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10/18/08
Safe Release from all Anxiety:-We Will, We Will Seize You -Cong delays J-K poll as it fears drubbing: BSP - BSP confident of coming to power in MP: Mishra-Mayawati targets SP’s OBC base -Jamia Nagar vows not to vote for Congress or BJP-# Flash: UP cabinet decides to return land in Rae Bareli to Rlys. for building coach factory. -The country has a poor record on distribution of wealth both by the Congress Party at the Centre and the BJP at the State.-Former BSP member Isham Singh disqualified from Rajya Sabha-
Filed under: General
Posted by: site admin @ 8:59 am


Safe Release from all
Anxiety:

The young deity Subrahma once asked the Buddha:
Always frightened is this Mind!
Always agitated is this Mind!
About present problems.
About future problems.
If there is a release from this Anxiety,
please then explain it to me…

Whereupon the Blessed Buddha declared:

I see no other real safety for any living being,


except from control of the senses,


except from the relinquishment of all,


except from awakening into Awakenment!



We Will, We Will Seize You

NEW
DELHI: Though political pundits claim that the role of the Bahujan
Samaj Party (BSP) will be limited to only spoiling the Congress’ hopes
of a hattrick in the forthcoming Assembly elections, the opinion in the BSP camp is quite different.

 

Party
leaders said they will not only script the “obituary” of the Congress
in the assembly polls, but also bury hopes of the BJP of making it to
power. Armed with an “impressive” share of SC population in at least 18
constituencies above 20% and banking on the “social engineering”
mantra, they claim their party will throw up many surprises.

 

Top
party leaders said the task of ticket distribution being completed well
before time had given candidates enough opportunity to constitute booth
level committees and they were ready to take the fight ahead, waiting
as they were only for the official party manifesto to be released.

 

In
the meantime, the issues to be addressed had been shortlisted. Price
rise, complete statehood, regularising unauthorised colonies besides
unemployment and poor living conditions in slums were going to be the
key points to be raised.

 

Explaining
that his party’s priorities were different from those of the Congress
and BJP, state party unit chief Brahm Singh Bidhuri said, “BJP and
Congress have only done lip service. That is what we are going to tell
the voters.”

 

Claiming
that all poll calculations will be proved wrong in Delhi as had been
the case in Uttar Pradesh, Bidhuri added, “We will tell people how the
entire sealing drive started during NDA rule.”

 

Party
nominee for New Delhi constituency Rajiv Singh said the social
engineering of BSP would bear fruit since the party had accommodated
every community and caste while distributing tickets. “Besides,
Mayawati addressing rallies ahead of polls would make a difference.
Even when she did not address a single rally during MCD elections, we
surprised everyone,” Singh said.

 

To
gain support from all communities, the party has given the most number
of tickets to Brahmins and Gujjars nine seats each. Aware that Jats
were going to play a key role in outer Delhi, BSP will field eight Jats
candidates. Vyshyas have got seven and Muslims have six tickets.
Punjabis have got tickets for four seats, Yadavs and Kshatriyas in
three each. The present status of the party’s list tally shows Sikhs
have got two tickets and Saini and Balmikis have got one each.

 

Commenting
on whether the party was “worried” about the recent Mayawati bashing by
Jama Masjid Shahi Imam Syed Ahmed Bukhari, Bidhuri said they were not
concerned about “baseless” allegations. “In municipal elections we gave
tickets to 27 Muslim candidates. In Delhi, BJP will do nothing for the
community and Congress should also spell oyt what it has done. We have
already finalised tickets for three Muslim candidates in the next
general elections,” he claimed.

 

Party
leaders also said they were banking on the support of poor and lower
middle class voters and lower rank government employees whom they
categorised as a “troubled lot”.

Cong delays J-K poll as it fears drubbing: BSP

The Bahujan Samaj Party (BSP) today (Oct 17) alleged
that the Congress is delaying assembly elections in Jammu and Kashmir
as it feared a drubbing at the hustings.

“BSP is ready for polls in Jammu and Kashmir, but the Congress is
delaying the process,” party General Secretary Narendra Kashyap told
reporters in Srinagar.

The Election Commission, which recently announced the poll schedule
for Delhi, Chattisgarh, Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan and Mizoram, had
deferred a decision on elections in the state.

When his attention was drawn that it was the commission’s decision
to delay the polls, he said it acted upon the report given by the
government on security and related issues.

“The Commission will take a decision based on the report of the
government. That is where the Congress is delaying the polls as it
fears for its future,” he added.

The party would decide on the number of seats it would contest once the election is announced, he said.

The BSP leader also announced expulsion of former party state
president Yashpal Bhagat and two other office bearers from the party
and said T K Langhe would now head the party unit in the state.

BSP confident of coming to power in MP: Mishra
Khargone (MP), Oct 18
(PTI) The Bahujan Samaj Party (BSP) today claimed it will form the next
government in Madhya Pradesh after the November 25 Assembly elections
as people were fed up with both the ruling BJP and the opposition
Congress in the state.
Both the BJP and the Congress are afraid of
the BSP, which will emerge as the leading force and not the third force
in the state, BSP leader and Uttar Pradesh Education Minister Rangnath
Mishra told reporters here.

The BSP has declared candidates for 130 of 230 constituencies.

Mishra, who is in the state to launch the poll campaign here, was addressing ‘Brahman Sammelan’, a party workers conference.

After coming to power, the BSP would work for development in Madhya Pradesh as it had done in Uttar Pradesh, he said.

The BSP leader, who is in-charge of the Sammelan, claimed that his
party was getting support from all sections of society and it would
raise issues including corruption, law and order and development during
the elections.

People in the state are fed up with both the BJP and the Congress, he said.

About one hundred Congress workers, including district panchayat
member Tarachand Yadav, Prakash Rayali from Kasrawad and Vijay Verma
joined the BSP at the Sammelan. PTI


Flash:
The UP state cabinet decided to
return the land for the
for building coach factory 
project at Lalganj town.


Asia ReView

Go to know more about Asia with us

Mayawati targets SP’s OBC base

 
Flagging off rally, BSP South India in-charge Suresh Mane said that the
rally intends to generate public awareness on “perils of Indo-US
nuclear deal” across the length and breadth of the country. Branding
the deal as  a “conspiracy to pledge the sovereignity of the country”,
he called upon the citizens to be vigilant against such destructive
measures.

“Management of nuclear waste is a Herculean task. It requires
investment of crores of rupees to set up waste management unit.
Further, nuclear power could meet only 6 pc of the total demand and
hence, Agreement is an exercise in futility. ”, he reasoned.

He claimed that India will not gain anything from the said deal and the
party has organised the rally  to sensitise people on the perceived
pitfalls of the Indo-US nuclear deal.

The rally is
scheduled to reach KGF via Narasapur, Malur and Tekal and further
proceed to Mulabagal, Srinivasapur, Chintamani, Shidlaghatta,
Gudibande, Gowribidanur, Chikkaballapur, Doddaballapur and reach
Devanahalli in three days.

On
20-10-2008 the Jeep rally from KGF will enter Yelahanka and pass
through Pulikeshinagar, Sarvagna Nagar, Shivaji Nagar, CV Raman Nagar,
KR Puram and Mahdevpura.Will generate public awareness on the perils of
Indo-US Nuclear deal, people’s apathy on the ever rising price rise and
unemployment problem which is because

The country has a poor
record on distribution of wealth

both by the Congress Party at the Centre and the BJP at the State.

Price
rise, regularising unauthorised colonies besides
unemployment and poor living conditions in slums were going to be the
key points to be raised in the Jeep Rally.

 

Explaining
that his party’s priorities were different from those of the Congress
and BJP, state party unit chief said, “BJP and
Congress have only done lip service. That is what we are going to tell
the voters.”

 

Claiming
that all poll calculations will be proved wrong in Karnataka as had been
the case in Uttar Pradesh.

.

 social
engineering of BSP would bear fruit since the party had accommodated
every community and caste while distributing tickets.

Vegetable prices to remain high

The high prices of vegetables and fruits in the City are expected to increase even further in the
coming days, reaching its peak


 This year, it is particularly obvious because of the high inflation rate.

Vegetable prices have
virtually hit the roofs in recent weeks. Carrots
are selling at Rs 48 per kg, tomatoes ( Rs 30 per kg), cauliflower,Cabbage has
risen  to Rs 15 a kg and beans  to Rs 29 a kg.Peas to Rs.150 a kg.
Brinjal (small) prices has doubled and coriander has seen a 300 per
cent increase. Among fruits pomegranate is the highest at Rs 150 per
kg. 

The price rise has hurt both sellers and buyers alike. Sellers have seen their margins
diminish with the rise in costs and buyers now have to fork out more money to meet their basic requirements.


The main reasons for the vegetable price rise is the rising inflationary trends in the
economy. 


Srinath of Reliance Fresh felt that only when there was a nationwide decrease in inflation levels would the food price levels come down.  The local vendors and Hopcom outlets  are also facing similar problems due to rise in vegetable price.

India has 200 million hungry people: report
Gargi Parsai

High levels of child under-nutrition and poor calorie count


NEW DELHI: Punjab, the granary of India, ranks below countries like
Honduras and Vietnam in terms of hunger levels while Madhya Pradesh has
the most severe level of hunger in the country, followed by Jharkhand
and Bihar, says a report prepared by U.S.-based International Food
Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in collaboration with Welthungerhilfe
and Concern
Worldwide, California.
“When Indian States are compared to countries in the 2008 Global
Hunger Index, Madhya Pradesh ranks between Ethiopia and Chad. Punjab, is below Gabon, Honduras and Vietnam,” says
the Country Report released here on Tuesday by G.K. Chadha, member of
Prime Minister’s Economic Advisory Council, on the eve of World Food
Day
.
“India is home to the world’s largest food insecure population,
with more than 200 million people who are hungry,” the India State
Hunger Index (ISHI) said. The country’s poor performance is driven by
its high levels of child under-nutrition and poor calorie count. “Its
rates of child malnutrition are higher than most countries in
sub-Saharan Africa,” the report said.
India, which scored 66th place in the 2008
Global Hunger list of 88
countries, does not have a single State in the ‘low hunger’ or
‘moderate hunger’ categories. Despite years of robust economic growth,
India scored worse than nearly 25 sub-Saharan African countries and all
of South Asia, except Bangladesh.
“Figuring amongst the 88 countries itself is shameful for the
country.. Policy-makers have to think about it. High GDP growth is not
sufficient. Inclusive growth is necessary. The country has a poor
record on distribution of wealth,”
Dr. Chadha said.
The India State Hunger Index measures hunger on three leading indicators and combines them into one index.
The three indicators are: prevalence of child malnutrition, rates of
child mortality, and the proportion of people who are
calorie
deficient. This approach is similar to the 2008 Global Hunger Index,
which includes India, and was also released on Tuesday for World Food
Day on October 16.
The ISHI found that 12 States fell in the ‘alarming’ category, and
one State – Madhya Pradesh – fell in the ‘extremely alarming’ category.
Four States – Punjab, Kerala, Haryana and Assam – were in the ‘serious’
category.
India’s slightly better performance relative to Bangladesh is
entirely due to better access to food in India, which in turn is a
consequence of India’s higher agricultural productivity. On the other
two components of the Global Hunger Index – child underweight and child
mortality – India ranks below Bangladesh.
In a few States, such as Kerala and Tamil Nadu,
calorie deficiency contributes almost as much as child underweight.
The report identified that strong economic growth does not
necessarily translate into lower hunger levels. Even States with high
rates of economic growth in recent years, such as Gujarat,
Chhattisgarh, and Maharashtra, have high levels of hunger, while States
with relatively slower economic growth, such as Punjab, achieved a
lower hunger level.
“Hunger and malnutrition are often rooted in poverty,” said Ashok
Gulati, IFPRI director in Asia. “Part of the solution rests with
increasing investments in agriculture and poverty reduction
programmes.”

How to eradicate poverty and unemployment problem in india ?


Jambudvipa, that is the Great Prabuddha Bharath is a vast country diversified geographically and humanly.We can
eradicate poverty and unemployment by making optimum use of our single
most vital asset, i.e. human resource or sheer manpower. It is the duty of the Government to distribute the nations wealth to all sections of the society.Supply healthy seeds to the farmers and distribute at least 10 acres of land to the tillers. Provide loans to all those who want to start bussiness and trade. The Government employees must be montitored to do their job honestly and sincerly.


India’s
employment perspective

Overview
of unemployment
Underemployment
Sector-wise
absorption of labour
Age
structure of population: 1997-2002
Trends
in  Labour Force Participation
Participation
in labour force by age & sex
Labour
Force Projections by Age Groups
Population
& Labour Force: 1997-2012
Projections
of work opportunities
Population,
Labour Force & Employment

Home

 







Overview

  • Economic reforms may have given a boost to industrial productivity and brought in
    foreign investment in capital intensive areas. But the boom has not created jobs. This was
    not unexpected. According to a report by the Washington-based Institute of Policy Studies
    (IPS), the combined sales of the world’s top 200 MNCs is now greater than the combined GDP
    of all but the world’s nine largest national economies. Yet, the total direct employment
    generated by these multinationals is a mere 18.8 millions -one-hundredth of one per cent
    of the global workforce.

  • India’s Ninth Five-Year Plan projects generation of 54 million new jobs during the Plan
    period (1997-2002). But performance has always fallen short of target in the past, and few
    believe that the current Plan will be able to meet its target.

  • India’s labour force is growing at a rate of 2.5 per cent annually, but employment is
    growing at only 2.3 per cent. Thus, the country is faced with the challenge of not only
    absorbing new entrants to the job market (estimated at seven million people every year),
    but also clearing the backlog.

  • Sixty per cent of India’s workforce is self-employed, many of whom remain very poor.
    Nearly 30 per cent are casual workers (i.e. they work only when they are able to get jobs
    and remain unpaid for the rest of the days). Only about 10 per cent are regular employees,
    of which two-fifths are employed by the public sector.

  • More than 90 per cent of the labour force is employed in the “unorganised
    sector”, i.e. sectors which don’t provide with the social security and other benefits
    of employment in the “organised sector.”

  • In the rural areas, agricultural workers form the bulk of the unorganised sector. In urban India, contract and
    sub-contract as well as migratory agricultural labourers make up most of the unorganised
    labour force.

  • Unorganised sector is made up of jobs in which the
    Minimum Wage Act is either not, or only marginally, implemented. The absence of unions in
    the unorganised sector does not provide any opportunity for collective bargaining.

  • Over 70 per cent of the labour force in all sector combined (organised and unorganised)
    is either illiterate or educated below the primary level.

  • The Ninth Plan projects a decline in the population growth rate to 1.59 per cent per
    annum by the end of the Ninth Plan, from over 2 per cent in the last three decades.
    However, it expects the growth rate of the labour force to reach a peak level of 2.54 per
    cent per annum over this period; the highest it has ever been and is ever likely to
    attain. This is because of the change in age structure, with the highest growth occurring
    in the 15-19 years age group in the Ninth Plan period.

  • The addition to the labour force during the Plan period is estimated to be 53 millions
    on the “usual status” concept. The acceleration in the economy’s growth rate to
    7 per cent per annum, with special emphasis on the agriculture sector, is expected to help
    in creating 54 million work opportunities over the period. This would lead to a reduction
    in the open unemployment rate from 1.9 per cent in 1996-97 to 1.47 per cent in the Plan’s
    terminal year, that is, by about a million persons - from 7.5 million to 6.63 million.

  • In other words, if the economy maintains an annual growth of 7 per cent, it would be
    just sufficient to absorb the new additions to the labour force. If the economy could grow
    at around 8 per cent per annum during the Plan period, the incidence of open unemployment
    could be brought down by two million persons, thus attaining near full employment by the
    end of the Plan period, according to the Plan.

  • However, there appears to be some confusion about the figure of open
    unemployment. The unemployment figure given in the executive summary of the Ninth Plan,
    gives the figure of open unemployment at 7.5 million while the annual report of the Labour
    Ministry, for 1995-96, puts the figure for 1995 at 18.7 million. An internal government
    paper prepared in 1997 put the unemployment figure at the beginning of the Eighth Plan at
    17 millions and at 18.7 million at the end of 1994-95. Perhaps the Planning Commission
    referred to the current figure while the Labour Ministry figure referred to the
    accumulated unemployment backlog.


    Underemployment

  • Open
    unemployment is not a true indicator of the gravity of the unemployment
    problem in an economy such as India, characterised as it is by
    large-scale underemployment and poor employment quality in the
    unorganised sector, which accounts for over 90 per cent of the total
    employment. The organised sector contributes only about 9 per cent to
    the total employment.

  • Underemployment in various segments of the labour force is quite high.
    For instance, though open unemployment was only 2 per cent in 1993-94, the incidence of
    under-employment and unemployment taken together was as much as 10 per cent that year.
    This, in spite of the fact that the incidence of underemployment was reduced substantially
    in the decade ending 1993-94.

  • According to the Planning Commission, the States which face the prospect
    of increased unemployment in the post-Ninth Plan period (2002- 2007) are Bihar, Rajasthan,
    Uttar Pradesh, Kerala and Punjab.

    Top


Sector-wise
absorption
of labour

Agriculture 62 per cent
Manufacturing & construction 16 per cent
Services 10 per cent

Sundry / miscellaneous jobs

12 per cent

Top

Table 1 : Age structure of population: 1997-2002

Age-group 1997 2002
0
- 14
37.23% 33.59%
15
- 59
56.07% 59.41%
60+ 6.70% 7.00%

Table 2 : Trends in  Labour Force Participation Rates(Per Thousand of Population)

Age
Group
Period Male Female
Rural Urban Rural Urban
15-29
1977-78
1987-88
1993-94
879
824
804
746
710
684
515
478
455
257
211
204
30-44
1977-78
1987-88
1993-94
990
988
990
990
987
986
619
603
600
324
301
300
45-59
1977-78
1987-88
1993-94
963
964
968
940
933
937
538
538
543
291
275
283
60+
1977-78
1987-88
1993-94
667
670
699
517
482
443
221
220
241
130
123
114
All
(15+)
1977-78
1987-88
1993-94
904
879
877
831
810
811
517
496
491
269
239
238

Note: Constituent shares in labour force in 1993-94 are Rural Male 0.499, Rural Female 0.270,Urban Male 0.182 and Urban  Female 0.049.

Table 3: Participation in Labour Force by Age Group and by Sex: 1997 - 2012(per thousand of population)
Age Male Female
1997 2002 2007 2012 1997 2002 2007 2012
15-19
20-24
25-29
30-34
35-39
40-44
45-49
50-54
55-59
60+
517
871
975
988
996
986
981
961
914
637
482 447

(a)

412 302
408
454
505
526
538
524
476
411
205
282 261

(a)

241
Note: (a) No change in labour force participation in age groups above 20 years.

 

Table 4 : Labour Force Projections by Age Groups




Age
Group
1997 2002 Growth
(Million) (%
p.a.)

15-19
20-24
25-29
30-34
35-39
40-44
45-49
50-54
55-59
60+

40.31
55.45
56.89
52.64
46.60
39.56
32.90
25.86
18.86
28.15
45.03
62.91
61.47
58.88
52.80
46.04
38.13
30.27
22.45
31.64
2.24
2.55
1.56
2.26
2.53
3.08
2.99
3.20
3.55
2.37

15+

397.22 449.62 2.51
Table 5: Population and Labour Force: 1997 - 2012(million - 1st April)

  1997 2002 2007 2012
Population 951.18 1028.93 1112.86 1196.41
Labour Force 397.22 449.62 507.94 562.91
   
Table 6 :  Projections of Work opportunities 1997-2002












Sector GDP Growth
(% p.a.)
Work
Opportunities
(Million)
1997-02 1997 2002

Agriculture

3.9 238.32 262.48

Mining & Quarrying

7.2 2.87 3.54

Manufacturing

8.2 43.56 48.22

Electricity

9.3 1.54 1.93

Construction

4.9 14.74 17.03

Wholesale & Retail Trade

6.7 34.78 41.67

Transport, Storage &
Communication

7.3 11.96 14.57

Financing, Real Estate,
Insurance and Business Services

8.5 4.55 5.68

Community, Social and Personal
Service

7.1 38.98 46.41

All Sectors

6.5 391.30 441.52
Table 7 : Population, Labour Force and Employment(Million)






  1978
(a)
1983
(b)
1994
(a)
8th
Plan
9th
Plan
10th
Plan
(1992-97)
(f)
(1997-02)
(f)
(2002-07)
(f)

Population
(c)

637.6 718.2
(2.19)
895.0
(2.12)
951.2
(1.89)
1028.9
(1.58)
1112.9
(1.58)

Labour
Force

255.8 286.6
(2.09)
368.5
(2.42)
374.2 423.4 478.8

Employment

249.1 281.2
(2.23)
361.5
(2.42)
367.2 416.4 474.7
(d)
Unemployment 6.7 5.4 7.0 7.0 7.0 4.1
(e)

Rate
(%)

2.63 1.89 1.89 1.87 1.66 0.86
(e)
Notes:1. Estimates of labour force and employment are on usual status concept and pertain to 15 yearsand above.2. Figures in brackets are compound growth rates in the preceding period.
	
(a) As on 1st January(b) As on 1st July(c) Population at the terminal year of the plan(d) Required to attain near full employment.(e) Unemployment reduces to negligible level by the year 2007 	  (f) Labour force, employment and unemployment are stated as annual averages during the Plan period.

Former BSP member Isham Singh disqualified from Rajya Sabha


New Delhi, Oct 17 (ANI): Former Bahujan Samaj Party (BSP) member Isham
Singh has been disqualified from the membership of the Rajya Sabha as
of July 4, 2008.
Rajya Sabha Chairman Mohammad Hamid Ansari today gave a ruling to this
effect in the House, after giving the entire background of the case.
Ansari said that he came to his conclusion after going through the case
thoroughly and listening to both sides.
In 2006, Singh had floated his own party against the interests of the
BSP. (ANI)

The Ease of
Serene Calm:

A radiant deity once asked the
Buddha:
Those who
dwell deep in the forest,
Peacefully living the Noble life,
Eating only a single meal a day,
Why is their appearance so serene?

The Blesses Buddha responded:
They do not trouble
over the past,
Nor do they crave for any future,
They live just with what is present,
Therefore are their looks so serene!

By urging towards the yet unreal
future,


By longing back into a forever lost past,


Fools verily dry up and wither away,


Like a green creeper cut at the root…



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