: „Tyto dhammy naprosto napomáhají nibbidě, virāga, nirodha, upasama, abhiñña, sambodhi, nibbāně, Upāli, můžete rozhodně tvrdit: ,Toto je Dhamma, Vinaya, pokyn učitele“.

Karaṇīya Metta Sutta: The Buddha’s Words on Lovingkindness. Buddhist Chanting. Pāli & English Text

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Do Good Purify Mind-Buddha’s 🤕 Own Words

Satthusāsana Sutta

— The Instruction of the Teacher —

Of these dhammas,Upāli, of which you may know: ‘These dhammas are utterly conducive to nibbida,virāga,nirodha,upasama,abhiñña,to sambodhi,to Nibbāna, Upāli,you may definitely hold: ‘This is the Dhamma,Vinaya,instruction of the Teacher’.

Gør det gode Rens Mind-Buddhas 🤕 Egne ord

Satthusāsana Sutta

— Lærerens instruktion —

Om disse dhammaer, Upāli, som du måske kender til: ‘Disse dhammas er fuldstændig befordrende for nibbida, virāga, nirodha, upasama, abhiñña, til sambodhi, til Nibbāna, Upāli, kan du helt sikkert mene: ‘Dette er Dhammaen, Vinaya, instruktion af læreren«.

https://youtu.be/2BDcgQRzklk
Do Good Purify Mind-Buddha’s 🤕 Own Words

Satthusāsana Sutta

— The Instruction of the Teacher —

Of these dhammas,Upāli, of which you may know: ‘These dhammas are utterly conducive to nibbida,virāga,nirodha,upasama,abhiñña,to sambodhi,to Nibbāna, Upāli,you may definitely hold: ‘This is the Dhamma,Vinaya,instruction of the Teacher’.

Doe het goede, zuiver de geest-Boeddha’s 🤕 Eigen woorden

Satthusāsana Sutta

— De instructie van de leraar —

Van deze dhamma’s, Upāli, waarvan u wellicht weet: ‘Deze dhamma’s zijn uitermate bevorderlijk voor nibbida, virāga,nirodha, upasama, abhiñña, sambodhi, Nibbāna, Upāli, waar u zeker van kunt houden: ‘Dit is de Dhamma, Vinaya, instructie van de leraar’.

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