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03 08 2012 FRIDAY LESSON 687 FREE ONLINE eNālāndā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org up a levelTipitaka network … his life, his acts, his words sabbe satta bhavantu sukhi-tatta TIPITAKA TIPITAKA AND TWELVE DIVISIONS Brief historical background Sutta Pitaka Vinaya Pitaka Abhidhamma Pitaka Twelve Divisions of Buddhist Canons Nine Divisions of Buddhist Canons Sutta Piṭaka — The basket of discourses —Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta (DN 22) {excerpt} - all infobubbles— Attendance on awareness —Kāyānupassanā IV. சட்டத்துக்கு அடிப்படையான அற முறைகளின் கூர்ந்த கவனிப்பு B. Khandhas பற்பல தனிமங்களின் கூட்டுகளை ஐக்கியப்படுத்தும் மீதான பகுதி Dhammapada Verses 283 and 284 Pancamahallakabhikkhu Vatthu-Verse 283. Shun Passion-Verse 284. Attachment To WomenALL ABOUT AWAKEN ONES WITH AWARENESS USA Vietnam Bắc Ninh • But Thap Temple • Phat Tich Temple Dong Nai • Buu Phong Temple Hanoi • One-Pillar Pagoda • Quan Su Temple • Tran Quoc Temple • Lang Temple • Perfume Temple • Thay Temple Huế • Thien Mu Pagoda • Quoc An Temple • Bao Quoc Temple • Dieu De Temple Hung Yen • Chuong Temple Ninh Binh • Bai Dinh Temple Nam Dinh • Pho Minh Temple Thai Binh • Keo Temple Tien Giang
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Posted by: site admin @ 7:04 am
03 08  2012 FRIDAY LESSON 687 FREE ONLINE  eNālāndā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY
through
http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org

up a levelTipitaka network … his life, his acts, his words
               
sabbe satta bhavantu sukhi-tatta

TIPITAKA
TIPITAKA   AND   TWELVE   DIVISIONS
    Brief historical background
   Sutta Pitaka
   Vinaya Pitaka
   Abhidhamma Pitaka
     Twelve Divisions of Buddhist Canons
Nine Divisions of Buddhist Canons
Sutta Piṭaka

— The basket of discourses —Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta (DN 22) {excerpt} - all infobubbles— Attendance on awareness —Kāyānupassanā
IV. சட்டத்துக்கு அடிப்படையான அற முறைகளின் கூர்ந்த கவனிப்பு


B. Khandhas பற்பல தனிமங்களின் கூட்டுகளை ஐக்கியப்படுத்தும் மீதான பகுதி

  Dhammapada Verses 283 and 284 Pancamahallakabhikkhu Vatthu-Verse 283. Shun Passion-Verse 284. Attachment To WomenALL ABOUT AWAKEN ONES WITH AWARENESS USA
Vietnam
Bắc Ninh
    •    But Thap Temple
    •    Phat Tich Temple
Dong Nai
    •    Buu Phong Temple
Hanoi
    •    One-Pillar Pagoda
    •    Quan Su Temple
    •    Tran Quoc Temple
    •    Lang Temple
    •    Perfume Temple
    •    Thay Temple
Huế
    •    Thien Mu Pagoda
    •    Quoc An Temple
    •    Bao Quoc Temple
    •    Dieu De Temple
Hung Yen
    •    Chuong Temple
Ninh Binh
    •    Bai Dinh Temple
Nam Dinh
    •    Pho Minh Temple
Thai Binh
    •    Keo Temple
Tien Giang

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Comments 





DN 22 - (D ii 290)

Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta

— Attendance on awareness —
[ mahā+satipaṭṭhāna ]

This sutta is widely considered as a the main reference for meditation practice.




Note: infobubbles on all Pali words


Pāḷi



Uddesa

I. Kāyānupassanā


   A. Ānāpāna Pabba
   B. Iriyāpatha Pabba
   C. Sampajāna Pabba
   D. Paṭikūlamanasikāra Pabba
   E. Dhātumanasikāra Pabba
   F. Navasivathika Pabba

II. Vedanānupassanā

III. Cittānupassanā

IV. Dhammānupassanā


   A. Nīvaraṇa Pabba
   B. Khandha Pabba
   C. Āyatana Pabba
   D. Bojjhaṅga Pabba



English



Introduction

I. Observation of Kāya


   A. Section on ānāpāna
   B. Section on postures
   C. Section on sampajañña
   D. Section on repulsiveness
   E. Section on the Elements
   F. Section on the nine charnel grounds

II. Observation of Vedanā

III. Observation of Citta

IV. Observation of Dhammas


   A. Section on the Nīvaraṇas
   B. Section on the Khandhas
   C. Section on the Sense Spheres
   D. Section on the Bojjhaṅgas


C. Āyatana Pabba

Puna ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu dhammesu dhammānupassī viharati, chasu ajjhattika·bāhiresu āyatanesu. Kathaṃ ca pana, bhikkhave, bhikkhu dhammesu cittānupassī viharati, chasu ajjhattika·bāhiresu āyatanesu?

C. Section on the Sense Spheres

And furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing dhammas in dhammas with reference to the six internal and external āyatanas. And furthermore, bhikkhus, how does a bhikkhu dwell observing dhammas in dhammas with reference to the six internal and external āyatanas


தமிழ்

IV. சட்டத்துக்கு அடிப்படையான அற முறைகளின் கூர்ந்த கவனிப்பு

C. புலனுணர்வு கோளங்கள் மீதான பிரிவு (Āyatana Pabba ஆயதன பப்பா)

மற்றும்
அதற்கு அப்பால், எவ்வாறு பிக்குக்களுக்களே, ஒரு பிக்கு, dhammas in
dhammas சட்டத்துக்கு அடிப்படையான அற முறைகளில் சட்டத்துக்கு அடிப்படையான
அற முறைகளூடன் ஐந்து Āyatana Pabba ஆயதன பப்பா புலனுணர்வு கோளங்களூடன்
கூர்ந்த கவனிப்புடன் வாசம் செய்கிரார்?

Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu cakkhuṃ ca pajānāti, rūpe ca pajānāti, yaṃ ca tad·ubhayaṃ paṭicca uppajjati saṃyojanaṃ taṃ ca pajānāti, yathā ca an·uppannassa saṃyojanassa uppādo hoti taṃ ca pajānāti, yathā ca uppannassa saṃyojanassa pahānaṃ hoti taṃ ca pajānāti, yathā ca pahīnassa saṃyojanassa āyatiṃ an·uppādo hoti taṃ ca pajānāti.

Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu understands cakkhu, he understands rūpa, he understands the saṃyojana which arises owing to these two, he understands how the unarisen saṃyojana comes to arise, he understands how the arisen saṃyojana is abandoned, and he understands how the abandoned saṃyojana does not come to arise in the future. 

இங்கு, பிக்குக்களுக்களே, ஒரு பிக்கு, அங்கே cakkhu கண்களை புரிந்து கொள்கிரார்,rūpa ரூபம்/சடப்பொருளை புரிந்து கொள்கிரார்,  இவ்விரண்டு காரணைங்களை நோக்கி  எழும் saṃyojana கால்விலங்கு/பற்றாசை
புரிந்து கொள்கிரார்; எவ்வாறு saṃyojana கால்விலங்கு/பற்றாசை என அவர் புரிந்து கொள்கிரார்; எவ்வாறு கைவிடப்பட்டsaṃyojana கால்விலங்கு/பற்றாசை எதிர்காலத்தில் அணுகாது என அவர் புரிந்து கொள்கிரார்.

Sotaṃ ca pajānāti, sadde ca pajānāti, yaṃ ca tad·ubhayaṃ paṭicca uppajjati saṃyojanaṃ taṃ ca pajānāti, yathā ca an·uppannassa saṃyojanassa uppādo hoti taṃ ca pajānāti, yathā ca uppannassa saṃyojanassa pahānaṃ hoti taṃ ca pajānāti, yathā ca pahīnassa saṃyojanassa āyatiṃ an·uppādo hoti taṃ ca pajānāti.

He understands sota, he understands sadda, he understands the saṃyojana which arises owing to these two, he understands how the unarisen saṃyojana comes to arise, he understands how the arisen saṃyojana is abandoned, and he understands how the abandoned saṃyojana does not come to arise in the future.

sota காதுகளை புரிந்து கொள்கிரார்,sadda  புரிந்து கொள்கிரார்,  இவ்விரண்டு காரணைங்களை நோக்கி  எழும் saṃyojana கால்விலங்கு/பற்றாசை புரிந்து கொள்கிரார்; எவ்வாறு saṃyojana கால்விலங்கு/பற்றாசை என அவர் புரிந்து கொள்கிரார்; எவ்வாறு கைவிடப்பட்டsaṃyojana கால்விலங்கு/பற்றாசை எதிர்காலத்தில் அணுகாது என அவர் புரிந்து கொள்கிரார்.

Ghānaṃ ca pajānāti, gandhe ca pajānāti, yaṃ ca tad·ubhayaṃ paṭicca uppajjati saṃyojanaṃ taṃ ca pajānāti, yathā ca an·uppannassa saṃyojanassa uppādo hoti taṃ ca pajānāti, yathā ca uppannassa saṃyojanassa pahānaṃ hoti taṃ ca pajānāti, yathā ca pahīnassa saṃyojanassa āyatiṃ an·uppādo hoti taṃ ca pajānāti.

He understands ghāna, he understands gandha, he understands the saṃyojana which arises owing to these two, he understands how the unarisen saṃyojana comes to arise, he understands how the arisen saṃyojana is abandoned, and he understands how the abandoned saṃyojana does not come to arise in the future.

ghāna மூக்கை புரிந்து கொள்கிரார்,gandha  புரிந்து கொள்கிரார்,  இவ்விரண்டு காரணைங்களை நோக்கி  எழும் saṃyojana கால்விலங்கு/பற்றாசை புரிந்து கொள்கிரார்; எவ்வாறு saṃyojana கால்விலங்கு/பற்றாசை என அவர் புரிந்து கொள்கிரார்; எவ்வாறு கைவிடப்பட்டsaṃyojana கால்விலங்கு/பற்றாசை எதிர்காலத்தில் அணுகாது என அவர் புரிந்து கொள்கிரார்.

Jivhaṃ ca pajānāti, rase ca pajānāti, yaṃ ca tad·ubhayaṃ paṭicca uppajjati saṃyojanaṃ taṃ ca pajānāti, yathā ca an·uppannassa saṃyojanassa uppādo hoti taṃ ca pajānāti, yathā ca uppannassa saṃyojanassa pahānaṃ hoti taṃ ca pajānāti, yathā ca pahīnassa saṃyojanassa āyatiṃ an·uppādo hoti taṃ ca pajānāti.

He understands jivha, he understands rasa, he understands the saṃyojana which arises owing to these two, he understands how the unarisen saṃyojana comes to arise, he understands how the arisen saṃyojana is abandoned, and he understands how the abandoned saṃyojana does not come to arise in the future.

jivha நாக்கை புரிந்து கொள்கிரார், rasa ருசியை புரிந்து கொள்கிரார்,  இவ்விரண்டு காரணைங்களை நோக்கி  எழும் saṃyojana கால்விலங்கு/பற்றாசை புரிந்து கொள்கிரார்; எவ்வாறு saṃyojana கால்விலங்கு/பற்றாசை என அவர் புரிந்து கொள்கிரார்; எவ்வாறு கைவிடப்பட்டsaṃyojana கால்விலங்கு/பற்றாசை எதிர்காலத்தில் அணுகாது என அவர் புரிந்து கொள்கிரார்.

Kāyaṃ ca pajānāti, phoṭṭhabbe ca pajānāti, yaṃ ca tad·ubhayaṃ paṭicca uppajjati saṃyojanaṃ taṃ ca pajānāti, yathā ca an·uppannassa saṃyojanassa uppādo hoti taṃ ca pajānāti, yathā ca uppannassa saṃyojanassa pahānaṃ hoti taṃ ca pajānāti, yathā ca pahīnassa saṃyojanassa āyatiṃ an·uppādo hoti taṃ ca pajānāti.

He understands kāya, he understands phoṭṭhabba, he understands the saṃyojana which arises owing to these two, he understands how the unarisen saṃyojana comes to arise, he understands how the arisen saṃyojana is abandoned, and he understands how the abandoned saṃyojana does not come to arise in the future.

 kāya காயா உடலை புரிந்து கொள்கிரார், phoṭṭhabba உணர்வுகளை புரிந்து கொள்கிரார்,  இவ்விரண்டு காரணைங்களை நோக்கி  எழும் saṃyojana கால்விலங்கு/பற்றாசை புரிந்து கொள்கிரார்; எவ்வாறு saṃyojana கால்விலங்கு/பற்றாசை என அவர் புரிந்து கொள்கிரார்; எவ்வாறு கைவிடப்பட்டsaṃyojana கால்விலங்கு/பற்றாசை எதிர்காலத்தில் அணுகாது என அவர் புரிந்து கொள்கிரார்.

Manaṃ ca pajānāti, dhamme ca pajānāti, yaṃ ca tad·ubhayaṃ paṭicca uppajjati saṃyojanaṃ taṃ ca pajānāti, yathā ca an·uppannassa saṃyojanassa uppādo hoti taṃ ca pajānāti, yathā ca uppannassa saṃyojanassa pahānaṃ hoti taṃ ca pajānāti, yathā ca pahīnassa saṃyojanassa āyatiṃ an·uppādo hoti taṃ ca pajānāti.

He understands mana, he understands dhammas, he understands the saṃyojana which arises owing to these two, he understands how the unarisen saṃyojana comes to arise, he understands how the arisen saṃyojana is abandoned, and he understands how the abandoned saṃyojana does not come to arise in the future.

mana,மனதை புரிந்து கொள்கிரார், dhammas தம்மங்களை புரிந்து கொள்கிரார்,  இவ்விரண்டு காரணைங்களை நோக்கி  எழும் saṃyojana கால்விலங்கு/பற்றாசை புரிந்து கொள்கிரார்; எவ்வாறு saṃyojana கால்விலங்கு/பற்றாசை என அவர் புரிந்து கொள்கிரார்; எவ்வாறு கைவிடப்பட்டsaṃyojana கால்விலங்கு/பற்றாசை எதிர்காலத்தில் அணுகாது என அவர் புரிந்து கொள்கிரார்.

Iti ajjhattaṃ dhammesu dhammānupassī viharati, bahiddhā dhammesu dhammānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā dhammesu dhammānupassī viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī dhammesu viharati, vaya-dhamm·ānupassī dhammesu viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī dhammesu viharati; ‘atthi dhammāti pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya, a·nissito ca viharati, na ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu dhammesu dhammānupassī viharati, chasu ajjhattika·bāhiresu āyatanesu.

Thus he dwells observing dhammas in dhammas internally, or he dwells observing dhammas in dhammas externally, or he dwells observing dhammas in dhammas internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of phenomena in dhammas, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena in dhammas, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of phenomena in dhammas; or else, [realizing:] “these are dhammas!” sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing dhammas in dhammas, with reference to the six internal and external āyatanas

இவ்வாறு அவர்  dhammas சட்டத்துக்கு அடிப்படையான அற முறைகளில் சட்டத்துக்கு அடிப்படையான அற முறைகளூடன் 
கூர்ந்து  கவனித்து  வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது சட்டத்துக்கு அடிப்படையான அற முறைகளில் சட்டத்துக்கு அடிப்படையான அற முறைகளூடன்  வெளியே கூர்ந்த கவனித்து  வாசம் செய்கிரார்;samudaya of phenomena புலன்களால் உணரத்தக்க தோற்றம் அதனுடைய அகநிலையில் கூர்ந்து  கவனித்து  வாசம் செய்கிரார், புலன்களால் உணரத்தக்க கழிதல் அதனுடைய அகநிலையில் கூர்ந்து  கவனித்து  வாசம் செய்கிரார், samudaya and passing away of phenomena புலன்களால் உணரத்தக்க தோற்றம் மற்றும் கழிதல் அதனுடைய அகநிலையில் கூர்ந்து  கவனித்து  வாசம் செய்கிரார், இல்லாவிடில் “இது  dhammas சட்டத்துக்கு அடிப்படையான அற முறைகளில் சட்டத்துக்கு அடிப்படையான அற முறைகளூடன் ” என உணர்ந்து,  sati விழிப்பு நிலை அவருக்குள் வந்திருக்கிறது, சும்மா வெறும் ñāṇa  ஓர்அளவு ஞானம் மற்றும் ஓர்அளவு paṭissati என எண்ணி பற்றறு வாசம் செய்கிரார். மற்றும் உலகத்தில் சிறிதளவாவது பற்றிக்கொள்ளாது,அவ்வாறாக பிக்குக்களுக்களே, ஒரு பிக்கு, dhammas சட்டத்துக்கு அடிப்படையான அற முறைகளில் சட்டத்துக்கு அடிப்படையான அற முறைகளூடன் ஆறு Āyatana Pabba ஆயதன பப்பா புலனுணர்வு கோளங்களூடன் கூர்ந்த கவனிப்புடன் வாசம் செய்கிரார்
.

Verse 283. Shun Passion

The wood cut down but not a tree
since it’s from wood that fear is born.
Having cut wood and woodedness
O bhikkhus be without a wood.

Explanation: Monks, cut down the forest of defilements. But,
do not cut down the trees. Fear comes from the forests of defilements.
Clear both the forest and the undergrowth. Having done this achieve
the state of Nibbana.

Verse 284. Attachment To Women

As long indeed as woodedness
of man to women is not cut
so long in bondage is one’s mind
as milch-calf to the mother cow.

Explanation: As long as a man’s mind is attached to women,
even minutely, like a little undergrowth that has not been cut down,
so long will his mind be attached like a suckling calf to its mother
cow.



Dhammapada Verses 283 and 284
Pancamahallakabhikkhu Vatthu

Vanam chindatha ma rukkham
vanato jayate bhayam
chetva vananca vanathanca
nibbana hotha bhikkhavo.

Yava hi vanatho na chijjati
anumattopi narassa narisu
patibaddhamanova tava so
vaccho khirapakova matari.

Verse 283: O bhikkhus, cut down the forest of craving, not the real tree; the
forest of craving breeds danger (of rebirth). Cut down the forest of craving as
well as its undergrowth and be free from craving.

Verse 284: So long as craving of man for woman is not cut down and the
slightest trace of it remains, so long is his mind in bondage as the calf is
bound to its mother.


The Story of Five Old Bhikkhus

While residing at the Jetavana monastery, the Buddha uttered Verses (283) and
(284) of this book, with reference to five old bhikkhus.

Once, in Savatthi, there were five friends who became bhikkhus only in their
old age. These five bhikkhus were in the habit of going together to their old
homes for alms-food. Of the former wives of those five, one lady in particular,
by the name of Madhurapacika was a good cook and she looked after them very
well. Thus, the five bhikkhus went mostly to her house. But one day,
Madhurapacika fell ill and died suddenly. The old bhikkhus felt their loss very
deeply and together they cried praising her virtues and lamenting their loss.

The Buddha called those bhikkhus to him and said, “Bhikkhus! You all
are feeling pain and sorrow because you are not free from greed, hatred, and
ignorance (raga, dosa, moha), which are like a forest. Cut down this forest and
you will be freed from greed, hatred and ignorance.”

Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:

Verse 283: O bhikkhus, cut down the forest of
craving, not the real tree; the forest of craving breeds danger (of
rebirth). Cut down the forest of craving as well as its undergrowth
and be free from craving.

 

Verse 284: So long as craving of man for woman is
not cut down and the slightest trace of it remains, so long is his
mind in bondage as the calf is bound to its mother.

At the end of the discourse the five old bhikkhus attained Sotapatti
Fruition.


Vietnam
Bắc Ninh
    •    But Thap Templehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/But_Thap_Temple

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Bút Tháp Temple

Statue of Avalokiteshvara Bodhisattva, crimson and gilded wood, Restored Lê dynasty, autumn of Bính Thân year (1656)

Bút Tháp Temple (Vietnamese: Chùa Bút Tháp, hán tự: 寧福寺) is a Buddhist temple located near the dyke of the Duong River, Thuan Thanh District, Bac Ninh Province, Vietnam. The temple is also popularly called Nhan Thap Temple. The temple houses the biggest Avalokiteśvara statue with one thousand eyes and a thousand arms.

    •    Phat Tich Temple
Dong Naihttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phat_Tich_Temple

Phật Tích Temple (Vietnamese: Chùa Phật Tích, Chinese: 佛跡寺, literally the Temple of Buddhist Relics) is a Buddhist temple located in the south of Phat Tich mountain, Bac Ninh Province, Vietnam. This is an important listed cultural site of Vietnam.

    •    Buu Phong Temple
Hanoihttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buu_Phong_Temple

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Bửu Phong Temple (Chùa Bửu Phong) is a historic 17th century Buddhist temple in Dong Nai Province in southern Vietnam, north of Ho Chi Minh City.[1][2]

The temple is located on Bửu Long mountain in Bình Điện, Tân Bửu, about 4 km from the city of Biên Hòa. Due to its location, it is also known as Bình Điện Temple.[1]

The temple was built by Thích Bửu Phong in the 17th century, at which point it was only a small shrine. The Đại Nam nhất thống chí, the official court records of the Nguyễn Lords
that ruled southern Vietnam during this period, said that the temple
was to the south of Phước Chánh district, to the west of a large
mountain range and to the north of Long Ẩn mountain. The chronicle made a
note of the idyllic scenery of the surrounding area, which it praised
as the best in the province. As a result of the temple’s presence, it
was also known as Bửu Phong mountain.[1]

Towards the end of the 18th century, a large number of ethnic Chinese immigrants came into southern Vietnam following the fall of the Ming Dynasty,
many of whom were Buddhists. The Chinese settlers rebuilt the original
temple, equipping it with a tiled roof. They invited Zen master Thích
Thành Trí, from the 36th generation of the Tào Động Zen lineage, to come
and become the abbot of the temple. Zen master Thích Pháp Thông was
also responsible for the construction of the nearby Long Ẩn Temple on
the Long Ẩn mountain directly in front of Bửu Long mountain. There is
now a hexagonal stupa at Long Ẩn Temple for Thích Pháp Thông’s remains.[1]

According to the records of Nguyễn Hiền Đức in the book Thiền sư Việt Nam (Vietnamese Zen masters)
compiled by Thích Thanh Từ, Thích Pháp Thông had no disciples to
continue his lineage, so the Zen Master Thích Viên Quang from Minh
Hương, from the 36th generation of the Lâm Tế lineage became the abbot
of the temple. In 1760, he held a renovation of the temple.[1]

In 1829, the temple was rebuilt and expanded due to large donations
made by Nguyễn Văn Hiệp and Nguyễn Văn Tâm. The temple was later
refurbished further in the late 19th century and also in the 20th
century.[1]

From the road to the entrance of the temple, there are 100 steps up
the side of the hill. At the entrance is a large arched triple gate. At
the front of the temple, there are inscriptions of verses on the wall.
In front of the temple is a statue of Avalokiteshvara bodhisattva, erected in 1963.[1]

Inside the highly decorated main hall is a historic statue of Amitabha Buddha. There is also a stupa behind the main hall where a sample of the relics of Gautama Buddha are enshrined.[1]

In present times, Bửu Long mountain has become an important tourist and historical attraction of Dong Nai Province. In the surrounding area, there are further stupas and statues which depict three key moments in the life of Gautama Buddha: his birth as Prince Siddhartha at Lumbini, his enlightenment under the bodhi tree at Bodh Gaya and the entering into nirvana at Kusinara.[1]

    •    One-Pillar Pagoda

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/One-Pillar_Pagoda

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One Pillar Pagoda, Hanoi

Steps leading up to the pagoda

Small shrine devoted to the Boddhisatva of Mercy inside the pagoda

The One Pillar Pagoda (Vietnamese: Chùa Một Cột, formally Diên Hựu tự 延祐寺 or Liên Hoa Đài 蓮花臺) is a historic Buddhist temple in Hanoi, the capital of Vietnam. It is regarded alongside the Perfume Temple, as one of Vietnam’s two most iconic temples.[1]

The temple was built by Emperor Lý Thái Tông, who ruled from 1028 to 1054. According to the court records, Lý Thái Tông was childless and dreamt that he met the bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara, who handed him a baby son while seated on a lotus
flower. Lý Thái Tông then married a peasant girl that he had met and
she bore him a son. The emperor constructed the temple in gratitude for
this in 1049,[1]
having been told by a monk named Thiền Tuệ to build the temple, by
erecting a pillar in the middle of a lotus pond, similar to the one he
saw in the dream.[2]

The temple was located in what was then the Tây Cấm Garden in Thạch
Bảo, Vĩnh Thuận district in the capital Thăng Long (now known as Hanoi).
Before the pagoda was opened, prayers were held for the longevity of
the monarch.[2] During the Lý Dynasty era, the temple was the site of an annual royal ceremony on the occasion of Vesak, the birthday of Gautama Buddha.
A Buddha-bathing ceremony was held annually by the monarch, and it
attracted monks and laymen alike to the ceremony. The monarch would then
free a bird, which was followed by the people.[2]

The temple was renovated in 1105 by Emperor Lý Nhân Tông
and a bell was cast and an installation was attempted in 1109. However,
the bell, which was regarded as one of the four major capital works of
Vietnam at the time, was much too large and heavy, and could not be
installed. Since it could not be tolled while left on the ground, it was
moved into the countryside and deposited in farmland adjacent to Nhất
Trụ Temple. This land was widely inhabited by turtles, so the bell came
to be known as Quy Điền chung, which means Bell of the Turtle Farmland. At the start of the 15th century, Vietnam was invaded and occupied by the Ming Dynasty. In 1426, the future Emperor Lê Lợi
attacked and dispersed the Chinese forces, and while the Ming were in
retreat and low on weapons, their commanding general ordered that the
bell be smelted, so that the copper could be used for manufacturing weaponry.[2]

The temple is built of wood on a single stone pillar 1.25 m in
diameter, and it is designed to resemble a lotus blossom, which is a
Buddhist symbol of purity, since a lotus blossoms in a muddy pond. In
1954, the French Union forces destroyed the pagoda before withdrawing from Vietnam after the First Indochina War, It was rebuilt afterwards.[1]

A replica was built in Thủ Đức in Saigon in the late 1950s and early 1960s.[1]

    •    Quan Su Temple

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quan_Su_Temple

Gate of Quán S Temple

Quán Sứ Temple (Vietnamese: Chùa Quán Sứ, Chinese: 舘使寺) is a Buddhist temple located at 73 Quan Su Street, Hanoi, Vietnam. The temple is the headquarters of the Buddhist Sangha of Vietnam.

History

Quan Su Temple was built in the 15th century under the Lê Dynasty. At that time there was no Buddhist temple here but some cottages used as a place of worship. According to Hoàng Lê nhất thống chí, during Emperor Le The Tong’s reign, Chiem Thanh (Champa), Ai Lao (Laos)
usually sent ambassadors to offer tributes to Đại Việt (official name
of Viet Nam under the Lê Dynasty). The Emperor ordered to construct a
building called Quan Su (Embassy) to receive foreign ambassadors to Thăng Long.
Because those ambassadors were all Buddhist, they decided to build a
temple on the premises for worship. Today only the temple remains.

According to Doctor Le Duy Trung’s essay carved on the 1855 stele, the temple was close to Hau Quan Base in the early years of Gia Long
Era (1802–1819). In 1822, the temple was renovated so that the local
residents could practise worship here. When the troops withdrew, the
temple was returned to the villagers. Monk Thanh Phuong, who hosted the
temple then, had corridors built, statues painted, bell made. The front
palace is dedicated to the Buddha and the rear palace is dedicate to
Master Minh Khong of the Lý Dynasty.

    •    Tran Quoc Temple

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tran_Quoc_Temple

Pagoda of Trấn Quốc Temple

Trấn Quốc Pagoda (Vietnamese: Chùa Trấn Quốc, Chinese: 鎭國寺) is a Buddhist temple located on a West Lake islet, Hanoi, Vietnam. Tran Quoc means “Stabilizing the Nation” in Vietnamese.

    •    Lang Temple

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lang_Temple

Láng Temple (Vietnamese: Chùa Láng, Chinese: 昭禪寺) is a Buddhist temple in Lang village, Dong Da District, Hanoi, Vietnam.


    •    Perfume Temple

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perfume_Temple

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A temple in the Perfume Temple Complex

The Perfume Pagoda or Perfume Temple (Vietnamese: Chùa Hương) is a vast complex of Buddhist temples and shrines built into the limestone Huong Tich mountains. It is the site of a religious festival which draws large numbers of pilgrims from across Vietnam.[1] The centre of the Perfume Temple lies in Huong Son Commune, My Duc District, former Ha Tay Province (now Hanoi). The centre of this complex is the Perfume Temple, also known as Chua Trong (Inner Temple), located in Huong Tich Cave.[2]

    •    Thay Temple
Huế

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thay_Temple

Thay Temple is a Buddhist temple located on the foot of Sai Son Mountain, Quoc Oai district, former Ha Tay province (now Hanoi). The temple was built under the Lý Dynasty, dedicated to Zen master Tu Dao Hanh.

    •    Thien Mu Pagoda

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thien_Mu_Pagoda

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Coordinates: 16.453599°N 107.544812°E

Phuoc Duyen Tower, Thien Mu Pagoda

Thien Mu Pagoda (Vietnamese: Chùa Thiên Mụ; Hán tự: ; also called Linh Mụ, ) is a historic temple in the city of Huế in Vietnam. Its pagoda has seven storeys and is the tallest in Vietnam. The temple is often the subject of folk rhymes and ca dao about Huế, such is its iconic status and association with the city.[1] It is regarded as the unofficial symbol of the former imperial capital.[2]

The pagoda sits on the Hà Khê hill, in the ward of Hương Long in Huế. It is around 3 km from the Citadel of Huế constructed by the Nguyễn Dynasty and sits on the northern bank of the Perfume River.[1][2]

Contents

    •    Quoc An Temple

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quoc_An_Temple

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Quoc An pagoda

Quoc An Temple (Vietnamese: Chùa Quốc Ân) is a Buddhist temple in the city of Huế, central Vietnam.[1]

In the main hall is a banner, containing a verse of praise of the temple and its founder, written by Nguyễn Phúc Chu, one of the Nguyễn Lords who once ruled central and southern Vietnam and the city of Huế.[1]
The temple is situated on a small hill in the ward of Trường An in the
city of Huế. It is located about 2 kilometres (1.2 mi) from the Phú Cam
bridge that spans the Perfume River, which passes through Huế.[1]

The temple was founded by Zen Master Thích Nguyên Thiều (1648–1728), between 1682 and 1685, and was known as the Vĩnh Ân Temple.[1]

Quoc An pagoda

Thích Nguyên Thiều was originally from China, and was a disciple of Thích Khoáng Viên, from Guangdong
in southern China. In 1677, he immigrated to southern Vietnam by boat,
to settle in territory ruled by the Nguyễn Lords. He had initially
arrived in Bình Định further south, founding the Chùa Thập Tháp Di-đà (Vietnamese for Temple of the Ten Towers of Amitabha). After building his first temple, he travelled the region expounding the dharma,
before travelling to Huế to found the Hà Trung Temple in Vinh Hà
district before moving to the Ngự Bình mountain district to build the
Vĩnh Ân Temple.[1]

In 1689, the Nguyễn Lord Nguyễn Phúc Trân
had the name of the temple changed to the Quốc Ân Temple, and gave the
temple an exemption from the land taxation system. Chùa Quốc Ân is the
seat of a Buddhist patriarch lineage of central Vietnam, since Z en
Master Thích Nguyên Thiều was the 33rd patriarch of the Lâm Tế Zen
School. Today, the bulk of Buddhists in central and southern Vietnam are
believed to have taken refuge under Thích Nguyên Thiều’s lineage of
disciples and students. After the passing of Thích Nguyên Thiều, the
ruling Nguyễn Lord of the time, Nguyễn Phúc Chu posthumously conferred him with imperial titles.[1]

During the time of the Nguyễn Dynasty, which was founded in 1802 and was derived from the Nguyễn Lords, the temple was renovated many times. In 1805 Long Thành, the elder sister of Emperor Gia Long personally funded a renovation project.[1]

At the time, the temple was a modest and simple. In 1822, the temple
was the subject of another imperial funded renovation project, this time
funded by Gia Long’s son and successor, Emperor Minh Mạng.
In 1825, the abbot died and a stupa was built in the garden of the
temple, in which his remains were interred. The temple was the subject
of another phase of expansion and renovation between 1837-42. From
1846-63, a triple gate was built, along with further shrines.[1]

At the front of the temple complex is the main ceremonial hall, while the patriarch hall is at the rear, while the sangha’s
quarters are at the sides. The main hall has a shrine commemorating the
birth of Prince Siddhartha, who went on to achieve enlightenment as Gautama Buddha. In the front yard of the temple, there is a plaque in 1729 erected by the Nguyễn Lord of the time, Nguyễn Phúc Chu, praising the spiritual achievements of the temple founder, Thích Nguyên Thiều. [1]


    •    Bao Quoc Temple

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bao_Quoc_Temple

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Bao Quoc Pagoda (Vietnamese: Chùa Báo Quốc)
is a Buddhist temple in the historic city of Huế in central Vietnam. It
was one of the three national pagodas of the city during the time of
the Nguyễn Dynasty.[1][2]

The temple is located on Báo Quốc Street, in the ward of Phường Đúc in Huế. It lies on the southern side of the Perfume River and is approximately one kilometre west of the city centre.[1]
The temple is located on a small hill called Hàm Long and a spring from
the top of the hill flows down into the grounds of the temple.[1]


    •    Dieu De Temple

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dieu_De_Temple

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Entrance to Diệu Đế pagoda on the bank of Dong Ba Canal

Dieu De Pagoda (Vietnamese: Chùa Diệu Đế) is a Buddhist temple in the central city of Huế in Vietnam. It is named for the Four Noble Truths of Buddhism, which are called Tứ Diệu Đế in Vietnamese. During the 19th century Nguyễn Dynasty, Emperor Thiệu Trị declared it to be one of the national pagodas of Vietnam.[1] Outside of Vietnam, the temple is best known as a site of activism during the 1960s, as well as against the Vietnam War. On the night of 21 August 1963, it was the site of a bloody battle between the government forces of President Ngô Đình Diệm
and rioting pro-Buddhist civilians who were attempting to stop the
troops from raiding the pagoda to arrest dissident monks who were
calling for religious equality during the Buddhist crisis.

Hung Yen
    •    Chuong Temple

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chuong_Temple

Chuông Temple (Vietnamese: Chùa Chuông, Chinese: 金鐘寺, Sino-Vietnamese: Kim Chung Tự) is a Buddhist temple, located in Hung Yen City, Vietnam. It is given the title “The most beautiful scenic spot of Pho Hien“. The other names of the temple include Bell Temple (chuông is the Vietnamese word for bell) and Golden Bell Temple.


Ninh Binh
    •    Bai Dinh Temple

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bai_Dinh_Temple

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Bái Đính Dien Tam The

Bái Đính Gac Chuong

Bái Đính Temple (Vietnamese: Chùa Bái Đính) or Bái Đính Temple Spiritual and Cultural Complex is a complex of Buddhist temples in Bai Dinh Mountain in Gia Vien District, Ninh Binh Province, Vietnam.
This complex consists of one old temple area and a new temple area,
which is being constructed. This is considered the largest complex of
Buddhist temples at completion in Vietnam. This is a popular site for
Buddhist pilgrims across Vietnam.[1] Bai Dinh Temple, along with Phat Diem Church, Hoa Lu Ancient Capital, Tam Coc - Bich Dong, Trang An, Cuc Phuong is a famous tourist attraction site of Ninh Binh Province.


Nam Dinh
    •    Pho Minh Temple

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pho_Minh_Temple

Pho Minh Temple (Vietnamese: Chùa Phổ Minh, Chinese: 普明寺) is a Buddhist temple in Tức Mặc village, 5 kilometres north of Nam Dinh city, Vietnam, the home town of the Trần Dynasty.


Thai Binh
    •    Keo Templehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keo_Temple

Keo Temple

Keo Temple (Vietnamese: Chùa Keo, Chinese: 神光寺) is a Buddhist temple in Vũ Thư District, Thai Binh Province, Vietnam. The temple was constructed in 1061 under the Lý Dynasty near the Red River.

Tien Giang

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vinh_Trang_Temple

Vĩnh Tràng Temple is a Buddhist temple near Mỹ Tho in the Mekong River Delta region of southern Vietnam. It is one of the best-known temples in the region.[1]

The temple stands on a 2 hectares (5 acres) block filled with fruit
trees in the village of Mỹ Hóa in the town of Mỹ Phong, on the banks of
the Bảo Định canal.[1]

In the middle of the 19th century, the temple came into being through
the endeavours of the district chief Bùi Công Đạt, who organised its
erection. He recruited the monk Thích Từ Lâm from Bửu Lâm Temple to
preside over Vĩnh Tràng. Following the death of Bùi Công Đạt, Thích Huệ
Đăng presided over the remainder of the construction phase and the
temple was completed in 1850.[1]

Between 1859 and 1862, French colonial forces battled the army of the Nguyễn Dynasty of Emperor Tự Đức. The French army prevailed and Tự Đức ceded three southern provinces to become the colony of Cochinchina.
In the fighting, Vinh Trang was heavily damaged. The successor of Thích
Huệ Đăng was Thích Thiện Đề, and he oversaw the reconstruction efforts.
After his death, the temple fell into disuse.[1]

In 1890, Thích Trà Chánh was recruited from Sắc tứ Linh Thứu Temple
to become the abbot of the temple. The new abbot hailed from Mỹ Tho
and was a disciple of Thích Minh Phước. In 1895, Thích Chánh Hậu
organised a compltet renovation of the temple. In 1904, the temple was
ravaged in a large tropical storm, requiring a major rebuilding in 1907.
Thích Chánh Hậu presided as the abbot for 33 years until his death in
1923. His successor Thích Minh Đàn, organised further renovations
including the main triple gate, main ceremonial hall and the patriarch
hall.[1]

The main triple gate was built in 1933 through the labour of craftsmen recruited from the imperial capital in Huế,
central Vietnam. The central gate is made from steel, while the two
side gates are made from concrete and styled akin to a historical
fortress. The triple gate has an upper level with another large gate on
top. On the right is the statue of Thích Chánh Hậu and on the left is a
statue of Thích Minh Đàn. Both sculptures were made of statue and were
made by Nguyễn Phi Hoanh. The front of the temple is designed in a style
that mixes European and Asian architecture.[1]

In the main hall of the temple, there are multiple statues of various Buddhas including Amitabha Buddha, Gautama Buddha, various arahants and bodhisattvas. There are also statues of Thích Chánh Hậu and Thích Minh Đàn. The three oldest statues in the temple are those of Amitabha, Avalokiteshvara
and Đại Thế Chí bodhisattva, which are made of bronze. However, the
statue of Avalokiteshvara has been lost for a long time, so a wooden
replacement was made. There is also a statue of the Jade Emperor, roughly the size of a real human.[1]

The statues of 18 arahants are carved from wood and were made in 1907
by a group of southern craftsmen. Each statue is approximately 80
centimetres (31 in) tall and 58 centimetres (23 in) in width.[1]

The garden of the temple is decorated with many pot plants and are
tended to on a regular basis. Under the shade of one tree is the stupa
of Thích Chánh Hậu, in which his ashes are interred.[1]

The temple is currently the office of the board of the provincial Buddhist Association of Tien Giang Province. It is a major provincial destination for tourists and pilgrims.[1]

THE OTTERS AND THE WOLF

[39]

O

NE day a Wolf said to her mate,
“A longing has come upon me to eat fresh fish.”

“I will go and get some for you,”
said he and he went down to the river.

There he saw two Otters standing on the bank
looking for fish. Soon one of the Otters saw a great fish,
and entering the water with a bound,
he caught hold of the tail of the fish.

But the fish was strong and swam away,
dragging the Otter after him. “Come and help me,”
the Otter called back to his friend.
“This great fish will be enough for both of us!”

So the other Otter went into the water.
The two together were able to bring the fish to land.
“Let us divide the fish into two parts.”

“I want the half with the head on,” said one.

“You cannot have that half. That is mine,” said the other.
“You take the tail.”

The Wolf heard the Otters and he went up to them.

[40] Seeing the Wolf, the Otters said:
“Lord of the gray-grass color,
this fish was caught by both of us together.
We cannot agree about dividing him. Will you divide him for us?”

[Illustration]

The Wolf cut off the tail and gave it to one,
giving the head to the other.
He took the large middle part for himself,
saying to them, “You can eat the head and the tail
without quarreling.” And away he ran with the body of the fish.
The Otters stood and looked at each other.
They had nothing to say, but each thought to himself
that the Wolf had run off with the best of the fish.

[41] The Wolf was pleased and said to himself,
as he ran toward home, “Now I have fresh fish for my mate.”

His mate, seeing him coming, came to meet him, saying:
“How did you get fish? You live on land, not in the water.”

Then he told her of the quarrel of the Otters.
“I took the fish as pay for settling their quarrel,” said he.

Maurya appointed BSP’s national general secretary

Lucknow: Leader of
Opposition in Uttar Pradesh Vidhan Sabha, Swamy Prasad Maurya, was on
Friday assigned the additional responsibly of national general secretary
of Bahujan Samaj Party.

BSP supremo Mayawati, while appreciating the contribution of Maurya in
motivating the people of Kushwaha and other backward castes to join the
BSP movement and help increase party’s vote-bank, today made the
announcement.

In a statement Mayawati said that she has always worked towards the
uplift of all sections of the society, especially those of the deprived, SC/STs and backwards sections.

Mayawati claimed that in all her tenures as CM she has taken “historical
steps” to ensure that these sections were not deprived of their honour
and rights, but regretted that some “selfish people” in her party have
played into the hands of opposition parties and made efforts to weaken
the movement.

The former CM, however, said that she had never held the caste, that
these “selfish people” represented, responsible for their acts, as she
believed that the caste and its people should not be punished for the
wrongdoings of individuals.
Meanwhile, Maurya has thanked his leader and promised that he would
discharge his duties with dedication and honesty.


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