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Paṭisambhidā Jāla-Abaddha Paripanti Tipiṭaka Anvesanā ca Paricaya Nikhilavijjālaya ca ñātibhūta Pavatti Nissāya 
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10/27/11
419 LESSON 28 10 2011 Ekaputta Sutta The Only Son
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419 LESSON 28 10 2011 Ekaputta Sutta The Only Son


 

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Ekaputta Sutta

The Only Son

Translated from the Pali by

Thanissaro Bhikkhu

I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying near Savatthi, in Jeta’s Grove, Anathapindika’s monastery. Now at that time the dear and beloved only son of a certain lay follower had died. So a large number of lay followers — their clothes wet, their hair wet — went to the Blessed One in the middle of the day and, on arrival, having bowed down to him, sat to one side. As they were sitting there the Blessed One said to them: “Why have you come here — your clothes wet, your hair wet — in the middle of the day?”

When this was said, the lay follower said to the Blessed One, “My dear and beloved only son has died. This is why we have come here — our clothes wet, our hair wet — in the middle of the day.”

Then, on realizing the significance of that, the Blessed One on that occasion exclaimed:

Tied down by what’s dear & alluring,

heavenly beings, most people,

worn out with misery,

fall under the sway of the King of Death.

But those who, day & night,

heedfully abandon what’s dear,

dig up misery

by the root —

         Death’s bait

         so hard

         to overcome.

DOB 690 Pramānavārttika: The Ocean of the Texts on Reasoning I - 2 credits

Delivery Mode: Residential & Online

Course Description:

This course is an in-depth study of Pramānavārttika by Dharmakīrti (ca. 7th century) -

the influential work of Buddhist Pramāna tradition - based on commentaries by the

Seventh Karmapa, Chödrak Gyamtso (1454–1506) and Sakya Pandita (1182–1251). We

will explore the first two chapters: establishing the Buddha as a source of valid cognition,

and exposition of direct perception.

Prerequisite: BUD 630

BUD 691 Pramānavārttika: The Ocean of the Texts on Reasoning II - 2 credits

Delivery Mode: Residential & Online

Course Description:

 

This course is a continuation of the in-depth study of Pramānavārttika by Dharmakīrti

(ca. 7th century) - the influential work of Buddhist Pramāna tradition - based on

commentaries by the Seventh Karmapa, Chödrak Gyamtso (1454–1506) and Sakya

Pandita (1182–1251). We will continue the exploration of the second chapter on direct

perception and conclude with chapters three and four which present inference for oneself

and inference of others.

Prerequisite: BUD 690

1.3.2 Advanced Curriculum: Second Turning

 

DOB 700 Madhyamakāvatāra: The Chariot of the Takpo Kagyü Siddhas I - 2 credits

Delivery Mode: Residential & Online

Course Description:

This course is an in-depth study of Chandrakīrti’s Madhyamakāvatāra based on the

commentary by the Eight Karmapa, Mikyö Dorje (1507-1554). We will begin with the

presentation of the Madhyamaka of the model texts followed by a close examination of

the first five Madhyamakāvatāra’s chapters correlated with the first five bodhisattva

bhūmis. Several difficult points will be covered such as the three reasons which prove

that arhats realize selflessness of person.

Prerequisite: BUD 691

BUD 701 Madhyamakāvatāra: The Chariot of the Takpo Kagyü Siddhas II - 2 credits

Delivery Mode: Residential & Online

Course Description:

This course is a continuation of the in-depth study of Chandrakīrti’s Madhyamakāvatāra

based on the commentary by the Eight Karmapa, Mikyö Dorje (1507-1554). We will study

the first part of the sixth chapter on the pāramitā of prajñā which primarily deals with the

reasoning refuting arising from the four extremes. The difficult points covered include the

prāsangika-svātantrika distinction as well as the presentation of the two truths.

Prerequisite: BUD 700

BUD 702 Madhyamakāvatāra: The Chariot of the Takpo Kagyü Siddhas III - 2 credits

Delivery Mode: Residential & Online

Course Description:

This course is a continuation of the in-depth study of Chandrakīrti’s Madhyamakāvatāra

based on the commentary by the Eight Karmapa, Mikyö Dorje (1507-1554). We will

complete the bulk of the sixth chapter on the pāramitā of prajñā. The topics covered

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418 LESSON 27 10 2011 KOSALA SUTTA The Kosalan
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Posted by: site admin @ 1:49 am

418 LESSON 27 102011  Kosala Sutta The Kosalan


FREE ONLINE eNālandā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY

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The Narratives for the Levels of Departmental Curricula- Course Descriptions-

AN 5.49

PTS: A iii 57

Kosala Sutta: The Kosalan

translated from the Pali by

Thanissaro Bhikkhu

© 1997–2011

Alternate translation: Hecker/Khema

Translator’s note: This discourse gives the Buddha’s recommendations for how to deal with grief. The passage discussing eulogies, chants, etc., is a reference to funeral customs designed to channel the feelings of the bereaved in a productive direction. As the Buddha notes, as long as these seem to be serving a purpose, engage in them. Once they no longer seem to be serving a purpose, and one finds that one is indulging in grief, one should return to the important duties of one’s life.

Once the Blessed One was staying near Savatthi in Jeta’s Grove, Anathapindika’s monastery. Then King Pasenadi the Kosalan went to the Blessed One and, on arrival, having bowed down, sat to one side. Now, at that time Queen Mallika died. Then a certain man went to the king and whispered in his ear: “Your majesty, Queen Mallika has died.” When this was said, King Pasenadi the Kosalan sat there miserable, sick at heart, his shoulders drooping, his face down, brooding, at a loss for words. Then the Blessed One saw the king sitting there miserable, sick at heart… at a loss for words, and so said to him, “There are these five things, great king, that cannot be gotten by a contemplative, a priest, a deva, a Mara, a Brahma, or anyone at all in the world. Which five?

“‘May what is subject to aging not age.’ This is something that cannot be gotten by a contemplative, a priest, a deva, a Mara, a Brahma, or anyone at all in the world.

“‘May what is subject to illness not grow ill.’ This is something that cannot be gotten by a contemplative, a priest, a deva, a Mara, a Brahma, or anyone at all in the world.

“‘May what is subject to death not die.’ This is something that cannot be gotten by a contemplative, a priest, a deva, a Mara, a Brahma, or anyone at all in the world.

“‘May what is subject to ending not end.’ This is something that cannot be gotten by a contemplative, a priest, a deva, a Mara, a Brahma, or anyone at all in the world.

“‘May what is subject to destruction not be destroyed.’ This is something that cannot be gotten by a contemplative, a priest, a deva, a Mara, a Brahma, or anyone at all in the world.

“Now, it happens to an uninstructed run-of-the-mill person that something that is subject to aging ages. With the aging of what is subject to aging, he does not reflect: ‘It doesn’t happen only to me that what is subject to aging will age. To the extent that there are beings — past & future, passing away & re-arising — it happens to all of them that what is subject to aging will age. And if, with the aging of what is subject to aging, I were to sorrow, grieve, lament, beat my breast, & become distraught, food would not agree with me, my body would become unattractive, my affairs would go untended, my enemies would be gratified and my friends unhappy.’ So, with the aging of what is subject to aging, he sorrows, grieves, laments, beats his breast, & becomes distraught. This is called an uninstructed run-of-the-mill person pierced by the poisoned arrow of sorrow, tormenting himself.

“Furthermore, it happens to an uninstructed run-of-the-mill person that something that is subject to illness grows ill… that something subject to death dies… that something subject to ending ends… that something subject to destruction is destroyed. With the destruction of what is subject to destruction, he does not reflect: ‘It doesn’t happen only to me that what is subject to destruction will be destroyed. To the extent that there are beings — past & future, passing away & re-arising — it happens to all of them that what is subject to destruction will be destroyed. And if, with the destruction of what is subject to destruction, I were to sorrow, grieve, lament, beat my breast, & become distraught, food would not agree with me, my body would become unattractive, my affairs would go untended, my enemies would be gratified and my friends unhappy.’ So, with the destruction of what is subject to destruction, he sorrows, grieves, laments, beats his breast, & becomes distraught. This is called an uninstructed run-of-the-mill person pierced by the poisoned arrow of sorrow, tormenting himself.

“Now, it happens to a well-instructed disciple of the noble ones that something that is subject to aging ages. With the aging of what is subject to aging, he reflects: ‘It doesn’t happen only to me that what is subject to aging will age. To the extent that there are beings — past & future, passing away & re-arising — it happens to all of them that what is subject to aging will age. And if, with the aging of what is subject to aging, I were to sorrow, grieve, lament, beat my breast, & become distraught, food would not agree with me, my body would become unattractive, my affairs would go untended, my enemies would be gratified and my friends unhappy.’ So, with the aging of what is subject to aging, he does not sorrow, grieve, or lament, does not beat his breast or become distraught. This is called a well-instructed disciple of the noble ones who has pulled out the poisoned arrow of sorrow pierced with which the uninstructed run-of-the-mill person torments himself. Sorrowless, arrowless, the disciple of the noble ones is totally unbound right within himself.

“Furthermore, it happens to a well-instructed disciple of the noble ones that something that is subject to illness grows ill… that something subject to death dies… that something subject to ending ends… that something subject to destruction is destroyed. With the destruction of what is subject to destruction, he reflects: ‘It doesn’t happen only to me that what is subject to destruction will be destroyed. To the extent that there are beings — past & future, passing away & re-arising — it happens to all of them that what is subject to destruction will be destroyed. And if, with the destruction of what is subject to destruction, I were to sorrow, grieve, lament, beat my breast, & become distraught, food would not agree with me, my body would become unattractive, my affairs would go untended, my enemies would be gratified and my friends unhappy.’ So, with the destruction of what is subject to destruction, he does not sorrow, grieve, or lament, does not beat his breast or become distraught. This is called a well-instructed disciple of the noble ones who has pulled out the poisoned arrow of sorrow pierced with which the uninstructed run-of-the-mill person torments himself. Sorrowless, arrowless, the disciple of the noble ones is totally unbound right within himself.

“These are the five things, great king, that cannot be gotten by a contemplative, a priest, a deva, a Mara, a Brahma, or anyone at all in the world.”

Not by sorrowing, not by lamenting, is any aim accomplished here, not even a bit. Knowing you’re sorrowing & in pain, your enemies are gratified. But when a sage with a sense for determining what is his aim doesn’t waver in the face of misfortune, his enemies are pained, seeing his face unchanged, as of old. Where & however an aim is accomplished through eulogies, chants, good sayings, donations, & family customs, follow them diligently there & that way. But if you discern that your own aim or that of others is not gained in this way, acquiesce [to the nature of things] unsorrowing, with the thought: ‘What important work am I doing now?’

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