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11/27/11
449 and 450 LESSONS 27 and 28 11 2011 Hatthaka Sutta About Hatthaka 1 and II
Filed under: General
Posted by: @ 9:23 pm

449 and 450
LESSONS 27 and 28 11 2011
Hatthaka Sutta About Hatthaka 1 and II

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 LESSON 449 and 450


Practice a Sutta a Day Keeps
Dukkha Away



AN 8.23


PTS: A iv 216


Hatthaka
Sutta: About Hatthaka (1)


translated
from the Pali by


Thanissaro
Bhikkhu


© 2004–2011


Translator’s note: On the surface, the
qualities the Buddha attributes to Hatthaka in this sutta do not seem
especially “amazing” or “astounding.” Keep in mind,
however, that the Canon depicts Hatthaka as very wealthy, and the Commentary
adds that he is a prince. To find such qualities in a person of power and
wealth is fairly amazing.


On one occasion the Blessed One was staying near Alavi
at the Aggalava Shrine. There he addressed the monks:
“Monks, remember Hatthaka of Alavi as being endowed with seven amazing,
astounding qualities. Which seven? Monks, Hatthaka of Alavi is endowed with
conviction. He is virtuous. He has a sense of conscience. He has a sense of
concern.[1]

He is learned. He is generous. He is discerning. Remember Hatthaka of Alavi as
being endowed with these seven amazing, astounding qualities.”


That is what the Blessed One said. Having said it, the One
Well-gone, getting up from his seat, went into his dwelling.


Then early in the morning a certain monk, having put on his
robes and carrying his bowl & outer robe, went to Hatthaka of Alavi’s home.
On arrival, he sat down on a seat made ready. Then Hatthaka of Alavi approached
the monk and, having bowed down to him, sat to one side. As he was sitting
there the monk said to him, “Friend, the Blessed One has described you as
being endowed with seven amazing, astounding qualities. Which seven? ‘Hatthaka
of Alavi is endowed with conviction. He is virtuous. He has a sense of
conscience. He has a sense of concern. He is learned. He is generous. He is discerning.’
Friend, the Blessed One has described you as being endowed with these seven
amazing, astounding qualities.”


“I hope, sir, that there were no white-clad householders
there.”


“No, friend, there were no white-clad householders
there.”


“It’s good, sir, that there were no white-clad householders
there.”


Then the monk, having received alms at Hatthaka of Alavi’s home,
departed. After his meal, returning from his alms round, he went to the Blessed
One. On arrival, having bowed down to the Blessed One, he sat to one side. As
he was sitting there, [he told the Blessed One what had happened.]


[The Blessed One replied:] “It’s good, monk, it’s very good
that the clansman is modest and does not want others to know of the skillful
qualities present in him. In that case, monk, remember Hatthaka of Alavi as
being endowed with this eighth amazing, astounding quality: modesty.”

AN 8.24


PTS: A iv 218


Hatthaka
Sutta: About Hatthaka (2)


translated
from the Pali by


Thanissaro
Bhikkhu


© 2004–2011


Translator’s note: The four grounds for the
bonds of fellowship (see AN 4.32) appear in the early Mahayana sutras as
guidelines for every aspiring bodhisattva — one of the few teachings that even
the more radical Mahayana sutras adopt from the early canons. The following
sutta, which maintains that these four qualities are required for developing
any large following, may account for this fact.


On one occasion the Blessed One was staying near Alavi at the
Aggalava Shrine. Then Hatthaka of Alavi, surrounded by approximately 500
[other] lay followers, went to the Blessed One. On arrival, having bowed down
to the Blessed One, he sat to one side. As he was sitting there the Blessed One
said to him, “Large is your following, Hatthaka. How have you won over
this large following?”


“Lord, I have won over this large following through the four
grounds for the bonds of fellowship taught by the Blessed One. When I know
that, ‘This person is to be won over by giving,’ then I win him/her over by
giving. When I know that, ‘This person is to be won over by kind words,’ then I
win him/her over by kind words. When I know that, ‘This person is to be won
over by beneficial help,’ then I win him/her over by beneficial help.[1] When I know that, ‘This person is to be won
over by consistency,’ then I win him/her over by consistency.[2]

Awed by the wealth of my family, they regard me as worth listening to, which
would not be the case if I were poor.”


“It’s good, Hatthaka, it’s very good that this is the means by
which you have won over a large following. All those in the past who have won
over a large following have done so by means of these four same grounds for the
bonds of fellowship. All those in the future who will win over a large
following will do so by means of these four same grounds for the bonds of
fellowship. All those at present who are winning over a large following do so
by means of these four same grounds for the bonds of fellowship.”


Then, having been instructed, urged, roused, & encouraged by the
Blessed One with a talk on Dhamma, Hatthaka of Alavi got up from his seat,
bowed down to the Blessed One, circled him — keeping him on his right — and
left. Not long after he had left, the Blessed One said to the monks,
“Monks, remember Hatthaka of Alavi as being endowed with eight amazing,
astounding qualities. Which eight? Hatthaka of Alavi is endowed with
conviction. He is virtuous. He has a sense of conscience. He has a sense of
concern (for the results of unskillful actions). He is learned. He is generous.
He is discerning. He is modest. Remember Hatthaka of Alavi as being endowed
with these eight amazing, astounding qualities.”

VOICE
OF SARVAJAN

Fwd: Dr B R Ambedkar - Proposed
personality for your next project of wax figures for the 2013-2014 commissions
at the Madame-Tussauds

shivaram ramaiah

shivramaiah@gmail.com

VERY URGENT & IMPORTANT

  

 

Dear Brothers and Sisters,

 

Please peruse the following correspondence between one of
our members, Mr. Pirthi Kaeley and Liz Edwards, PR Manager, Madame-Tussauds
regarding commissioning of Dr Ambedkar’s statue in the Madame-Tussauds’ gallery.
I request you, your organisation, your  friends , and your contacts to
write to Madame-Tussauds’ and support this project for inclusion of ‘Dr. B R
Ambedkar’
in their next project. The contact details of Madame-Tussauds and
their website are given below.

 

You can also recommend/ vote Dr. Ambedkar on their
facebook website. Dr. Ambedkar’s  name will be shortlisted on the basis of
support he gets from all of you and as many people.  In addition to
writing to  Madame Tussauds, It is also important to follow the facebook
link  and suggest/recommend that there should be a Wax figure of Dr B R
Ambedkar at the Madame-Tussauds. 

 

 

Madame-Tussauds Facebook link:  https://www.facebook.com/officialmadametussaudslondon?sk=wall

 

Contact Details for Madame-Tussauds:

Liz Edwards

PR
Manager - Madame Tussauds London

Madame
Tussauds
Marylebone Road
London, NW1 5LR

e-mail:
liz.edwards@madame-tussauds.com

 

Please forward this message to your contacts and of their
contacts as many as possible.

 

With kindest Regards,

Arun Kumar

General Secretary

Dr. Ambedkar Mission Society, Bedford.

 

NB: Please also feel free to browse the following links
for Madame-Tussauds below:

Web Links:

Visit us across the globe: http://www.madametussauds.com/

London: http://www.madametussauds.com/London/Default.aspx

 

From: P.Kaeley [mailto:p.kaeley28a11@sky.com]

Sent: Tuesday, 22 November, 2011 1:33 PM
To: ‘Liz Edwards’
Subject: Proposed personality for your next project of figures for the
2013-2014 commissions at the Madame-Tussauds

 

Dear Liz,

Thank you for a prompt reply.

I wish to propose the name of ‘Dr Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar’
to be added to the figures along with the other prominent world leaders, who
has made the difference for the betterment of  the humanity worldwide,
especially for the rights of the women and the oppressed peoples around the
globe including India.  Below is the brief summary of his life and
contributions to the humanity as a whole:

Dr. Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar

I wish to draw your attention to a great personality, Dr.
Bheem Ramji Ambedkar, popularly also known as Babasaheb Ambedkar
. He was one among the tallest leaders in the world who
fought for the dignity of all humans irrespective of all artificial barriers –
caste, race, gender, religion, ethnicity etc. He is no less in stature than
Dr King, Nelson Mandela, or anyone else who fought for the human dignity.
Lately he is becoming a
world phenomenon and the oppressed people across the Globe get inspiration from
him. Whole of his life he struggled for the basic human rights of millions of
people living in the Indian sub-continent. Schools opened in the name of Ambedkar
in Hungary by the Roma community are an evidence of his growing popularity.
Contribution of Dr. Ambedkar to eradicate
caste based discrimination (CBD) and his work to improve the conditions of
nearly 200 million oppressed people in India alone are being recognised in
academic and political circles not only in India but also all over the world.
On the demand of Dalit network Netherlands, on 30th June, 2011, Dutch
Parliament adopted a motion by two third majorities requesting the Minister of
Foreign Affairs to continue an active approach to combat CBD and improving the
position of over 300 million Dalits in South Asian countries. It was also
requested to raise issue on the European Union, UN organisations, the World
Bank and the International Monetary Fund. Parliament was further asked to
accept Ambedkar Principles framed by International Dalit Solidarity
Network, Netherlands as an integral part of the Corporate Social Responsibility
(CSR) policy of Dutch and the European companies including in the supply chain
who are active in the countries where CBD is practised.

Dr. Ambedkar was an Indian jurist, political leader, philosopher, thinker, anthropologist, historian, orator,
prolific writer, economist, scholar, editor, a revolutionary and one of the
founding fathers of independent India. He was born as untouchable community
which is considered inherently so much low and inferior that their mere shadow
polluted others. Overcoming numerous social and financial obstacles, Ambedkar
became one of the first so-called outcastes to obtain a college education in
India and earning law degrees and multiple doctorates for his study and
research in law, economics and political science from Columbia University and the London School of Economics
Despite all his learning, he was still considered low. He
fought ideological wars with his opponents (including Gandhi) to get minimum
human rights for his people. Overcoming all prejudices, he became the
Chairman of the Drafting
Committee of the Indian Constitution and
which
was adopted on January 26, 1950
.
Ambedkar’s work on the constitution provided the legal framework for the
abolition of many oppressive features of Indian society and transformed the
lives of over three hundred million people by abolishing age old scourge of
humanity- Untouchability in modern India.

Ambedkar gave
preference to social reforms over political reforms. After his education in
London, he started a social movement to improve the conditions and social
status of Untouchables. He started newspapers and authored many books to
highlight the plight of untouchables. As they were not allowed to enter into
temples and fetch water from common water tanks, he started campaign to enter
into these places and drink water. Their admission in schools was prohibited.
In 1927, he led the Mahad March at the Chowdar Tank at Colaba, near Bombay, to
give the untouchables the right to draw water from the public tank where he
burnt copies of the ‘Manusmriti’ (a Hindu scripture advocating caste
based discrimination) publicly. This marked the beginning of the anti-caste and
anti-priest movement. The temple entry movement launched by Dr. Ambedkar in
1930 at ‘Kalaram Temple’, Nasik is another landmark in the struggle for human
rights and social justice His campaign caught the attention of Gandhi and he
also started talking about it. But unfortunately he was only
against untouchability but supported caste system where Dr. Ambedkar differed
from him.

Dr. Ambedkar,
organised the Independent Labour Party, participated in the provincial
elections and was elected to the Bombay Legislative Assembly. During these days
he stressed the need for abolition of the feudal system and pleaded for
workers’ right to strike.

 

He
attended all Round Tables Conferences held in London to negotiate more
political rights to the Indians. Each time, he forcefully projected his
views in the interest of the ‘untouchable’. He also exhorted the downtrodden
sections to raise their living standards and to acquire as much political power
as possible.  In 1930s, the British government set up Simon Commission
to give representation in the government to various groups. Ambedkar pleaded
his case for the untouchables. The British Prime Minister, Ramsay McDonald
announced the findings of the Commission and as a result several communities
including the ‘depressed classes’(Untouchables) were given the right to have
separate electorates. As a Hindu leader, Gandhiji didn’t want to see the Hindu
community divided and went on a fast unto death to oppose it. Pressure was
put on Ambedkar to abandon his demand and save Gandhi’s life. Consequently on
24th September 1932, Dr. Ambedkar and Gandhi reached an agreement by which
reservations (quotas) were provided for untouchables in Government jobs and
legislative assemblies. Gandhi very cunningly was successful in stopping
untouchables electing their own representatives to voice their concerns. But
the agreement carved out a clear and definite position for the downtrodden on
the political scene of the country. It opened up opportunities of education and
government services for them and also gave them a right to vote.

 

During
the Second World War, he called upon Indians to join the Army in large
numbers to defeat Nazism, which he said, was another name for Fascism.

Before
Independence of India, Ambedkar was appointed the Labour Minister in the
Viceroy’s Council. As a Labour Minister, he fixed the working hours of the
labourers. He also stopped pregnant women working in the mine industry

As Law Minister in
the Independent India, he framed a Hindu Code Bill by which an Indian women
received an equal rights at par with men. For the first time she could inherit
the parents property. She was given a right to divorce to leave an unhappy
married life. Because of the pressure from the conservative Hindus, the
government was not prepared to pass this bill. Rather than compromising on this
issue, he resigned from the government. Later on this bill was passed in
instalments.

In 1952, Columbia
University from where he earned his MA in 1915 and PhD in 1927 presented him
with an honorary doctorate for his service as “a great social reformer and
a valiant upholder of human rights’. In 1995 a bronze bust of Dr. Ambedkar was
installed in the Lehman library of the Columbia University. Similarly a bronze
bust of Ambedkar also adores the London School of Economics from where he
obtained a DSc degree in Economics. Ambedkar was also
posthumously awarded the Bharat Ratna, India’s highest civilian award,
in 1990.

I hope that the above synopsis should give you the idea
of the proposed personality and hope that you consider the proposal seriously
to do the justice to the contribution he has made to the rights of women and
the oppressed people across the globe.

 

I’m sure that you would carry out your own research on
the proposed personality and come up with the favourable right conclusion and
include ‘Dr B R Ambedkar’ to your next project of figures for the 2013-2014
commissions.

 

I shall look forward to hearing from you.

With Kindest Regards

Pirthi Kaeley

 

NB: I’ve also attached a copy of the above synopsis and a
copy of a brief life & work of the proposed personality as a separate files
for your convenience.

 

From: Liz Edwards [mailto:Liz.Edwards@madame-tussauds.com]
Sent: Monday, 21 November, 2011 2:59 PM
To: P.Kaeley
Subject: RE: How one should go about suggesting the display of next
figures at the Madame-Tussauds?

 

Dear Pirthi

 

Thank you for your email and interest in Madame Tussauds London.

 

I would be delighted to hear your request and then I can add
him/her to the list. We’ve already decided our figures for 2012 and until March
2013 but it’s still great to get feedback from our guests.

 

Best wishes,

 

Liz

 


From: P.Kaeley [mailto:p.kaeley28a11@sky.com]
Sent: 21 November 2011 12:08
To: Liz Edwards
Subject: How one should go about suggesting the display of next figures
at the Madame-Tussauds?

 

Dear Liz Edwards,

 

Regarding the above, would you be so kind to provide me
with the relevant information on the decision process of  who’s figure is
commissioned next and displayed at the ‘Madame-Tussauds’.

 

One of my friend has recently visited the
‘Madame-Tussauds’ at London and there was a message displayed outside asking
the public “Who’s figure you would like to see next at the Madame–Tussauds?”.
I’m not sure of the exact text of the message, but I’m sure you would
understand what I mean.

 

Please advise on how one should go about suggesting the
name of the next important personality/celebrity for his figure to be displayed
at the Madame-Tussauds?

 

Your help in the above would be very much appreciated. I
shall look forward to hearing from you.

Kindest Regards

Pirthi Kaeley






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