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LESSON 4000 Mon 14 Jun 2021 30) Classical English,Roman, With kind regards and respect to Most Ven. Dr. Sunanda Putuwar, Ph. D. List of all International organizations striving hard to PLANT VEGETABLES & DWARF FRUIT BEARING TREES IN POTS ALL OVER THE WORLD AS PRACTICED BY SAMRAT ASHOKA as Said by an Awakened One with Awareness “Hunger is the worst illness, where 4 times Chief Minister Ms Mayawati who became eligible to be the Prime Minister with her excellent governance of Uttar Pradesh promised to reestablish Ashokan rule along with the farmers compounded existence the worst suffering or aliment (dukkha) with ending of ailments ( dukkha Nirodha)
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LESSON 4000 Mon 14 Jun 2021

30) Classical English,Roman,

With kind regards and respect to Most Ven. Dr. Sunanda Putuwar, Ph. D.

List of all International organizations striving hard to
PLANT VEGETABLES & DWARF FRUIT BEARING TREES IN POTS ALL OVER THE WORLD AS PRACTICED BY SAMRAT ASHOKA as

Said by an Awakened One with Awareness
“Hunger is the worst illness, where 4 times Chief Minister Ms Mayawati who became eligible to be the Prime Minister with her excellent governance of Uttar Pradesh promised to reestablish Ashokan rule along with the farmers

compounded existence the worst suffering or aliment (dukkha) with ending of ailments ( dukkha Nirodha)

https://www.buddhismforkids.net/LifeBuddha.html

https://www.buddhismforkids.net/LifeBuddha.html

The Life of the Buddha
~563 B.C.

Birth of the Buddha
Buddhism is one of the major religions in the world. It began around 2,500 years ago in India when Siddhartha Gautama discovered how to bring happiness into the world. He was born around 566 BC, in the small kingdom of Kapilavastu. His father was King Suddhodana and his mother was Queen Maya.

Seven days after his birth. Queen Maya died. Her sister, Prajapati, raised him as her own child.

A mystic foretold that the prince would be a great king or a Buddha. Now the king, wanting his son to be a king, raised him amid song and dance He kept him in the palace, cut off from the misfortunes of life.
 
As a prince, Siddhartha was trained in warfare and educated in the arts and sciences of the time. Soon he blossomed into a young man of great strength, beauty, and wisdom. At the age of nineteen, he won his beautiful wife, Yashodara, in an archery contest. Passing the days in riches and happiness, he knew nothing of poverty or suffering. 
~19 years old

Four Sights
At age 29, Siddhartha took three trips beyond the palace gates. Along the way, he saw the world that his father had hidden from him–an old man, a sick man, and a dead man. He asked, “How can I lie happily on silk cushions and not ease this suffering? But how?”

On the last ride, he saw a wondering monk who was seeking happiness among human suffering. “This I must do,” Siddhartha said.  So, he gave up his wealth, his royal title and all that he loved. He said goodbye to Yashodara and secretly fled the palace into the misty night.  
29 years old

The Search
For six years, Siddhartha wandered in the forest. He learned deep meditation from wise teachers, and practiced fasting and austerity with five yogis. Thinking this was the way to everlasting happiness, he endured the most pain of all, but found no answers. He said, “I did not find peace in palace life. Nor did I find peace in an austere life. There must be a middle way.”

Near death, he accepted a bowl of rice-milk from a young girl and regained his strength. When the five yogis saw Siddhartha eat the rich and delicious food, they thought he had given up, so they left him.  
~35 years old

Enlightenment
Going alone, he sat under a Bodhi tree and became enlightened, a Buddha. He understood the cycle of birth and death and how to ease suffering. He saw his true nature and that of all living beings. This was the end of his spiritual quest.

Remembering the five yogis, he found them in the Deer Park near Benares and taught them the Four Noble Truths and the Eightfold Path, the pillars of Buddhism. They formed the first order of Buddhist Monks, called the Sangha. 
35-80 years old

The Buddha Teaches
The Buddha spent the next forty-five years spreading his teachings throughout India. He was the first religious leader to accept women and untouchables who are the lowest caste. Rich and poor, men and women, king and slaves, young and old—all were equal in his community.

Two years after his awakening, the Buddha visited his family in Kapilavastu. The king became a disciple of the Buddha and many members of the royal family joined the Sangha, including the Buddha’s son, Rahula. After the king’s death, the Buddha’s aunt Prajapati became the first Buddhist nun. She then ordained Yashodara and hundreds of other women as part of the Sangha.  
80 years old

The Last Years
In his own day, the Buddha became the best known and loved of all the spiritual teachers in India. He never set himself up as an authority, but was a wise and kind friend to all.

At age eighty, he gathered his disciples around him. He told them to not follow another leader, but to take the Dharma as their master. His last words were, “All things in life end. Work diligently for your own enlightenment.” Closing his eyes, the Buddha passed into the final state of nirvana.  

The Heart of the Buddha’s Teachings

The Buddha’s teaching can be simply summed up into three parts:
Four Dharma Seals
Four Noble Truths
Noble Eightfold Path 

The Four Dharma Seals reflect the genuine teachings of the Buddha, just as a legal document is stamped with the royal seal. They can be simply explained by using the following terms:
Anicca (impermanence)
Everything in life, our feelings and thoughts, people, animals, plants, bacteria and countries are always changing and reacting. Without change, there could be no life, no flowers, no grandparents, and no happiness.
Dukkha (suffering)
People suffer because they want things to be permanent when they are not. They cling to things that are ending and try to avoid things that are unpleasant. But thanks to change, we can change suffering into happiness.
Anatta (non-self):  
Nothing lives on its own, not even you or me. We are alive due to our parents, air, food, water, and everything around us. We cannot even remain the same for two moments. We are born, grow old, get sick and die. There is nothing that can be called a permanent “I” or a soul. That which carries on to our next life is our life force, or karma. The concept of “me” and “mine” is an illusion we create with our minds.
Nirvana (true peace)
By accepting and understanding that change is a part of life, we can be content with what we have and who are. We can reach the state of Nirvana, a state of complete selflessness. The word nirvana means to blow out a candle. It is not a place, like heaven, but more a state of being in harmony with the universe, and is beyond words.
The Four Noble Truths
After he became enlightened, the Buddha first taught the Four Noble Truths to five hermits in Deer Park near Benares. They became the first Buddhist monks, the beginning of the Buddhist order called the sangha.  The Four Noble Truths are:

The First Noble Truth is that life is full of unhappiness. No one can stay happy for long. We become sad when we cannot get what we want or when we lose something that we prize, or a loved one dies.
The Second Noble Truth is that suffering and unhappiness are a result of unfulfilled desire. No matter how good or how much we receive, we never seem to have enough. And we certainly don’t want things we do not like.
The Third Noble Truth is that we can end suffering, but we have to give up wanting what we don’t have and stop being envious of what others have. This is not easy to do. It takes a good deal of diligence and self-discipline.
The Fourth Noble Truth is the Buddha taught that the way to conquer feelings of greed and selfishness is to follow the Eightfold Path. 

The Eightfold Path
The Eightfold Path covers eight of the most important things in our lives—from the way we think and speak to how mindful we are of others. By carefully following the Eightfold Path, we can live a life of virtue and find peace of mind and enlightenment. Sometimes these eight steps are called the Middle Path. Life should not be too hard or too easy.
1 Right View: Developing wisdom by understanding the Four Noble Truths. 
2 Right thoughts: Thinking kind thoughts about others, beginning with ourselves.
3 Right speech: Speaking in a kind way, free from lies and angry words.
4 Right action or conduct: Protecting the rights and feelings of others–also caring for the natural environment.
5 Right work: Earning an honest living, careful not to harm the environment or any person or animal.
6 Right effort: Developing a positive attitude and changing our bad habits,
7 Right mindfulness: Being aware of our feelings and alert to what is going on, not daydreaming.
8 Right concentration: Focusing on one thought at a time, to be calm and peaceful.

Follow the Teachings

The Five Precepts
In the beginning, the Buddha did not make any rules for the sangha. A rule was made only when a wrong was done. He taught that following the precepts faithfully is the same as filial respect toward our parents and Dharma teachers. The five major rules are called the Five Precepts. 
1 No killing - Respect for life 
2 No stealing - Respect for others’ possessions
3 No sexual misconduct - Respect for your own pure nature
4 No lying - Respect truth
5 Not using alcohol or drugs that cloud the mind:  - respecting clarity of mind it now!

The Four Limitless Minds
Living life in a kind and wise way is important to Buddhists. To nurture these ideals, the Buddha taught them to sow seeds of goodness by practicing Compassion, Loving-Kindness, Joy, and Inclusiveness. The loving-kindness meditation, mettā, is the traditional Buddhist blessing.

May all beings be well. 
May all beings be happy. 
May all beings be at ease. 

Five Precepts
5. No Intoxicants

The fifth precept is based on self-respect and being health-minded. Young people may think that drinking alcohol, taking drugs, and smoking makes them feel grown up, a “cool thing to do.” But a young person’s body cannot cope with intoxicants. They can affect the way the brain develops and grows and make children sick and lose control of their behavior.  It’s important to keep yourself safe. Don’t get sucked into trying something that may harm you.  Learn how to say “no.”

The Six Perfections
The Six Perfections are a set of positive qualities to develop on the Bodhisattva Path.
1. Giving: The wish to give freely, without expecting a reward
2. Precepts: Development of good behavior
3. Patience: Calmly facing the difficulties in life
4. Effort: Being energetic and overcoming laziness
5. Concentration: Staying relaxed, with the mind focused
6. Wisdom: Combining intellectual understanding with insight into the way things really are

Different Traditions in Buddhism
The Buddha taught in different ways to different people at different times. As a result, different traditions have formed. The two main traditions are Theravada and Mahayana. Both share the common basic teachings of Four Noble Truths and the Eight-fold Path. One tradition is not any better than the other; both seek for enlightenment, but their approach is different– so is their location.

Theravada Buddhism is common in Sri Lanka, Thailand, Miramar, and Laos.

Mahayana Buddhism is found in Tibet, China, Japan, Korea, Vietnam, and Mongolia. It includes Japanese Zen, Chinese, Tibetan, Korean and Vietnamese Buddhism.

Theravada Buddhism

Theravada follows the first teachings of the Buddha. The goal is to become an Arhat—an enlightened one–but not a Buddha. Only a monk or nun can be an Arhat, but through long hours of meditation and personal discipline. Theravada Buddhists revere Gautama or Buddha Shakyamuni, the Buddha of this eon. They also accept Buddha Maitreya as the future Buddha. The teachings are written in Pali and are known as the Pali Canon, or suttas. The most popular is the Metta Sutta on loving-kindness.

There are two Theravada traditions: the village monastery and the Thai forest tradition. Village monasteries are places of ceremony, prayer, community events, education and medicine. The Thai forest tradition is a life of ascetic wandering and meditation practice in the wilderness.
Mahayana Buddhism
Mahayana focuses more on the newer teachings of the Buddha. The goal is the Bodhisattva Path–not only seeking enlightenment for oneself, but the enlightenment of all beings. One who engages in this path is called a Bodhisattva. The path includes more than meditation and personal discipline, but selfless service and working in the world for the benefit of others.

Mahayana Buddhists believe that there have been many Buddhas in the past and that more will appear in the future. According to the Buddha’s teachings, all beings have the Buddha nature and can become Buddhas. Anyone can embark on the Bodhisattva Path of compassion and reach the state of Buddhahood in this very life—monks and nuns, as well as lay Buddhists.

Mahayana teachings are written in Sanskrit and called sutras. The most well-known sutras are the Diamond Sutra, the Flower Garland Sutra, and the Lotus Sutra.

Buddhist Holidays & Festivals

Buddhists celebrate many holidays, most of which honor important events in the life of the Buddha or various Bodhisattvas. The holidays are joyous occasions. Lay people take offerings of food, candles, and flowers to the monks and nuns in the local temples and monasteries. They chant the Buddha’s teachings, listen to Dharma talks and meditate. The dates of the holidays are based on the lunar calendar and often differ by country and tradition.

Dharma Day
Asalha Puja Day or Dharma Day is celebrated on the full moon in July. It honors the Buddha’s first teachings of the Dharma to the five hermits in the Deer Park at Benares. Upon hearing the Truth of his words, the five hermits overcame their doubts and became the Buddha’s first disciples–the beginning of the Buddhist sangha.

Buddhist New Year is celebrated with great joy and spirit on different days in different countries. Special food is offered to monks and nuns. Buddha statues are bathed, houses cleaned, offerings made to ancestors, and lanterns lit to bring good luck for the coming year. Children bow to their parents and receive red envelopes with lucky money. 

Bodhisattva Guan Yin Celebrations:  These holidays celebrate the compassion of the Bodhisattva and are popular in China, Tibet and Nepal. The celebrations are in the form of worship by reciting Guan Yin’s name and reflecting upon our own compassionate nature. The birthday of Guan Yin is celebrated on the full moon day of the 2nd lunar month, his Day of Enlightenment on the 6th lunar month and his Day of Renunciation on the 9th lunar month.

Ullambana: On this day Buddhists make offerings of robes, bedding and daily needs to the monks and nuns to commemorate the kindness of the Buddha’s disciple, Maudgalyayana. The Buddha told Maudgalyayana to make offerings to liberate his mother and others who had fallen into the realm of ghosts. This tradition of making offerings for dead ancestors is usually observed in August or September.

Wesak or the Buddha’s birthday is the most important holiday in Buddhism. It falls on first full moon day in May. On this day, Buddhists clean the temples and elegantly decorate them with flowers and banners. In Mahayana countries, like China and Japan, Buddhists pour water scented with flower petals over an image of the baby Buddha to purify their hearts.
In Theravada countries, this day is known as Wesak and marks the Buddha’s birth, awakenment
and pari NIBBĀNA . Buddhists Wesak or the Buddha’s birthday is the most important holiday in Buddhism. It falls on first full moon day in May. On this day, Buddhists clean the temples and elegantly decorate them with flowers and banners. In Mahayana countries, like China and Japan, Buddhists pour water scented with flower petals over an image of the baby Buddha to purify their hearts.
In Theravada countries, this day is known as Wesak and marks the Buddha’s birth, enlightenment and death. Buddhists visit the monasteries, and take part in street processions and entertainment.   the monasteries, and take part in street processions and entertainment.  

Buddhist Symbols
Buddhism is full of symbols.  Although the Buddha lived in the 6th century BCE, according to tradition, statues of the Buddha and buddhist symbols did not appear in India until around the 3rd century BCE.  Since then these symbols have represented certain aspects of the Buddha and conveyed the core principles of Buddhism.  As Buddhism spread to other countries, the different buddhist traditions transmitted their teachings through the use of various symbols which is believed to be the key to the survival of Buddhism. 

These symbols may invoke inner peace and contentment or awaken deeper states of mind in those who see them.  Each symbol is unique and holds a different meaning or convey a different message.  It may inspire us to achieve our greatest aspirations, values, and potentials.  Here are some of the most inspiring buddhist symbols and their meaning.

10 Inspiring Buddhist Symbols
What do they mean?

Aum (Om) Symbol
Om, also written as Aum, is a mystical and sacred syllable that originated from Hinduism, but is now common to Buddhism and other religions. In Hinduism, Om is the first sound of creation and symbolizes the three stages of existence: birth, life, and death.

The best known use of Om in Buddhism is in Om Mani Padme Hum, the “Six-Syllable Great Bright Mantra” of the Bodhisattva of compassion, Avalokiteśvara. When chanting or looking at the syllables, we invoke the compassion of the Bodhisattva and instill his qualities. AUM (Om) consists of three separate letters, A, U, and M. They symbolize the body, spirit and speech of the Buddha; “Mani” is for the path of teaching; “Padme” for the wisdom of the path, and “hum” denotes wisdom and the path to it, as explained in Buddhism: A Brief Introduction

La https://youtu.be/6zjYFghugJI. ಕವಿ ಸಿದ್ಧಲಿಂಗಯ ಅವರಿಂದ ಅತ್ಯುತ್ತಮ ಆಯ್ಕೆ ಮಾಡಿದ ಉಚಿತ ಆನ್‌ಲೈನ್ ಕವನಗಳು

ಸಿದ್ದಲಿಂಗಯ್ಯ (ಕವಿ)
ಭಾರತೀಯ ಕವಿ
ಭಾಷೆ
ವೀಕ್ಷಿಸಿ
ಸಂಪಾದಿಸಿ
ಸಿದ್ದಲಿಂಗಯ್ಯನವರು (೩ ಫೆಬ್ರವರಿ ೧೯೫೪ - ೧೧ ಜೂನ್ ೨೦೨೧) ಕನ್ನಡದ ಲೇಖಕರಲ್ಲೊಬ್ಬರು. ‘ಬಂಡಾಯ ಸಾಹಿತಿ’, ‘ದಲಿತ ಕವಿ’ ಎಂದೇ ಪ್ರಸಿದ್ಧರಾದ ಸಿದ್ಧಲಿಂಗಯ್ಯನವರು ದಲಿತ ಹೋರಾಟ ಮತ್ತು ಸಾಮಾಜಿಕ ಸಮಾನತೆಗಾಗಿ ಕಾವ್ಯ ಸಾಹಿತ್ಯಗಳನ್ನು ರಚಿಸಿದವರು. ಕಾವ್ಯ, ನಾಟಕ, ಪ್ರಬಂಧ, ವಿಮರ್ಶೆ, ಸಂಶೋಧನೆ, ಆತ್ಮಕಥನ ಮುಂತಾದ ಪ್ರಕಾರಗಳಲ್ಲಿ ಸಾಹಿತ್ಯ ರಚನೆ ಮಾಡಿದವರು. ಎರಡು ಬಾರಿ ಕರ್ನಾಟಕ ವಿಧಾನಪರಿಷತ್ತಿನ ಸದಸ್ಯರಾಗಿದ್ದರು. ಅಧ್ಯಾಪನ-ಬರವಣಿಗೆಗಳಲ್ಲಿ ತೊಡಗಿಕೊಂಡಿರುವವರು.

ಜನನ, ಜೀವನ ಸಂಪಾದಿಸಿ

ಸಿದ್ಧಲಿಂಗಯ್ಯನವರು ಆಗಿನ ಬೆಂಗಳೂರು ಗ್ರಾಮಾಂತರ ಜಿಲ್ಲೆ,ಈಗಿನ ರಾಮನಗರ ಜಿಲ್ಲೆಯ ‘ಮಾಗಡಿ’ ತಾಲ್ಲೂಕಿನ ‘ಮಂಚನಬೆಲೆ’ ಗ್ರಾಮದಲ್ಲಿ ೧೯೫೪ರಲ್ಲಿ ಜನಿಸಿದರು. ತಂದೆ ದೇವಯ್ಯ, ತಾಯಿ ಶ್ರೀಮತಿ ವೆಂಕಮ್ಮ. ಮಲ್ಲೇಶ್ವರಂನ ಸರ್ಕಾರಿ ಪ್ರೌಢಶಾಲೆ ಇವರ ವಿದ್ಯಾಕೇಂದ್ರವಾಗಿತ್ತು. ಆ ವೇಳೆಗಾಗಲೇ ಕವಿತೆ ಬರೆವ ಅಭ್ಯಾಸ ಇವರಿಗಿತ್ತು. ವಿದ್ಯಾರ್ಥಿ ದೆಸೆಯಲ್ಲಿಯೇ ಇವರು ಉತ್ತಮ ಭಾಷಣಕಾರರಾಗಿದ್ದರು. ಅಂಬೇಡ್ಕರ್, ಪೆರಿಯಾರ್, ವಸುದೇವಭೂಪಾಲ, ಲೋಹಿಯಾ ಮುಂತಾದವರ ವಿಚಾರಧಾರೆಗಳಿಂದ ಆಕರ್ಷಿತರಾಗಿದ್ದರು.

ಗೌರವ, ಪ್ರಶಸ್ತಿಗಳು ಸಂಪಾದಿಸಿ

ಉತ್ತಮ ಚಲನಚಿತ್ರಗೀತ ರಚನೆಗಾಗಿ ಕರ್ನಾಟಕ ಸರ್ಕಾರ ಪ್ರಶಸ್ತಿ-೧೯೮೪
ರಾಜ್ಯೋತ್ಸವ ಪ್ರಶಸ್ತಿ -ಕರ್ನಾಟಕ ಸರ್ಕಾರ-೧೯೮೬
ಡಾ.ಅಂಬೇಡ್ಕರ್ ಶತಮಾನೋತ್ಸವ ವಿಶೇಷ ಪ್ರಶಸ್ತಿ -೧೯೯೨
ಕರ್ನಾಟಕ ಸಾಹಿತ್ಯ ಅಕಾಡೆಮಿ ಗೌರವ ಪ್ರಶಸ್ತಿ -೧೯೯೬
ಜಾನಪದ ತಜ್ಞ ಪ್ರಶಸ್ತಿ -೨೦೦೧
೨ ಬಾರಿ ಕರ್ನಾಟಕ ರಾಜ್ಯ ವಿಧಾನ ಪರಿಷತ್ ಸದಸ್ಯ.
ಸಂದೇಶ್ ಪ್ರಶಸ್ತಿ -೨೦೦೧
ಡಾ.ಅಂಬೇಡ್ಕರ್ ಪ್ರಶಸ್ತಿ -೨೦೦೨
ಸತ್ಯಕಾಮ ಪ್ರತಿಷ್ಠಾನ ಪ್ರಶಸ್ತಿ -೨೦೦೨
ಬಾಬುಜಗಜೀವನರಾಮ್ ಪ್ರಶಸ್ತಿ -೨೦೦೫
ನಾಡೋಜ ಪ್ರಶಸ್ತಿ -೨೦೦೭
ಪ್ರೆಸಿಡೆನ್ಸಿ ಇನ್ಷಿಟ್ಯೂಷನ್ ಪ್ರಶಸ್ತಿ -೨೦೧೨
ಆಳ್ವಾಸ್ ನುಡಿಸಿರಿ ಪ್ರಶಸ್ತಿ -೨೦೧೨
ಶ್ರವಣಬೆಳಗೊಳದಲ್ಲಿ ನಡೆದ ೮೧ನೇ ಕನ್ನಡ ಸಾಹಿತ್ಯ ಸಮ್ಮೇಳನದ ಅಧ್ಯಕ್ಷರು.
ನೃಪತುಂಗ ಪ್ರಶಸ್ತಿ -೨೦೧೮
ಪಂಪ ಪ್ರಶಸ್ತಿ - ೨೦೧೯[೧]

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