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17 08 2012 Friday LESSON 679 FREE ONLINE eNālāndā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org up a levelTipitaka network … his life, his acts, his words sabbe satta bhavantu sukhi-tatta TIPITAKA TIPITAKA AND TWELVE DIVISIONS Brief historical background Sutta Pitaka Vinaya Pitaka Abhidhamma Pitaka Twelve Divisions of Buddhist Canons Nine Divisions of Buddhist Canons Sutta Piṭaka — The basket of discourses —Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta (DN 22) {excerpt} - all infobubbles— Attendance on awareness —Kāyānupassanā IV. சட்டத்துக்கு அடிப்படையான அற முறைகளின் கூர்ந்த கவனிப்பு 
Dhammapada Verse 304 Culasubhadda Vatthu-The Virtuous Are Seen ABOUT AWAKEN ONES WITH AWARENESS China Hebei • Kaishan Temple • Longxing Monastery • Puning Temple • Putuo Zongcheng Temple - BSP protests renaming of Kanshi Ram park Communal amity in UP under threat, says BSP
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17  08  2012 Friday LESSON 679 FREE ONLINE  eNālāndā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY
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http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org

up a levelTipitaka network … his life, his acts, his words
               
sabbe satta bhavantu sukhi-tatta

TIPITAKA
TIPITAKA   AND   TWELVE   DIVISIONS
    Brief historical background
   Sutta Pitaka
   Vinaya Pitaka
   Abhidhamma Pitaka
     Twelve Divisions of Buddhist Canons
Nine Divisions of Buddhist Canons
Sutta Piṭaka

— The basket of discourses —Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta (DN 22) {excerpt} - all infobubbles— Attendance on awareness —Kāyānupassanā
IV. சட்டத்துக்கு அடிப்படையான அற முறைகளின் கூர்ந்த கவனிப்பு
Dhammapada Verse 304 Culasubhadda Vatthu-The Virtuous Are Seen

ABOUT AWAKEN ONES WITH AWARENESS  China
Hebei
    •    Kaishan Temple
    •    Longxing Monastery
    •    Puning Temple
    •    Putuo Zongcheng Temple

BSP protests renaming of Kanshi Ram park

Communal amity in UP under threat, says BSP

The Bahujan Samaj Party (BSP) took to the Lucknow streets on Tuesday to
protest against renaming a park commemorating its idealogue and founder
Kanshi Ram after late Samajwadi Party leader Janeshwar Mishra.

Leading the sit-in in front of the park in Vyom Khand area of Gomtinagar, BSP 

general secretary and Leader of Opposition Swami Prasad Maurya
said that they would not tolerate the “games” the Samajwadi Party
government was playing with the names of SC/ST/OBC icons.

Contending that the 376-acre park was conceived by the previous
Mayawati government, which had decided to name the park after Kanshi
Ram, Maurya said the decision of the Akhilesh Yadav government had
reduced the honour given to SC/ST/OBC leaders to a mockery.

BSP leader and former PWD minister Naseemuddin Siddiqui said the
government’s decision would be opposed tooth and nail and demanded that
the renaming be revoked.

The Lucknow Development Authority (LDA) on Monday evening had hung a
board outside the park naming it Janeshwar Mishra Park and had Tuesday
begun construction there.

As soon as the news reached the BSP cadres and supporters, they
arrived in strength at the park and Maurya and Siddiqui staged a sit-in
outside.

Communal amity in UP under threat, says BSP

Lucknow: During the last
five months of the Uttar Pradesh government the law and order situation
has deteriorated and question marks were also being raised about the
communal amity in the state, opposition BSP on Thursday alleged.

Leader of Opposition in the Vidhan Sabha, Swami Prasad Maurya said,
“there is no law and order worth its name in the state besides there was
also a question mark on the communal amity of the state because of some
recent incidents.”

He demanded “concrete measures” by the Samajwadi Party government to immediately check the prevailing “goonda” and “mafiaraj”.

Incidents in Kosi Kalan (Mathura), Pratapgarh, Saharanpur and now
Bareilly have harmed the communal amity in the state, he said.

The BSP leader alleged that it is not just the criminals, but also the
police as well as those belonging to the ruling party who are also
responsible for the present scenario.

Under the present conditions, the chief minister and his ministers are
busy issuing mere statements, Maurya said adding that government should
immediately formulate a concrete strategy to check the situation so that
the people of the state could get respite from it.



Verse 304. The Virtuous Are Seen

Afar the true are manifest
like Himalayan range,
yet even here the false aren’t seen,
they’re arrows shot by night.

Explanation: Like the Himalayas, the good
are visible even from afar; like arrows shot in the night, the wicked
are not seen even though they may be near.





Dhammapada Verse 304
Culasubhadda Vatthu

Dure santo pakasenti
himavantova pabbato
asantettha na dissanti
rattim khitta yatha sara.

Verse 304: Like the Himalayas, the good are visible even from afar; like
arrows shot in the night, the wicked are not seen even though they may be near.


The Story of Culasubhadda

While residing at the Jetavana monastery, the Buddha uttered Verse (304) of
this book, with reference to Culasubhadda the daughter of Anathapindika.

Anathapindika and Ugga, the rich man from Ugga, studied under the same
teacher when they were both young. Ugga had a son while Anathapindika had a
daughter. When their children came of age, Ugga asked for the consent of
Anathapindika to the marriage of their two children. So the marriage took place,
and Culasubhaddi, the daughter of Anathapindika, had to stay in the house of her
parents-in-law. Ugga and his family were followers of non-Buddhist ascetics.
Sometimes, they would invite those non-Buddhist ascetics to their house. On such
occasions, her parents-in-law would ask Culasubhadda to pay respect to those
naked ascetics, but she always refused to comply. Instead, she told her
mother-in-law about the Buddha and his unique qualities.

The mother-in-law of Culasubhadda was very anxious to see the Buddha when she
was told about him by her daughter-in-law. She even agreed to let Culasubhaddha
invite the Buddha for alms-food to their house. So, Culasubhadda prepared food
and collected other offerings for the Buddha and his disciples. She then went up
to the upper part of the house and looking towards the Jetavana monastery, she
made offerings of flowers and incense and contemplate the unique qualities and
virtues of the Buddha. She then spoke out her wish, “Venerable Sir! May it
please you to come with your disciples, to our house tomorrow. I, your devoted
lay-disciple, most respectfully invite you. May this invitation of mine be made
known to you by this symbol and gesture.” Then she took eight fistfuls of
jasmin and threw them up into the sky. The flowers floated through the air all
the way to the Jetavana monastery and lay hanging from the ceiling of the
congregation hall where the Buddha was expounding the Dhamma.

At the end of the discourse, Anathapindika, the father of Culasubhadda,
approached the Buddha to invite him to have alms-food in his house the following
day. But the Buddha replied that he had already accepted Culasubhadda’s
invitation for the next day.

Anathapindika was puzzled at the reply of the Buddha and said,”But,
Venerable Sir! Culasubhadda does not live here in Savatthi; she lives in Ugga at
a distance of one hundred and twenty yojanas from here.” To him the Buddha
said, “True, householder, but the good are clearly visible as if they
are in one’s very presence even though they may be living at a distance”.

Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:

Verse 304: Like the Himalayas, the good are visible
even from afar; like arrows shot in the night, the wicked are not seen
even though they may be near.

The next day, the Buddha came to the house of Ugga, the father-in-law of
Culasubhadda. The Buddha was accompanied by five hundred bhikkhus on this trip;
they all came through the air in decorated floats created by the order of Sakka,
king of the devas. Seeing the Buddha in his splendour and glory, the
parents-in-law of Culasubhadda were very much impressed and they paid homage to
the Buddha. Then, for the next seven days, Ugga, and his family gave alms-food
and made other offerings to the Buddha and his disciples.


engr0ssed:Film actor Nandita going through ‘The Hindu MetroPlus Lifestyle Show’ at the Hitex Exhibition Centre on Wednesday.— Photo: G. Krishnaswamy

VOICE OF SARVAJAN



Hebei
    •    Kaishan Temple

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kaishan_Temple

Jump to: navigation, search
Kaishan Temple

The Daxiongbao Hall (Chinese: 殿; pinyin: Dàxíongbǎo Diàn) of Kaishan Temple

Basic information
Location Xincheng, near Gaobeidian
Affiliation Buddhist
Province Hebei
Architectural description
Completed 1033 CE
Liao Dynasty
Specifications

Kaishan Temple (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: Kāi Shàn ) is a Buddhist temple located in Xincheng village near Gaobeidian, Hebei Province, China.
The temple was first founded in the Tang Dynasty, and grew large and
important in the subsequent centuries until declining in recent
centuries. In the 20th century, the most important hall of the temple,
Daxiongbao Hall, dating from 1033 of the Liao Dynasty, was used as both a school and as a granary. In 2002, the hall underwent a restoration that was completed in 2007.

Contents

    •    Longxing Monastery

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Longxing_Monastery

Longxing Temple

The Manichean Hall of the Longxing Temple

Basic information
Location Zhengding
Geographic coordinates 38°8′38.91″N 114°34′33.86″ECoordinates: 38°8′38.91″N 114°34′33.86″E
Affiliation Buddhist
Province Hebei
Architectural description
Completed 1052 CE
Song Dynasty
Specifications

The Longxing Monastery or Longxing Temple (Chinese: ; pinyin: Lóngxīng ) is an ancient Buddhist monastery located near the town of Zhengding in Hebei Province, China, approximately 15 kilometers north of the provincial capital of Shijiazhuang. It has been referred to as the “First Temple south of Beijing”.

History

The Hall of Great Benevolence flanked by two pavilions holding stelae

The monastery was first built in 586 AD, during the Sui Dynasty. Its original name was Longcang monastery (Chinese: ; pinyin: Lóngcáng ). One of the oldest stelae on the grounds of the monastery, the “Longcangsi Stele” (Chinese: ; pinyin: Lóng Cáng Bēi), dates from the year the monastery’s foundation. Much of it was reconstructed during the Song Dynasty (960-1279 AD).

Following a common pattern, the monastery complex features a central
axis along which a sequence of buildings and focal points is arranged.
The first building is the Hall of the Heavenly Kings. At the opposite end of the axis is the Main Hall (Chinese: ; pinyin: bēi ), a 33-meter-high wooden structure, which houses a bronze statue of Guan Yin. This bronze was built during the early years of the Song Dynasty;
its height exceeds 20 meters. Inside the hall, a staircase leads around
the statue which allows it to be seen from top to bottom.

Longxing Monastery, photographed from the balcony of the Main Hall.

    •    Puning Temple

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puning_Temple

Jump to: navigation, search

Puning Temple

The Puning Temple (Chinese: 普宁寺; pinyin: Pǔníng Sì; literally “Temple of Universal Peace“) of Chengde, Hebei province, China (commonly called the Big Buddha Temple[1]) is a Qing Dynasty era Buddhist temple complex built in 1755, during the reign of the Qianlong Emperor (1735-1796 AD) to show the Qing’s respect to the ethnic minorities. It is located near the Chengde Mountain Resort, and alongside the equally famed Putuo Zongcheng Temple, it is one of the “Eight Outer Temples” of Chengde. Much how the Putuo Zongcheng Temple was modeled after the Tibetan Potala Palace, the Puning Temple was modeled after the Samye Monastery, the sacred Lamaist
site in Tibet. The front temple was constructed in the Chinese style,
although the temple complex follows both Chinese and Tibetan
architectural styles. The Puning Temple also houses the world’s tallest
wooden sculpture of the Bodhisattva Avalokiteśvara (22.28-meter-high and 110-ton),[2][3]
hence the Puning Temple is often nicknamed the “Big Buddha Temple”. The
complex features temple halls, pavilions, drum towers and bell towers. [4]

Contents

History

The Qianlong Emperor (r. 1735–1796) touring Chengde.

The giant wooden Bodhisattva of Puning Temple; click here for a closer look.

Since the 17th century, during the late Chinese Ming Dynasty, the Dzungar people of northwestern China (modern Xinjiang) were engaged in a civil war and conflicts with other nomadic horse-archer groups in the region. The later Qianlong Emperor dispatched an army to Yili in order to suppress their resistance against the Qing Dynasty. The Chinese attacked Kulja (Yining) and captured the ruling Dzungar khan.
After the conquest, Emperor Qianlong personally inscribed his writing
on a tablet that is located in the stele pavilion of the Puning Temple.
This stele of 1755, called the Puning Sibei, commemorated the founding of the temple and the conquering of the Dzungars.[5]
Qianlong ordered for the building of this new Temple of Universal
Peace, a symbol of the emperor’s ambition to maintain peace among
various ethnic minorities and a stable environment within the
northwestern regions. The historian Waley-Cohen calls Chengde “a crucial
location for the exhibition of Manchu power and the representation of
Qing imperial knowledge,” being the location of the summer capital.[5]
Since the Dzungar were followers of Lamaism, the temple was built in
imitation of Samye monastery, the sacred place of Lamaism in Tibet.[4]

The large wooden Buddhist statue of the Bodhisattva Avalokiteśvara
within the main hall of the Puning Temple is one of its most renowned
features. It shows a thousand different eyes and a thousand different
arms stretched out from its frame (in various sizes). The statue itself
is made from five kinds of wood, including pine, cypress, elm, fir, and linden.

As of 1994, the Chengde Mountain Resort and Chengde’s Eight Outer Temples (including the Puning Temple) were established as UNESCO World Heritage Sites. Today, the Puning Temple remains a site of tourist attraction and local festivities.

Gallery

    •    Putuo Zongcheng Temple

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Putuo_Zongcheng_Temple

Jump to: navigation, search

The Putuo Zongcheng Temple of Chengde, built in the 18th century during the reign of the Qianlong Emperor.

View within the Cihangpudu building, the main hall of the temple, crowned with Chinese pavilions and centered around a hall with a golden rooftop (see gallery picture below).

The Putuo Zongcheng Temple (Manchu: ᠪᡠᡩᠠᠯᠠ ᡳ ᡨᠣᠪ
ᡧᠠᠴᡳᠨ ᡳ ᠮᡠᡴ᠋ᡨᡝᡥᡝᠨ
; Chinese: 普陀宗
乘之廟
; pinyin: Pǔtuó Zōngchéng zhī miào; Mongolian: ᠪᠤᠳᠠᠯᠠ ᠶᠢᠨ ᠲᠥᡋ
ᠱᠠᠰᠢᠨ ᠤ ᠰᠦᠮ᠎ᠡ᠃
; Tibetan: གྲུ་འཛིན་་་
བསྟན་པའི་རྩ་
བའི་ལྷ་ཁང༌།
, ZYPY: Chunzin Dainbaiza Pailhakang)[1] of Chengde, Hebei province, China is a Qing Dynasty era Buddhist temple complex built between 1767 and 1771,[2] during the reign of the Qianlong Emperor (1735–1796). It is located near the Chengde Mountain Resort, which is south of the Putuo Zongcheng. Along with the equally famed Puning Temple, it is one of the Eight Outer Temples of Chengde. The temple was modeled after the Potala Palace of Tibet, the old sanctuary of the Dalai Lama built a century earlier.[2][3]
Since it was modeled after the Potala palace, the temple represents a
fusion of Chinese and Tibetan architectural styles. The temple complex
covers a surface area of some 220,000 square meters, making it one of
the largest in China. Many of its halls and pavilions are adorned with
copper and gold tiled roofs, adding to the splendor of the site.

Contents

History

The Putuo Zongcheng Temple is part of the “Eight Outer Temples”
located in Chengde, which are part of the World Heritage List along with
Chengde’s Mountain Resort.
These temples were administered by the “Lifan Yuan”, an administrative
department for the affairs of ethnic minorities such as the Mongolians
and Tibetans, hence the different combinations of architectural style
which could be seen throughout these Eight Outer Temples in Chengde.

The Putuo Zongcheng Temple was originally dedicated to Qianlong in
order to commemorate his birthday, as well as provide Hebei with a
temple of equal size and splendor as the Tibetan Potala Palace. The
Putuo Zongcheng temple served more functions than just Buddhist
ceremonies and festivals; it was also the location that the emperor
would gather meetings of different ethnic envoys from within the empire.
The location served as a peaceful getaway in contrast to the bustling
life of the capital Beijing, as well as complimented the nearby hunting grounds that the emperor would enjoy with his hosts.

As of 1994, the Chengde Mountain Resort and Chengde’s Eight Outer
Temples (including the Putuo Zongcheng Temple) were established as UNESCO World Heritage Sites. Today, the temple remains a site of tourism and local festivities.

Gates, halls, and towers

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