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12/14/10
LESSON 111 Bhutamidam Sutta This Has Come Into Being 14 12 2010 FREE ONLINE eNālandā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY-BSP to contest all seats-GOOD GOVERNANCE-Maya demands Chidambaram’s apology-BSP seek Himachal BJP president’s removal-VOICE OF SARVAJAN -SENSITIVE HONEYLEAKS-The BSA Hercules India Cyclothon, an event for professionals and amateurs, is promoted as one of the largest cycling mobilisation initiatives in India and will be held here on January 23.-MANYAWAR KANSHIRAMJI CYCLOTHON AND MEDIOTHONE INITIATIVE CAN GET GREENER and also the MASTERKEY-Did you sleep well last night? Thousands didn’t-Official figures on homeless a gross underestimation-
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LESSON 111 Bhutamidam Sutta This Has Come Into Being 14 12 2010  FREE ONLINE eNālandā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY

Awakeness Practices

All 84,000 Khandas As Found in the Pali Suttas

Traditionally the are 84,000 Dharma Doors - 84,000 ways to get Awakeness. Maybe so; certainly the Buddha taught a large number of practices that lead to Awakeness. This web page attempts to catalogue those found in the Pali Suttas (DN, MN, SN, AN, Ud & Sn 1). There are 3 sections:

The discourses of Buddha are divided into 84,000, as to separate addresses. The division includes all that was spoken by Buddha.”I received from Buddha,” said Ananda, “82,000 Khandas, and  from the priests 2000; these are 84,000 Khandas maintained by me.” They are divided into 275,250, as to the stanzas of the original text, and into 361,550, as to the stanzas of the commentary. All the discourses including both those of Buddha and those of the commentator, are divided  into 2,547 banawaras, containing 737,000 stanzas, and 29,368,000 separate letters.

Course Programs:

SN 12.31 

PTS: S ii 47 

CDB i 566

Bhutamidam Sutta: This Has Come Into Being

translated from the Pali by

Thanissaro Bhikkhu

© 1998–2010

Alternate translation: Nyanaponika

On one occasion the Blessed One was staying near Savatthi in Jeta’s Grove, Anathapindika’s monastery. There he addressed Ven. Sariputta, “Sariputta, it is said in Ajita’s Question in the Way to the Further Shore:[1]

Those here who have fathomed the Dhamma,

          those who are learners,

          those who are run-of-the-mill:

When you, dear sir, astute,

          are asked this,

tell me their manner of life.

“How is the detailed meaning of this brief statement to be understood?”

When this was said, Ven. Sariputta remained silent.

A second time… A third time the Blessed One addressed Ven. Sariputta, “Sariputta, it is said in Ajita’s Question in the Way to the Further Shore:

Those here who have fathomed the Dhamma,

          those who are learners,

          those who are run-of-the-mill:

When you, dear sir, astute,

          are asked this,

tell me their manner of life.

“How is the detailed meaning of this brief statement to be understood?”

A third time, Ven. Sariputta remained silent.

“Do you see, Sariputta, that ‘this has come into being’?”

“One sees with right discernment, lord, that ‘this has come into being.’ Seeing with right discernment that ‘this has come into being,’ one practices for disenchantment with, for dispassion toward, for the cessation of what has come into being. One sees with right discernment that ‘it has come into being from this nutriment.’ Seeing with right discernment that ‘it has come into being from this nutriment,’ one practices for disenchantment with, for dispassion toward, for the cessation of the nutriment by which it has come into being. One sees with right discernment that ‘from the cessation of this nutriment, what has come into being is subject to cessation.’ Seeing with right discernment that ‘from the cessation of this nutriment, what has come into being is subject to cessation,’ one practices for disenchantment with, for dispassion toward, for the cessation of what is subject to cessation. This is how one is a learner.

“And how, lord, is one a person who has fathomed the Dhamma?

“One sees with right discernment, lord, that ‘this has come into being.’ Seeing with right discernment that ‘this has come into being,’ one is — through disenchantment, dispassion, cessation, through lack of clinging/sustenance — released from what has come into being. One sees with right discernment that ‘it has come into being from this nutriment.’ Seeing with right discernment that ‘it has come into being from this nutriment,’ one is — through disenchantment, dispassion, cessation, through lack of clinging/sustenance — released from the nutriment by which it has come into being. One sees with right discernment that ‘from the cessation of this nutriment, what has come into being is subject to cessation.’ Seeing with right discernment that ‘from the cessation of this nutriment, what has come into being is subject to cessation,’ one is — through disenchantment, dispassion, cessation, through lack of clinging/sustenance — released from what is subject to cessation. This is how one is a person who has fathomed the Dhamma.

“It is in this way, lord, that I understand the detailed meaning of the brief statement in Ajita’s Question in the Way to the Further Shore:

Those here who have fathomed the Dhamma,

          those who are learners,

          those who are run-of-the-mill:

When you, dear sir, astute,

          are asked this,

tell me their manner of life.”

“Excellent, Sariputta. Excellent. One sees with right discernment that ‘this has come into being.’ Seeing with right discernment that ‘this has come into being,’ one practices for disenchantment with, for dispassion toward, for the cessation of what has come into being. One sees with right discernment that ‘it has come into being from this nutriment.’ Seeing with right discernment that ‘it has come into being from this nutriment,’ one practices for disenchantment with, for dispassion toward, for the cessation of the nutriment by which it has come into being. One sees with right discernment that ‘from the cessation of this nutriment, what has come into being is subject to cessation.’ Seeing with right discernment that ‘from the cessation of this nutriment, what has come into being is subject to cessation,’ one practices for disenchantment with, for dispassion toward, for the cessation of what is subject to cessation. This is how one is a learner.

“And how is one a person who has fathomed the Dhamma?

“One sees with right discernment that ‘this has come into being.’ Seeing with right discernment that ‘this has come into being,’ one is — through disenchantment, dispassion, cessation, through lack of clinging/sustenance — released from what has come into being. One sees with right discernment that ‘it has come into being from this nutriment.’ Seeing with right discernment that ‘it has come into being from this nutriment,’ one is — through disenchantment, dispassion, cessation, through lack of clinging/sustenance — released from the nutriment by which it has come into being. One sees with right discernment that ‘from the cessation of this nutriment, what has come into being is subject to cessation.’ Seeing with right discernment that ‘from the cessation of this nutriment, what has come into being is subject to cessation,’ one is — through disenchantment, dispassion, cessation, through lack of clinging/sustenance — released from what is subject to cessation. This is how one is a person who has fathomed the Dhamma.

“It is in this way that the detailed meaning of the brief statement in Ajita’s Question in the Way to the Further Shore is to be understood:

Those here who have fathomed the Dhamma,

          those who are learners,

          those who are run-of-the-mill:

When you, dear sir, astute,

          are asked this,

tell me their manner of life.”

Note

1.

See Sn 5.1.

See also: SN 12.11; SN 12.12; SN 12.63; SN 12.64; AN 10.27; The Four Nutriments of Life by Nyanaponika Thera.

BUDDHA (EDUCATE)!               DHAMMA (MEDITATE)!              SANGHA (ORGANISE)!

WISDOM           IS            POWER

Awakened One Shows the Path to Attain Ultimate Bliss

Using such an instrument

The Free ONLINE e-Nālandā Research and Practice University has been re-organized to function through the following Schools of Learning :

Buddha’s Sangha Practiced His Dhamma Free of cost, hence the Free- e-Nālandā Research and Practice University follows suit

As the Original Nālandā University did not offer any Degree, so also the Free  e-Nālandā Research and Practice University.

The teachings of Buddha are eternal, but even then Buddha did not proclaim them to be infallible. The religion of Buddha has the capacity to change according to times, a quality which no other religion can claim to have…Now what is the basis of Buddhism? If you study carefully, you will see that Buddhism is based on reason. There is an element of flexibility inherent in it, which is not found in any other religion.

§  Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar , Indian scholar, philosopher and architect of Constitution of India, in his writing and speeches

I.
KAMMA

REBIRTH

AWAKEN-NESS

BUDDHA

THUS COME ONE

DHAMMA

II.
ARHAT

FOUR HOLY TRUTHS

EIGHTFOLD PATH

TWELVEFOLD CONDITIONED ARISING

BODHISATTVA

PARAMITA

SIX PARAMITAS

III.

SIX SPIRITUAL POWERS

SIX PATHS OF REBIRTH

TEN DHARMA REALMS

FIVE SKANDHAS

EIGHTEEN REALMS

FIVE MORAL PRECEPTS

IV.

MEDITATION

MINDFULNESS

FOUR APPLICATIONS OF MINDFULNESS

LOTUS POSTURE

SAMADHI

CHAN SCHOOL

FOUR JHANAS

FOUR FORMLESS REALMS

V.

FIVE TYPES OF BUDDHIST STUDY AND PRACTICE

MAHAYANA AND HINAYANA COMPARED

PURE LAND

BUDDHA RECITATION

EIGHT CONSCIOUSNESSES

ONE HUNDRED DHARMAS

EMPTINESS

VI.

DEMON

LINEAGE

with

Level I: Introduction to Buddhism

Level II: Buddhist Studies

TO ATTAIN

Level III: Stream-Enterer

Level IV: Once - Returner

Level V: Non-Returner
Level VI: Arhat

Jambudvipa, i.e, PraBuddha Bharath scientific thought in

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Welcome to the Free Online e-Nālandā Research and Practice University

BSP to contest all seats

The Bahujan Samaj Party will contest polls from all the taluk and zilla panchayat constituencies, BSP State president Marasandra Muniyappa said here. Mr. Muniyappa told presspersons on Monday that his party would not join hands with any other political party.

GOOD GOVERNANCE

Maya demands Chidambaram’s apology


Terming Union Home Minister P Chidambaram’s comment on migrants as irresponsible, Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister and BSP supremo Mayawati on Monday asked him to apologise to people of the country.

“Chidambaram’s remarks are irresponsible. He should not only apologise to people of the country but also take back his words immediately,” She said in a statement here.

“People of UP and Bihar will not forget Chidambaram for his comment,” the Chief Minister said.

Talking to reporters in New Delhi earlier in the day on the sidelines of a function, the Home Minister sought to blame migrants for crimes in the national capital.

BSP seek Himachal BJP president’s removal

Himachal unit of  BSP have sought the resignation of BJP state president Khimi Ram over alleged casteist remarks he made against Kulu district BJP president Ram Singh Thakur, who lodged an  FIR against him under HP SC/ST Atrocity Act on Saturday.

In a statement released to media, Bahujan Samaj Party leader Ravi Kumar ‘SC/STs’ deeply opposed the misbehaviour of BJP president, terming his action against his own party leader highly discriminatory.

He said that people of this section were deeply hurt after the alleged remarks of Mr. Ram and other party leader. He also sought immediate removal from his post and also demanded to his resignation on moral grounds. BSP urged the BJP national President Nitin Gadkari to take immediate action in this regard.

As it has been reported that State Bharatiya Janta Party President Khimi Ram and another leader of party were booked under SC & ST Atrocity Act 1989 on the complaint of district party office bearer on Saturday.

Khimi Ram and Local BJP leader Dharamvir Dharmani were booked under Schedule Caste and Schedule Tribe Atrocity Act 1989 for allegedly using derogatory remark against the caste of complainant local party leader of BJP Ram Singh when state BJP president was finalising tickets for Panchayat Raj Candidates of party at Kullu Friday night, Abhishaik Dhular Superintendent Kullu District said.

The complainant is district BJP president, registered his complaint at Kullu Sadar Police Station on Saturday where FIR has been lodged against Khimi Ram and Dharamvir Dharmani.

Mr Khimi ram was elected party president in February 2010 replacing former president Jai Ram Thakur has been elevated to Cabinet Minister in Prem Kumar Dhumal government.

Dharmvir Dharmani has been remained rebel candidate of BJP during last Assembly Elections recently joined the party fold during Lok Sabha Election supporting policies of Prem Kumar Dhumal government.

The incident of casteist remarks broke out after alleged altercation between the party leaders while deciding the candidates for Panchayati Raj and Urban Bodies elections to be held in end of Dec 2010 and Jan 2011 for which nominations is being underway.

VOICE OF SARVAJAN

SENSITIVE HONEYLEAKS

Chinese Ambassador Zhang Yan on Monday termed the India-China ties “very fragile, easy to be damaged and difficult to repair” and called for special care in creating a conducive public environment.

“Efforts should be made on both sides … to create an objective, friendly and mutually trusting environment rather than a wrong projection of each other,” he said at a FICCI seminar here. He wanted both governments to avoid a war of words. A good environment would not only provide the necessary condition for the stable and healthy development of bilateral ties but would also prepare the ground for the settlement of the existing problems.

This race can’t get any greener

Those of you who get misty-eyed about the days you cycled to school, and others who love to pedal away to fitness, it is time to hit the road with the environment-friendly two-wheeler.

The BSA Hercules India Cyclothon, an event for professionals and amateurs, is promoted as one of the largest cycling mobilisation initiatives in India and will be held here on January 23.

In the build-up to the event, lead sponsor TI Cycles’ general manager Rajesh Mani reiterated his company’s support and referred to the previous edition that featured 6,000 participants. “We hope the young and old, students and homemakers contribute to a healthier and greener environment by supporting this event,” Mr. Mani said.

Onkar Singh, a leading official from the Cycle Federation of India, said that the event will increase awareness about cycling.

Registrations are open for the event that features a national race of 50 km for professionals and amateur rides of 25 km and 13 km.

The race will commence at the Karnataka Trade Promotion Organisation in Whitefield in the morning on January 23.

Those fit enough to pedal 50 km in the national race have an added attraction: a total prize money of Rs. 5 lakh that will be be distributed among the top 20. For the rest, it will be about fun and reliving memories of the good old days when the cycle was your trusty steed.

MANYAWAR KANSHIRAMJI CYCLOTHON AND MEDIOTHONE INITIATIVE CAN GET GREENER and also the MASTERKEY

Logon to http://www.bsacyclothon.com/

Did you sleep well last night? Thousands didn’t

NO HOME AND ALONE: By day, the only trace Bangalore's homeless leave behind is the gray ash from their life-sustaining bonfires. — PHOTO: K. MURALI KUMAR

  • The entire cycle of life is consummated on the streets for the homeless
  • As much as 26 per cent of Bangalore’s 18,000 street dwellers are women
  • Like a hesitant tide, they emerge after sundown to occupy spaces that the rest of the city vacates to retreat indoors. And an hour before the crack of dawn, the flood of the homeless hurriedly recedes as the army of working people returns for yet another day’s battle for life and livelihood in the city’s marketplaces and mandis; pavements, playgrounds and parks; railway stations and bus stops; even in the environs of temples, mosques and churchyards.

    By around 5 a.m., it seems as though the bedraggled bodies from the night before never existed. While some of them join the jostle for employment, others throw themselves at the mercy of passersby with loose change to spare. The only trace the city’s homeless leave behind is the gray ash from their life-sustaining bonfires.

    “Summers are a time of plenty,” says Veeranna (40), who has been living on the pavement opposite the metro rail worksite in Kalasipalyam, along with his wife, Lakshmamma (45). He has been on the street for the last 18 years, ever since his brother threw him out of his home after their father’s death. “In the summer, we don’t have to spend so much on firewood, medicines, warm clothes and plastic sheets,” he says.

    “And he drinks less,” quips Lakshmamma.

    Expensive warmth

    Winters are a particularly harsh time. And nobody knows it better than Bibi Jaan (60), who lost her 18-month-old granddaughter to the cold two winters ago. “Every day we have to spend Rs. 30 to buy two such boxes,” she says pointing to a pile of used packing crates. They, of course, will feed the life-sustaining bonfire.

    Her daughter struggles nearby to shove a measure of cough syrup down the throat of her six-month-old son.

    A report compiled by Indo-global Social Service Society, titled “Invisible City-Makers”, estimates that over 4,600 or 26 per cent of the city’s 18,000 street dwellers are women.

    The inescapable functions of the body such as defecating and bathing are the riskiest part of 19-year-old Nazneen’s life on the streets. The newly married girl’s husband Babu Inayath (25) says: “I never let her go alone.” But she complains that he is not always around to accompany her.

    Never known a home

    The entire cycle of life, punctuated by marriage, birth, disease and death is consummated on the streets for people such as Rambo alias Ramu (32) who has never known a home. Recently married, his wedding was arranged in the basement of a commercial complex near Burma Bazaar.

    “The archak charged Rs. 500 and there were 25 guests. We gave the guests food coupons worth Rs. 30 from a nearby Andhra-style hotel,” says his father Nagarajappa (50).

    Near-miracle

    Under such conditions, it is remarkable — almost miraculous — that Veeranna’s youngest son, Gururaju (16), is studying in Class 9. His is one of the thousands of lives salvaged by the Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan.

    Gurumurthy (49) spends five nights in a week sleeping near the KSRTC bus stop or the railway station at Majestic.

    By day, he works as a porter. And for the other two days he goes back home to Tumkur. By following this routine for 30 years he managed to pay for the wedding of his three sisters and his daughter’s education. His daughter Shyla graduated in law four years ago. “She is married and lives separately now,” he says, and adds softly, “We rarely meet.”

    Most of the homeless said that they paid the beat constables between Rs. 5 and 10 daily.

    Official figures on homeless a gross underestimation

    Long after the pandemonium subsides, the narrow thoroughfares in Shivajinagar and the adjoining market areas are home to scores of people who sleep under the open sky. At least a couple of hundreds of men, women and children work in this commercial centre, and “reserve” street corners or pavements to rest at night-time.

    So when the State Government’s survey of the homeless in Bangalore finds that only 588 people are shelterless in the Bangalore East Zone (which has an estimated population of around 19 lakh), it would appear a “gross underestimation”. The survey, conducted in August 2010 in eight Bruhat Bangalore Mahanagara Palike zones, pegs the figure at an unbelievably low 2,868. The number for the State, including eight city corporations, is 7,561.

    In Bangalore, the Mahadevpura zone has the maximum number of homeless (1,612) followed by Bangalore East (588), Bangalore South (222), Yelahanka (133), Bangalore West (117), Bommanahalli (108), Rajarajeshwari Nagar (60) and Dasarahalli (18).

    Just 70 shelters

    These numbers are important, for it will form the basis of the Government’s plans to implement the Supreme Court’s directive to build shelters for the homeless. To be implemented at the earliest in 62 cities, the Supreme Court order specified a ratio of at least one shelter per lakh citizens. By that estimate, the Government decided that Bangalore should build 70 shelters for the homeless.

    Civil society groups have contested the Government’s statistics. For instance, a survey conducted by the Indo-Global Social Service Society in March found nearly 18,000 shelterless people on the streets of Bangalore, a figure that is at a variance with the government survey.

    A beginning

    Speaking to The Hindu, Anjum Parvez, Director, Directorate of Municipal Administration, the nodal agency in charge of providing shelters, says: “These numbers hardly matter. The point is that we have to start making the shelters, and if we find the demand is more in a certain area, we will build more shelters there.”

    He adds that the BBMP has been asked to identify land for at least two shelters in each zone. These will be open round the clock to provide basic amenities and safety, and community kitchens. Mr. Parvez points out that funds are readily available under the Basic Services to the Urban Poor schemes, and said that the Government is keen on getting this project on the road.

    ‘Ridiculously low’

    Harsh Mander, Special Commissioner appointed by the Supreme Court to monitor the implementation of its interim orders, concedes that the Karnataka figures are a “gross underestimation”. Unofficial estimates of urban spaces peg the number of homeless in most cities at one per cent, excluding children, and by these standards, the government figure is “ridiculously low”.

    However, he points out that the headcount approach to providing for the homeless hardly works. “If Bangalore needs 70 shelters, the State Government needs to map the concentration of the homeless rather than do a simple headcount. A profile of the homeless in each area must be made before shelters are built,” he explains.

     

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