Analytic Insight Net - FREE Online Tipiṭaka Research & Practice Universitu 
in
 112 CLASSICAL LANGUAGES
Paṭisambhidā Jāla-Abaddha Paripanti Tipiṭaka Anvesanā ca Paricaya Nikhilavijjālaya ca ñātibhūta Pavatti Nissāya 
http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org anto 105 Seṭṭhaganthāyatta Bhāsā
Categories:

Archives:
Meta:
April 2011
M T W T F S S
« Mar   May »
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
252627282930  
04/02/11
216 LESSON 03 04 2011 Appativana Relentlessly The Longer Discourse to Saccaka Wood from a Pyre The Subduing of Passion FREE ONLINE eNālandā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY and BUDDHIST GOOD NEWS letter to VOTE for BSP ELEPHANT for Social Transformation and Economic Emancipation to attain Ultimate Bliss-Through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org
Filed under: General
Posted by: site admin @ 9:15 pm

  216 LESSON 03 04 2011 Appativana Relentlessly The Longer Discourse to Saccaka Wood from a Pyre The Subduing of Passion FREE ONLINE eNālandā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY and BUDDHIST GOOD NEWS letter  to VOTE for BSP ELEPHANT for Social Transformation and Economic Emancipation to attain Ultimate Bliss-Through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org

Dove-02-june.gif (38556 bytes)       revolving globe

 

         


LESSON 
216

THEBUDDHIST 

ONLINE GOOD NEWS LETTER

Appativana
Sutta: Relentlessly

translated
from the Pali by

Thanissaro
Bhikkhu

© 2006–2011

“Monks, I have known two
qualities through experience: discontent with regard to skillful qualities[1] and unrelenting exertion. Relentlessly
I exerted myself, [thinking,] ‘Gladly would I let the flesh & blood in my
body dry up, leaving just the skin, tendons, & bones, but if I have not
attained what can be reached through human firmness, human persistence, human
striving, there will be no relaxing my persistence.’ From this heedfulness of
mine was attained Awakening. From this heedfulness of mine was attained the
unexcelled freedom from bondage.

“You,
too, monks, should relentlessly exert yourselves, [thinking,] ‘Gladly would we
let the flesh & blood in our bodies dry up, leaving just the skin, tendons,
& bones, but if we have not attained what can be reached through human
firmness, human persistence, human striving, there will be no relaxing our
persistence.’ You, too, in no long time will reach & remain in the supreme
goal of the holy life for which clansmen rightly go forth from home into
homelessness, knowing & realizing it for yourselves in the here & now.

“Thus
you should train yourselves: ‘We will relentlessly exert ourselves, [thinking,]
“Gladly would we let the flesh & blood in our bodies dry up, leaving
just the skin, tendons, & bones, but if we have not attained what can be
reached through human firmness, human persistence, human striving, there will
be no relaxing our persistence.”‘ That’s how you should train
yourselves.”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6NmPG3eMmn4

for

Majjhima Nikaya Sutta: MN 126; MN 127; MN 128
- Ven. Dhammavuddho Thero

 

Maha-Saccaka
Sutta: The Longer Discourse to Saccaka

I have heard that on one occasion
the Blessed One was staying in Vesali, at the
Gabled Hall in the Great Forest. And on that occasion he had finished dressing
in the morning and was carrying his bowl and outer robe, planning to enter
Vesali for alms.

Then
Saccaka, a Nigantha (Jain), while walking and wandering around to exercise his
legs, went to the Gabled Hall in the Great Forest. Ven. Ananda saw him coming
from afar and, on seeing him, said to the Blessed One, “Venerable sir,
here comes Saccaka the Nigantha: a debater, a shrewd talker, assumed by many to
be a saint. He is intent on the disparagement of the Buddha, the disparagement
of the Dhamma, the disparagement of the Sangha. It would be good if the Blessed
One would sit down for a moment, out of sympathy (for him).” So the
blessed One sat down on a prepared seat. Then Saccaka the Nigantha went to the
Blessed One and, on arrival, exchanged courteous greetings with him. After an
exchange of friendly greetings & courtesies, he sat to one side.

As he was
sitting there he said to the Blessed One, “There are, Master Gotama, some
brahmans & contemplatives who live committed to the development of the body
but not to the development of the mind. They are touched by bodily painful
feeling. It has happened in the past that when one (of them) was touched by
bodily painful feeling, his thighs would grow rigid, his heart would burst, hot
blood would gush from his mouth, he would go mad, out of his mind. His mind was
thus subservient to his body and fell under the power of the body. Why was
that? A lack of development of the mind.

“Then
there are some brahmans & contemplatives who live committed to the
development of the mind but not to the development of the body. They are
touched by mental painful feeling. It has happened in the past that when one
(of them) was touched by mental painful feeling, his thighs would grow rigid,
his heart would burst, hot blood would gush from his mouth, he would go mad,
out of his mind. His body was thus subservient to his mind and fell under the
power of the mind. Why was that? A lack of development of the body. The thought
has occurred to me that the disciples of Gotama the contemplative live
committed to the development of the mind but not to the development of the
body.”

“But
what have you learned, Aggivessana, about the development of the body?”

“There are, for example,
Nanda Vaccha, Kisa Sankicca, and Makkhali Gosala. They are a cloth-less[1] ascetics,
rejecting conventions, licking their hands, not coming when called, not staying
when asked. They don’t consent to food brought to them or food dedicated to
them or to an invitation to a meal. They accept nothing from the mouth of a pot
or from the mouth of a bowl. They accept nothing from across a threshold,
across a stick, across a pestle, from two eating together, from a pregnant
woman, from a nursing woman, from a woman living with a man, from where it is
announced that food is to be distributed, from where a dog is waiting or flies
are buzzing. They take no fish or meat. They drink no liquor, wine, or
fermented drink. They limit themselves to one house & one morsel a day, or
two houses & two morsels… seven houses & seven morsels. They live on
one saucerful a day, two… seven saucerfuls a day. They take food once a day,
once every two days… once every seven days, and so on up to a fortnight,
devoted to regulating their intake of food.”

“But,
Aggivessana, do they survive just on that?”

“No,
Master Gotama. Sometimes they eat outstanding staple foods, chew on outstanding
non-staple foods, taste outstanding delicacies, and drink outstanding drinks.
They rescue the body & its strength, fortify it, and fatten it.”

“What
they earlier abandoned, Aggivessana, they later gather up. This is how there is
decrease & increase of the body. But what have you learned, Aggivessana,
about the development of the mind?”

Yet
Saccaka the Nigantha, when asked by the Blessed One about the development of
the mind, was unable to respond.

Then the
Blessed One said to Saccaka, “The ones you described just now as developed
in the development of the body: That is not legitimate development of the body
in the discipline of the noble ones. As you don’t understand the development of
the body, from where would you understand the development of the mind?
Nevertheless, as to how one is undeveloped in body and undeveloped in mind, and
developed in body and developed in mind, listen and pay close attention. I will
speak.”

“As
you say, Master Gotama,” Saccaka responded.

The
Blessed One said, “And how is one undeveloped in body and undeveloped in
mind? There is the case where a pleasant feeling arises in an uneducated
run-of-the-mill person. On being touched by the pleasant feeling, he becomes
impassioned with pleasure, and is reduced to being impassioned with pleasure.
His pleasant feeling ceases. With the cessation of the pleasant feeling there
arises a painful feeling. On being touched with the painful feeling, he
sorrows, grieves, & laments, beats his breast, becomes distraught. When
that pleasant feeling had arisen in him, it invaded his mind and remained
because of his lack of development of the body. When that painful feeling had
arisen in him, it invaded his mind and remained because of his lack of
development of the mind. This is how one is undeveloped in body and undeveloped
in mind.

“And
how is one developed in body and developed in mind? There is the case where a
pleasant feeling arises in a well-educated disciple of the noble ones. On being
touched by the pleasant feeling, he doesn’t become impassioned with pleasure,
and is not reduced to being impassioned with pleasure. His pleasant feeling
ceases. With the cessation of the pleasant feeling there arises a painful
feeling. On being touched with the painful feeling, he doesn’t sorrow, grieve,
or lament, beat his breast or becomes distraught. When that pleasant feeling
had arisen in him, it didn’t invade his mind and remain because of his
development of the body. When that painful feeling had arisen in him, it didn’t
invade his mind and remain because of his development of the mind. This is how
one is developed in body and developed in mind.”

“I
have confidence in Master Gotama that Master Gotama is developed in body and
developed in mind.”

“Well, Aggivessana, you are
certainly being rude and presumptuously speaking your words, but nevertheless I
will respond to you.[2] Ever since I shaved my hair &
beard, put on the ochre robe, and went forth from the home life into
homelessness, it has not been possible for a pleasant feeling that has arisen
to invade my mind and remain, or for a painful feeling that has arisen to
invade my mind and remain.”

“But perhaps there has never
arisen in Master Gotama the sort of pleasant feeling that, having arisen, would
invade the mind and remain. Perhaps there has never arisen in Master Gotama the
sort of painful feeling that, having arisen, would invade the mind and remain.”[3]

“Why wouldn’t it have,
Aggivessana? Before my Awakening, when I was still an unawakened Bodhisatta,
the thought occurred to me: ‘Household life is confining, a dusty path. Life gone
forth is the open air. It isn’t easy, living in a home, to practice the holy
life totally perfect, totally pure, a polished shell. What if I, having shaved
off my hair & beard and putting on the ochre robe, were to go forth from the
household life into homelessness?’

“So
at a later time, when I was still young, black-haired, endowed with the
blessings of youth in the first stage of life, having shaved off my hair &
beard — though my parents wished otherwise and were grieving with tears on
their faces — I put on the ochre robe and went forth from the home life into
homelessness.

“Having gone forth in search
of what might be skillful, seeking the unexcelled state of sublime peace, I
went to Alara Kalama and,
on arrival, said to him: ‘Friend Kalama, I want to practice in this doctrine
& discipline.’

“When
this was said, he replied to me, ‘You may stay here, my friend. This doctrine
is such that a wise person can soon enter & dwell in his own teacher’s
knowledge, having realized it for himself through direct knowledge.’

“It
was not long before I quickly learned the doctrine. As far as mere lip-reciting
& repetition, I could speak the words of knowledge, the words of the
elders, and I could affirm that I knew & saw — I, along with others.

“I
thought: ‘It isn’t through mere conviction alone that Alara Kalama declares,
“I have entered & dwell in this Dhamma, having realized it for myself
through direct knowledge.” Certainly he dwells knowing & seeing this
Dhamma.’ So I went to him and said, ‘To what extent do you declare that you
have entered & dwell in this Dhamma?’ When this was said, he declared the
dimension of nothingness.

“I
thought: ‘Not only does Alara Kalama have conviction, persistence, mindfulness,
concentration, & discernment. I, too, have conviction, persistence,
mindfulness, concentration, & discernment. What if I were to endeavor to
realize for myself the Dhamma that Alara Kalama declares he has entered &
dwells in, having realized it for himself through direct knowledge.’ So it was
not long before I quickly entered & dwelled in that Dhamma, having realized
it for myself through direct knowledge. I went to him and said, ‘Friend Kalama,
is this the extent to which you have entered & dwell in this Dhamma, having
realized it for yourself through direct knowledge?’

“‘Yes,
my friend…’

“‘This,
friend, is the extent to which I, too, have entered & dwell in this Dhamma,
having realized it for myself through direct knowledge.’

“‘It
is a gain for us, my friend, a great gain for us, that we have such a companion
in the holy life. So the Dhamma I declare I have entered & dwell in, having
realized it for myself through direct knowledge, is the Dhamma you declare you
have entered & dwell in, having realized it for yourself through direct
knowledge. And the Dhamma you declare you have entered & dwell in, having
realized it for yourself through direct knowledge, is the Dhamma I declare I
have entered & dwell in, having realized it for myself through direct
knowledge. The Dhamma I know is the Dhamma you know; the Dhamma you know is the
Dhamma I know. As I am, so are you; as you are, so am I. Come friend, let us
now lead this community together.’

“In
this way did Alara Kalama, my teacher, place me, his pupil, on the same level
with himself and pay me great honor. But the thought occurred to me, ‘This
Dhamma leads not to disenchantment, to dispassion, to cessation, to stilling,
to direct knowledge, to Awakening, nor to Unbinding, but only to reappearance
in the dimension of nothingness.’ So, dissatisfied with that Dhamma, I left.

“In search of what might be
skillful, seeking the unexcelled state of sublime peace, I went toUddaka Ramaputta and, on arrival, said to him: ‘Friend
Uddaka, I want to practice in this doctrine & discipline.’

“When
this was said, he replied to me, ‘You may stay here, my friend. This doctrine
is such that a wise person can soon enter & dwell in his own teacher’s
knowledge, having realized it for himself through direct knowledge.’

“It
was not long before I quickly learned
the doctrine. As far as mere lip-reciting & repetition, I could speak the
words of knowledge, the words of the elders, and I could affirm that I knew
& saw — I, along with others.

“I
thought: ‘It wasn’t through mere conviction alone that Rama declared, “I
have entered & dwell in this Dhamma, having realized it for myself through
direct knowledge.” Certainly he dwelled knowing & seeing this Dhamma.’
So I went to Uddaka and said, ‘To what extent did Rama declare that he had
entered & dwelled in this Dhamma?’ When this was said, Uddaka declared the
dimension of neither perception nor non-perception.

“I
thought: ‘Not only did Rama have conviction, persistence, mindfulness,
concentration, & discernment. I, too, have conviction, persistence,
mindfulness, concentration, & discernment. What if I were to endeavor to
realize for myself the Dhamma that Rama declared he entered & dwelled in,
having realized it for himself through direct knowledge.’ So it was not long
before I quickly entered & dwelled in that Dhamma, having realized it for
myself through direct knowledge. I went to Uddaka and said, ‘Friend Uddaka, is
this the extent to which Rama entered & dwelled in this Dhamma, having
realized it for himself through direct knowledge?’

“‘Yes,
my friend…’

“‘This,
friend, is the extent to which I, too, have entered & dwell in this Dhamma,
having realized it for myself through direct knowledge.’

“‘It
is a gain for us, my friend, a great gain for us, that we have such a companion
in the holy life. So the Dhamma Rama declared he entered & dwelled in,
having realized it for himself through direct knowledge, is the Dhamma you
declare you have entered & dwell in, having realized it for yourself
through direct knowledge. And the Dhamma you declare you have entered & dwell
in, having realized it for yourself through direct knowledge, is the Dhamma
Rama declared he entered & dwelled in, having realized it for himself
through direct knowledge. The Dhamma he knew is the Dhamma you know; the Dhamma
you know is the Dhamma he knew. As he was, so are you; as you are, so was he.
Come friend, lead this community.’

“In
this way did Uddaka Ramaputta, my companion in the holy life, place me in the
position of teacher and pay me great honor. But the thought occurred to me,
‘This Dhamma leads not to disenchantment, to dispassion, to cessation, to
stilling, to direct knowledge, to Awakening, nor to Unbinding, but only to
reappearance in the dimension of neither perception nor non-perception.’ So,
dissatisfied with that Dhamma, I left.

“In
search of what might be skillful, seeking the unexcelled state of sublime
peace, I wandered by stages in the Magadhan country and came to the military
town of Uruvela. There I saw some delightful countryside, with an inspiring
forest grove, a clear-flowing river with fine, delightful banks, and villages
for alms-going on all sides. The thought occurred to me: ‘How delightful is
this countryside, with its inspiring forest grove, clear-flowing river with
fine, delightful banks, and villages for alms-going on all sides. This is just
right for the striving of a clansman intent on striving.’ So I sat down right
there, thinking, ‘This is just right for striving.’

“Then these three similes —
spontaneous, never before heard — appeared to me. Supposethere were a wet, sappy piece of timber lying in
the water, and a man were to come along with an upper fire-stick, thinking,
‘I’ll light a fire. I’ll produce heat.’ Now what do you think? Would he be able
to light a fire and produce heat by rubbing the upper fire-stick in the wet,
sappy timber lying in the water?”

“No,
Master Gotama. Why is that? Because the timber is wet & sappy, and besides
it is lying in the water. Eventually the man would reap only his share of
weariness & disappointment.”

“So
it is with any priest or contemplative who does not live withdrawn from
sensuality in body & mind, and whose desire, infatuation, urge, thirst,
& fever for sensuality is not relinquished & stilled within him:
Whether or not he feels painful, racking, piercing feelings due to his striving
[for Awakening], he is incapable of knowledge, vision, & unexcelled
self-awakening. This was the first simile — spontaneous, never before heard —
that appeared to me.

“Then
a second simile — spontaneous, never before heard — appeared to me. Suppose
there were a wet, sappy piece of timber lying on land far from water, and a man
were to come along with an upper fire-stick, thinking, ‘I’ll light a fire. I’ll
produce heat.’ Now what do you think? Would he be able to light a fire and
produce heat by rubbing the upper fire-stick in the wet, sappy timber lying on
land far from water?”

“No,
Master Gotama. Why is that? Because the timber is wet & sappy, even though
it is lying on land far from water. Eventually the man would reap only his
share of weariness & disappointment.”

“So
it is with any priest or contemplative who lives withdrawn from sensuality in
body only, but whose desire, infatuation, urge, thirst, & fever for
sensuality is not relinquished & stilled within him: Whether or not he
feels painful, racking, piercing feelings due to his striving, he is incapable
of knowledge, vision, & unexcelled self-awakening. This was the second
simile — spontaneous, never before heard — that appeared to me.

“Then
a third simile — spontaneous, never before heard — appeared to me. Suppose
there were a dry, sapless piece of timber lying on land far from water, and a
man were to come along with an upper fire-stick, thinking, ‘I’ll light a fire.
I’ll produce heat.’ Now what do you think? Would he be able to light a fire and
produce heat by rubbing the upper fire-stick in the dry, sapless timber lying
on land?”

“Yes,
Master Gotama. Why is that? Because the timber is dry & sapless, and
besides it is lying on land far from water.”

“So
it is with any priest or contemplative who lives withdrawn from sensuality in
body & mind, and whose desire, infatuation, urge, thirst, & fever for
sensuality is relinquished & stilled within him: Whether or not he feels
painful, racking, piercing feelings due to his striving, he is capable of knowledge,
vision, & unexcelled self-awakening. This was the third simile —
spontaneous, never before heard — that appeared to me.

“I
thought: ‘Suppose that I, clenching my teeth and pressing my tongue against the
roof of my mouth, were to beat down, constrain, & crush my mind with my
awareness.’ So, clenching my teeth and pressing my tongue against the roof of
my mouth, I beat down, constrained, & crushed my mind with my awareness.
Just as a strong man, seizing a weaker man by the head or the throat or the shoulders,
would beat him down, constrain, & crush him, in the same way I beat down,
constrained, & crushed my mind with my awareness. As I did so, sweat poured
from my armpits. And although tireless persistence was aroused in me, and
unmuddled mindfulness established, my body was aroused & uncalm because of
the painful exertion. But the painful feeling that arose in this way did not
invade my mind or remain.

“I thought: ‘Suppose I were
to become absorbed in the trance of non-breathing.’ So I stopped the in-breaths
& out-breaths in my nose & mouth. As I did so, there was a loud roaring
of winds coming out my earholes, just like the
loud roar of winds coming out of a smith’s bellows… So I stopped the
in-breaths & out-breaths in my nose & mouth & ears. As I did so,
extreme forces sliced through my head, just as if a
strong man were slicing my head open with a sharp sword… Extreme pains arose
in my head, just as if a
strong man were tightening a turban made of tough leather straps around my
head… Extreme forces carved up my stomach cavity, just as if a
butcher or his apprentice were to carve up the stomach cavity of an ox… There
was an extreme burning in my body, just as if two strong men, grabbing a weaker
man by the arms, were to roast & broil him over a pit of hot embers. And
although tireless persistence was aroused in me, and unmuddled mindfulness
established, my body was aroused & uncalm because of the painful exertion.
But the painful feeling that arose in this way did not invade my mind or
remain.

“Devas,
on seeing me, said, ‘Gotama the contemplative is dead.’ Other devas said, ‘He
isn’t dead, he’s dying.’ Others said, ‘He’s neither dead nor dying, he’s an arahant,
for this is the way arahants live.’

“I
thought: ‘Suppose I were to practice going altogether without food.’ Then devas
came to me and said, ‘Dear sir, please don’t practice going altogether without
food. If you go altogether without food, we’ll infuse divine nourishment in
through your pores, and you will survive on that.’ I thought, ‘If I were to
claim to be completely fasting while these devas are infusing divine
nourishment in through my pores, I would be lying.’ So I dismissed them,
saying, ‘Enough.’

“I
thought: ‘Suppose I were to take only a little food at a time, only a handful
at a time of bean soup, lentil soup, vetch soup, or pea soup.’ So I took only a
little food at a time, only a handful at a time of bean soup, lentil soup,
vetch soup, or pea soup. My body became extremely emaciated. Simply from my
eating so little, my limbs became like the jointed segments of vine stems or
bamboo stems… My backside became like a camel’s hoof… My spine stood out
like a string of beads… My ribs jutted out like the jutting rafters of an
old, run-down barn… The gleam of my eyes appeared to be sunk deep in my eye
sockets like the gleam of water deep in a well… My scalp shriveled &
withered like a green bitter gourd, shriveled & withered in the heat &
the wind… The skin of my belly became so stuck to my spine that when I
thought of touching my belly, I grabbed hold of my spine as well; and when I
thought of touching my spine, I grabbed hold of the skin of my belly as well…
If I urinated or defecated, I fell over on my face right there… Simply from
my eating so little, if I tried to ease my body by rubbing my limbs with my
hands, the hair — rotted at its roots — fell from my body as I rubbed, simply
from eating so little.

“People
on seeing me would say, ‘Gotama the contemplative is black.’ Other people would
say, ‘Gotama the contemplative isn’t black, he’s brown.’ Others would say,
‘Gotama the contemplative is neither black nor brown, he’s golden-skinned.’ So
much had the clear, bright color of my skin deteriorated, simply from eating so
little.

“I
thought: ‘Whatever priests or contemplatives in the past have felt painful,
racking, piercing feelings due to their striving, this is the utmost. None have
been greater than this. Whatever priests or contemplatives in the future will
feel painful, racking, piercing feelings due to their striving, this is the
utmost. None will be greater than this. Whatever priests or contemplatives in
the present are feeling painful, racking, piercing feelings due to their striving,
this is the utmost. None is greater than this. But with this racking practice
of austerities I haven’t attained any superior human state, any distinction in
knowledge or vision worthy of the noble ones. Could there be another path to
Awakening?’

“I
thought: ‘I recall once, when my father the Sakyan was working, and I was
sitting in the cool shade of a rose-apple tree, then — quite secluded from
sensuality, secluded from unskillful mental qualities — I entered &
remained in the first jhana: rapture & pleasure born from seclusion,
accompanied by directed thought & evaluation. Could that be the path to
Awakening?’ Then following on that memory came the realization: ‘That is the
path to Awakening.’ I thought: ‘So why am I afraid of that pleasure that has
nothing to do with sensuality, nothing to do with unskillful mental qualities?’
I thought: ‘I am no longer afraid of that pleasure that has nothing to do with
sensuality, nothing to do with unskillful mental qualities, but that pleasure
is not easy to achieve with a body so extremely emaciated. Suppose I were to
take some solid food: some rice & porridge.’ So I took some solid food:
some rice & porridge. Now five monks had been attending on me, thinking,
‘If Gotama, our contemplative, achieves some higher state, he will tell us.’
But when they saw me taking some solid food — some rice & porridge — they
were disgusted and left me, thinking, ‘Gotama the contemplative is living
luxuriously. He has abandoned his exertion and is backsliding into abundance.’

“So
when I had taken solid food and regained strength, then — quite secluded from
sensuality, secluded from unskillful mental qualities, I entered & remained
in the first jhana: rapture & pleasure born from seclusion, accompanied by
directed thought & evaluation. But the pleasant feeling that arose in this
way did not invade my mind or remain. With the stilling of directed thoughts
& evaluations, I entered & remained in the second jhana: rapture &
pleasure born of concentration, unification of awareness free from directed
thought & evaluation — internal assurance. But the pleasant feeling that
arose in this way did not invade my mind or remain. With the fading of rapture
I remained equanimous, mindful, & alert, and sensed pleasure with the body.
I entered & remained in the third jhana, of which the noble ones declare,
‘Equanimous & mindful, he has a pleasant abiding.’ But the pleasant feeling
that arose in this way did not invade my mind or remain. With the abandoning of
pleasure & pain — as with the earlier disappearance of elation &
distress — I entered & remained in the fourth jhana: purity of equanimity
& mindfulness, neither pleasure nor pain. But the pleasant feeling that
arose in this way did not invade my mind or remain.

“When
the mind was thus concentrated, purified, bright, unblemished, rid of
defilement, pliant, malleable, steady, & attained to imperturbability, I
directed it to the knowledge of recollecting my past lives. I recollected my
manifold past lives, i.e., one birth, two…five, ten…fifty, a hundred, a
thousand, a hundred thousand, many eons of cosmic contraction, many eons of
cosmic expansion, many eons of cosmic contraction & expansion: ‘There I had
such a name, belonged to such a clan, had such an appearance. Such was my food,
such my experience of pleasure & pain, such the end of my life. Passing
away from that state, I re-arose there. There too I had such a name, belonged
to such a clan, had such an appearance. Such was my food, such my experience of
pleasure & pain, such the end of my life. Passing away from that state, I
re-arose here.’ Thus I remembered my manifold past lives in their modes &
details.

“This
was the first knowledge I attained in the first watch of the night. Ignorance
was destroyed; knowledge arose; darkness was destroyed; light arose — as
happens in one who is heedful, ardent, & resolute. But the pleasant feeling
that arose in this way did not invade my mind or remain.

“When
the mind was thus concentrated, purified, bright, unblemished, rid of
defilement, pliant, malleable, steady, & attained to imperturbability, I
directed it to the knowledge of the passing away & reappearance of beings.
I saw — by means of the divine eye, purified & surpassing the human —
beings passing away & re-appearing, and I discerned how they are inferior
& superior, beautiful & ugly, fortunate & unfortunate in accordance
with their kamma: ‘These beings — who were endowed with bad conduct of body,
speech, & mind, who reviled the noble ones, held wrong views and undertook
actions under the influence of wrong views — with the break-up of the body,
after death, have re-appeared in the plane of deprivation, the bad destination,
the lower realms, in hell. But these beings — who were endowed with good
conduct of body, speech & mind, who did not revile the noble ones, who held
right views and undertook actions under the influence of right views — with the
break-up of the body, after death, have re-appeared in the good destinations,
in the heavenly world.’ Thus — by means of the divine eye, purified & surpassing
the human — I saw beings passing away & re-appearing, and I discerned how
they are inferior & superior, beautiful & ugly, fortunate &
unfortunate in accordance with their kamma.

“This
was the second knowledge I attained in the second watch of the night. Ignorance
was destroyed; knowledge arose; darkness was destroyed; light arose — as
happens in one who is heedful, ardent, & resolute. But the pleasant feeling
that arose in this way did not invade my mind or remain.

“When
the mind was thus concentrated, purified, bright, unblemished, rid of
defilement, pliant, malleable, steady, & attained to imperturbability, I
directed it to the knowledge of the ending of the mental fermentations. I
discerned, as it was actually present, that ‘This is stress… This is the
origination of stress… This is the cessation of stress… This is the way
leading to the cessation of stress… These are fermentations… This is the
origination of fermentations… This is the cessation of fermentations… This
is the way leading to the cessation of fermentations.’ My heart, thus knowing,
thus seeing, was released from the fermentation of sensuality, released from
the fermentation of becoming, released from the fermentation of ignorance. With
release, there was the knowledge, ‘Released.’ I discerned that ‘Birth is ended,
the holy life fulfilled, the task done. There is nothing further for this
world.’

“This
was the third knowledge I attained in the third watch of the night. Ignorance
was destroyed; knowledge arose; darkness was destroyed; light arose — as
happens in one who is heedful, ardent, & resolute. But the pleasant feeling
that arose in this way did not invade my mind or remain.

“I
recall having taught the Dhamma to an assembly of many hundreds, and yet each
one of them assumes of me, ‘Gotama the contemplative is teaching the Dhamma
attacking just me,’ but it shouldn’t be seen in that way. The Tathagata rightly
teaches them the Dhamma simply for the purpose of giving knowledge. At the end
of that very talk I steady the mind inwardly, settle it, concentrate it, and
unify it in the same theme of concentration as before, in which I almost
constantly dwell.”

“That
is credible for the Master Gotama, as would be the case for one who is worthy
& rightly self-awakened. But does the Master Gotama recall sleeping during
the day?”

“I
recall, Aggivessana, in the last month of the hot season, after the meal,
returning from my almsround, setting out my outer robe folded in four, lying
down on my right side, and falling asleep while mindful & alert.”

“There
are some brahmans & contemplatives, Master Gotama, who would call that
dwelling in delusion.”

“It’s
not to that extent that one is deluded or undeluded, Aggivessana. As to how one
is deluded or undeluded, listen and pay close attention. I will speak.”

“As
you say, Master Gotama,” Saccaka responded.

The
Blessed One said: “In whomever the fermentations that defile, that lead to
renewed becoming, that give trouble, that ripen in stress, and lead to future
birth, aging, & death are not abandoned: Him I call deluded. For it is from
not abandoning the fermentations that one is deluded. In whomever the
fermentations that defile, that lead to renewed becoming, that give trouble,
that ripen in stress, and lead to future birth, aging, & death are abandoned: Him I call undeluded. For
it is from abandoning the fermentations that one is undeluded. In the
Tathagata, Aggivessana, the fermentations that defile, that lead to renewed
becoming, that give trouble, that ripen in stress, and lead to future birth, aging,
& death have been abandoned, their root destroyed, made like a palmyra
stump, deprived of the conditions of existence, not destined for future
arising. Just as a palmyra cut off at the crown is incapable of further growth,
in the same way in the Tathagata the fermentations that defile, that lead to
renewed becoming, that give trouble, that ripen in stress, and lead to future
birth, aging, & death have been abandoned, their root destroyed, made like
a palmyra stump, deprived of the conditions of existence, not destined for future
arising.”

When this
was said, Saccaka the Nigantha said to the Blessed One: “It’s amazing,
Master Gotama. It’s astounding — that when Master Gotama is addressed rudely
again & again, is assailed by presumptuous courses of speech, the color of
his skin brightens, the color of his face clears, as would be the case with one
who is worthy and rightly self-awakened. I recall engaging Purana Kassapa in
debate. He, when engaged in debate by me, spoke evasively and led the
discussion astray, displayed irritation, aversion, & peevishness. But when
Master Gotama is addressed rudely again & again, is assailed by
presumptuous courses of speech, the color of his skin brightens, the color of
his face clears, as would be the case with one who is worthy and rightly
self-awakened. I recall engaging Makkhali Gosala… Ajita Kesakambala…
Pakudha Kaccayana…Sañjaya Velatthaputta… Nigantha Nataputa in debate. He,
when engaged in debate by me, spoke evasively and led the discussion astray,
displayed irritation, aversion, & peevishness. But when Master Gotama is
addressed rudely again & again, is assailed by presumptuous courses of
speech, the color of his skin brightens, the color of his face clears, as would
be the case with one who is worthy and rightly self-awakened.

“And
now, Master Gotama, I am going. Many are my duties, many my
responsibilities.”

“Then
do, Aggivessana, what you think it is now time to do.”

So Saccaka the Nigantha,
delighting in & approving of the Blessed One’s words, got up from his seat
and left.[4]

Chavalata
Sutta: Wood from a Pyre

“Monks,
these four kinds of persons are to be found existing in the world. Which four?
One who is engaged in promoting neither his own good nor in promoting the good
of another; one who is engaged in promoting another’s good but not in promoting
his own good; one who is engaged in promoting his own good but not in promoting
the good of another; and one who is engaged in promoting his own good and also
in promoting the good of another.

“Just
as, monks, a piece of wood from a pyre, burnt at both ends and in the middle
fouled with dung, serves neither for fuel in the village nor for timber in the
forest, so in the same way, monks, is such a person, I say, who is engaged in
promoting neither his own good nor in promoting the good of another.

“Monks,
there is the person who is engaged in promoting the good of another but not in
promoting his own good. Of these two individuals the latter is superior. Monks,
there is the person who is engaged in promoting his own good but not in
promoting the good of another. Of these three individuals he is superior.
Monks, there is the person who is engaged in promoting his own good and also in
promoting another’s good. Of these four individuals he is the foremost, the
chief, the principal, the best and the supreme.

“Just
as, monks, from a cow comes milk; from milk, curd; from curd, butter; from
butter, ghee; from ghee, the skimmings of ghee, and that is reckoned the best;
even so, monks, among these four individuals the person who is engaged in
promoting his own good and also the good of another is the foremost, the chief,
the principal, the best and the supreme. Monks, these are the four individuals
who are to be found existing in the world.”

 Raga-vinaya Sutta: The Subduing of Passion

“Monks,
these four types of individuals are to be found existing in the world. Which
four? The one who practices for his/her own benefit but not for that of others.
The one who practices for the benefit of others but not for his/her own. The
one who practices neither for his/her own benefit nor for that of others. The
one who practices for his/her own benefit and for that of others.

“And
who is the individual who practices for his/her own benefit but not for that of
others? There is the case where a certain individual practices for the subduing
of passion within him/herself but doesn’t encourage others in the subduing of
passion; practices for the subduing of aversion within him/herself but doesn’t
encourage others in the subduing of aversion; practices for the subduing of
delusion within him/herself but doesn’t encourage others in the subduing of
delusion. Such is the individual who practices for his/her own benefit but not
for that of others.

“And
who is the individual who practices for the benefit of others but not for
his/her own? There is the case where a certain individual doesn’t practice for
the subduing of passion within him/herself but encourages others in the
subduing of passion; he/she doesn’t practice for the subduing of aversion
within him/herself but encourages others in the subduing of aversion; he/she
doesn’t practice for the subduing of delusion within him/herself but encourages
others in the subduing of delusion. Such is the individual who practices for
the benefit of others but not for his/her own.

“And
who is the individual who practices neither for his/her own benefit nor for
that of others? There is the case where a certain individual doesn’t practice
for the subduing of passion within him/herself and doesn’t encourage others in
the subduing of passion; he/she doesn’t practice for the subduing of aversion
within him/herself and doesn’t encourage others in the subduing of aversion;
he/she doesn’t practice for the subduing of delusion within him/herself and
doesn’t encourage others in the subduing of delusion. Such is the individual
who practices neither for his/her own benefit nor for that of others.

“And
who is the individual who practices for his/her own benefit and for that of
others? There is the case where a certain individual practices for the subduing
of passion within him/herself and encourages others in the subduing of passion;
practices for the subduing of aversion within him/herself and encourages others
in the subduing of aversion; practices for the subduing of delusion within
him/herself and encourages others in the subduing of delusion. Such is the
individual who practices for his/her own benefit and for that of others.

“These
are the four types of individuals to be found existing in the world.”

 

 

Awakeness Practices

All 84,000 Khandas As Found in the
Pali Suttas


Traditionally
the are 84,000 Dharma Doors - 84,000 ways to get Awakeness. Maybe so;
certainly the Buddha taught a large number of practices that lead to
Awakeness. This web page attempts to catalogue those found in the Pali Suttas
(DN, MN, SN, AN, Ud & Sn
 1). There are 3 sections:


The
discourses of Buddha are divided into 84,000, as to separate addresses. The
division includes all that was spoken by Buddha.”I received from Buddha,” said
Ananda, “82,000 Khandas, and  from the
priests 2000; these are 84,000 Khandas maintained by me.” They are divided into
275,250, as to the stanzas of the original text, and into 361,550, as to the
stanzas of the commentary. All the discourses including both those of Buddha
and those of the commentator, are divided 
into 2,547 banawaras, containing 737,000 stanzas, and 29,368,000
separate letters.

 

BUDDHA (EDUCATE)!          DHAMMA
(MEDITATE)!  SANGHA (ORGANISE)!

WISDOM IS POWER

Awakened One
Shows the Path to Attain Eternal Bliss

Using such an instrument

The Free ONLINE e-Nālandā Research and Practice
University has been re-organized to function through the following Schools of
Learning :

Buddha’s
Sangha Practiced His Dhamma Free of cost, hence the Free- e-Nālandā
Research and Practice University follows suit

As
the Original Nālandā University did not offer any Degree, so also the
Free  e-Nālandā Research and Practice University.

The teachings of Buddha are eternal, but even then
Buddha did not proclaim them to be infallible. The religion of Buddha has the
capacity to change according to times, a quality which no other religion can
claim to have…Now what is the basis of Buddhism? If you study carefully, you
will see that Buddhism is based on reason. There is an element of flexibility
inherent in it, which is not found in any other religion.

Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar , Indian scholar, philosopher and
architect of Constitution of India, in his writing and speeches

IKAMMA,REBIRTH,AWAKEN-NESS,BUDDHA,THUS COME ONE,DHAMMA II.ARHA ,FOUR HOLY TRUTHS,EIGHTFOLD PATH,TWELVEFOLD CONDITIONED ARISING,BODHISATTVA,PARAMITA,SIX PARAMITAS III.SIX SPIRITUAL POWERS,SIX PATHS OF REBIRTH,TEN DHARMA REALMS,FIVE SKANDHAS,EIGHTEEN REALMS,FIVE MORAL PRECEPTS IV. MEDITATION,MINDFULNESS,FOUR APPLICATIONS OF MINDFULNESS,LOTUS POSTURE,SAMADHI,CHAN SCHOOL,FOUR JHANAS,FOUR FORMLESS REALMS V. FIVE TYPES OF BUDDHIST STUDY AND PRACTICE,MAHAYANA AND HINAYANA COMPARED,PURE LAND,BUDDHA RECITATION,EIGHT CONSCIOUSNESSES,ONE HUNDRED DHARMAS,EMPTINESS VI. DEMON,LINEAGE

with

Level I: Introduction to Buddhism,Level
II: Buddhist Studies,

TO ATTAIN

Level III: Stream-Enterer,Level IV: Once
– Returner,Level V: Non-Returner,Level VI: Arhat

Jambudvipa,
i.e, PraBuddha Bharath scientific thought in

mathematics,astronomy,alchemy,andanatomy

Philosophy
and Comparative Religions;Historical Studies;International Relations and Peace
Studies;Business Management in relation to Public Policy and Development
Studies;Languages and Literature;and Ecology and Environmental Studies

 

Jambudvipa,
i.e, PraBuddha Bharath scientific thought in

Mathematics

Astronomy

Alchemy

And
Andanatomy

 

Buddhist perception of humanity

Buddhism and Information Technology

Buddhist perception of Business Management in
Relation to Public Policy and Development and Ecology and Environment

Buddhist
perception of Languages
and Literature

 


comments (0)
215 LESSON 01 04 2011 Appamada Sutta Heedfulness FREE ONLINE eNālandā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY and BUDDHIST GOOD NEWS letter to VOTE for BSP ELEPHANT for Social Transformation and Economic Emancipation to attain Ultimate Bliss-Through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org
Filed under: General
Posted by: site admin @ 6:15 am

215 LESSON 01 04 2011 Appamada Sutta Heedfulness FREE ONLINE eNālandā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY and BUDDHIST GOOD NEWS letter  to VOTE for BSP ELEPHANT for Social Transformation and Economic Emancipation to attain Ultimate Bliss-Through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org

    Dove-02-june.gif (38556 bytes)       THE

BUDDHISTrevolving globe

ONLINE GOOD NEWS


LESSON 
215

Appamada
Sutta: Heedfulness

translated
from the Pali by

Thanissaro
Bhikkhu

© 1998–2011

At
Savatthi. As he was sitting to one side, King Pasenadi Kosala said to the
Blessed One: “Is there, lord, any one quality that keeps both kinds of
benefit secure — benefits in this life & benefits in lives to come?”

“There
is one quality, great king, that keeps both kinds of benefit secure — benefits
in this life & benefits in lives to come.”

“But
what, lord, is that one quality…?”

Heedfulness, great king. Just as the footprints of all
living beings with legs can be encompassed by the footprint of the elephant,
and the elephant’s footprint is declared to be supreme among them in terms of
its great size; in the same way, heedfulness is the one quality that keeps both
kinds of benefit secure — benefits in this life & benefits in lives to
come.”

That
is what the Blessed One said. Having said that, the One Well-Gone, the Teacher,
said further:

 

For
one who desires

long
life, health,

beauty,
heaven, & noble birth,


lavish delights, one after another —

the
wise praise heedfulness

in
performing deeds of merit.

 

When
heedful, wise,

you
achieve both kinds of benefit:

benefits
in this life,

&
benefits in lives to come.

 

By
breaking through to your benefit,

you’re
called enlightened,

wise.

Nandiya
Sutta: To Nandiya

translated
from the Pali by

Thanissaro
Bhikkhu

© 2004–2011

On one occasion the Blessed One
was staying among the Sakyans near Kapilavatthu in Nigrodha’s Park. Then Nandiya the
Sakyan went to the Blessed One and, on arrival, having bowed down to him, sat
to one side. As he was sitting there he said to the Blessed One, “Lord,
the disciple of the noble ones in whom the factors of stream entry are
altogether & in every way lacking: Is he called a disciple of the noble
ones who lives heedlessly?”

“Nandiya,
the person in whom the factors of stream entry are altogether & in every
way lacking I call an outsider, one who stands in the faction of the
run-of-the-mill. But as to how a disciple of the noble ones lives heedlessly
and heedfully, listen well and pay attention, I will speak”

“As
you say, lord,” Nandiya the Sakyan responded.

The
Blessed One said, “And how, Nandiya, does a disciple of the noble ones
live heedlessly? There is the case where a disciple of the noble ones is
endowed with verified confidence in the Awakened One: ‘Indeed, the Blessed One
is worthy and rightly self-awakened, consummate in knowledge & conduct,
well-gone, an expert with regard to the world, unexcelled as a trainer for
those people fit to be tamed, the Teacher of divine & human beings,
awakened, blessed.’ Content with that verified confidence in the Awakened One,
he does not exert himself further in solitude by day or seclusion by night. For
him, living thus heedlessly, there is no joy. There being no joy, there is no
rapture. There being no rapture, there is no serenity. There being no serenity,
he dwells in pain. When pained, the mind does not become centered. When the
mind is uncentered, phenomena do not become manifest. When phenomena are not
manifest, he is reckoned simply as one who dwells heedlessly.

“Furthermore,
the disciple of the noble ones is endowed with verified confidence in the
Dhamma: ‘The Dhamma is well-expounded by the Blessed One, to be seen here &
now, timeless, inviting verification, pertinent, to be realized by the wise for
themselves.’ Content with that verified confidence in the Dhamma, he does not
exert himself further in solitude by day or seclusion by night. For him, living
thus heedlessly, there is no joy. There being no joy, there is no rapture.
There being no rapture, there is no serenity. There being no serenity, he dwells
in pain. When pained, the mind does not become centered. When the mind is
uncentered, phenomena do not become manifest. When phenomena are not manifest,
he is reckoned simply as one who dwells heedlessly.

“Furthermore,
the disciple of the noble ones is endowed with verified confidence in the ‘The
Sangha of the Blessed One’s disciples who have practiced well… who have
practiced straight-forwardly… who have practiced methodically… who have
practiced masterfully — in other words, the four types of noble disciples when
taken as pairs, the eight when taken as individual types — they are the Sangha
of the Blessed One’s disciples: worthy of gifts, worthy of hospitality, worthy
of offerings, worthy of respect, the incomparable field of merit for the world.’
Content with that verified confidence in the Sangha, he does not exert himself
further in solitude by day or seclusion by night. For him, living thus
heedlessly, there is no joy. There being no joy, there is no rapture. There
being no rapture, there is no serenity. There being no serenity, he dwells in
pain. When pained, the mind does not become centered. When the mind is
uncentered, phenomena do not become manifest. When phenomena are not manifest,
he is reckoned simply as one who dwells heedlessly.

“Furthermore,
the disciple of the noble ones is endowed with virtues that are appealing to
the noble ones: untorn, unbroken, unspotted, unsplattered, liberating, praised
by the wise, untarnished, leading to concentration. Content with those virtues
pleasing to the noble ones, he does not exert himself further in solitude by
day or seclusion by night. For him, living thus heedlessly, there is no joy.
There being no joy, there is no rapture. There being no rapture, there is no
serenity. There being no serenity, he dwells in pain. When pained, the mind
does not become centered. When the mind is uncentered, phenomena do not become
manifest. When phenomena are not manifest, he is reckoned simply as one who
dwells heedlessly.

“This
is how a disciple of the noble ones lives heedlessly.

“And
how, Nandiya, does a disciple of the noble ones live heedfully? There is the
case where a disciple of the noble ones is endowed with verified confidence in
the Awakened One… Not content with that verified confidence in the Awakened
One, he exerts himself further in solitude by day or seclusion by night. For
him, living thus heedfully, joy arises. In one who has joy, rapture arises. In
one who has rapture, the body becomes serene. When the body is serene, one
feels pleasure. Feeling pleasure, the mind becomes centered. When the mind is
centered, phenomena become manifest. When phenomena are manifest, he is
reckoned as one who dwells heedfully.

“Furthermore,
the disciple of the noble ones is endowed with verified confidence in the Dhamma…
verified confidence in the Sangha… virtues that are appealing to the noble
ones: untorn, unbroken, unspotted, unsplattered, liberating, praised by the
wise, untarnished, leading to concentration. Not content with those virtues
pleasing to the noble ones, he exerts himself further in solitude by day or
seclusion by night. For him, living thus heedfully, joy arises. In one who has
joy, rapture arises. In one who has rapture, the body becomes serene. When the
body is serene, one feels pleasure. Feeling pleasure, the mind becomes
centered. When the mind is centered, phenomena become manifest. When phenomena
are manifest, he is reckoned as one who dwells heedfully.

“This
is how a disciple of the noble ones lives heedfully.”

Aparihani Sutta: No Falling Away

“Endowed
with four qualities, a monk is incapable of falling away and is right in the
presence of Unbinding. Which four?

“There
is the case where a monk is consummate in virtue, guards the doors to his sense
faculties, knows moderation in eating, & is devoted to wakefulness.

“And
how is a monk consummate in virtue? There is the case where a monk is virtuous.
He dwells restrained in accordance with the Patimokkha, consummate in his
behavior & sphere of activity. He trains himself, having undertaken the
training rules, seeing danger in the slightest faults. This is how a monk is
consummate in virtue.

“And
how does a monk guard the doors to his sense faculties? There is the case where
a monk, on seeing a form with the eye, does not grasp at any theme or
variations by which — if he were to dwell without restraint over the faculty of
the eye — evil, unskillful qualities such as greed or distress might assail
him. He practices with restraint. He guards the faculty of the eye. He achieves
restraint with regard to the faculty of the eye.

“On hearing a sound with the ear…

“On smelling an aroma with the nose…

“On tasting a flavor with the tongue…

“On feeling a tactile sensation with the
body…

“On
cognizing an idea with the intellect, he does not grasp at any theme or
variations by which — if he were to dwell without restraint over the faculty of
the intellect — evil, unskillful qualities such as greed or distress might
assail him. He practices with restraint. He guards the faculty of the
intellect. He achieves restraint with regard to the faculty of the intellect.
This is how a monk guards the doors to his sense faculties.

“And
how does a monk know moderation in eating? There is the case where a monk,
considering it appropriately, takes his food not playfully, nor for
intoxication, nor for putting on bulk, nor for beautification, but simply for
the survival & continuance of this body, for ending its afflictions, for
the support of the holy life, thinking, ‘I will destroy old feelings [of
hunger] & not create new feelings [from overeating]. Thus I will maintain
myself, be blameless, & live in comfort.’ This is how a monk knows
moderation in eating.

“And how is a monk devoted to
wakefulness? There is the case where a monk during the day, sitting &
pacing back & forth, cleanses his mind of any qualities that would hold the
mind in check. During the first watch of the night,[1] sitting & pacing back & forth,
he cleanses his mind of any qualities that would hold the mind in check. During
the second watch of the night,[2] reclining on his right side, he takes
up the lion’s posture, one foot placed on top of the other, mindful, alert,
with his mind set on getting up [either as soon as he awakens or at a
particular time]. During the last watch of the night,[3] sitting & pacing back & forth,
he cleanses his mind of any qualities that would hold the mind in check. This
is how a monk is devoted to wakefulness.

“Endowed
with these four qualities, a monk is incapable of falling away and is right in
the presence of Unbinding.”

 

The
monk established in virtue,

restrained
with regard to the sense faculties,

knowing
moderation in food,

&
devoted to wakefulness:

dwelling
thus ardently,

day
& night, untiring,

he
develops skillful qualities

for
the attainment of rest from the yoke.

The
monk delighting in heedfulness

and
seeing danger in heedlessness

is
incapable of falling away,

is
right in the presence of Unbinding.

Dhp
315

 

Like
a frontier fortress,

guarded
inside & out,

guard
yourself.

Don’t
let the moment pass by.

Those
for whom the moment is past

grieve,
consigned to hell.

 

Suriya
Sutta: The Sun Deity’s Prayer for Protection

 

Thus
have I heard:

On one
occasion the Blessed One was living near Savatthi at Jetavana at
Anathapindika’s monastery. At that time Suriya, the sun deity, was seized by
Rahu, Lord of Asuras. Thereupon calling to mind the Blessed One, Suriya, the
Sun deity, recited this stanza:

i. “O
Buddha, the Hero, thou art wholly free from all evil. My adoration to thee. I
have fallen into distress. Be thou my refuge.”

Thereupon
the Blessed One addressed a stanza to Rahu, Lord of Asuras, on behalf of Suriya
thus:

ii.
“O Rahu, Suriya has gone for refuge to the Tathagata, the Consummate One.
Release Suriya. The Buddhas radiate compassion on the world (of beings).

iii.
“O Rahu, swallow not the dispeller of darkness, the shining one, the
radiant and effulgent traveler through the sky. Rahu, release Suriya, my
son.”

Thereupon
Rahu, Lord of Asuras, released Suriya, and immediately came to the presence of
Vepacitta, Lord of Asuras, and stood beside him trembling with fear and with
hair standing on end. Then Vepacitta addressed Rahu in this stanza:

iv.
“Rahu, why did you suddenly release Suriya? Why have you come trembling,
and why are you standing here terrified?”

“I
have been spoken to by the Buddha in a stanza (requesting me to release
Suriya). If I had not released Suriya my head would have split into seven
pieces. While yet I live, I should have had no happiness. (Therefore I released
Suriya).”

Candima Sutta: The Moon Deity’s
Prayer for Protection

Thus
have I heard:

On one
occasion the Blessed One was living near Savatthi, at Jetavana at
Anathpindika’s monastery. At that time Candima, the moon deity, was seized by
Rahu, lord of Asura. Thereupon calling to mind the Blessed One, Candima, the
moon deity, recited this stanza:

i. “O
Buddha, the Hero, thou art wholly free from all evil. My adoration to thee. I
have fallen into distress. Be thou my refuge.”

Thereupon
the Blessed One addressed a stanza to Rahu, Lord of Asuras, on behalf of
Candima, thus:

ii.
“O Rahu, Candima has gone for refuge to the Tathagata, the Consummate One.
Release Candima. The Buddhas radiate compassion on the world (of beings).”

Thereupon
Rahu, Lord of Asuras, released Candima, the deity, and immediately came to the
presence of Vepacitta, Lord of Asuras, and stood beside him trembling with fear
and with hair standing on end. Then Vepacitta addressed Rahu in this stanza.

iii.
“Rahu. Why did you suddenly release Candima? Why have you come trembling,
and why are you standing here terrified?”

“I
have been spoken to by the Buddha in a stanza (requesting me to release
Candima). If I had not released Candima my head would have split into seven
pieces. While yet I live, I should have had no happiness. (Therefore I released
Candima).”


        

Awakeness Practices

All 84,000 Khandas As Found in the Pali Suttas

Traditionally the are 84,000 Dharma Doors - 84,000 ways to get Awakeness. Maybe so; certainly the Buddha taught a large number of practices that lead to Awakeness. This web page attempts to catalogue those found in the Pali Suttas (DN, MN, SN, AN, Ud & Sn 1). There are 3 sections:

The discourses of Buddha are divided into 84,000, as to separate addresses. The division includes all that was spoken by Buddha.”I received from Buddha,” said Ananda, “82,000 Khandas, andfrom the priests 2000; these are 84,000 Khandas maintained by me.” They are divided into 275,250, as to the stanzas of the original text, and into 361,550, as to the stanzas of the commentary. All the discourses including both those of Buddha and those of the commentator, are divided into 2,547 banawaras, containing 737,000 stanzas, and 29,368,000 separate letters.

BUDDHA (EDUCATE)!DHAMMA (MEDITATE)!SANGHA (ORGANISE)!

WISDOM IS POWER

Awakened One Shows the Path to Attain Eternal Bliss

Using such an instrument

The Free ONLINE e-Nālandā Research and Practice University has been re-organized to function through the following Schools of Learning :

Buddha’s Sangha Practiced His Dhamma Free of cost, hence the Free- e-NālandāResearch and Practice University follows suit

As the Original Nālandā University did not offer any Degree, so also the Free e-Nālandā Research and Practice University.

The teachings of Buddha are eternal, but even then Buddha did not proclaim them to be infallible. The religion of Buddha has the capacity to change according to times, a quality which no other religion can claim to have…Now what is the basis of Buddhism? If you study carefully, you will see that Buddhism is based on reason. There is an element of flexibility inherent in it, which is not found in any other religion.

Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar , Indian scholar, philosopher and architect of Constitution of India, in his writing and speeches

IKAMMA,REBIRTH,AWAKEN-NESS,BUDDHA,THUS COME ONE,DHAMMA II.ARHA ,FOUR HOLY TRUTHS,EIGHTFOLD PATH,TWELVEFOLD CONDITIONED ARISING,BODHISATTVA,PARAMITA,SIX PARAMITAS III.SIX SPIRITUAL POWERS,SIX PATHS OF REBIRTH,TEN DHARMA REALMS,FIVE SKANDHAS,EIGHTEEN REALMS,FIVE MORAL PRECEPTS IV. MEDITATION,MINDFULNESS,FOUR APPLICATIONS OF MINDFULNESS,LOTUS POSTURE,SAMADHI,CHAN SCHOOL,FOUR JHANAS,FOUR FORMLESS REALMS V. FIVE TYPES OF BUDDHIST STUDY AND PRACTICE,MAHAYANA AND HINAYANA COMPARED,PURE LAND,BUDDHA RECITATION,EIGHT CONSCIOUSNESSES,ONE HUNDRED DHARMAS,EMPTINESS VI. DEMON,LINEAGE

with

Level I: Introduction to Buddhism,Level II: Buddhist Studies,

TO ATTAIN

Level III: Stream-Enterer,Level IV: Once– Returner,Level V: Non-Returner,Level VI: Arhat

Jambudvipa, i.e, PraBuddha Bharath scientific thought in

mathematics,astronomy,alchemy,andanatomy

Philosophy and Comparative Religions;Historical Studies;International Relations and Peace Studies;Business Management in relation to Public Policy and Development Studies;Languages and Literature;and Ecology and Environmental Studies

Jambudvipa, i.e, PraBuddha Bharath scientific thought in

Mathematics

Astronomy

Alchemy

And Andanatomy

Buddhist perception of humanity

Buddhism and Information Technology

Buddhist perception of Business Management in Relation to Public Policy and Development and Ecology and Environment

Buddhist perception of Languages and Literature



comments (0)