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10/01/11
392 LESSON 02 10 2011-Duggata Sutta: Fallen on Hard Times
Filed under: General
Posted by: @ 7:39 pm

392 LESSON
02 10 2011

Duggata
Sutta: Fallen on Hard Times

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The Narratives for the Levels
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Unraveling Logic in Buddhist Texts II


SN 15.11

PTS: S ii
186

CDB i 657

Duggata Sutta: Fallen on
Hard Times

translated from the Pali
by

Thanissaro Bhikkhu

©
1997–2011

At Savatthi. There the Blessed One said: “From an
inconstruable beginning comes transmigration. A beginning point is not evident,
though beings hindered by ignorance and fettered by craving are transmigrating
& wandering on. When you see someone who has fallen on hard times,
overwhelmed with hard times, you should conclude: ‘We, too, have experienced
just this sort of thing in the course of that long, long time.’

“Why
is that? From an inconstruable beginning comes transmigration. A beginning
point is not evident, though beings hindered by ignorance and fettered by
craving are transmigrating & wandering on. Long have you thus experienced
stress, experienced pain, experienced loss, swelling the cemeteries — enough to
become disenchanted with all fabricated things, enough to become dispassionate,
enough to be released.”

DOB 551 Unraveling Logic in Buddhist Texts II - 1 credit

Delivery Mode: Residential

Course Description:

This course is a sequel to
Unraveling Logic in Buddhist Texts I and continues training in

understanding the logical arguments
found in classic Buddhist texts and oral teachings.

Of the three types of reasons, the
emphasis will be on the reasons of non-observation

and the reasons of results. We will
also work with the approach to debate that utilizes

prasangas, or
absurd consequences, that along with the reasons of non-observation are

the main reasonings used in
Madhyamaka treatises.

Prerequisite: DOB 550

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