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LESSON 95 From One Who Is Dear 22 11 2010 FREE ONLINE eNālandā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY-GOOD GOVERNANCE-Hon’ble C.M. reviews Beautification, renovation and development works of Hazaratganj-Construction work of STP at Bharwara should be completed by November 30-Hon’ble C. M. greets people on Guru Nanak Jayanti and Kartik Purnima-Rs. 5 lakh financial assistance to dependents of late Jamuna Prasad Nishad-Rs. 2 lakh each to dependents of four persons died in a road accident
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LESSON  95 From One Who Is Dear 22 11 2010 FREE ONLINE eNālandā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY

Awakeness Practices

All 84,000 Khandas As Found in the Pali Suttas

Traditionally the are 84,000 Dharma Doors - 84,000 ways to get Awakeness. Maybe so; certainly the Buddha taught a large number of practices that lead to Awakeness. This web page attempts to catalogue those found in the Pali Suttas (DN, MN, SN, AN, Ud & Sn 1). There are 3 sections:

The discourses of Buddha are divided into 84,000, as to separate addresses. The division includes all that was spoken by Buddha.”I received from Buddha,” said Ananda, “82,000 Khandas, and  from the priests 2000; these are 84,000 Khandas maintained by me.” They are divided into 275,250, as to the stanzas of the original text, and into 361,550, as to the stanzas of the commentary. All the discourses including both those of Buddha and those of the commentator, are divided  into 2,547 banawaras, containing 737,000 stanzas, and 29,368,000 separate letters.

BUDDHA (EDUCATE)!               DHAMMA (MEDITATE)!              SANGHA (ORGANISE)!

WISDOM           IS            POWER

Awakened One Shows the Path to Attain Ultimate Bliss

Using such an instrument

The Free ONLINE e-Nālandā Research and Practice University has been re-organized to function through the following Schools of Learning :

Buddha’s Sangha Practiced His Dhamma Free of cost, hence the Free- e-Nālandā Research and Practice University follows suit

As the Original Nālandā University did not offer any Degree, so also the Free  e-Nālandā Research and Practice University.

The teachings of Buddha are eternal, but even then Buddha did not proclaim them to be infallible. The religion of Buddha has the capacity to change according to times, a quality which no other religion can claim to have…Now what is the basis of Buddhism? If you study carefully, you will see that Buddhism is based on reason. There is an element of flexibility inherent in it, which is not found in any other religion.

§  Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar , Indian scholar, philosopher and architect of Constitution of India, in his writing and speeches

I.
KAMMA

REBIRTH

AWAKEN-NESS

BUDDHA

THUS COME ONE

DHAMMA

II.
ARHAT

FOUR HOLY TRUTHS

EIGHTFOLD PATH

TWELVEFOLD CONDITIONED ARISING

BODHISATTVA

PARAMITA

SIX PARAMITAS

III.

SIX SPIRITUAL POWERS

SIX PATHS OF REBIRTH

TEN DHARMA REALMS

FIVE SKANDHAS

EIGHTEEN REALMS

FIVE MORAL PRECEPTS

IV.

MEDITATION

MINDFULNESS

FOUR APPLICATIONS OF MINDFULNESS

LOTUS POSTURE

SAMADHI

CHAN SCHOOL

FOUR JHANAS

FOUR FORMLESS REALMS

V.

FIVE TYPES OF BUDDHIST STUDY AND PRACTICE

MAHAYANA AND HINAYANA COMPARED

PURE LAND

BUDDHA RECITATION

EIGHT CONSCIOUSNESSES

ONE HUNDRED DHARMAS

EMPTINESS

VI.

DEMON

LINEAGE

with

Level I: Introduction to Buddhism

Level II: Buddhist Studies

TO ATTAIN

Level III: Stream-Enterer

Level IV: Once - Returner

Level V: Non-Returner
Level VI: Arhat

Jambudvipa, i.e, PraBuddha Bharath scientific thought in

mathematics,

astronomy,

alchemy,

and

anatomy

Philosophy and Comparative Religions;

Historical Studies;

International Relations and Peace Studies;

Business Management in relation to Public Policy and Development Studies;

Languages and Literature;

and Ecology and Environmental Studies

Welcome to the Free Online e-Nālandā Research and Practice University

Course Programs:

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/sn/sn42/sn42.011.than.html

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/mn/mn.087.than.html

MN 87 

PTS: M ii 106

Piyajatika Sutta: From One Who Is Dear

translated from the Pali by

Thanissaro Bhikkhu

© 1998–2010

I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying near Savatthi at Jeta’s Grove, Anathapindika’s monastery. Now at that time a certain householder’s dear & beloved little son, his only child, had died. Because of his death, the father had no desire to work or to eat. He kept going to the cemetery and crying out, “Where have you gone, my only little child? Where have you gone, my only little child?”

Then he went to the Blessed One and, on arrival, having bowed down to him, sat to one side. As he was sitting there the Blessed One said to him, “Householder, your faculties are not those of one who is steady in his own mind. There is an aberration in your faculties.”

“Lord, how could there not be an aberration in my faculties? My dear & beloved little son, my only child, has died. Because of his death, I have no desire to work or to eat. I keep going to the cemetery and crying out, ‘Where have you gone, my only little child? Where have you gone, my only little child?’”

“That’s the way it is, householder. That’s the way it is — for sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, & despair are born from one who is dear, come springing from one who is dear.”

“But lord, who would ever think that sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, & despair are born from one who is dear, come springing from one who is dear? Happiness & joy are born from one who is dear, come springing from one who is dear.” So the householder, not delighting in the Blessed One’s words, rejecting the Blessed One’s words, got up from his seat and left.

Now at that time a large number of gamblers were playing dice not far from the Blessed One. So the householder went to them and, on arrival, said to them, “Just now, venerable sirs, I went to Gotama the contemplative and, on arrival, having bowed down to him, sat to one side. As I was sitting there, Gotama the contemplative said to me, ‘Householder, your faculties are not those of one who is steady in his own mind. There is an aberration in your faculties.’

“When this was said, I said to him, ‘Lord, how could there not be an aberration in my faculties? My dear & beloved little son, my only child, has died. Because of his death, I have no desire to work or to eat. I keep going to the cemetery and crying out, “Where have you gone, my only little child? Where have you gone, my only little child?”‘

“‘That’s the way it is, householder. That’s the way it is — for sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, & despair are born from one who is dear, come springing from one who is dear.’

“‘But, lord, who would ever think that sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, & despair are born from one who is dear, come springing from one who is dear? Happiness & joy are born from one who is dear, come springing from one who is dear.’ So, not delighting in the words of Gotama the contemplative, rejecting them, I got up from my seat and left.”

“That’s the way it is, householder [said the gamblers]. That’s the way it is. Happiness & joy are born from one who is dear, come springing from one who is dear.”

So the householder left, thinking, “I agree with the gamblers.”

Eventually, word of this conversation made its way into the king’s inner chambers. Then King Pasenadi Kosala addressed Queen Mallika, “Mallika, your contemplative, Gotama, has said this: ‘Sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, & despair are born from one who is dear, come springing from one who is dear.’”

“If that was said by the Blessed One, great king, then that’s the way it is.”

“No matter what Gotama the contemplative says, Mallika endorses it: ‘If that was said by the Blessed One, great king, then that’s the way it is.’ Just as, no matter what his teacher says, a pupil endorses it: ‘That’s the way it is, teacher. That’s the way is.’ In the same way, no matter what Gotama the contemplative says, Mallika endorses it: ‘If that was said by the Blessed One, great king, then that’s the way it is.’ Go away, Mallika! Out of my sight!”

Then Queen Mallika called for the brahman Nalijangha: “Come, brahman. Go to the Blessed One and, on arrival, showing reverence with your head to his feet in my name, ask whether he is free from illness & affliction, is carefree, strong, & living in comfort, saying: ‘Queen Mallika, lord, shows reverence with her head to your feet and asks whether you are free from illness & affliction, are carefree, strong, & living in comfort.’ And then say: ‘Lord, did the Blessed One say that sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, & despair are born from one who is dear, come springing from one who is dear?’ Whatever the Blessed One says, remember it well and tell it to me. For Tathagatas do not speak what is untrue.”

“Yes, madam,” the brahman Nalijangha responded to Queen Mallika. Going to the Blessed One, on arrival he exchanged courteous greetings with the Blessed One. After an exchange of friendly greetings & courtesies, he sat to one side. As he was sitting there he said to the Blessed One: “Master Gotama, Queen Mallika shows reverence with her head to your feet and asks whether you are free from illness & affliction, are carefree, strong, & living in comfort. And she says further: ‘Lord, did the Blessed One say that sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, & despair are born from one who is dear, come springing from one who is dear?’”

“That’s the way it is, brahman. That’s the way it is. Sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, & despair are born from one who is dear, come springing from one who is dear. And it’s through this sequence of events that it may be understood how sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, & despair are born from one who is dear, come springing from one who is dear.

“Once in this same Savatthi there was a woman whose mother died. Owing to her mother’s death she went mad, out of her mind, and wandering from street to street, crossroads to crossroads, would say, ‘Have you seen my mother? Have you seen my mother?’ It’s through this sequence of events that it may be understood how sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, & despair are born from one who is dear, come springing from one who is dear.

“Once in this same Savatthi there was a woman whose father died… whose brother died… whose sister died… whose son died… whose daughter died… whose husband died. Owing to his death she went mad, out of her mind, and wandering from street to street, crossroads to crossroads, would say, ‘Have you seen my husband? Have you seen my husband?’ It’s through this sequence of events that it may be understood how sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, & despair are born from one who is dear, come springing from one who is dear.

“Once in this same Savatthi there was a man whose mother died. Owing to her death he went mad, out of his mind, and wandering from street to street, crossroads to crossroads, would say, ‘Have you seen my mother? Have you seen my mother?’ It’s through this sequence of events that it may be understood how sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, & despair are born from one who is dear, come springing from one who is dear.

“Once in this same Savatthi there was a man whose father died… whose brother died… whose sister died… whose son died… whose daughter died… whose wife died. Owing to her death he went mad, out of his mind, and wandering from street to street, crossroads to crossroads, would say, ‘Have you seen my wife? Have you seen my wife?’ It’s through this sequence of events that it may be understood how sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, & despair are born from one who is dear, come springing from one who is dear.

“Once in this same Savatthi there was a wife who went to her relatives’ home. Her relatives, having separated her from her husband, wanted to give her to another against her will. So she said to her husband, ‘These relatives of mine, having separated us, want to give me to another against my will,’ whereupon he cut her in two and slashed himself open, thinking, ‘Dead we will be together.’ It’s through this sequence of events that it may be understood how sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, & despair are born from one who is dear, come springing from one who is dear.”

Then the brahman Nalijangha, delighting in & approving of the Blessed One’s words, got up from his seat and went to Queen Mallika. On arrival, he told her all that had been said in his conversation with the Blessed One.

Then Queen Mallika went to King Pasenadi Kosala and on arrival said to him, “What do you think, great king: Is Princess Vajiri dear to you?”

“Yes, Mallika, Princess Vajiri is dear to me.”

“And what do you think: would sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, & despair arise in you from any change & aberration in Princess Vajiri?”

“Mallika, any change & aberration in Princess Vajiri would mean an aberration of my very life. How could sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, & despair not arise in me?”

“Great king, it was in connection with this that the Blessed One — the One who knows, the One who sees, worthy, & rightly self-awakened — said, ‘Sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, & despair are born from one who is dear, come springing from one who is dear.’

“Now what do you think, great king: Is the noble Queen Vasabha dear to you?… Is [your son] General Vidudabha dear to you?… Am I dear to you?”

“Yes, Mallika, you are dear to me.”

“And what do you think: would sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, & despair arise in you from any change & aberration in me?”

“Mallika, any change & aberration in you would mean an aberration of my very life. How could sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, & despair not arise in me?”

“Great king, it was in connection with this that the Blessed One — the One who knows, the One who sees, worthy, & rightly self-awakened — said, ‘Sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, & despair are born from one who is dear, come springing from one who is dear.’

“Now what do you think, great king: Are [your subjects] the Kasis & Kosalans dear to you?”

“Yes, Mallika, the Kasis & Kosalans are dear to me. It is through the might of the Kasis & Kosalans that we use Kasi sandalwood and wear garlands, scents, & ointments.”

“And what do you think: would sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, & despair arise in you from any change & aberration in the Kasis & Kosalans?”

“Mallika, any change & aberration in the Kasis & Kosalans would mean an aberration of my very life. How could sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, & despair not arise in me?”

“Great king, it was in connection with this that the Blessed One — the One who knows, the One who sees, worthy, & rightly self-awakened — said, ‘Sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, & despair are born from one who is dear, come springing from one who is dear.’”

It’s amazing, Mallika. It’s astounding: how deeply the Blessed One sees, having pierced through, as it were, with discernment. Come Mallika: Give me the ablution water.” Then King Pasenadi Kosala, rising from his seat and arranging his upper robe over one shoulder, paid homage in the direction of the Blessed One with his hands palm-to-palm in front of his heart, and exclaimed three times:

Homage to the Blessed One, worthy & rightly self-awakened!
Homage to the Blessed One, worthy & rightly self-awakened!
Homage to the Blessed One, worthy & rightly self-awakened!

 

 

GOOD GOVERNANCE

 

Press Information Bureau

(C.M. Information Campus)

Information & Public Relations Department, U.P.

Hon’ble C.M. reviews Beautification, renovation and development works of Hazaratganj

Construction work of STP at Bharwara should be completed by November 30

Lucknow: 20 November 2010

Keeping in view the different programmes proposed on

completion of 200 years of Hazaratganj in December, the Hon’ble

Chief Minister of Uttar Pradesh Ms. Mayawati ji has directed the

officers to complete all works pertaining to beautification and

renovation of Hazaratganj within fixed time limit in qualitative

manner.

The Hon’ble Chief Minister said that Hazartganj had a special

importance in the cultural and economic activities of Lucknow. In

view of it, cleanliness and other works should be completed on

priority basis. She had also directed the officers to get the works of

footpath, railing, lighting, fountain etc. completed as soon as

possible. Besides, the painting of buildings on both sides of the

main road of Hazaratganj should also be completed soon. She also

directed that construction work of Sewage Treatment Plant (STP) in

Bharwara should also be completed by November at all costs.

The Hon’ble Chief Minister gave these directives when the

Chairman of U.P. State Advisory Council Mr. Satish Chandra Mishra

apprised her of the conclusions after a high-level meeting held at

his residence to review the progress of works in Hazaratganj.

Mr. Mishra also reviewed the progress of different

programmes announced by Hon’ble Chief Minister for the all-round

development of Mathura, Vrindavan, Varanasi, Ayodhya-Faizabad,

Kanpur-Bithoor, Allahabad, Lucknow and Meerut. He directed the

officers to complete these works soon. It may be mentioned that

the Hon’ble Chief Minister had already sanctioned Rs. 6593.15 crore

for several schemes to provide infrastructure facilities of cities and

restore the glory of places of religious, historic and cultural

importance.

On this occasion, Principal Secretary to CM Mr. R.P. Singh,

Secretary to CM Mr. Navneet Sehgal, Commissioner Lucknow Mr.

Prashant Trivedi and other senior officers were present.

********

Hon’ble C. M. greets people on Guru Nanak Jayanti and Kartik Purnima

Lucknow: 20 November 2010

The Hon’ble Chief Minister of Uttar Pradesh Ms. Mayawati

ji has greeted the people of the State on the occasion of Guru

Nanak Jayanti and Kartik Purnima.

In a greetings message, the Hon’ble Chief Minister said

that the founder of Sikh religion Guru Nanak Dev’s message of

Sarv Dharm Sambhav and Social harmony lead towards the

welfare of humanity. She said that Guru Nanak Dev ji was

against blind faiths and religious ostentations. He had given a

new direction to the society by strengthening mutual

brotherhood, she said adding that all saints, gurus and great

men served the poor and weaker sections. They worked for

their welfare and betterment.

Ms. Mayawati ji has also greeted people on Kartik

Purnima and has appealed to celebrate the occasion with

peace and harmony.

********

Rs. 5 lakh financial assistance to dependents of late Jamuna Prasad Nishad

Rs. 2 lakh each to dependents of four persons died in a road accident

Lucknow: 20 November 2010

The Hon’ble Chief Minister of Uttar Pradesh Ms.

Mayawati ji has directed the officers to provide financial

assistance of Rs. 5 lakh to the dependents of MLA and

former minister late Jamuna Prasad Nishad. She has also

directed to provide Rs. 2 lakh each to the dependents of

deceased who were killed in a road accident. It may be

recalled that Mr. Nishad and four other persons were died

yesterday in a road accident.

It may be mentioned that the Hon’ble Chief Minister

on getting the information immediately rushed to Dr. Ram

Manohar Lohia Hospital late night yesterday and offered her

floral tributes to late Nishad. She expressed her deep

sympathies and condolences towards the family members

of late Nishad and other persons died in a road accident.

********

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