TIPITAKA (3BASKETS)of the BUDDHA the AWAKENONE with AWARENESS through FREE ONLINE E-Nālanda Research and Practice UNIVERSITY
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1249 LESSON 29814 FRIDAY

FREE ONLINE E-Nālanda Research and Practice UNIVERSITY

Kindly render exact translation in your mother tounge of this Google translation and become a Stream Enterer

Please visit:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XwifMmjCQ50

for

Tipitaka Chanting Ceremony - Sri Dalada Maligawa - Kandy 7:23:28 Hrs

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kQxV7LOWXiE

Tipitaka Chanting Ceremony - Sri Dalada Maligawa (2nd Day) 8:19:23 Hrs

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SraNRm7ZFro

Tipitaka Chanting Ceremony - Sri Dalada Maligawa (3rd Day) 8:32:12 Hrs

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RIZv2D2ZjLY

Jahan Chan Buddha Ka Ankhan (Nepali) 5:27 mins

213,789

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xjS_eJjum4Q

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1d-hpMej9bQ&list=RD1d-hpMej9bQ#t=176


Chinese Buddha Chants - Best for Meditation
1,679

654,772

Jaha chan buddha ka aankha 5:20mins

115,284
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1d-hpMej9bQ

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uISW480-PCw

ลืมไปก่อน Buddha Bless ft. เกรียน peace.flv 4:37mins

21,351,807

Uploaded on Oct 9, 2010

ลืมไปก่อน Buddha Bless ft. เกรียน peace.flv


  • Purchase

    • ลืมไปก่อน (feat. เกรียน Peace) (iTunes)

  • Category


  • License

    • Standard YouTube License

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AzafpchDMP0

Buddha Bless - อาละวาด (MV Karaoke)3:48 mins





Published on Apr 9, 2014



Title : อาละวาด
Artist : Buddha Bless
Album : ไฟเขียว ไฟแดง
Label : ก้านคอคลับ

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=amWcCI-4Go8

สบายมาก - Buddha Bless【OFFICIAL MV】HD3:32 mins

113,039

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4krfML6YHk0


Bodyslam Sticker feat อุ๋ย Buddha Bless กอล์ฟ สิงห์เหนือ YouTube7:06 mins

1,004,791




https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TdNw4Xjamn4

Bump Boom Boom - Buddha Bless 4:03mins

464,841

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BqLhkRaze_k
MV - แสงสุดท้าย bodyslam (for fanclub version) 4:50mins

20,981,528

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r2UdeKMBrIg

[Live]รักเดียว - พงษ์สิทธิ์ คำภีร์ 25 ปี มีหวัง 5:13 mins

8,802,090

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QBybBZcCzvs


Buddha Bar - Best House Music Ever0

16,615



426,883

Published on Apr 22, 2012

House music is a genre of electronic
dance music that originated in the American city of Chicago in the
early 1980s. It was initially popularized circa 1984 in Chicago, but
beginning in 1985, it fanned out to other major cities such as
Baltimore[citation needed], Detroit[citation needed], Toronto[citation
needed], Mexico City[citation needed], New York City[citation needed],
San Francisco[citation needed], Boston[citation needed],
Montreal[citation needed], Cancún[citation needed], Manchester,[1]
Miami[citation needed], London,[1] and Paris[citation needed]. It then
began to influence popular music in Europe, with songs such as “House
Nation” by House Master Boyz and the Rude Boy of House (1987) and
“Doctorin’ the House” by Coldcut (1988) in the pop charts. Since the
early to mid-1990s, house music has been infused in mainstream pop and
dance music worldwide.

Early house music was generally
dance-based music characterized by repetitive 4/4 beats, rhythms mainly
provided by drum machines,[2] off-beat hi-hat cymbals, and synthesized
basslines. While house displayed several characteristics similar to
disco music, it was more electronic and minimalistic,[2] and the
repetitive rhythm of house was more important than the song itself.
House music today, while keeping several of these core elements, notably
the prominent kick drum on every beat, varies a lot in style and
influence, ranging from the soulful and atmospheric deep house to the
more minimalistic microhouse. House music has also fused with several
other genres creating fusion subgenres,[2] such as euro house, tech
house, and electro house.

Many local Chicago house music artists
suddenly found themselves with major label deals. House music proved to
be a commercially successful genre and a more mainstream pop-based
variation grew increasingly popular. Artists and groups such as
Madonna,[2] Janet Jackson,[3] Björk, Aretha Franklin, Steps, and C+C
Music Factory[2] incorporated the genre into their work. After enjoying
significant success in the early to mid-90s, house music grew even
larger during the second wave of progressive house (1999–2001). The
genre has remained popular and fused into other popular subgenres, as
the DJ Mag Top 100 DJs poll has been dominated by house DJs since the
beginning of the polls. Today, house music remains popular in both clubs
and in the mainstream pop scene while retaining a strong foothold on
underground scenes across the globe.

Some disco songs
incorporated sounds produced with synthesizers and drum machines, and
some compositions were entirely electronic; examples include Giorgio
Moroder’s late 1970s productions such as Donna Summer’s hit single “I
Feel Love” from 1977, Cerrone’s “Supernature” (1977),[4] Yellow Magic
Orchestra’s synth-disco-pop productions from their self-titled album
(1978), Solid State Survivor (1979),[5][6] and several early 1980s
disco-pop productions by the Hi-NRG group Lime.

Soul and disco
influenced house music, plus mixing and editing techniques earlier
explored by disco DJs, producers, and audio engineers like
M&M-music, Walter Gibbons, Tom Moulton, Jim Burgess, Larry Levan,
Ron Hardy, M & M, and others who produced longer, more repetitive,
and percussive arrangements of existing disco recordings. Early house
producers like Frankie Knuckles created similar compositions from
scratch, using samplers, synthesizers, sequencers, and drum machines.

2010s
saw multiple new sounds in house music developed by numerous DJs.
Sweden knew a prominence of snare-less “Swedish progressive house” with
the emergence of Sebastian Ingrosso, Axwell, Steve Angello (These three
formed a trio called Swedish House Mafia), Avicii, Alesso, etc.
Netherlands brought together a concept of “Dirty Dutch”, electro house
subgenre characterized by very abrasive leads and darker arpeggios, with
prominent DJs Chuckie, Hardwell, Laidback Luke, Afrojack, R3hab, Bingo
Players, Quintino, Alvaro, Cedric Gervais, 2G, etc. Elsewhere, fusion
genres derivative of 2000s progressive house returned to prominence,
especially with the help of DJs Calvin Harris, Eric Prydz, Mat Zo, Above
& Beyond and Fonzerelli in Europe, Deadmau5, Kaskade, Steve Aoki,
Porter Robinson and Wolfgang Gartner in the US and Canada. The growing
popularity of such artists led to the emergence of electro house and
progressive house sounds (big room house) in popular music, such as
singles Lady Gaga’s “Marry the Night”, Black Eyed Peas “The Best One Yet
(The Boy)” and the will.i.am and Britney Spears “Scream and Shout”. Big
room house found increasing popularity since 2010, particularly through
international dance music festivals such as Tomorrowland, Ultra Music
Festival, and Electric Daisy Carnival.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gLf75mAOGrw

Buddha Bar - Buddha Bar 2013
65,522

2,905,551




Published on Jul 17, 2013



Since Buddha Bar its opening, the
Buddha-Bar’s musical identity has embodied an innovative and avant-garde
aspect, thanks to the subtle Buddha Bar mixture of captivating
Electro-Ethnic rhythms and tribal sounds, played each evening by a
resident DJ.

Buddha Bar 2014 Video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Or8k…

In
perfect harmony with the Buddha Bar décor and atmosphere, this poignant
and constantly innovative musical style enchants both the Parisian and
international clientele. Raymond Visan asked Claude Challe, the original
resident DJ, to create the very first Buddha-Bar compilation.

However, this was only the beginning of a great adventure…

http://goo.gl/d2EUk

Spurred
by Raymond Visan, the George V record label was created in 2000 and has
successfully produced a collection of 14 Buddha Bar compilations.
Numerous singers and musicians, under the guidance of current resident
DJ Ravin, have produced unique musical compilations like buddha bar
secret love, which are widely acclaimed by the international public.

http://goo.gl/m7Llv

Today,
the buddha bar 2012 is asked by prestigious brands (L’Oréal, Salvatore
Ferragamo, Cartier) to create albums that accurately reflect their
image. This represents a real underlying trend in the global marketing
concept, in which George V records, as a precursor, intends to remain
leader in the industry.

http://goo.gl/0196X

https://www.google.com/search?q=Buddh…

http://goo.gl/jUsGd

http://www.lastfm.de/music/Buddha+Bar

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Buddha…

Free Download: http://goo.gl/WVPyYC
Please follow us for Free Downloads





Let It Go - Frozen - Alex Boyé (Africanized Tribal Cover) Ft. One Voice Children’s Choir 3:15 mins


49,548,882

TIPITAKA

TIPITAKA   AND   TWELVE   DIVISIONS
    Brief historical background
   Sutta Pitaka
   Vinaya Pitaka
   Abhidhamma Pitaka
     Twelve Divisions of Buddhist Canons
Nine Divisions of Buddhist Canons


TIPITAKA   AND   TWELVE   DIVISIONS  is the collection of the teachings
of the Buddha over 45 years. It consists of Sutta (the conventional
teaching), Vinaya (Disciplinary code) and Abhidhamma (commentaries).

The Tipitaka was compiled and arranged in its present form by the
disciples who had immediate contact with Shakyamuni Buddha. 
The Buddha
had passed away, but the sublime Dhamma which he unreservedly bequeathed
to humanity still exists in its pristine purity. 
Although the Buddha
had left no written records of his teachings, his distinguished
disciples preserved them by committing to memory and transmitting them
orally from generation to generation. 


     Brief historical background 


 
Immediately after the final passing away of the Buddha, 500
distinguished Arahats held a convention known as the First Buddhist
Council to rehearse the Doctrine taught by the Buddha. Venerable Ananda,
who was a faithful attendant of the Buddha and had the special
privilege of hearing all the discourses the Buddha ever uttered, recited
the Sutta, whilst the Venerable Upali recited the Vinaya, the rules of
conduct for the Sangha. 
One hundred years after the First Buddhist
Council, some disciples saw the need to change certain minor rules. The
orthodox Bhikkus said that nothing should be changed while the others
insisted on modifying some disciplinary rules (Vinaya). Finally, the
formation of different schools of Buddhism germinated after his council.
And in the Second Council, only matters pertaining to the Vinaya were
discussed and no controversy about the Dhamma was reported. 
In the 3rd
Century B.C. during the time of Emperor Asoka, the Third Council was
held to discuss the differences of opinion held by the Sangha community.
At this Council the differences were not confined to the Vinaya but
were also connected with the Dhamma. The Abhidhamma Pitaka was discussed
and included at this Council. The Council which was held in Sri Lanka
in 80 B.C. is known as the 4th Council under the patronage of the pious
King Vattagamini Abbaya. It was at this time in Sri Lanka that the
Tipitaka was first committed to writing in Pali language. 




The
Sutta Pitaka consists mainly of discourses delivered by the Buddha
himself on various occasions. There were also a few discourses delivered
by some of his distinguished disciples (e.g. Sariputta, Ananda,
Moggallana) included in it. It is like a book of prescriptions, as the
sermons embodied therein were expounded to suit the different occasions
and the temperaments of various persons. There may be seemingly
contradictory statements, but they should not be misconstrued as they
were opportunely uttered by the Buddha to suit a particular purpose.

This Pitaka is divided into five Nikayas or collections, viz.:- 


Dīgha Nikāya
[dīgha:
long] The Dīgha Nikāya gathers 34 of the longest discourses given by
the Buddha. There are various hints that many of them are late additions
to the original corpus and of questionable authenticity.


Majjhima Nikāya
[majjhima:
medium] The Majjhima Nikāya gathers 152 discourses of the Buddha of
intermediate length, dealing with diverse matters.


Saṃyutta Nikāya
[samyutta:
group] The Saṃyutta Nikāya gathers the suttas according to their
subject in 56 sub-groups called saṃyuttas. It contains more than three
thousand discourses of variable length, but generally relatively short.


Aṅguttara Nikāya
[aṅg:
factor | uttara: additionnal] The Aṅguttara Nikāya is subdivized in
eleven sub-groups called nipātas, each of them gathering discourses
consisting of enumerations of one additional factor versus those of the
precedent nipāta. It contains thousands of suttas which are generally
short.


Khuddaka Nikāya
[khuddha: short,
small] The Khuddhaka Nikāya short texts and is considered as been
composed of two stratas: Dhammapada, Udāna, Itivuttaka, Sutta Nipāta,
Theragāthā-Therīgāthā and Jātaka form the ancient strata, while other
books are late additions and their authenticity is more questionable.


    The fifth is subdivided into fifteen books:- 


   Khuddaka Patha (Shorter Texts)

   Dhammapada (The Way of Truth)

   Udana (Heartfelt sayings or Paeons of Joy)

   Iti Vuttaka (’Thus said’ Discourses)

   Vimana Vatthu (Stories of Celestial Mansions)

   Peta Vatthu (Stories of Petas)

  Theragatha (Psalms of the Brethren)

Therigatha (Psalms of the Sisters)

Jataka (Birth Stories)

Niddesa (Expositions)

Patisambhida (Analytical Knowledge)

Apadana (Lives of Saints)

  Buddhavamsa (The History of Buddha)
   
 Cariya Pitaka (Modes of Conduct)

  
  Vinaya Pitaka 
The Vinaya Pitaka mainly deals with the rules and
regulations of the Order of monks (Bhikhus) and nuns (Bhikhunis). It
also gives an account of the life and ministry of the Buddha. Indirectly
it reveals some useful information about ancient history, Indian
customs, arts, sciences, etc. 
For nearly twenty years since his
enlightenment, the Buddha did not lay down rules for the control of the
Sangha. Later, as the occasion arose, the Buddha promulgated rules for
the future discipline of the Sangha. 
This Pitaka consists of the
following five books:- 


     Parajika Pali (Major Offences)
     Pacittiya Pali (Minor Offences)
    Mahavagga Pali (Greater Section)
  Cullavagga Pali (Smaller Section)
  Parivara Pali (Epitome of the Vinaya)

 
Abhidhamma Pitaka 
The Abhidhamma, is the most important and
interesting, as it contains the profound philosophy of the Buddha’s
teaching in contrast to the illuminating but simpler discourses in the
Sutta Pitaka. 
In the Sutta Pitaka one often finds references to
individual, being, etc., but in the Abhidhamma, instead of such
conventional terms, we meet with ultimate terms, such as aggregates,
mind, matter etc. 
In the Abhidhamma everything is analyzed and
explained in detail, and as such it is called analytical doctrine
(Vibhajja Vada). 
Four ultimate things (Paramattha) are enumerated in
the Abhidhamma. They are Citta (Consciousness), Cetasika (Mental
concomitants). Rupa (Matter) and Nibbana. 
The so-called being is
microscopically analyzed and its component parts are minutely described.
Finally the ultimate goal and the method to achieve it is explained
with all necessary details. 
The Abhidhamma Pitaka is composed of the
following works: 


   Dhamma-Sangani (Enumeration of Phenomena)
    Vibhanaga (The Book of the Treatises)
  Ikatha Vatthu (Point of Controversy)
  Puggala Pannatti (Description of Individuals)
   Dhatu Katha (Discussion with reference to Elements)
   Yamaka (The Book of Pairs)
    Patthana (The Book of Relations)

   
  Twelve Divisions of Buddhist Canons 
The content of Buddhist canons
is divided into twelve divisions, categorized by the types of forms of
literature (i.e., Sutta, Geyya and Gatha) and the context (i.e., all
other nine divisions). It is known as the Twelve Divisions. 


  
Sutta  - These are the short, medium, and long discourses expounded by
the Buddha on various occasions. The whole Vinaya Pitaka is also
included in this respect.

   Geyya  - i.e., the metrical pieces. These are discourses/proses mixed with Gathas or verses.

      
Gatha - i.e., verses, chants or poems. These include verses formed in
the Dharmapada, etc., and those isolated verses which are not classified
amongst the Sutta.

   Nidana - i.e., the causes and conditions of the Buddha’s teachings.

    Itivrttaka - i.e., the suttas in which the Buddhas tell of the deeds of their disciples and others in previous lives.

    Jataka - i.e., stories of the former lives of Buddhas. These are the 547 birth-stories.

  
Abbhuta-dhamma - i.e., miracles, etc. These are the few discourses that
deal with wonderful and inconceivable powers of the Buddhas.

  
Avadana - i.e., parables, metaphors. Illustrations are used to
facilitate the human beings to understand the profound meanings of the
Buddhist Dhamma.

   Upadesa - i.e.,
dogmatic treatises. The discourse and discussions by questions and
answers regarding the Buddhist doctrines. It is a synonym for Abhidhamma
Pitaka.

      Udana - i.e.,
impromptu or unsolicited addresses. The Buddha speaks voluntarily and
not in reply to questions or appeals, e.g., the Amitabha Sutta.

    
Vaipulya - i.e., interpretation by elaboration or deeper explanation of
the doctrines. It is the broad school or wider teachings, in contrast
with the “narrow” school. The term covers the whole of the specifically
Mahayana suttas. The Suttas are also known as the scriptures of
measureless meaning, i.e., infinite and universalistic.

    Veyyakarama  - i.e. prophecies, prediction by the Buddha of the future attainment of Buddhahood by his disciples.

  
Nine Divisions of Buddhist Canons 
The term is generally referred to
Hinayana. There are only nine divisions excluding Udana, Vaipulya and
Veyyakarana. 
However, there is also a Mahayana division of nine of the
Twelve Divisions, i.e., all except Nidana, Avadana and Upadesa.


Sutta Piṭaka

— The basket of discourses —
[ sutta: discourse ]
Dīgha Nikāya


DN 9 -
Poṭṭhapāda Sutta
{excerpt}


— The questions of Poṭṭhapāda —

Tree

Sutta Piṭaka


— The basket of discourses —
[ sutta: discourse ]


The Sutta Piṭaka contains the essence of the Buddha’s teaching
regarding the Dhamma. It contains more than ten thousand suttas. It is
divided in five collections called Nikāyas.




Dīgha Nikāya
[dīgha: long] The Dīgha Nikāya gathers 34 of the longest
discourses given by the Buddha. There are various hints that many of
them are late additions to the original corpus and of questionable
authenticity.

Majjhima Nikāya
[majjhima: medium] The Majjhima Nikāya gathers 152 discourses of the Buddha of intermediate length, dealing with diverse matters.

Saṃyutta Nikāya
[samyutta: group] The Saṃyutta Nikāya gathers the suttas
according to their subject in 56 sub-groups called saṃyuttas. It
contains more than three thousand discourses of variable length, but
generally relatively short.

Aṅguttara Nikāya
[aṅg: factor | uttara: additionnal] The Aṅguttara
Nikāya is subdivized in eleven sub-groups called nipātas, each of them
gathering discourses consisting of enumerations of one additional factor
versus those of the precedent nipāta. It contains thousands of suttas
which are generally short.

Khuddaka Nikāya
[khuddha: short, small] The Khuddhaka Nikāya short texts
and is considered as been composed of two stratas: Dhammapada, Udāna,
Itivuttaka, Sutta Nipāta, Theragāthā-Therīgāthā and Jātaka form the
ancient strata, while other books are late additions and their
authenticity is more questionable.


 Cariya Pitaka (Modes of Conduct)

  
  Vinaya Pitaka 
The Vinaya Pitaka mainly deals with the rules and
regulations of the Order of monks (Bhikhus) and nuns (Bhikhunis). It
also gives an account of the life and ministry of the Buddha. Indirectly
it reveals some useful information about ancient history, Indian
customs, arts, sciences, etc. 
For nearly twenty years since his
enlightenment, the Buddha did not lay down rules for the control of the
Sangha. Later, as the occasion arose, the Buddha promulgated rules for
the future discipline of the Sangha. 
This Pitaka consists of the
following five books:- 


     Parajika Pali (Major Offences)
     Pacittiya Pali (Minor Offences)
    Mahavagga Pali (Greater Section)
  Cullavagga Pali (Smaller Section)
  Parivara Pali (Epitome of the Vinaya)

 
Abhidhamma Pitaka 
The Abhidhamma, is the most important and
interesting, as it contains the profound philosophy of the Buddha’s
teaching in contrast to the illuminating but simpler discourses in the
Sutta Pitaka. 
In the Sutta Pitaka one often finds references to
individual, being, etc., but in the Abhidhamma, instead of such
conventional terms, we meet with ultimate terms, such as aggregates,
mind, matter etc. 
In the Abhidhamma everything is analyzed and
explained in detail, and as such it is called analytical doctrine
(Vibhajja Vada). 
Four ultimate things (Paramattha) are enumerated in
the Abhidhamma. They are Citta (Consciousness), Cetasika (Mental
concomitants). Rupa (Matter) and Nibbana. 
The so-called being is
microscopically analyzed and its component parts are minutely described.
Finally the ultimate goal and the method to achieve it is explained
with all necessary details. 
The Abhidhamma Pitaka is composed of the
following works: 


   Dhamma-Sangani (Enumeration of Phenomena)
    Vibhanaga (The Book of the Treatises)
  Ikatha Vatthu (Point of Controversy)
  Puggala Pannatti (Description of Individuals)
   Dhatu Katha (Discussion with reference to Elements)
   Yamaka (The Book of Pairs)
    Patthana (The Book of Relations)

   
  Twelve Divisions of Buddhist Canons 
The content of Buddhist canons
is divided into twelve divisions, categorized by the types of forms of
literature (i.e., Sutta, Geyya and Gatha) and the context (i.e., all
other nine divisions). It is known as the Twelve Divisions. 


  
Sutta  - These are the short, medium, and long discourses expounded by
the Buddha on various occasions. The whole Vinaya Pitaka is also
included in this respect.

   Geyya  - i.e., the metrical pieces. These are discourses/proses mixed with Gathas or verses.

      
Gatha - i.e., verses, chants or poems. These include verses formed in
the Dharmapada, etc., and those isolated verses which are not classified
amongst the Sutta.

   Nidana - i.e., the causes and conditions of the Buddha’s teachings.

    Itivrttaka - i.e., the suttas in which the Buddhas tell of the deeds of their disciples and others in previous lives.

    Jataka - i.e., stories of the former lives of Buddhas. These are the 547 birth-stories.

  
Abbhuta-dhamma - i.e., miracles, etc. These are the few discourses that
deal with wonderful and inconceivable powers of the Buddhas.

  
Avadana - i.e., parables, metaphors. Illustrations are used to
facilitate the human beings to understand the profound meanings of the
Buddhist Dhamma.

   Upadesa - i.e.,
dogmatic treatises. The discourse and discussions by questions and
answers regarding the Buddhist doctrines. It is a synonym for Abhidhamma
Pitaka.

      Udana - i.e.,
impromptu or unsolicited addresses. The Buddha speaks voluntarily and
not in reply to questions or appeals, e.g., the Amitabha Sutta.

    
Vaipulya - i.e., interpretation by elaboration or deeper explanation of
the doctrines. It is the broad school or wider teachings, in contrast
with the “narrow” school. The term covers the whole of the specifically
Mahayana suttas. The Suttas are also known as the scriptures of
measureless meaning, i.e., infinite and universalistic.

    Veyyakarama  - i.e. prophecies, prediction by the Buddha of the future attainment of Buddhahood by his disciples.

  
Nine Divisions of Buddhist Canons 
The term is generally referred to
Hinayana. There are only nine divisions excluding Udana, Vaipulya and
Veyyakarana. 
However, there is also a Mahayana division of nine of the
Twelve Divisions, i.e., all except Nidana, Avadana and Upadesa.


Sutta Piṭaka

— The basket of discourses —
[ sutta: discourse ]
Dīgha Nikāya


DN 9 -
Poṭṭhapāda Sutta
{excerpt}

— The questions of Poṭṭhapāda —

Tree

Sutta Piṭaka


— The basket of discourses —
[ sutta: discourse ]


The Sutta Piṭaka contains the essence of the Buddha’s teaching
regarding the Dhamma. It contains more than ten thousand suttas. It is
divided in five collections called Nikāyas.




Dīgha Nikāya
[dīgha: long] The Dīgha Nikāya gathers 34 of the longest
discourses given by the Buddha. There are various hints that many of
them are late additions to the original corpus and of questionable
authenticity.

Majjhima Nikāya
[majjhima: medium] The Majjhima Nikāya gathers 152 discourses of the Buddha of intermediate length, dealing with diverse matters.

Saṃyutta Nikāya
[samyutta: group] The Saṃyutta Nikāya gathers the suttas
according to their subject in 56 sub-groups called saṃyuttas. It
contains more than three thousand discourses of variable length, but
generally relatively short.

Aṅguttara Nikāya
[aṅg: factor | uttara: additionnal] The Aṅguttara
Nikāya is subdivized in eleven sub-groups called nipātas, each of them
gathering discourses consisting of enumerations of one additional factor
versus those of the precedent nipāta. It contains thousands of suttas
which are generally short.

Khuddaka Nikāya
[khuddha: short, small] The Khuddhaka Nikāya short texts
and is considered as been composed of two stratas: Dhammapada, Udāna,
Itivuttaka, Sutta Nipāta, Theragāthā-Therīgāthā and Jātaka form the
ancient strata, while other books are late additions and their
authenticity is more questionable.


Idhānanda, ariyasāvako Buddhe aveccappasāda samannāgato hoti


English


Mahāparinibbāna Sutta
{excerpts}
— The last instructions —
[mahā-parinibbāna]

(The Mirror of the Dhamma)

This
sutta gathers various instructions the Buddha gave for the sake of his
followers after his passing away, which makes it be a very important set
of instructions for us nowadays.

I will expound the
discourse on the Dhamma which is called Dhammādāsa, possessed of which
the ariyasāvaka, if he so desires, can declare of himself: ‘For me,
there is no more niraya, no more tiracchāna-yoni, no more pettivisaya,
no more state of unhappiness, of misfortune, of misery, I am a
sotāpanna, by nature free from states of misery, certain of being
destined to sambodhi.

And
what, Ānanda, is that discourse on the Dhamma which is called
Dhammādāsa, possessed of which the ariyasāvaka, if he so desires, can
declare of himself: ‘For me, there is no more niraya, no more
tiracchāna-yoni, no more pettivisaya, no more state of unhappiness, of
misfortune, of misery, I am a sotāpanna, by nature free from states of
misery, certain of being destined to sambodhi?

Here, Ānanda, an ariyasāvaka is endowed with Buddhe aveccappasāda:






DN 22 - (D ii 290)

Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta

— Attendance on awareness —
[ mahā+satipaṭṭhāna ]

This sutta is widely considered as a the main reference for meditation practice.



Note:
infobubbles on all Pali words


Pāḷi



Uddesa

I. Kāyānupassanā

   A. Ānāpāna Pabba
   B. Iriyāpatha Pabba
   C. Sampajāna Pabba
   D. Paṭikūlamanasikāra Pabba
   E. Dhātumanasikāra Pabba
   F. Navasivathika Pabba

II. Vedanānupassanā



English



Introduction

I. Observation of Kāya

   A. Section on ānāpāna
   B. Section on postures
   C. Section on sampajañña
   D. Section on repulsiveness
   E. Section on the Elements
   F. Section on the nine charnel grounds

II. Observation of Vedanā




Uddesa


Evaṃ me sutaṃ:

Introduction



Thus have I heard:

Ekaṃ samayaṃ bhagavā kurūsu viharati kammāsadhammaṃ nāma kurūnaṃ nigamo. Tatra kho bhagavā bhikkhū āmantesi:


On one occasion, the Bhagavā was staying among the Kurus at Kammāsadhamma, a market town of the Kurus. There, he addressed the bhikkhus:


Bhikkhavo ti.

Bhaddante ti te bhikkhū bhagavato paccassosuṃ. Bhagavā etad-avoca:


– Bhikkhus.

– Bhaddante answered the bhikkhus. The Bhagavā said:


Ekāyano ayaṃ, bhikkhave, maggo sattānaṃ visuddhiyā, soka-paridevānaṃ samatikkamāya, dukkha-domanassānaṃ atthaṅgamāya, ñāyassa adhigamāya, nibbānassa sacchikiriyāya, yadidaṃ cattāro satipaṭṭhānā.

This, bhikkhus, is the path that leads to nothing but the purification
of beings, the overcoming of sorrow and lamentation, the disappearance
of dukkha-domanassa, the attainment of the right way, the realization of Nibbāna, that is to say the four satipaṭṭhānas.

Katame cattāro? Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī viharati ātāpī sampajāno satimā, vineyya loke abhijjhā-domanassaṃ. Vedanāsu vedanānupassī viharati ātāpī sampajāno satimā, vineyya loke abhijjhā-domanassaṃ. Citte cittānupassī viharati ātāpī sampajāno satimā, vineyya loke abhijjhā-domanassaṃ. Dhammesu dhammānupassī viharati ātāpī sampajāno satimā, vineyya loke abhijjhā-domanassaṃ.


Which four? Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya, ātāpī sampajāno, satimā, having given up abhijjhā-domanassa towards the world. He dwells observing vedanā in vedanā, ātāpī sampajāno, satimā, having given up abhijjhā-domanassa towards the world. He dwells observing citta in citta, ātāpī sampajāno, satimā, having given up abhijjhā-domanassa towards the world. He dwells observing dhamma·s in dhamma·s, ātāpī sampajāno, satimā, having given up abhijjhā-domanassa towards the world.


I. Kāyānupassanā

A. Ānāpāna Pabba


Katha·ñ·ca, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī viharati? Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu arañña-gato rukkha-mūla-gato suññāgāra-gato nisīdati pallaṅkaṃ ābhujitvā ujuṃ kāyaṃ paṇidhāya parimukhaṃ satiṃ upaṭṭhapetvā. So satova assasati, satova passasati. Dīghaṃ assasantodīghaṃ assasāmīti pajānāti; dīghaṃ passasantodīghaṃ passasāmīti pajānāti; rassaṃ assasantorassaṃ assasāmīti pajānāti; rassaṃ passasantorassaṃ passasāmīti pajānāti;

sabba-kāya-paṭisaṃvedī assasissāmīti sikkhati; ‘sabba-kāya-paṭisaṃvedī passasissāmīti sikkhati; ‘passambhayaṃ kāya-saṅkhāraṃ assasissāmīti sikkhati; ‘passambhayaṃ kāya-saṅkhāraṃ passasissāmīti sikkhati.


I. Kāyānupassanā

A. Section on ānāpāna



And how, bhikkhus, does a bhikkhu dwell observing kāya in kāya? Here, bhikkhus, a
bhikkhu, having gone to the forest or having gone at the root of a tree
or having gone to an empty room, sits down folding the legs crosswise,
setting kāya upright, and setting sati parimukhaṃ.
Being
thus sato he breathes in, being thus sato he breathes out. Breathing in
long he understands: ‘I am breathing in long’; breathing out long he
understands: ‘I am breathing out long’; breathing in short he
understands: ‘I am breathing in short’; breathing out short he
understands: ‘I am breathing out short’;
he
trains himself: ‘feeling the whole kāya, I will breathe in’; he trains
himself: ‘feeling the whole kāya, I will breathe out’; he trains
himself: ‘calming down the kāya-saṅkhāras, I will breathe in’; he trains
himself: ‘calming down the kāya-saṅkhāras, I will breathe out’.

Seyyathāpi, bhikkhave, dakkho bhamakāro bhamakār·antevāsī dīghaṃ añchantodīghaṃ añchāmīti pajānāti; rassaṃ añchantorassaṃ añchāmīti pajānāti; evameva kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu dīghaṃ assasantodīghaṃ assasāmīti pajānāti; dīghaṃ passasantodīghaṃ passasāmīti pajānāti; rassaṃ assasantorassaṃ assasāmīti pajānāti; rassaṃ passasantorassaṃ passasāmīti pajānāti;

sabba-kāya-paṭisaṃvedī assasissāmīti sikkhati; ‘sabba-kāya-paṭisaṃvedī passasissāmīti sikkhati; ‘passambhayaṃ kāya-saṅkhāraṃ assasissāmīti sikkhati; ‘passambhayaṃ kāya-saṅkhāraṃ passasissāmīti sikkhati.


Just as, bhikkhus, a skillful turner or a turner’s apprentice, making a
long turn, understands: ‘I am making a long turn’; making a short turn,
he understands: ‘I am making a short turn’; in the same way, bhikkhus, a
bhikkhu, breathing in long, understands: ‘I am breathing in long’;
breathing out long he understands: ‘I am breathing out long’; breathing
in short he understands: ‘I am breathing in short’; breathing out short
he understands: ‘I am breathing out short’;
he
trains himself: ‘feeling the whole kāya, I will breathe in’; he trains
himself: ‘feeling the whole kāya, I will breathe out’; he trains
himself: ‘calming down the kāya-saṅkhāras, I will breathe in’; he trains
himself: ‘calming down the kāya-saṅkhāras, I will breathe out’.

Iti ajjhattaṃ kāye kāyānupassī viharati, bahiddhā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā kāye kāyānupassī viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī kāyasmiṃ viharati, vaya-dhamm·ānupassī kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyoti pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati, na ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī viharati.


Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya.

B. Iriyāpatha Pabba


Puna ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu gacchanto gacchāmīti pajānāti, ṭhito ṭhitomhīti pajānāti, nisinno nisinnomhīti pajānāti, sayāno sayānomhīti pajānāti. Yathā yathā pan·assa kāyo paṇihito hoti, tathā tathā naṃ pajānāti.

B. Section on postures



Furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, while walking, understands: ‘I am
walking’, or while standing he understands: ‘I am standing’, or while
sitting he understands: ‘I am sitting’, or while lying down he
understands: ‘I am lying down’. Or else, in whichever position his kāya is disposed, he understands it accordingly.

Iti ajjhattaṃ kāye kāyānupassī viharati, bahiddhā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā kāye kāyānupassī viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī kāyasmiṃ viharati, vaya-dhamm·ānupassī kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyoti pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati, na ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī viharati.


Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya.

C. Sampajāna Pabba


Puna ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu abhikkante paṭikkante sampajānakārī hoti, ālokite vilokite sampajānakārī hoti, samiñjite pasārite sampajānakārī hoti, saṅghāṭi-patta-cīvara-dhāraṇe sampajānakārī hoti, asite pīte khāyite sāyite sampajānakārī hoti, uccāra-passāva-kamme sampajānakārī hoti, gate ṭhite nisinne sutte jāgarite bhāsite tuṇhībhāve sampajānakārī hoti.

C. Section on sampajañña



Furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, while approaching and while departing,
acts with sampajañña, while looking ahead and while looking around, he
acts with sampajañña, while bending and while stretching, he acts with
sampajañña, while wearing the robes and the upper robe and while
carrying the bowl, he acts with sampajañña, while eating, while
drinking, while chewing, while tasting, he acts with sampajañña, while
attending to the business of defecating and urinating, he acts with
sampajañña, while walking, while standing, while sitting, while
sleeping, while being awake, while talking and while being silent, he
acts with sampajañña.

Iti ajjhattaṃ kāye kāyānupassī viharati, bahiddhā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā kāye kāyānupassī viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī kāyasmiṃ viharati, vaya-dhamm·ānupassī kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyoti pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati, na ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī viharati.


Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya.

D. Paṭikūlamanasikāra Pabba


Puna ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu imam·eva kāyaṃ, uddhaṃ pādatalā adho kesa·matthakā, taca·pariyantaṃ pūraṃ nānappakārassa asucino paccavekkhati: ‘Atthi imasmiṃ kāye kesā lomā nakhā dantā taco maṃsaṃ nhāru aṭṭhi aṭṭhimiñjaṃ vakkaṃ hadayaṃ yakanaṃ kilomakaṃ pihakaṃ papphāsaṃ antaṃ antaguṇaṃ udariyaṃ karīsaṃ pittaṃ semhaṃ pubbo lohitaṃ sedo medo assu vasā kheḷo siṅghāṇikā lasikā muttaṃti.

D. Section on Repulsiveness



Furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu considers this very body, from the
soles of the feet up and from the hair on the head down, which is
delimited by its skin and full of various kinds of impurities: “In this kāya,
there are the hairs of the head, hairs of the body, nails, teeth, skin,
flesh, tendons, bones, bone marrow, kidneys, heart, liver, pleura,
spleen, lungs, intestines, mesentery, stomach with its contents, feces,
bile, phlegm, pus, blood, sweat, fat, tears, grease, saliva, nasal
mucus, synovial fluid and urine.”

Seyyathāpi, bhikkhave, ubhatomukhā putoḷi pūrā nānāvihitassa dhaññassa, seyyathidaṃ sālīnaṃ vīhīnaṃ muggānaṃ māsānaṃ tilānaṃ taṇḍulānaṃ.
Tamenaṃ cakkhumā puriso muñcitvā paccavekkheyya: ‘Ime sālī ime vīhī, ime muggā, ime māsā, ime tilā, ime taṇḍulāti; evameva kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu imam·eva kāyaṃ, uddhaṃ pādatalā adho kesa·matthakā, taca·pariyantaṃ pūraṃ nānappakārassa asucino paccavekkhati: ‘Atthi imasmiṃ kāye kesā lomā nakhā dantā taco maṃsaṃ nhāru aṭṭhi aṭṭhimiñjaṃ vakkaṃ hadayaṃ yakanaṃ kilomakaṃ pihakaṃ papphāsaṃ antaṃ antaguṇaṃ udariyaṃ karīsaṃ pittaṃ semhaṃ pubbo lohitaṃ sedo medo assu vasā kheḷo siṅghāṇikā lasikā muttaṃti.


Just as if, bhikkhus, there was a bag having two openings and filled
with various kinds of grain, such as hill-paddy, paddy, mung beans,
cow-peas, sesame seeds and husked rice. A man with good eyesight, having
unfastened it, would consider [its contents]: “This is hill-paddy, this
is paddy, those are mung beans, those are cow-peas, those are sesame
seeds and this is husked rice;” in the same way, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu
considers this very body, from the soles of the feet up and from the
hair on the head down, which is delimited by its skin and full of
various kinds of impurities: “In this kāya,
there are the hairs of the head, hairs of the body, nails, teeth, skin,
flesh, tendons, bones, bone marrow, kidneys, heart, liver, pleura,
spleen, lungs, intestines, mesentery, stomach with its contents, feces,
bile, phlegm, pus, blood, sweat, fat, tears, grease, saliva, nasal
mucus, synovial fluid and urine.”

Iti ajjhattaṃ kāye kāyānupassī viharati, bahiddhā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā kāye kāyānupassī viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī kāyasmiṃ viharati, vaya-dhamm·ānupassī kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyoti pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati, na ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī viharati.


Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya.

E. Dhātumanasikāra Pabba


Puna ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu imam·eva kāyaṃ yathā·ṭhitaṃ yathā·paṇihitaṃ dhātuso paccavekkhati: ‘Atthi imasmiṃ kāye pathavī·dhātu āpo·dhātū tejo·dhātū vāyo·dhātūti.

E. Section on the Elements



Furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu reflects on this very kāya, however it is placed, however it is disposed: “In this kāya, there is the earth element, the water element, the fire element and the air element.”

Seyyathāpi, bhikkhave, dakkho goghātako goghātak·antevāsī gāviṃ vadhitvā catu·mahā·pathe bilaso vibhajitvā nisinno assa; evameva kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu imam·eva kāyaṃ yathā·ṭhitaṃ yathā·paṇihitaṃ dhātuso paccavekkhati: ‘Atthi imasmiṃ kāye pathavī·dhātu āpo·dhātū tejo·dhātū vāyo·dhātūti.


Just as, bhikkhus, a skillful butcher or a butcher’s apprentice, having
killed a cow, would sit at a crossroads cutting it into pieces; in the
same way, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu reflects on this very kāya, however it is placed, however it is disposed: “In this kāya, there is the earth element, the water element, the fire element and the air element.”

Iti ajjhattaṃ kāye kāyānupassī viharati, bahiddhā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā kāye kāyānupassī viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī kāyasmiṃ viharati, vaya-dhamm·ānupassī kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyoti pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati, na ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī viharati.


Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya.

F. Navasivathika Pabba

(1)

Puna ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu seyyathāpi passeyya sarīraṃ sivathikāya chaḍḍitaṃ ekāha·mataṃ dvīha·mataṃ tīha·mataṃ uddhumātakaṃ vinīlakaṃ vipubbaka·jātaṃ, so imam·eva kāyaṃ upasaṃharati: ‘ayaṃ pi kho kāyo evaṃ·dhammo evaṃ·bhāvī evaṃ·an·atītoti.

F. Section on the nine charnel grounds

(1)


Furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as if he was seeing a dead body,
cast away in a charnel ground, one day dead, or two days dead or three
days dead, swollen, bluish and festering, he considers this very kāya: “This kāya also is of such a nature, it is going to become like this, and is not free from such a condition.”

Iti ajjhattaṃ kāye kāyānupassī viharati, bahiddhā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā kāye kāyānupassī viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī kāyasmiṃ viharati, vaya-dhamm·ānupassī kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyoti pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati, na ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī viharati.


Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya.

(2)

Puna ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu seyyathāpi passeyya sarīraṃ sivathikāya chaḍḍitaṃ kākehi khajjamānaṃ kulalehi khajjamānaṃ gijjhehi khajjamānaṃ kaṅkehi khajjamānaṃ sunakhehi khajjamānaṃ byagghehi khajjamānaṃ dīpīhi khajjamānaṃ siṅgālehi khajjamānaṃ vividhehi pāṇaka·jātehi khajjamānaṃ, so imam·eva kāyaṃ upasaṃharati: ‘ayaṃ pi kho kāyo evaṃ·dhammo evaṃ·bhāvī evaṃ·an·atītoti.

(2)


Furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as if he was seeing a dead body,
cast away in a charnel ground, being eaten by crows, being eaten by
hawks, being eaten by vultures, being eaten by herons, being eaten by
dogs, being eaten by tigers, being eaten by panthers, being eaten by
various kinds of beings, he considers this very kāya: “This kāya also is of such a nature, it is going to become like this, and is not free from such a condition.”

Iti ajjhattaṃ kāye kāyānupassī viharati, bahiddhā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā kāye kāyānupassī viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī kāyasmiṃ viharati, vaya-dhamm·ānupassī kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyoti pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati, na ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī viharati.


Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya.

(3)

Puna ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu seyyathāpi passeyya sarīraṃ sivathikāya chaḍḍitaṃ aṭṭhika·saṅkhalikaṃ sa·maṃsa·lohitaṃ nhāru·sambandhaṃ, so imam·eva kāyaṃ upasaṃharati: ‘ayaṃ pi kho kāyo evaṃ·dhammo evaṃ·bhāvī evaṃ·an·atītoti.

(3)


Furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as if he was seeing a dead body,
cast away in a charnel ground, a squeleton with flesh and blood, held
together by tendons, he considers this very kāya: “This kāya also is of such a nature, it is going to become like this, and is not free from such a condition.”

Iti ajjhattaṃ kāye kāyānupassī viharati, bahiddhā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā kāye kāyānupassī viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī kāyasmiṃ viharati, vaya-dhamm·ānupassī kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyoti pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati, na ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī viharati.


Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya.

(4)

Puna ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu seyyathāpi passeyya sarīraṃ sivathikāya chaḍḍitaṃ aṭṭhika·saṅkhalikaṃ ni·maṃsa·lohita·makkhitaṃ nhāru·sambandhaṃ, so imam·eva kāyaṃ upasaṃharati: ‘ayaṃ pi kho kāyo evaṃ·dhammo evaṃ·bhāvī evaṃ·an·atītoti.

(4)


Furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as if he was seeing a dead body,
cast away in a charnel ground, a squeleton without flesh and smeared
with blood, held together by tendons, he considers this very kāya: “This kāya also is of such a nature, it is going to become like this, and is not free from such a condition.”

Iti ajjhattaṃ kāye kāyānupassī viharati, bahiddhā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā kāye kāyānupassī viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī kāyasmiṃ viharati, vaya-dhamm·ānupassī kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyoti pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati, na ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī viharati.


Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya.

(5)

Puna ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu seyyathāpi passeyya sarīraṃ sivathikāya chaḍḍitaṃ aṭṭhika·saṅkhalikaṃ apagata·maṃsa·lohitaṃ nhāru·sambandhaṃ, so imam·eva kāyaṃ upasaṃharati: ‘ayaṃ pi kho kāyo evaṃ·dhammo evaṃ·bhāvī evaṃ·an·atītoti.

(5)


Furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as if he was seeing a dead body,
cast away in a charnel ground, a squeleton without flesh nor blood, held
together by tendons, he considers this very kāya: “This kāya also is of such a nature, it is going to become like this, and is not free from such a condition.”

Iti ajjhattaṃ kāye kāyānupassī viharati, bahiddhā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā kāye kāyānupassī viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī kāyasmiṃ viharati, vaya-dhamm·ānupassī kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyoti pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati, na ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī viharati.


Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya.

(6)

Puna ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu seyyathāpi passeyya sarīraṃ sivathikāya chaḍḍitaṃ aṭṭhikāni apagata·sambandhāni disā vidisā vikkhittāni, aññena hatth·aṭṭhikaṃ aññena pād·aṭṭhikaṃ aññena gopphak·aṭṭhikaṃ aññena jaṅgh·aṭṭhikaṃ aññena ūru·ṭṭhikaṃ aññena kaṭi·ṭṭhikaṃ aññena phāsuk·aṭṭhikaṃ aññena piṭṭh·iṭṭhikaṃ aññena khandh·aṭṭhikaṃ aññena gīv·aṭṭhikaṃ aññena hanuk·aṭṭhikaṃ aññena dant·aṭṭhikaṃ aññena sīsakaṭāhaṃ, so imam·eva kāyaṃ upasaṃharati: ‘ayaṃ pi kho kāyo evaṃ·dhammo evaṃ·bhāvī evaṃ·an·atītoti.

(6)


Furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as if he was seeing a dead body,
cast away in a charnel ground, disconnected bones scattered here and
there, here a hand bone, there a foot bone, here an ankle bone, there a
shin bone, here a thigh bone, there a hip bone, here a rib, there a back
bone, here a spine bone, there a neck bone, here a jaw bone, there a
tooth bone, or there the skull, he considers this very kāya: “This kāya also is of such a nature, it is going to become like this, and is not free from such a condition.”

Iti ajjhattaṃ kāye kāyānupassī viharati, bahiddhā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā kāye kāyānupassī viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī kāyasmiṃ viharati, vaya-dhamm·ānupassī kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyoti pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati, na ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī viharati.


Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya.

(7)

Puna ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu seyyathāpi passeyya sarīraṃ sivathikāya chaḍḍitaṃ aṭṭhikāni setāni saṅkha·vaṇṇa·paṭibhāgāni, so imam·eva kāyaṃ upasaṃharati: ‘ayaṃ pi kho kāyo evaṃ·dhammo evaṃ·bhāvī evaṃ·an·atītoti.

(7)


Furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as if he was seeing a dead body,
cast away in a charnel ground, the bones whitened like a seashell, he
considers this very kāya: “This kāya also is of such a nature, it is going to become like this, and is not free from such a condition.”

Iti ajjhattaṃ kāye kāyānupassī viharati, bahiddhā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā kāye kāyānupassī viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī kāyasmiṃ viharati, vaya-dhamm·ānupassī kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyoti pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati, na ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī viharati.


Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya.

(8)

Puna ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu seyyathāpi passeyya sarīraṃ sivathikāya chaḍḍitaṃ aṭṭhikāni puñja·kitāni terovassikāni, so imam·eva kāyaṃ upasaṃharati: ‘ayaṃ pi kho kāyo evaṃ·dhammo evaṃ·bhāvī evaṃ·an·atītoti.

(8)


Furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as if he was seeing a dead body,
cast away in a charnel ground, heaped up bones over a year old, he
considers this very kāya: “This kāya also is of such a nature, it is going to become like this, and is not free from such a condition.”

Iti ajjhattaṃ kāye kāyānupassī viharati, bahiddhā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā kāye kāyānupassī viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī kāyasmiṃ viharati, vaya-dhamm·ānupassī kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyoti pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati, na ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī viharati.


Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya.

(9)

Puna ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu seyyathāpi passeyya sarīraṃ sivathikāya chaḍḍitaṃ aṭṭhikāni pūtīni cuṇṇaka·jātāni, so imam·eva kāyaṃ upasaṃharati: ‘ayaṃ pi kho kāyo evaṃ·dhammo evaṃ·bhāvī evaṃ·an·atītoti.

(9)


Furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as if he was seeing a dead body,
cast away in a charnel ground, rotten bones reduced to powder, he
considers this very kāya: “This kāya also is of such a nature, it is going to become like this, and is not free from such a condition.”

Iti ajjhattaṃ kāye kāyānupassī viharati, bahiddhā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā kāye kāyānupassī viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī kāyasmiṃ viharati, vaya-dhamm·ānupassī kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyoti pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati, na ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī viharati.


Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya.


II. Vedanānupassanā


Kathaṃ ca pana, bhikkhave, bhikkhu vedanāsu vedanānupassī viharati?


II. Observation of Vedanā



And how now, bhikkhus, does a bhikkhu dwell observing vedanā in vedanā?

Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu sukhaṃ vedanaṃ vedayamānosukhaṃ vedanaṃ vedayāmīti pajānāti; dukkhaṃ vedanaṃ vedayamānodukkhaṃ vedanaṃ vedayāmīti pajānāti; a·dukkham-a·sukhaṃ vedanaṃ vedayamānoa·dukkham-a·sukhaṃ vedanaṃ vedayāmīti pajānāti. Sāmisaṃ sukhaṃ vedanaṃ vedayamānosāmisaṃ sukhaṃ vedanaṃ vedayāmīti pajānāti; nirāmisaṃ sukhaṃ vedanaṃ vedayamānonirāmisaṃ sukhaṃ vedanaṃ vedayāmīti pajānāti. Sāmisaṃ dukkhaṃ vedanaṃ vedayamānosāmisaṃ dukkhaṃ vedanaṃ vedayāmīti pajānāti; nirāmisaṃ dukkhaṃ vedanaṃ vedayamānonirāmisaṃ dukkhaṃ vedanaṃ vedayāmīti pajānāti. Sāmisaṃ a·dukkham-a·sukhaṃ vedanaṃ vedayamānosāmisaṃ a·dukkham-a·sukhaṃ vedanaṃ vedayāmīti pajānāti; nirāmisaṃ a·dukkham-a·sukhaṃ vedanaṃ vedayamānonirāmisaṃ a·dukkham-a·sukhaṃ vedanaṃ vedayāmīti pajānāti.


Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, experiencing a sukha vedanā, undersands: “I am experiencing a sukha vedanā“; experiencing a dukkha vedanā, undersands: “I am experiencing a dukkha vedanā“; experiencing an adukkham-asukhā vedanā, undersands: “I am experiencing a adukkham-asukhā vedanā“; experiencing a sukha vedanā sāmisa, undersands: “I am experiencing a sukha vedanā sāmisa“; experiencing a sukha vedanā nirāmisa, undersands: “I am experiencing a sukha vedanā nirāmisa“; experiencing a dukkha vedanā sāmisa, undersands: “I am experiencing a dukkha vedanā sāmisa“; experiencing a dukkha vedanā nirāmisa, undersands: “I am experiencing a dukkha vedanā nirāmisa“; experiencing an adukkham-asukhā vedanā sāmisa, undersands: “I am experiencing a adukkham-asukhā vedanā sāmisa“; experiencing an adukkham-asukhā vedanā nirāmisa, undersands: “I am experiencing a adukkham-asukhā vedanā nirāmisa“.

Iti ajjhattaṃ vedanāsu vedanānupassī viharati, bahiddhā vedanāsu vedanānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vedanāsu vedanānupassī viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vedanāsu viharati, vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vedanāsu viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vedanāsu viharati; ‘atthi vedanāti pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati, na ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu vedanāsu vedanānupassī viharati.


Thus he dwells observing vedanā in vedanā internally, or he dwells observing vedanā in vedanā externally, or he dwells observing vedanā in vedanā internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of phenomena in vedanā, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena in vedanā, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of phenomena in vedanā; or else, [realizing:] “this is vedanā!” sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing vedanā in vedanā.

Bodhi leaf





Note


1. ‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya:
this is probably the trickiest part of the sutta. It is very important
because it will be repeated over 20 times, and also because it is the
central part explaining how sati is actually made present. Here are a
few alternate renderings:

VRI: “Now his awareness is established: “This
is body!” Thus he develops his awareness to such an extent that there
is mere understanding along with mere awareness.”

Bhante Analayo: “Or else mindfulness that ‘There is a body’ is established in him to the extent of bare knowledge and remembrance of it”

Thanissaro Bhikkhu: “Or his mindfulness that ‘There is a body’ is maintained to the extent of knowledge & remembrance”

Bhikkhu Nanamoli & Bhikkhu Bodhi: “Or
else mindfulness that ‘there is a body’ is simply established in him to
the extent necessary for bare knowledge and mindfulness.”

Nyanasatta Thera: “Or his mindfulness is
established with the thought: “The body exists,” to the extent necessary
just for knowledge and mindfulness.”

Soma Thera: “Or indeed his mindfulness is
established with the thought: ‘The body exists,’ to the extent necessary
just for knowledge and remembrance”

Maurice Walshe: “Or else, mindfulness that “there is a body” is present to him just to the extent necessary for the knowledge and awareness.”



Translation suggested by the webmaster,
with the support of Thanissaro Bhikkhu’s translation.

———oOo———
Published as a gift of Dhamma, to be distributed free of charge.
Any copies or derivatives of this work must cite their original source.






English


 I.Fixing the attention,  earnest meditation

Which four? Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya, ātāpī sampajāno, satimā, having given up abhijjhā-domanassa towards the world. He dwells observing vedanā in vedanā, ātāpī sampajāno, satimā, having given up abhijjhā-domanassa towards the world. He dwells observing citta in citta, ātāpī sampajāno, satimā, having given up abhijjhā-domanassa towards the world. He dwells observing dhamma·s in dhamma·s, ātāpī sampajāno, satimā, having given up abhijjhā-domanassa towards the world.




I. Kāyānupassanā

A. Ānāpāna Pabba


English



Introduction

I. Observation of Kāya

   A. Section on ānāpāna
   B. Section on postures
   C. Section on sampajañña
   D. Section on repulsiveness
   E. Section on the Elements
   F. Section on the nine charnel grounds

II. Observation of Vedanā

11) Classical Bosnian

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