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434 LESSON 12 11 2011 Gopaka Moggallana Sutta Moggallana the Guardsman- Please watch Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister and nest Prime Minister of PraBuddha Bharath Ms Mayawati’s press conference on all National News Channels betwn 11AM & 12noon on 12&13 Nov.& see her highly performing best & meritorious Governance.
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432 and 433 LESSONS 10 and 11 11 2011 Aneñja sappaya Sutta Conducive to the Imperturbable Udana Sutta Exclamation
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432 and 433 LESSONS  10 and 11 11 2011 Aneñja sappaya Sutta
Conducive to the Imperturbable Udana Sutta Exclamation

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 LESSON 432 and 433

Practice a Sutta a Day Keeps Dukkha Away



PTS: M ii 261

Aneñja-sappaya Sutta: Conducive to the
Imperturbable

translated from the Pali by

Thanissaro Bhikkhu

© 2002–2011

I have heard that on one
occasion the Blessed One was staying in the Kuru country. Now
there is a town of the Kurus called Kammasadhamma. There the Blessed One
addressed the monks: “Monks!”

“Yes, lord,”
the monks responded.

The Blessed One said:
“Monks, sensuality is inconstant, hollow, vain, deceptive. It is illusory,
the babble of fools. Sensuality here & now; sensuality in lives to come;
sensual perceptions here & now; sensual perceptions in lives to come: both
are Mara’s realm, Mara’s domain, Mara’s bait, Mara’s range.
They lead to these evil, unskillful mental states: greed, ill will, &
contentiousness. They arise for the obstruction of a disciple of the noble ones
here in training.

“In that case, the
disciple of the noble ones considers this: ‘Sensuality here & now;
sensuality in lives to come; sensual perceptions here & now; sensual
perceptions in lives to come: both are Mara’s realm, Mara’s domain, Mara’s
bait, Mara’s range. They lead to these evil, unskillful mental states: greed,
ill will, & contentiousness. They arise for the obstruction of a disciple
of the noble ones here in training. What if I — overpowering the world [of the
five senses] and having determined my mind — were to dwell with an awareness
that was abundant & enlarged? Having done so, these evil, unskillful mental
states — greed, ill will, & contentiousness — would not come into being.
With their abandoning, my mind would become unlimited, immeasurable, & well
developed.’ Practicing & frequently abiding in this way, his mind acquires
confidence in that dimension. There being full confidence, he either attains
the imperturbable now or else is committed to discernment. With the break-up of
the body, after death, it’s possible that this leading-on consciousness of his
will go to the imperturbable. This is declared to be the first practice
conducive to the imperturbable.

“Then again, the
disciple of the noble ones considers this: ‘Sensuality here & now;
sensuality in lives to come; sensual perceptions here & now; sensual perceptions
in lives to come: whatever is form, every form, is the four great elements or a
form derived from the four great elements.’ Practicing & frequently abiding
in this way, his mind acquires confidence in that dimension. There being full
confidence, he either attains the imperturbable now or else is committed to
discernment. With the break-up of the body, after death, it’s possible that
this leading-on consciousness of his will go to the imperturbable. This is
declared to be the second practice conducive to the imperturbable.

“Then again, the
disciple of the noble ones considers this: ‘Sensuality here & now;
sensuality in lives to come; sensual perceptions here & now; sensual
perceptions in lives to come; forms here & now; forms in lives to come;
form-perceptions here & now; form-perceptions in lives to come: both are
inconstant. Whatever is inconstant is not worth relishing, is not worth
welcoming, is not worth remaining fastened to.” Practicing &
frequently abiding in this way, his mind acquires confidence in that dimension.
There being full confidence, he either attains the imperturbable now or else is
committed to discernment. With the break-up of the body, after death, it’s
possible that this leading-on consciousness of his will go to the imperturbable.
This is declared to be the third practice conducive to the imperturbable.

“Then again, the
disciple of the noble ones considers this: ‘Sensuality here & now;
sensuality in lives to come; sensual perceptions here & now; sensual
perceptions in lives to come; forms here & now; forms in lives to come;
form-perceptions here & now; form-perceptions in lives to come; perceptions
of the imperturbable: all are perceptions. Where they cease without remainder:
that is peaceful, that is exquisite, i.e., the dimension of nothingness.’
Practicing & frequently abiding in this way, his mind acquires confidence
in that dimension. There being full confidence, he either attains the dimension
of nothingness now or else is committed to discernment. With the break-up of the
body, after death, it’s possible that this leading-on consciousness of his will
go to the dimension of nothingness. This is declared to be the first practice
conducive to the dimension of nothingness.

“Then again, the
disciple of the noble ones, having gone into the wilderness, to the root of a
tree, or into an empty dwelling, considers this: ‘This is empty of self or of
anything pertaining to self.’ Practicing & frequently abiding in this way,
his mind acquires confidence in that dimension. There being full confidence, he
either attains the dimension of nothingness now or else is committed to
discernment. With the break-up of the body, after death, it’s possible that
this leading-on consciousness of his will go to the dimension of nothingness.
This is declared to be the second practice conducive to the dimension of
nothingness.

“Then again, the
disciple of the noble ones considers this: ‘I am not anyone’s anything
anywhere; nor is anything of mine in anyone anywhere.’ Practicing &
frequently abiding in this way, his mind acquires confidence in that dimension.
There being full confidence, he either attains the dimension of nothingness now
or else is committed to discernment. With the break-up of the body, after
death, it’s possible that this leading-on consciousness of his will go to the
dimension of nothingness. This is declared to be the third practice conducive
to the dimension of nothingness.

“Then again, the
disciple of the noble ones considers this: ‘Sensuality here & now;
sensuality in lives to come; sensual perceptions here & now; sensual
perceptions in lives to come; forms here & now; forms in lives to come;
form-perceptions here & now; form-perceptions in lives to come; perceptions
of the imperturbable; perceptions of the dimension of nothingness: all are perceptions.
Where they cease without remainder: that is peaceful, that is exquisite, i.e.,
the dimension of neither perception nor non-perception.’ Practicing &
frequently abiding in this way, his mind acquires confidence in that dimension.
There being full confidence, he either attains the dimension of neither
perception nor non-perception now or else is committed to discernment. With the
break-up of the body, after death, it’s possible that this leading-on
consciousness of his will go to the dimension of neither perception nor
non-perception. This is declared to be the practice conducive to the dimension
of neither perception nor non-perception.

When this was said, Ven.
Ananda said to the Blessed One: “There is the case, lord, where a monk,
having practiced in this way — ‘It should not be, it should not occur to me; it
will not be, it will not occur to me. What is, what has come to be, that I
abandon’ — obtains equanimity. Now, would this monk be totally unbound, or
not?”

“A certain such monk
might, Ananda, and another might not.’

“What is the cause,
what is the reason, whereby one might and another might not?”

“There is the case,
Ananda, where a monk, having practiced in this way — (thinking) ‘It should not
be, it should not occur to me; it will not be, it will not occur to me. What
is, what has come to be, that I abandon’ — obtains equanimity. He relishes that
equanimity, welcomes it, remains fastened to it. As he relishes that
equanimity, welcomes it, remains fastened to it, his consciousness is dependent
on it, is sustained by it (clings to it). With clinging/sustenance, Ananda, a
monk is not totally unbound.”

“Being sustained,
where is that monk sustained?”

“The dimension of
neither perception nor non-perception.”

“Then, indeed, being
sustained, he is sustained by the supreme sustenance.”

“Being sustained,
Ananda, he is sustained by the supreme sustenance; for this — the
dimension of neither perception nor non-perception — is the supreme sustenance.
There is [however] the case where a monk, having practiced in this way — ‘It
should not be, it should not occur to me; it will not be, it will not occur to
me. What is, what has come to be, that I abandon’ — obtains equanimity. He does
not relish that equanimity, does not welcome it, does not remain fastened to
it. As he does not relish that equanimity, does not welcome it, does not remain
fastened to it, his consciousness is not dependent on it, is not sustained by
it (does not cling to it). Without clinging/sustenance, Ananda, a monk is
totally unbound.”

“It’s amazing, lord.
It’s astounding. For truly, the Blessed One has declared to us the way to cross
over the flood by going from one support to the next. But what is the noble
liberation?”

“There is the case,
Ananda, where a disciple of the noble ones considers this: ‘Sensuality here
& now; sensuality in lives to come; sensual perceptions here & now;
sensual perceptions in lives to come; forms here & now; forms in lives to
come; form-perceptions here & now; form-perceptions in lives to come;
perceptions of the imperturbable; perceptions of the dimension of nothingness;
perceptions of the dimension of neither perception nor non-perception: that is
an identity, to the extent that there is an identity. This is deathless: the liberation
of the mind through lack of clinging/sustenance.’

“Now, Ananda, I have
taught the practice conducive to the imperturbable. I have taught the practice
conducive to the dimension of nothingness. I have taught the practice conducive
to the dimension of neither perception nor non-perception. I have taught the
way to cross over the flood by going from one support to the next, the noble
liberation. Whatever a teacher should do — seeking the welfare of his
disciples, out of sympathy for them — that have I done for you. Over there are
the roots of trees; over there, empty dwellings. Practice jhana, Ananda. Don’t
be heedless. Don’t later fall into regret. This is our message to you
all.”

That is what the Blessed
One said. Gratified, Ven. Ananda delighted in the Blessed One’s words.

Note

1.

The “imperturbable” usually
denotes the four formless attainments. In this context, though, it means the
fourth jhana and the first two formless attainments based on it: the dimension
of the infinitude of space and the dimension of the infinitude of
consciousness.

 

SN 22.55

PTS: S iii 55

CDB i 892

Udana Sutta: Exclamation

translated from the Pali by

Thanissaro Bhikkhu

© 1995–2011

At Savatthi.
There the Blessed One exclaimed this exclamation: “‘It should not be, it
should not occur to me;
 it will
not be, it will not occur to me’: a monk set on this would break the [five]
lower fetters.”

When this was said, a certain
monk said to the Blessed One, “In what way would a monk set on this — ‘It
should not be, it should not occur to me; it will not be, it will not occur to
me’ — break the [five] lower fetters?”

“There is the case,
monk, where an uninstructed, run-of-the-mill person — who has no regard for
noble ones, is not well-versed or disciplined in their Dhamma; who has no
regard for men of integrity, is not well-versed or disciplined in their Dhamma
— assumes form to be the self, or the self as possessing form, or form as in
the self, or the self as in form.

“He assumes feeling to
be the self, or the self as possessing feeling, or feeling as in the self, or
the self as in feeling. He assumes perception to be the self, or the self as
possessing perception, or perception as in the self, or the self as in
perception. He assumes (mental) fabrications to be the self, or the self as
possessing fabrications, or fabrications as in the self, or the self as in
fabrications. He assumes consciousness to be the self, or the self as
possessing consciousness, or consciousness as in the self, or the self as in
consciousness.

“He does not discern, as
it actually is, inconstant form as ‘inconstant form.’ He does not discern, as
it actually is, inconstant feeling as ‘inconstant feeling’ … inconstant
perception as ‘inconstant perception’ … inconstant fabrications as ‘inconstant
fabrications’ … inconstant consciousness as ‘inconstant consciousness.’

“He does not discern, as
it actually is, stressful form as ’stressful form’ … stressful feeling as
’stressful feeling’ … stressful perception as ’stressful perception’ …
stressful fabrications as ’stressful fabrications’ … stressful consciousness
as ’stressful consciousness.’

“He does not discern, as
it actually is, not-self form as ‘not-self form’ … not-self feeling as
‘not-self feeling’ … not-self perception as ‘not-self perception’ …
not-self fabrications as ‘not-self fabrications’ … not-self consciousness as
‘not-self consciousness.’

“He does not discern, as
it actually is, fabricated form as ‘fabricated form’ … fabricated feeling as
‘fabricated feeling’ … fabricated perception as ‘fabricated perception’ …
fabricated fabrications as ‘fabricated fabrications’ … fabricated
consciousness as ‘fabricated consciousness.’

“He does not discern, as
it actually is, that ‘form will stop being’ … ‘feeling will stop being’ …
‘perception will stop being’ … ‘fabrications will stop being’ …
‘consciousness will stop being.’

“Now, a well-instructed
disciple of the noble ones — who has regard for nobles ones, is well-versed
& disciplined in their Dhamma; who has regard for men of integrity, is
well-versed & disciplined in their Dhamma — does not assume form to be the
self, or the self as possessing form, or form as in the self, or the self as in
form. He does not assume feeling to be the self… does not assume perception
to be the self … does not assume fabrications to be the self… He does not
assume consciousness to be the self, or the self as possessing consciousness,
or consciousness as in the self, or the self as in consciousness.

“He discerns, as it actually
is, inconstant form as ‘inconstant form’ … inconstant feeling as ‘inconstant
feeling’ … inconstant perception as ‘inconstant perception’ … inconstant
fabrications as ‘inconstant fabrications’ … inconstant consciousness as
‘inconstant consciousness.’

“He discerns, as it
actually is, stressful form as ’stressful form’ … stressful feeling as
’stressful feeling’ … stressful perception as ’stressful perception’ …
stressful fabrications as ’stressful fabrications’ … stressful consciousness
as ’stressful consciousness.’

“He discerns, as it
actually is, not-self form as ‘not-self form’ … not-self feeling as ‘not-self
feeling’ … not-self perception as ‘not-self perception’ … not-self
fabrications as ‘not-self fabrications’ … not-self consciousness as ‘not-self
consciousness.’

“He discerns, as it
actually is, fabricated form as ‘fabricated form’ … fabricated feeling as
‘fabricated feeling’ … fabricated perception as ‘fabricated perception’ …
fabricated fabrications as ‘fabricated fabrications’ … fabricated
consciousness as ‘fabricated consciousness.’

“He discerns, as it
actually is, that ‘form will stop being’ … ‘feeling will stop being’ …
‘perception will stop being’ … ‘fabrications will stop being’ …
‘consciousness will stop being.’

“From the stopping of
form, from the stopping of feeling … of perception … of fabrications … of
consciousness, a monk set on this — ‘It should not be, it should not occur to
me; it will not be, it will not occur to me’ — would break the [five] lower
fetters.”

“Lord, a monk set on
this would break the [five] lower fetters. But for one knowing in what way,
seeing in what way, is there the immediate ending of fermentations?”

“There is the case where
an uninstructed run-of-the-mill person … falls into fear over what is not
grounds for fear. There is fear for an uninstructed run-of-the-mill person [who
thinks], ‘It should not be, it should not occur to me; it will not be, it will
not occur to me.’ But an instructed disciple of the noble ones does not fall
into fear over what is not grounds for fear. There is no fear for an instructed
disciple of the noble ones [who thinks], ‘It should not be, it should not occur
to me; it will not be, it will not occur to me.’

“Should consciousness,
when standing (still), stand attached to (a physical) form, supported by form
(as its object), established on form, watered with delight, it would exhibit
growth, increase, & proliferation.

“Should consciousness,
when standing (still), stand attached to feeling, supported by feeling (as its
object), established on feeling, watered with delight, it would exhibit growth,
increase, & proliferation.

“Should consciousness,
when standing (still), stand attached to perception, supported by perception
(as its object), established on perception, watered with delight, it would
exhibit growth, increase, & proliferation.

“Should consciousness,
when standing (still), stand attached to fabrications, supported by
fabrications (as its object), established on fabrications, watered with
delight, it would exhibit growth, increase, & proliferation.

“Were someone to say, ‘I
will describe a coming, a going, a passing away, an arising, a growth, an
increase, or a proliferation of consciousness apart from form, from feeling,
from perception, from fabrications,’ that would be impossible.

“If a monk abandons
passion for the property of form …

“If a monk abandons
passion for the property of feeling …

“If a monk abandons
passion for the property of perception …

“If a monk abandons
passion for the property of fabrications …

“If a monk abandons
passion for the property of consciousness, then owing to the abandonment of
passion, the support is cut off, and there is no base for consciousness.
Consciousness, thus unestablished, not proliferating, not performing any
function, is released. Owing to its release, it stands still. Owing to its
stillness, it is contented. Owing to its contentment, it is not agitated. Not
agitated, he (the monk) is totally unbound right within. He discerns that
‘Birth is ended, the holy life fulfilled, the task done. There is nothing
further for this world.’

“For one knowing in this
way, seeing in this way, monk, there is the immediate ending of
fermentations.”

Notes

1.

I.e., “should not be mine.”

2.

I.e., “will not be mine.”

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POLITICS IS SACRED
WITH HIGHLY PERFORMING BEST AND MERITORIOUS GOVERNANCE OF UP CM MAYAWATI JI


 


Mayawati’s Proposed
division of UP into 4 states


LUCKNOW: Chief
Minister Mayawati has proposed division of Uttar
Pradesh into four smaller states. She is expected to table a motion on this in
the winter session of the assembly which starts on November 21.


 


The move is aimed
at turning the focus on the Congress-led central government.


 


Congress would
come under intense pressure if the UP assembly passes a motion for the division
of the state, as the onus would then be with the UPA government, already in a bind over the
demand for creation of Telangana state.




BSP aims to corner
SP too, which has been constantly opposing UP’s division, Mayawati is aware
that the Centre would have a hard time either accepting or rejecting the motion
passed by the assembly. Even if the central government accepts, most of the
credit would go to Mayawati, as she has been demanding division of UP into four
smaller states for the last five years and has written several letters to the
prime minister on this.


 


Also the process
for creation of new states is long-drawn and any delay would result in the UPA
government being portrayed as the spoiler of the show, rather than Mayawati.


 


On the other hand,
if the UPA government rejects the proposal, Mayawati aims to garner the
goodwill of the people as the only chief minister who is committed to the
cause. UP is being proposed to be divided into four smaller states.




Harit Pradesh
comprising 22 districts in west-UP, Bundelkhand with 7 districts in the
most-backward region of the state, Poorvanchal comprising 32 districts in the
eastern part and central UP, with the remaining 14 districts.




Congress is on the
verge of sealing a pre-poll pact with Ajit Singh’s RLD who has some influence
in western UP, and has been an ardent campaigner for Harit Pradesh’s creation.




Mayawati seeks to
blunt any advantages Congress will have from the alliance with RLD by turning
the new champion of Harit Pradesh.




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