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(61) 2720 Tue 21 Aug 2018 LESSON (61) Mon 21 Aug 2007 Do Good Be Mindful - Awakened One with Awareness (AOA) ” May the auspicious occasion of Eid bless you with peace & bring joy to your heart & home. ” Happy Eid! DBS (Diploma in Buddhist Studies) Sunday 2 pm - 3 pm INTRODUCTION TO ABHIDHAMMA Sayalay Uttamanyani 3 pm - 4 pm Pali Language and Literature Bhikkhu Pamokkho 4.30 pm - 5.30 pm Sutta Pitaka Bhikkhu Gandhamma/Bhikkhu Dhammaloka 5.50 pm - 6.30 pm Life of Buddha and Dhammapada Dr BV Rajaram 6.30 pm - 7.30 pm Bhikkhu Ariyavamsa/Bhikkhu Ayupala
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(61)  2720 Tue 21 Aug 2018 LESSON (61) Mon 21 Aug 2007
  
Do Good Be Mindful  -  Awakened One with Awareness (AOA)

” May the auspicious occasion of Eid bless you with peace & bring joy to your heart & home. “ 

Happy Eid!

DBS (Diploma in Buddhist Studies)

Sunday
2 pm - 3 pm
 
INTRODUCTION TO ABHIDHAMMA
Sayalay Uttamanyani

3 pm - 4 pm
 
Pali Language and Literature
Bhikkhu Pamokkho

4.30 pm - 5.30 pm

Sutta Pitaka
Bhikkhu Gandhamma/Bhikkhu Dhammaloka

5.50 pm - 6.30 pm

Life of Buddha and Dhammapada

Dr BV Rajaram

6.30 pm - 7.30 pm
Bhikkhu Ariyavamsa/Bhikkhu Ayupala

INTRODUCTION OF ABHIDHAMMA
There are three pitaks  (Tipitaka) in Theravada Buddhism as Vinaya, Stttanta and Abhidhamma.

Tipitakas
means threee teachings of Buddha within 45 years  (vasa) have been kept
in  as an origin without modifying, without adding also without making
corrections known as Theravada Buddhism.

3 pitakas or 3 baskets or 3 collections are as follows :

1. Vinaya                         =   5 treaties = 21,000 Dhammakkhandha
2. Suttanta                       =   40 ——– =  21,000———————-
3. Abhidhamma              =    7 ———-= 42,0000 ———————

If suup altogethert 84,000 Dhammakkhandas in 3 pitakas

Herein …Vinaya can be called Andesana which is authoritative teachings

                Suttana ————– Voharadesana———Conventional teachings
         
                Abhidhamma ——- Paramtthadesana —Ultimate teachings as well.

Q, What is Abhidhamma ?

    
Abhidhamma is ubique in Buddhism. It is one of the Tipitakas pali texts
which explains dhammas in detail and in an analytical way.

    
Abhidhamma is expounded in detail by the BUDDHA Himself during the 7th
vasa for the gratitude of his mother Mahamayadevi as deva at Tavatisma
celestial abode. Even though while He was in deva world to expound
dhamma, He came down to humworld for havingmeals as human being.

    
At that time, Venerable Sariputta, one of the chief desciples,
approached to the Buddha, learnt and brought the Abhidhamma to the human
world. Then he taught this doctrine to bhikkhu pupils. In this way
Abhidhamma was introduced into our world in a concise form as the
profound dhamma.

Abhidhamma is classified into seven books as follows:

1. Dhammasangani  (the Book of Classification)
2. Vibhangta  (the Book of Analysis)
3. Dhatukatha  (he Book of Discourse on Element)
4. Puggalapannati (the Book of Designation and Individuals)
5. Kathvatthu  (the Book of Contoversy)
6.  Yamaka  ( the Book of Pairs )
7.  Patthana  (the Book of Conditional Relations )

A
brief outline of contents of the seven books of Abhidhamma will provide
textual material to be condensed and summarisd by Abhidhamattha Sangha (
the Manual o Abhidhamma)

The Manual of Abhidhamma contains nine chpters and theyn are:

1. Citta               = Consciousness
2. Cetasika        = Mental Factor
3. Pakkinaka     = Miscellaneous
4.Vithi                = Cognitive Process
5. Vithimutta     = Process Freed
6. Rupa             = Matter
7. Samuccaya  = Categories
8. Paccaya       = Conditionalities
9. Kamatthana = Meditations Subjects

THE FOUR ULTIIMATE REALITIES

1. CITTA         = 89 or 121
2. Cetasika    = 52
3. Rupa          = 28
4. Nibbana



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THE BLESSED NOBLE AWAKENED ONE - THE TATHAGATA -Young-The City

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THE BLESSED NOBLE AWAKENED ONE - THE TATHAGATA 

Young

I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying near Savatthi in Jeta’s Grove, Anathapindika’s monastery. Then King Pasenadi Kosala
went to the Blessed One and, on arrival, exchanged courteous greetings
with him. After this exchange of friendly greetings & courtesies, he
sat to one side. As he was sitting there he said to the Blessed One:
“Now then, does Master Gotama claim, ‘I have awakened to the unexcelled
right self-awakening’?”

“If, great king, one speaking rightly could say of anyone,
‘He has awakened to the unexcelled right self-awakening,’ one could
rightly say that of me. For I, great king, have awakened to the
unexcelled right self-awakening.”

“But Master Gotama, those priests & contemplatives each
with his group, each with his community, each the teacher of his group,
an honored leader, well-regarded by people at large — i.e., Purana Kassapa, Makkhali Gosala, Ajita Kesakambalin, Pakudha Kaccayana, Sañjaya Belatthaputta, and the Nigantha
Nathaputta: even they, when I asked them whether they claimed to have
awakened to the unexcelled right self-awakening, didn’t make that claim.
So who is Master Gotama to do so when he is still young & newly
gone-forth?”

“There are these four things, great king, that shouldn’t be despised & disparaged for being young.

Which four? A noble warrior, great king, shouldn’t be
despised & disparaged for being young. A snake… A fire… And a monk
shouldn’t be despised & disparaged for being young. These are the
four things that shouldn’t be despised & disparaged for being
young.”

That is what the Blessed One said. Having said that, the One Well-Gone, the Teacher, said further:

You shouldn’t look down on
— for being young —
a noble warrior of consummate birth,
a high-born prince of great status.
A person shouldn’t disparage him.

	
For it’s possible
that this lord of human beings,
this noble warrior,
will gain the throne
and, angered at that disparagement,
come down harshly
with his royal might.
So, guarding your life,
avoid him.
	
You shouldn’t look down on
— for being young —
a serpent you meet
in village or wilderness:
A person shouldn’t disparage it.
	
As that potent snake slithers along
with vibrant colors,
it may someday burn the fool,
whether woman or man.
So, guarding your life,
avoid it.
 \"(Serpent)\"
You shouldn’t look down on
— for being young —
a blaze that feeds on many things,
a flame with its blackened trail:
A person shouldn’t disparage it.
	

Fire Prevention Week

\"fire\"Next week, October 7-13 is Fire Prevention Week. The theme of this For if it gains sustenance, becoming a great mass of flame, it may someday burn the fool, whether woman or man. So, guarding your life, avoid it. When a fire burns down a forest — that flame with its blackened trail — the shoots there take birth once more with the passage of days & nights. But if a monk, his virtue consummate, burns you with his potency, you won’t acquire sons or cattle nor will your heirs enjoy wealth. They become barren, heir-less, like palm tree stumps. So a person who’s wise, out of regard for his own good, should always show due respect for a serpent, a fire, a noble warrior with high status, & a monk, his virtue consummate.

When this was said, King Pasenadi Kosala said to the Blessed One: “Magnificent,
lord! Magnificent! Just as if he were to place upright what was
overturned, to reveal what was hidden, to show the way to one who was
lost, or to carry a lamp into the dark so that those with eyes could see
forms, in the same way has the Blessed One — through many lines of
reasoning — made the Doctrine - The True Practice of The True Followers
of The Path Shown by The Blessed Noble Awakened One - the
Tathagata clear. I go to the Blessed One for refuge, to the Doctrine -
The True Practice of The True Followers of The Path Shown by The Blessed
Noble Awakened One - the Tathagata, and to the Community of monks. May
the Blessed One remember me as a lay follower who has gone to him for
refuge, from this day forward, for life.”

The City

Dwelling at Savatthi
“True Followers of The Path Shown by The Blessed Noble Awakened One -
The Tathagata, before my Awakening, when I was just an unawakened The
Blessed Noble Awakened One - The Tathagata To Be, the realization came
to me: ‘How this world has fallen on difficulty! It is born, it ages, it
dies, it falls away & rearises, but it does not discern the escape
from this stress, from this aging & death. O when will it discern
the escape from this stress, from this aging & death?’

“Then the thought occurred to me, ‘Aging & death exist
when what exists? From what as a requisite condition is there aging
& death?’ From my appropriate attention there came the breakthrough
of discernment: ‘Aging & death exist when birth exists. From birth
as a requisite condition comes aging & death.’ Then the thought
occurred to me, ‘Birth exists when what exists? From what as a requisite
condition comes birth?’ From my appropriate attention there came the
breakthrough of discernment: ‘Birth exists when becoming exists. From
becoming as a requisite condition comes birth… ‘Name-&-form exists
when what exists? From what as a requisite condition is there
name-&-form?’ From my appropriate attention there came the
breakthrough of discernment: ‘Name-&-form exists when consciousness
exists. From consciousness as a requisite condition comes
name-&-form.’ Then the thought occurred to me, ‘Consciousness exists
when what exists? From what as a requisite condition comes
consciousness?’ From my appropriate attention there came the
breakthrough of discernment: ‘Consciousness exists when name-&-form
exists. From name-&-form as a requisite condition comes
consciousness.’

“Then the thought occurred to me, ‘This consciousness turns
back at name-&-form, and goes no farther. It is to this extent that
there is birth, aging, death, falling away, & re-arising, i.e., from
name-&-form as a requisite condition comes consciousness, from
consciousness as a requisite condition comes name-&-form. From
name-&-form as a requisite condition come the six sense media
Thus is the origination of this entire mass of stress. Origination,
origination.’ Vision arose, clear knowing arose, discernment arose,
knowledge arose, illumination arose within me with regard to things
never heard before.

“Then the thought occurred to me, ‘Aging & death don’t
exist when what doesn’t exist? From the cessation of what comes the
cessation of aging & death?’ From my appropriate attention there
came the breakthrough of discernment: ‘Aging & death don’t exist
when birth doesn’t exist. From the cessation of birth comes the
cessation of aging & death.’… ‘Name-&-form doesn’t exist when
what doesn’t exist? From the cessation of what comes the cessation of
name-&-form?’ From my appropriate attention there came the
breakthrough of discernment: ‘Name-&-form doesn’t exist when
consciousness doesn’t exist. From the cessation of consciousness comes
the cessation of name-&-form.’ Then the thought occurred to me,
‘Consciousness doesn’t exist when what doesn’t exist? From the cessation
of what comes the cessation of consciousness?’ From my appropriate
attention there came the breakthrough of discernment: ‘Consciousness
doesn’t exist when name-&-form doesn’t exist. From the cessation of
name-&-form comes the cessation of consciousness.’

“The thought occurred to me, ‘I have attained this path to
Awakening, i.e., from the cessation of name-&-form comes the
cessation of consciousness, from the cessation of consciousness comes
the cessation of name-&-form. From the cessation of name-&-form
comes the cessation of the six sense media. From the cessation of the
six sense media comes the cessation of contact. From the cessation of
contact comes the cessation of feeling. From the cessation of feeling
comes the cessation of craving. From the cessation of craving comes the
cessation of clinging/sustenance. From the cessation of
clinging/sustenance comes the cessation of becoming. From the cessation
of becoming comes the cessation of birth. From the cessation of birth,
then aging & death, sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, &
despair all cease. Thus is the cessation of this entire mass of stress.
Cessation, cessation.’ Vision arose, clear knowing arose, discernment
arose, knowledge arose, illumination arose within me with regard to
things never heard before.

It is just as if
a man, traveling along a wilderness track, were to see an ancient path,
an ancient road, traveled by people of former times. He would follow
it. Following it, he would see an ancient city, an ancient capital
inhabited by people of former times, complete with parks, groves, &
ponds, walled, delightful. He would go to address the king or the king’s
minister, saying, ‘Sire, you should know that while traveling along a
wilderness track I saw an ancient path… I followed it… I saw an ancient
city, an ancient capital… complete with parks, groves, & ponds,
walled, delightful. Sire, rebuild that city!’ The king or king’s
minister would rebuild the city, so that at a later date the city would
become powerful, rich, & well-populated, fully grown &
prosperous.

“In the same way I saw an ancient path, an ancient road,
traveled by the Rightly Self-awakened Ones of former times. And what is
that ancient path, that ancient road, traveled by the Rightly
Self-awakened Ones of former times? Just
this noble eightfold path: right view, right aspiration, right speech,
right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, right
concentration. That is the ancient path, the ancient road, traveled by
the Rightly Self-awakened Ones of former times. I followed that path.
Following it, I came to direct knowledge of aging & death, direct
knowledge of the origination of aging & death, direct knowledge of
the cessation of aging & death, direct knowledge of the path leading
to the cessation of aging & death. I followed that path. Following
it, I came to direct knowledge of birth… becoming… clinging… craving…
feeling… contact… the six sense media… name-&-form… consciousness,
direct knowledge of the origination of consciousness, direct knowledge
of the cessation of consciousness, direct knowledge of the path leading
to the cessation of consciousness. I followed that path.

“Following it, I came to direct knowledge of fabrications,
direct knowledge of the origination of fabrications, direct knowledge of
the cessation of fabrications, direct knowledge of the path leading to
the cessation of fabrications. Knowing that directly, I have revealed it
to monks, nuns, male lay followers & female lay followers, so that
this holy life has become powerful, rich, detailed, well-populated,
wide-spread, proclaimed among celestial & human beings.”

Stock Photo titled: Way Between Two Stone Walls At The Back Of Greco-Roman Theatre Kourion Archaeological Site In Cyprus Spring 2007 Vertical, USE OF THIS IMAGE WITHOUT PERMISSION IS PROHIBITED

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About the Course

Until
recently, the wisdom of the world’s many religions existed in separate
silos blocked from other traditions by barriers of language, distance,
and slow communications. Now, more than at any time in history, this
collective wisdom is easily available to anyone with an internet
connection. But without a guide to this enormous wealth of information
and practice, we can quickly lose our way.  

In
this course, comparative religionist Kenneth Rose will be your guide in
learning about and practicing the religious and spiritual wisdom that
can change your life and the life of your community. Taking his start
from the spiritual principles and practices outlined by noted investor
 and spiritual teacher Sir John Templeton in his book Wisdom from World Religions: Pathways Toward Heaven on Earth,
Kenneth Rose will trace these teachings to their sources in the world’s
major religions and show you how you can put them into practice.

What You’ll Learn

This course provides clear and inspiring answers to many of life’s big questions:

  • Does life have an ultimate meaning?
  • Is science the ultimate guide to the deepest truth of life?
  • Does God, or a divine reality, exist?
  • What practices can bring God, or a divine reality, into your own experience?
  • Is death the end of life?

Course Learning Objectives

After taking this course, participants should be able to:

  • Identify the basic teachings of the world’s major active religious traditions.
  • Distinguish the different religions from each other.
  • Compare these religions in search of commonalties and differences.
  • Evaluate Sir John’s contributions to the study of spirituality.
  • Apply some of the spiritual practices suggested by Sir John Templeton
  • Assess claims about spiritual realities made by the various religions.

 


https://wisdomfromworldreligions.com/my-courses





Thank you for registering with the Graduate Theological Union.


Our next session of Wisdom from World Religions will be taught August 13th, 2018 – September 21st, 2018. 


You will be contacted shortly before the course launches with further instructions. Thank you! 

My Courses Wisdom from World Religions Day 1 (Monday): Wisdom from World Religions

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Day 1 (Monday): Wisdom from World Religions

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Unit 1 Study Guide: Sir John Templeton’s Wisdom from World Religions:  The Tapestry of World Religions

Unit 1 Study Guide: Sir John Templeton’s Wisdom from World Religions: The Tapestry of World Religions



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Unit 1 Video: Sir John Templeton’s Wisdom from World Religions: The Tapestry of World Religions

Unit 1 Video: Sir John Templeton’s Wisdom from World Religions: The Tapestry of World Religions



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Unit 2 Study Guide: Introducing the Religions of the World: Sir John Templeton and the Study of Religion

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Unit 2 Video: Introducing the Religions of the World: Sir John Templeton and the Study of Religion,



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Unit 3 Study Guide: A Spiritual Practice from Sir John Templeton: Lifting Your awareness to a Higher level of Receptivity

Unit 3 Study Guide: A Spiritual Practice from Sir
John Templeton: Lifting Your awareness to a Higher level of Receptivity



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Unit 3 Video: A Spiritual Practice from Sir John Templeton: Lifting Your Awareness to a Higher Level of Receptivity

Unit 3 Video: A Spiritual Practice from Sir John
Templeton: Lifting Your Awareness to a Higher Level of Receptivity



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Unit 4 Study Guide: Guest Lecture: Sir John Templeton on Science and Religion

Unit 4 Study Guide: Guest Lecture: Sir John Templeton on Science and Religion



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Unit 4 Video 4: Guest Lecture: Sir John Templeton on Science and Religion

Unit 4 Video 4: Guest Lecture: Sir John Templeton on Science and Religion


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Video 1: Sir John Templeton’s Wisdom from World Religions

Topic:  The Tapestry of World Religions

A Spiritual Law from Sir John Templeton:
“The rich variety of world religions creates a tapestry of amazing
beauty—a testimony to the spiritual nature of our human visit on earth”
(WWR 56).

Video 1 Learning Objectives:

  1. To get acquainted with Sir John Templeton’s Spiritual Vision
  2. To apply spiritual laws in order
    to become what Sir John Templeton calls “a constructive participant in
    building ‘heaven on earth’” (WWR xix).
  3. To employ the resources of the world’s religions to a personal quest for wisdom.

Readings and Selections

Suggested Reading in Wisdom from World Religions

  • xix-xxv

Discussion questions 

  • Seekers 

    • How many significant living religions of the world can you name?
    • What methods would you use to study the religions of the world?
  • Proficients 
    • Can you group different current religious into two or three or more families of religions/
    • What critical and theoretical perspectives do you bring to bear on the study of religion?
  • Adepts 
    • Do you think that spiritual practices and the study of religion belong together?
    • What do you see as the strengths and weaknesses of the
      synthesis of religious ideas and practices that John Templeton expresses
      in Wisdom from World Religions?

 

Readings from Sir John Templeton’s Wisdom from World Religions

  • “The rich variety of world
    religions creates a tapestry of amazing beauty—a testimony to the
    essential spiritual nature of our human visit on earth. And yet, within
    this amazing and sometimes fascinating diversity can be found an equally
    amazing unity” (WWR 56).
  • “The more we know about the
    universe and our place in it, the more we realize how little we know.
    So, in our ongoing search, we often look to the spiritual teachings of
    the world religions to provide assistance in helping us understand more
    of who and what we are and why we are here.” (WWR 5)
  • Wisdom from World Religions: Pathways toward Heaven on Earth
    is designed to offer people of all ages and all nations an opportunity
    to learn a little more about the spiritual laws, principles, and
    teachings of a variety of great spiritual practices. I hope that in this
    book we can offer a Scripture verse or story or parable or discipline
    or quote that may show you the world in a way more helpful than you have
    seen it before. The materials presented in this book can provide an
    opportunity for learning and “growing in wisdom.” There are clear
    scriptural and philosophical bases for advocating the need for an
    inquiring and open mind. . . . Can the value in learning to see a
    different world lie not in replacing the one you have, but in providing a
    basis for an opportunity to see from a different, or larger,
    perspective? Can the timeless universal principles of life that
    transcend modern times or particular cultures help people in all parts
    of the world live happier and more useful lives?” (WWR xxi).
  • “The publishing of this book is
    accomplished with reverence and appreciation for the world religions
    that purify a person’s mind and heart, elevate his emotions, and offer
    guidance for a spiritual way of life. Much of the material contained
    herein has been made possible by the sincere light of the prophets,
    teachers, and traditions of the world’s great religions that, through
    the ages, have expressed sacred insights and wisdom to humanity” (WWR
    xxv).
  • “Who am I? Why am I here on planet
    Earth? What does the future hold? How can I set out on my own into a
    world that sometimes seems filled with conflict and strife? How can I
    get along better with the people in my life? How do I cope with
    day-to-day pressures? How can I be successful in my work? How do I find
    peace in the midst of turmoil? How can my life be useful and happy?”
    (WWR 3).

My Course  Wisdom from World Religions

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Thank you for registering with the Graduate Theological Union.

Our next session of Wisdom from World Religions will be taught August 13th, 2018 – September 21st, 2018.

You will be contacted shortly before the course launches with further instructions. Thank you!

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About
the Course Until recently, the wisdom of the world’s many religions
existed in separate silos blocked from other traditions by barriers of
language, distance, and slow communications. Now, more than at any time
in history, this collective wisdom is…
                                

The First Things To Do In The Course                                                  

                               

What You’ll Learn in This Course                                                  

                               

Orientation Video                                                  

                               

Course Plan (Syllabus) Word Version                                                  

                               

Daily Course Activities                                                  

                               

FAQs and Troubleshooting Guide                                                  

                               

Brought
to by a Generous Grant from the Templeton World Charity Foundation
(Executive Summary)                                                  

                               

Pretest

©
2018 Kenneth Rose. Excluding quoted material from other copyrighted,
public domain, Creative Commons materials and proprietary material owned
by Accord LMS, Now You Know Media, the Templeton World Charity
Foundation, and the Graduate Theological Union. All rights reserved.

Permission
to include excerpts from Wisdom from World Religions: Pathways Toward
Heaven on Earth © 2002 Templeton Foundation Press has been granted by
the Templeton Foundation Press. All rights reserved.

The
Wisdom from World Religions global open online course is offered in
partnership with the Graduate Theological Union of Berkeley, California,
a unique multi-religious consortium for the graduate study of religion
featuring more than 20 member schools, centers, and institutes.

Sir
John Templeton and Wisdom from World Religions is a grant-funded
project from the Templeton World Charity Foundation. The opinions
expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not
necessarily reflect the views of the Templeton World Charity Foundation,
Inc.
Copyright 2018 Kenneth Rose and Accord LMS | Privacy Statement | Terms Of Use

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About the Course

Until
recently, the wisdom of the world’s many religions existed in separate
silos blocked from other traditions by barriers of language, distance,
and slow communications. Now, more than at any time in history, this
collective wisdom is easily available to anyone with an internet
connection. But without a guide to this enormous wealth of information
and practice, we can quickly lose our way. 

In this course,
comparative religionist Kenneth Rose will be your guide in learning
about and practicing the religious and spiritual wisdom that  can change
your life and the life of your community. Taking his start from the
spiritual principles and practices outlined by noted investor  and
spiritual teacher Sir John Templeton in his book Wisdom from World
Religions: Pathways Toward Heaven on Earth, Kenneth Rose will trace
these teachings to their sources in the world’s major religions and show
you how you can put them into practice.

What You’ll Learn

This course provides clear and inspiring answers to many of life’s big questions:

Does life have an ultimate meaning?
Is science the ultimate guide to the deepest truth of life?
Does God, or a divine reality, exist?
What practices can bring God, or a divine reality, into your own experience?
Is death the end of life?
Course Learning Objectives

After taking this course, participants should be able to:

Identify the basic teachings of the world’s major active religious traditions.
Distinguish the different religions from each other.
Compare these religions in search of commonalties and differences.
Evaluate Sir John’s contributions to the study of spirituality.
Apply some of the spiritual practices suggested by Sir John Templeton
Assess claims about spiritual realities made by the various religions.
 

https://wisdomfromworldreligions.com/my-courses

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Thank you for registering with the Graduate Theological Union.

Our next session of Wisdom from World Religions will be taught August 13th, 2018 – September 21st, 2018.

You will be contacted shortly before the course launches with further instructions. Thank you!

My Courses  Wisdom from World Religions

Wisdom from World Religions

1%
Start: Mon 23 Jul 2018
View More
Until
quite recently, the wisdom of the world’s many religions existed in
separate silos barricaded from other traditions behind barriers of
language, distance, and slow communications. Now, more than any time in
history, this collective wisdom is easily …
Week 1

                                                          
Getting Started

                                                          
Day 1 (Monday): Wisdom from World Religions

                                                          
Day 2 (Wednesday): The Divinity of the World: “God-life moving through all” 

                                                          
Day 3 (Friday): The Spiritual Anchor of the Material World

Week 2

                                                          
Day 4 (Monday): Spiritual Pluralism

                                                          
Day 5 (Wednesday): Spiritual Laws

                                                          
Day 6 (Friday): Divine Intelligence and Creativity

Week 3

                                                          
Day 7 (Monday): The Humble Approach

                                                          
Day 8 (Wednesday): A Moral Wakeup Call

                                                          
Day 9 (Friday): Expanding Spiritual Science and Research

Week 4

                                                          
Day 10 (Monday): The Law of Mind Action

                                                          
Day 11 (Wednesday): A Guiding Inner Power

                                                          
Day 12 (Friday): An Attitude of Gratitude

Week 5

                                                          
Day 13 (Monday): The Return on Generosity

                                                          
Day 14 (Wednesday): The Movement of Forgiveness

                                                          
Day 15 (Friday): Practicing Unlimited Love

Week 6

                                                          
Day 16 (Monday): Forward into the Divine Unknown

                                                          
Day 17 (Wednesday): The Mystic Power of Prayer

                                                          
Day 18 (Friday): The Standpoint of Nonduality

©
2018 Kenneth Rose. Excluding quoted material from other copyrighted,
public domain, Creative Commons materials and proprietary material owned
by Accord LMS, Now You Know Media, the Templeton World Charity
Foundation, and the Graduate Theological Union. All rights reserved.

Permission
to include excerpts from Wisdom from World Religions: Pathways Toward
Heaven on Earth © 2002 Templeton Foundation Press has been granted by
the Templeton Foundation Press. All rights reserved.

The
Wisdom from World Religions global open online course is offered in
partnership with the Graduate Theological Union of Berkeley, California,
a unique multi-religious consortium for the graduate study of religion
featuring more than 20 member schools, centers, and institutes.

Sir
John Templeton and Wisdom from World Religions is a grant-funded
project from the Templeton World Charity Foundation. The opinions
expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not
necessarily reflect the views of the Templeton World Charity Foundation,
Inc.
Copyright 2018 Kenneth Rose and Accord LMS | Privacy Statement | Terms Of Use

2718 Sun 19 Aug 2018 LESSON (59) Sun 19 Aug 2007
  
Do Good Be Mindful  -  Awakened One with Awareness (AOA)

Sunday 7 Hours  Morning 9:30 am - 11:30 am Sutta (Discourse)

Thank you for registering with the Graduate Theological Union.

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Thank you for registering with the Graduate Theological Union.

Our next session of Wisdom from World Religions will be taught August 13th, 2018 – September 21st, 2018.

You will be contacted shortly before the course launches with further instructions. Thank you!

My Courses  Wisdom from World Religions  Getting Started

Getting Started

12%
Start: Mon 23 Jul 2018
View More
About
the Course Until recently, the wisdom of the world’s many religions
existed in separate silos blocked from other traditions by barriers of
language, distance, and slow communications. Now, more than at any time
in history, this collective wisdom is…
                               

The First Things To Do In The Course                                                  

                               

What You’ll Learn in This Course                                                  

                               

Orientation Video                                                  

                               

Course Plan (Syllabus) Word Version                                                  

                               

Daily Course Activities                                                  

                               

FAQs and Troubleshooting Guide                                                  

                               

Brought
to by a Generous Grant from the Templeton World Charity Foundation
(Executive Summary)                                                  

                               

Pretest

©
2018 Kenneth Rose. Excluding quoted material from other copyrighted,
public domain, Creative Commons materials and proprietary material owned
by Accord LMS, Now You Know Media, the Templeton World Charity
Foundation, and the Graduate Theological Union. All rights reserved.

Permission
to include excerpts from Wisdom from World Religions: Pathways Toward
Heaven on Earth © 2002 Templeton Foundation Press has been granted by
the Templeton Foundation Press. All rights reserved.

The
Wisdom from World Religions global open online course is offered in
partnership with the Graduate Theological Union of Berkeley, California,
a unique multi-religious consortium for the graduate study of religion
featuring more than 20 member schools, centers, and institutes.

Sir
John Templeton and Wisdom from World Religions is a grant-funded
project from the Templeton World Charity Foundation. The opinions
expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not
necessarily reflect the views of the Templeton World Charity Foundation,
Inc.
Copyright 2018 Kenneth Rose and Accord LMS | Privacy Statement | Terms Of Use

https://wisdomfromworldreligions.com/DesktopModules/Interzoic.AccordLMS/SCOLoader.aspx?LEID=5eeb618a-2a3d-4d06-9924-291d4cdbde67&FId=265cabb3-80fd-4942-b195-c1ba9b1db55d&MId=491&PortalId=0&TbId=119
About the Course

Until
recently, the wisdom of the world’s many religions existed in separate
silos blocked from other traditions by barriers of language, distance,
and slow communications. Now, more than at any time in history, this
collective wisdom is easily available to anyone with an internet
connection. But without a guide to this enormous wealth of information
and practice, we can quickly lose our way. 

In this course,
comparative religionist Kenneth Rose will be your guide in learning
about and practicing the religious and spiritual wisdom that can change
your life and the life of your community. Taking his start from the
spiritual principles and practices outlined by noted investor  and
spiritual teacher Sir John Templeton in his book Wisdom from World
Religions: Pathways Toward Heaven on Earth, Kenneth Rose will trace
these teachings to their sources in the world’s major religions and show
you how you can put them into practice.

What You’ll Learn

This course provides clear and inspiring answers to many of life’s big questions:

Does life have an ultimate meaning?
Is science the ultimate guide to the deepest truth of life?
Does God, or a divine reality, exist?
What practices can bring God, or a divine reality, into your own experience?
Is death the end of life?
Course Learning Objectives

After taking this course, participants should be able to:

Identify the basic teachings of the world’s major active religious traditions.
Distinguish the different religions from each other.
Compare these religions in search of commonalties and differences.
Evaluate Sir John’s contributions to the study of spirituality.
Apply some of the spiritual practices suggested by Sir John Templeton
Assess claims about spiritual realities made by the various religions.
 

https://wisdomfromworldreligions.com/my-courses

Awakened One

|
Logout

My Courses
Resources
Community
About
Home
Thank you for registering with the Graduate Theological Union.

Our next session of Wisdom from World Religions will be taught August 13th, 2018 – September 21st, 2018.

You will be contacted shortly before the course launches with further instructions. Thank you!

My Courses  Wisdom from World Religions

Wisdom from World Religions

1%
Start: Mon 23 Jul 2018
View More
Until
quite recently, the wisdom of the world’s many religions existed in
separate silos barricaded from other traditions behind barriers of
language, distance, and slow communications. Now, more than any time in
history, this collective wisdom is easily …
Week 1

                                                          
Getting Started

                                                          
Day 1 (Monday): Wisdom from World Religions

                                                          
Day 2 (Wednesday): The Divinity of the World: “God-life moving through all” 

                                                          
Day 3 (Friday): The Spiritual Anchor of the Material World

Week 2

                                                          
Day 4 (Monday): Spiritual Pluralism

                                                          
Day 5 (Wednesday): Spiritual Laws

                                                          
Day 6 (Friday): Divine Intelligence and Creativity

Week 3

                                                          
Day 7 (Monday): The Humble Approach

                                                          
Day 8 (Wednesday): A Moral Wakeup Call

                                                          
Day 9 (Friday): Expanding Spiritual Science and Research

Week 4

                                                          
Day 10 (Monday): The Law of Mind Action

                                                          
Day 11 (Wednesday): A Guiding Inner Power

                                                          
Day 12 (Friday): An Attitude of Gratitude

Week 5

                                                          
Day 13 (Monday): The Return on Generosity

                                                          
Day 14 (Wednesday): The Movement of Forgiveness

                                                          
Day 15 (Friday): Practicing Unlimited Love

Week 6

                                                          
Day 16 (Monday): Forward into the Divine Unknown

                                                          
Day 17 (Wednesday): The Mystic Power of Prayer

                                                          
Day 18 (Friday): The Standpoint of Nonduality

©
2018 Kenneth Rose. Excluding quoted material from other copyrighted,
public domain, Creative Commons materials and proprietary material owned
by Accord LMS, Now You Know Media, the Templeton World Charity
Foundation, and the Graduate Theological Union. All rights reserved.

Permission
to include excerpts from Wisdom from World Religions: Pathways Toward
Heaven on Earth © 2002 Templeton Foundation Press has been granted by
the Templeton Foundation Press. All rights reserved.

The
Wisdom from World Religions global open online course is offered in
partnership with the Graduate Theological Union of Berkeley, California,
a unique multi-religious consortium for the graduate study of religion
featuring more than 20 member schools, centers, and institutes.

Sir
John Templeton and Wisdom from World Religions is a grant-funded
project from the Templeton World Charity Foundation. The opinions
expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not
necessarily reflect the views of the Templeton World Charity Foundation,
Inc.
Copyright 2018 Kenneth Rose and Accord LMS | Privacy Statement | Terms Of Use

https://wisdomfromworldreligions.com/my-courses

Awakened One

|
Logout

My Courses
Resources
Community
About
Home
Thank you for registering with the Graduate Theological Union.

Our next session of Wisdom from World Religions will be taught August 13th, 2018 – September 21st, 2018.

You will be contacted shortly before the course launches with further instructions. Thank you!

My Courses
                                     

                                                          
Wisdom from World Religions

©
2018 Kenneth Rose. Excluding quoted material from other copyrighted,
public domain, Creative Commons materials and proprietary material owned
by Accord LMS, Now You Know Media, the Templeton World Charity
Foundation, and the Graduate Theological Union. All rights reserved.

Permission
to include excerpts from Wisdom from World Religions: Pathways Toward
Heaven on Earth © 2002 Templeton Foundation Press has been granted by
the Templeton Foundation Press. All rights reserved.

The
Wisdom from World Religions global open online course is offered in
partnership with the Graduate Theological Union of Berkeley, California,
a unique multi-religious consortium for the graduate study of religion
featuring more than 20 member schools, centers, and institutes.

Sir
John Templeton and Wisdom from World Religions is a grant-funded
project from the Templeton World Charity Foundation. The opinions
expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not
necessarily reflect the views of the Templeton World Charity Foundation,
Inc.
Copyright 2018 Kenneth Rose and Accord LMS | Privacy Statement | Terms Of Use

https://wisdomfromworldreligions.com/DesktopModules/Interzoic.AccordLMS/SCOLoader.aspx?LEID=5eeb618a-2a3d-4d06-9924-291d4cdbde67&FId=265cabb3-80fd-4942-b195-c1ba9b1db55d&MId=491&PortalId=0&TbId=119

About the Course

Until
recently, the wisdom of the world’s many religions existed in separate
silos blocked from other traditions by barriers of language, distance,
and slow communications. Now, more than at any time in history, this
collective wisdom is easily available to anyone with an internet
connection. But without a guide to this enormous wealth of information
and practice, we can quickly lose our way. 

In this course,
comparative religionist Kenneth Rose will be your guide in learning
about and practicing the religious and spiritual wisdom that can change
your life and the life of your community. Taking his start from the
spiritual principles and practices outlined by noted investor  and
spiritual teacher Sir John Templeton in his book Wisdom from World
Religions: Pathways Toward Heaven on Earth, Kenneth Rose will trace
these teachings to their sources in the world’s major religions and show
you how you can put them into practice.

What You’ll Learn

This course provides clear and inspiring answers to many of life’s big questions:

Does life have an ultimate meaning?
Is science the ultimate guide to the deepest truth of life?
Does God, or a divine reality, exist?
What practices can bring God, or a divine reality, into your own experience?
Is death the end of life?
Course Learning Objectives

After taking this course, participants should be able to:

Identify the basic teachings of the world’s major active religious traditions.
Distinguish the different religions from each other.
Compare these religions in search of commonalties and differences.
Evaluate Sir John’s contributions to the study of spirituality.
Apply some of the spiritual practices suggested by Sir John Templeton
Assess claims about spiritual realities made by the various religions.
 

https://wisdomfromworldreligions.com/my-courses

Thank you for registering with the Graduate Theological Union.

Our next session of Wisdom from World Religions will be taught August 13th, 2018 – September 21st, 2018.

You will be contacted shortly before the course launches with further instructions. Thank you!

My Courses Wisdom from World Religions Day 1 (Monday): Wisdom from World Religions

Day 1 (Monday): Wisdom from World Religions

0%
Start: Mon 23 Jul 2018
Click the Open button to the right to access today’s learning elements.
                               

Unit
1 Study Guide: Sir John Templeton’s Wisdom from World Religions: The
Tapestry of World
Religions                                                  

                               

Unit
1 Video: Sir John Templeton’s Wisdom from World Religions: The Tapestry
of World Religions                                                  

                               

Unit
2 Study Guide: Introducing the Religions of the World: Sir John
Templeton and the Study of
Religion                                                  

                               

Unit
2 Video: Introducing the Religions of the World: Sir John Templeton and
the Study of
Religion,                                                  

                               

Unit
3 Study Guide: A Spiritual Practice from Sir John Templeton: Lifting
Your awareness to a Higher level of
Receptivity                                                  

                               

Unit
3 Video: A Spiritual Practice from Sir John Templeton: Lifting Your
Awareness to a Higher Level of
Receptivity                                                  

                               

Unit 4 Study Guide: Guest Lecture: Sir John Templeton on Science and Religion                                                  

                               

Unit 4 Video 4: Guest Lecture: Sir John Templeton on Science and Religion                                                  

https://wisdomfromworldreligions.com/DesktopModules/Interzoic.AccordLMS/SCOLoader.aspx?LEID=5eeb618a-2a3d-4d06-9924-291d4cdbde67&FId=265cabb3-80fd-4942-b195-c1ba9b1db55d&MId=491&PortalId=0&TbId=119

About the Course

Until
recently, the wisdom of the world’s many religions existed in separate
silos blocked from other traditions by barriers of language, distance,
and slow communications. Now, more than at any time in history, this
collective wisdom is easily available to anyone with an internet
connection. But without a guide to this enormous wealth of information
and practice, we can quickly lose our way. 

In this course,
comparative religionist Kenneth Rose will be your guide in learning
about and practicing the religious and spiritual wisdom that can change
your life and the life of your community. Taking his start from the
spiritual principles and practices outlined by noted investor  and
spiritual teacher Sir John Templeton in his book Wisdom from World
Religions: Pathways Toward Heaven on Earth, Kenneth Rose will trace
these teachings to their sources in the world’s major religions and show
you how you can put them into practice.

What You’ll Learn

This course provides clear and inspiring answers to many of life’s big questions:

Does life have an ultimate meaning?
Is science the ultimate guide to the deepest truth of life?
Does God, or a divine reality, exist?
What practices can bring God, or a divine reality, into your own experience?
Is death the end of life?
Course Learning Objectives

After taking this course, participants should be able to:

Identify the basic teachings of the world’s major active religious traditions.
Distinguish the different religions from each other.
Compare these religions in search of commonalties and differences.
Evaluate Sir John’s contributions to the study of spirituality.
Apply some of the spiritual practices suggested by Sir John Templeton
Assess claims about spiritual realities made by the various religions.
 

https://wisdomfromworldreligions.com/DesktopModules/Interzoic.AccordLMS/SCOLoader.aspx?LEID=baed4430-b15c-4cd9-9296-e59b90798ffe&FId=6cb27ee6-c289-4a70-95d5-218eb9da98e7&MId=491&PortalId=0&TbId=119
Video 1: Sir John Templeton’s Wisdom from World Religions

Topic:  The Tapestry of World Religions

A
Spiritual Law from Sir John Templeton: “The rich variety of world
religions creates a tapestry of amazing beauty—a testimony to the
spiritual nature of our human visit on earth” (WWR 56).

Video 1 Learning Objectives:

To get acquainted with Sir John Templeton’s Spiritual Vision
To
apply spiritual laws in order to become what Sir John Templeton calls
“a constructive participant in building ‘heaven on earth’” (WWR xix).
To employ the resources of the world’s religions to a personal quest for wisdom.
Readings and Selections

Suggested Reading in Wisdom from World Religions

xix-xxv
Discussion questions

Seekers
How many significant living religions of the world can you name?
What methods would you use to study the religions of the world?
Proficients
Can you group different current religious into two or three or more families of religions/
What critical and theoretical perspectives do you bring to bear on the study of religion?
Adepts
Do you think that spiritual practices and the study of religion belong together?
What
do you see as the strengths and weaknesses of the synthesis of
religious ideas and practices that John Templeton expresses in Wisdom
from World Religions?
 

Readings from Sir John Templeton’s Wisdom from World Religions

“The
rich variety of world religions creates a tapestry of amazing beauty—a
testimony to the essential spiritual nature of our human visit on earth.
And yet, within this amazing and sometimes fascinating diversity can be
found an equally amazing unity” (WWR 56).
“The more we know about
the universe and our place in it, the more we realize how little we
know. So, in our ongoing search, we often look to the spiritual
teachings of the world religions to provide assistance in helping us
understand more of who and what we are and why we are here.” (WWR 5)
“Wisdom
from World Religions: Pathways toward Heaven on Earth is designed to
offer people of all ages and all nations an opportunity to learn a
little more about the spiritual laws, principles, and teachings of a
variety of great spiritual practices. I hope that in this book we can
offer a Scripture verse or story or parable or discipline or quote that
may show you the world in a way more helpful than you have seen it
before. The materials presented in this book can provide an opportunity
for learning and “growing in wisdom.” There are clear scriptural and
philosophical bases for advocating the need for an inquiring and open
mind. . . . Can the value in learning to see a different world lie not
in replacing the one you have, but in providing a basis for an
opportunity to see from a different, or larger, perspective? Can the
timeless universal principles of life that transcend modern times or
particular cultures help people in all parts of the world live happier
and more useful lives?” (WWR xxi).
“The publishing of this book is
accomplished with reverence and appreciation for the world religions
that purify a person’s mind and heart, elevate his emotions, and offer
guidance for a spiritual way of life. Much of the material contained
herein has been made possible by the sincere light of the prophets,
teachers, and traditions of the world’s great religions that, through
the ages, have expressed sacred insights and wisdom to humanity” (WWR
xxv).

“Who am I? Why am I here on planet Earth? What does the future
hold? How can I set out on my own into a world that sometimes seems
filled with conflict and strife? How can I get along better with the
people in my life? How do I cope with day-to-day pressures? How can I be
successful in my work? How do I find peace in the midst of turmoil? How
can my life be useful and happy?” (WWR 3).

https://wisdomfromworldreligions.com/DesktopModules/Interzoic.AccordLMS/SCOLoader.aspx?LEID=41f9f3a7-0329-4fe1-bed1-c518422460bb&FId=6cb27ee6-c289-4a70-95d5-218eb9da98e7&MId=491&PortalId=0&TbId=119

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(60) 2719 Mon 20 Aug 2018 LESSON (60) Mon 20 Aug 2007 Do Good Be Mindful - Awakened One with Awareness (AOA) DBS (Diploma in Buddhist Studies) Sunday 2 pm - 3 pm INTRODUCTION TO ABHIDHAMMA Sayalay Uttamanyani 3 pm - 4 pm Pali Language and Literature Bhikkhu Pamokkho 4.30 pm - 5.30 pm Sutta Pitaka Bhikkhu Gandhamma/Bhikkhu Dhammaloka 5.50 pm - 6.30 pm Life of Buddha and Dhammapada Dr BV Rajaram 6.30 pm - 7.30 pm Bhikkhu Ariyavamsa/Bhikkhu Ayupala
Filed under: General
Posted by: site admin @ 5:59 pm




(60)
2719 Mon 20 Aug 2018 LESSON (60) Mon 20 Aug 2007
  
Do Good Be Mindful  -  Awakened One with Awareness (AOA)

DBS (Diploma in Buddhist Studies)

Sunday

2 pm - 3 pm
 
INTRODUCTION TO ABHIDHAMMA
Sayalay Uttamanyani

3 pm - 4 pm
 
Pali Language and Literature
Bhikkhu Pamokkho

4.30 pm - 5.30 pm

Sutta Pitaka
Bhikkhu Gandhamma/Bhikkhu Dhammaloka

5.50 pm - 6.30 pm

Life of Buddha and Dhammapada

Dr BV Rajaram

6.30 pm - 7.30 pm
Bhikkhu Ariyavamsa/Bhikkhu Ayupala



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x_CWFS-rca8


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Comment

http://www.palikanon.de/english/sangaha/sangaha.html

ABHIDHAMMATTHA - SANGAHA

of Anuruddhācariya

A manual of ABHIDHAMMA

Edited in the original Pali Text with English Translation and Explanatory Notes

by Nārada Thera, Vājirārāma, Colombo

Preface

CHAPTER I - Different Types of Consciousness (citta-sangaha-vibhāgo)

Introductory Verse
Subject - Matter (Abhidhammatthā)
The Four Classes of Consciousness (catubbidha-cittāni)
Immoral Consciousness (akusala cittāni)
(18 Types Of Rootless Consciousness)
“Beautiful” Consciousness Of The Sensuous Sphere - 24
(Form-Sphere Consciousness - 15)
(Formless-Sphere Consciousness - 12)
(Supra Mundane Consciousness - 4)
(121 Types of Consciousness)
Diagrams:

CHAPTER II - Mental States (cetasika)

Introduction
(Definition)
52 Kinds of Mental States
Different Combinations of Mental States
Immoral Mental States
(Beautiful Mental States)
Contents of Different Types of Consciousness
Supra mundane Consciousness
(Sublime Consciousness)
Sense-Sphere Beautiful Consciousness
Immoral Consciousness
Rootless Consciousness

CHAPTER III - Miscellaneous Section

(i. Summary of Feeling)
(ii. Summary of Roots)
(iii. Summary of Functions)
(iv. Summary of Doors)
(v. Summary of Objects)
(vi. Summary of Bases)

CHAPTER IV - Analysis of Thought-Processes

Five Sense-Door Thought-process
Thought-Processes
Mind-door Thought-Process
Appanā Thought-Process
The Procedure of Retention
Procedure of Javana (13)
Classification of Individuals
Section on Planes
Diagram IX

CHAPTER V - PROCESS-FREED SECTION

Summary of Rebirth Procedure
i. Four Planes of Life
ii. Fourfold Rebirth
iii. Fourfold Kamma (29)
iv . Procedure with Regard to Decease and Rebirth
v. The Stream of Consciousness

CHAPTER VI - ANALYSIS OF MATTER

Introduction
Analysis of Matter
Classification of Matter
The Arising of Material Phenomena (52)
Grouping of Material Qualities (57)
Arising of Material Phenomena (58)
Nibbāna (59)
Diagram XIII

CHAPTER VII - Abhidhamma Categories

Introductory verse
(Immoral Categories)
Diagram XIV
Mixed Categories
Factors of Enlightenment (28)
A Synthesis of ‘the Whole’ (36)

CHAPTER VIII - The Compendium Of Relations

Introductory verse
The Law of Dependent Arising
The Law of Casual Relations
Paññatti

CHAPTER IX - Mental Culture

Introductory verse
(Compendium of Calm)
Suitability of Subjects for different Temperaments
Stages of Mental Culture
Signs of Mental Culture
Rūpa Jhāna
Arūpa Jhāna (22)
Supernormal Knowledge (23)
Different Kind of Purity
Realization
Emancipation
Individuals
The Path of Purification
Attainments
Aspirations

Oben

PREFACE

Abhidhamma, as the term implies, is the Higher Teaching of the Buddha. It expounds the quintessence of His profound doctrine.


The Dhamma, embodied in the Sutta Pitaka, is the conventional teaching
(vohāra desanā), and the Abhidhamma is the ultimate teaching (paramattha
desanā)

In the Abhidhamma both mind and matter, which constitute
this complex machinery of man, are microscopically analyzed. Chief
events connected with the process of birth and death are explained in
detail. Intricate points of the Dhamma are clarified. The Path of
Emancipation is set forth in clear terms.

Modern Psychology,
limited as it is comes within the scope of Abhidhamma inasmuch as it
deals with the mind, with thoughts, thought-processes, and mental states
but it does not admit of a psyche or a soul. Buddhism teaches a
psychology without a psyche.

If one were to read the Abhidhamma
as a modern textbook on psychology, one would be disappointed. No
attempt has here been made to solve all the problems that confront a
modern psychologist.

Consciousness is defined. Thoughts are
analyzed and classified chiefly from an ethical standpoint. All mental
states are enumerated. The composition of each type of consciousness is
set forth in detail. The description of thought-processes that arise
through the five sense-doors and the mind-door is extremely interesting.
Such a clear exposition of thought-processes cannot be found in any
other psychological treatise.

Bhavanga and Javana
thought-moments, which are explained only in the Abhidhamma, and which
have no parallel in modern psychology, are of special interest to a
research student in psychology.

That consciousness flows like a
stream, a view propounded by some modern psychologists like William
James, becomes extremely clear to one who understands the Abhidhamma. It
must be added that an Abhidhamma student can fully comprehend the
Anattā (No-soul) doctrine, the crux of Buddhism, which is important both
from a philosophical and an ethical standpoint.

The advent of
death, process of rebirth in various planes without anything to pass
from one life to another, the evidently verifiable doctrine of Kamma and
Rebirth are fully explained.

Giving a wealth of details about
mind, Abhidhamma discusses the second factor of man-matter or rūpa.
Fundamental units of matter, material forces, properties of matter,
source of matter, relationship of mind and matter, are described.


In the Abhidhammattha Sangaha there is a brief exposition of the Law of
Dependent Origination, followed by a descriptive account of the Causal
Relations that finds no parallel in any other philosophy.

A physicist should not delve into Abhidhamma to get a thorough knowledge of physics.


It should be made clear that Abhidhamma does not attempt to give a
systematized knowledge of mind and matter. It investigates these two
composite factors of so-called being to help the understanding of things
as they truly are. A philosophy has been developed on these lines.
Based on that philosophy, an ethical system has been evolved to realize
the ultimate goal, Nibbāna.

As Mrs. Rhys Davids rightly says,
Abhidhamma deals with “(1) What we find (a) within us (b) around us and
of (2) what we aspire to find.”

In Abhidhamma all irrelevant
problems that interest students and scholars, but having no relation to
one’s Deliverance, are deliberately set aside.

The Abhidhammattha
Sangaha, the authorship of which is attributed to venerable Anuruddha
Thera, an Indian monk of Kanjevaram (Kāñcipura), gives an epitome of the
entire Abhidhamma Pitaka. It is still the most fitting introduction to
Abhidhamma. By mastering this book, a general knowledge of Abhidhamma
may easily be acquired.

To be a master of Abhidhamma all the
seven books, together with commentaries and sub-commentaries, have to be
read and re-read patiently and critically.

Abhidhamma is not a subject of fleeting interest designed for the superficial reader.


To the wise truth-seekers, Abhidhamma is an indispensable guide and an
intellectual treat. Here there is food for thought to original thinkers
and to earnest students who wish to increase their wisdom and lead an
ideal Buddhist life.

However, to the superficial, Abhidhamma must appear as dry as dust.


It may be questioned, “Is Abhidhamma absolutely essential to realize
Nibbāna, the summum bonum of Buddhism, or even to comprehend things as
they truly are?”

Undoubtedly Abhidhamma is extremely helpful to
comprehend fully the word of the Buddha and realize Nibbāna, as it
presents a key to open the door of reality. It deals with realities and a
practical way of noble living, based on the experience of those who
have understood and realized. Without a knowledge of the Abhidhamma one
at times’ finds it difficult to understand the real significance of some
profound teachings of the Buddha. To develop Insight (vipassanā)
Abhidhamma is certainly very useful.

But one cannot positively assert that Abhidhamma is absolutely necessary to gain one’s Deliverance.


Understanding or realization is purely personal (sanditthika). The four
Noble Truths that form the foundation of the Buddha’s teaching are
dependent on this one fathom body. The Dhamma is not apart from oneself.
Look within, Seek thyself. Lo, the truth will unfold itself.

Did
not sorrow-afflicted Patācārā, who lost her dear and near ones, realize
Nibbāna; reflecting on the disappearance of water that washed her feet?


Did not Cūlapanthaka, who could not memorize a verse even for four
months, attain Arahantship by comprehending the impermanent nature of a
clean handkerchief that he was handling, gazing at the sun?

Did not Upatissa, later venerable Sāriputta Thera, realize Nibbāna, on hearing half a stanza relating to cause and effect?

To some a fallen withered leaf alone was sufficient to attain Pacceka Buddha hood.

It was mindfulness on respiration (ānāpāna-sati) that acted as the basis for the Bodhisatta to attain Buddha hood.

To profound thinkers, a slight indication is sufficient to discover great truths.

According to some scholars, Abhidhamma is not a teaching of the Buddha, but is a later elaboration of scholastic monks.

Tradition, however, attributes the nucleus of the Abhidhamma to the Buddha Himself.


Commentators state that the Buddha, as a mark of gratitude to His
mother who was born in a celestial plane, preached the Abhidhamma to His
mother Deva and others continuously for three months. The principal
topics (mātikā) of the advanced teaching such as moral states (kusalā
dhammā), immoral states (akusalā dhammā) and indeterminate states
(abyākatā dhammā), etc., were taught by the Buddha to venerable
Sāriputta Thera, who subsequently elaborated them in the six books
(Kathāvatthu being excluded) that comprise the Abhidhamma Pitaka.


Whoever the great author or authors of the Abhidhamma may have been, it
has to be admitted that he or they had intellectual genius comparable
only to that of the Buddha. This is evident from the intricate and
subtle Patthāna Pakarana which minutely describes the various causal
relations.

It is very difficult to suggest an appropriate English equivalent for Abhidhamma.


There are many technical terms, too, in Abhidhamma which cannot be
rendered into English so as to convey their exact connotation. Some
English equivalents such as consciousness, will, volition, intellect,
perception are used in a specific sense in Western Philosophy. Readers
should try to understand in what sense these technical terms are
employed in Abhidhamma. To avoid any misunderstanding, due to
preconceived views, Pāli words, though at times cumbersome to those not
acquainted with the language, have judiciously been retained wherever
the English renderings seem to be inadequate. To convey the correct
meaning implied by the Pāli terms, the etymology has been given in many
instances.

At times Pāli technical terms have been used in
preference to English renderings so that the reader may be acquainted
with them and not get confused with English terminology.


Sometimes readers will come across unusual words such as corruption,
defilement, volitional activities, functional, resultants, and so forth,
which are of great significance from an Abhidhamma standpoint. Their
exact meaning should be clearly understood.

In preparing this
translation, Buddhist Psychology by Mrs. Rhys Davids and the Compendium
of Philosophy (Abhidhammattha Sangaha) by Mr. Shwe Zan Aung proved
extremely helpful to me. Liberty has been taken to quote them wherever
necessary with due acknowledgment.

My grateful thanks are due to
the Kandy Buddhist Publication Society for the printing of this fourth
revised volume, to the printers for expediting the printing, to Miss
Rañjani Goonatilaka for correcting the proofs, and to Ven. Bhikkhu Bodhi
for his useful suggestions.

Above all I have to thank Mr.
Lankatilaka, a most distinguished artist of Sri Lanka, for his beautiful
and symbolical dust jacket design.

Nārada 14.7.1978/2522.

Oben
ages/pitsanu.gif” width=”40″ height=”40″> Oben


palikanon.de
Abhidhamma, as the term implies, is the Higher Teaching of the Buddha. It expounds the quintessence of His profound doctrine.

https://www.youtube.com/watch…
What is Abhidhamma

256
7

Share
nobelpathfinder
Published on Feb 8, 2011
The ultimate objective in Buddhism is attained by purifying and
improving mind. However, understanding what “mind” is a quite
complicated act for any person. This is a barrier for someone who is
interested in learning Buddhism in‐depth. One of the teachings in
Buddhism which provides a comprehensive analysis on mind is
“Abhidhamma”.

The Buddhist
doctrine is categorized into three, which is known to anyone, as
“Thripitaka” namely Suthra Pitaka, Vinya Pitaka and Abhidhamma Pitaka.
Vinaya Pitaka consists rules of conduct for Sangha and Suthra Pitaka
consists of Suttas containing the central teachings of Buddhism. Suthra
Pitaka is mostly on “Conventional Teachings” (Sammuthi Dheshana) of
Buddhism. Abhidhamma Pitaka provides a theoretical framework for the
doctrine principles in Suthra Pitaka which could be used to describe
“Mind and Matter”. Hence, Abhidhamma embraces the “Ultimate Teachings”
(Paramaththa Dheshana) in Buddhism.

Abhidhamma Pitaka consists of seven treatises;

1. Dhammasangani

2. Vibhanga

3. Dhatukatha

4. Puggalapannatti

5. Kathavatthu

6. Yamaka

7. Pattthana


The term “Abhidhamma” simply means “Higher Doctrine”. It is an in‐depth
investigation to mind and matter. It answers many intricate points of
Dhamma. It analyses complex machinery of human, world, mind, thoughts,
thought‐process, mental formations and etc. Therefore it is indeed a
complex doctrine to understand. However, there are many who are
interested in learning this beautiful branch of doctrine. Amongst them
there are plenty of non‐Buddhists as well. This effort is to present
this doctrine in an “Easy to Understand” manner.

( 8th FEB 2011)
Category
Education


youtube.com
The
ultimate objective in Buddhism is attained by purifying and improving
mind. However, understanding what “mind” is a quite complicated act for
any person….








6  Abhidhhamma Pitaka in Brief              

http://www.palikanon.de/english/sangaha/sangaha.html

ABHIDHAMMATTHA - SANGAHA


of Anuruddhācariya


A manual of ABHIDHAMMA

Edited in the original Pali Text with English Translation and Explanatory
Notes


by Nārada Thera, Vājirārāma, Colombo

Preface

CHAPTER I - Different Types of Consciousness
(citta-sangaha-vibhāgo)

Introductory Verse
Subject - Matter (Abhidhammatthā)
The Four Classes of Consciousness (catubbidha-cittāni)
Immoral Consciousness (akusala cittāni)
(18 Types Of Rootless Consciousness)
“Beautiful” Consciousness Of The Sensuous Sphere - 24
(Form-Sphere Consciousness - 15)
(Formless-Sphere Consciousness - 12)
(Supra Mundane Consciousness - 4)
(121 Types of Consciousness)
Diagrams:
CHAPTER II - Mental States (cetasika)
Introduction
(Definition)
52 Kinds of Mental States
Different Combinations of Mental States
Immoral Mental States
(Beautiful Mental States)
Contents of Different Types of Consciousness
Supra mundane Consciousness
(Sublime Consciousness)
Sense-Sphere Beautiful Consciousness
Immoral Consciousness
Rootless Consciousness
CHAPTER III - Miscellaneous Section
(i. Summary of Feeling)
(ii. Summary of Roots)
(iii. Summary of Functions)
(iv. Summary of Doors)
(v. Summary of Objects)
(vi. Summary of Bases)
CHAPTER IV - Analysis of Thought-Processes
Five Sense-Door Thought-process
Thought-Processes
Mind-door Thought-Process
Appanā Thought-Process
The Procedure of Retention
Procedure of Javana (13)
Classification of Individuals
Section on Planes
Diagram IX
CHAPTER V - PROCESS-FREED SECTION
Summary of Rebirth Procedure
i. Four Planes of Life
ii. Fourfold Rebirth
iii. Fourfold Kamma (29)
iv . Procedure with Regard to Decease and Rebirth
v. The Stream of Consciousness
CHAPTER VI - ANALYSIS OF MATTER
Introduction
Analysis of Matter
Classification of Matter
The Arising of Material Phenomena (52)
Grouping of Material Qualities (57)
Arising of Material Phenomena (58)
Nibbāna (59)
Diagram XIII
CHAPTER VII - Abhidhamma Categories
Introductory verse
(Immoral Categories)
Diagram XIV
Mixed Categories
Factors of Enlightenment (28)
A Synthesis of ‘the Whole’ (36)
CHAPTER VIII - The Compendium Of Relations
Introductory verse
The Law of Dependent Arising
The Law of Casual Relations
Paññatti
CHAPTER IX - Mental Culture


Introductory verse
(Compendium of Calm)
Suitability of Subjects for different Temperaments
Stages of Mental Culture
Signs of Mental Culture
Rūpa Jhāna
Arūpa Jhāna (22)
Supernormal Knowledge (23)
Different Kind of Purity
Realization
Emancipation
Individuals
The Path of Purification
Attainments
Aspirations






  Oben 


PREFACE

 

Abhidhamma, as the term implies, is the Higher Teaching of the Buddha.
It expounds the quintessence of His profound doctrine.

The Dhamma, embodied in the Sutta Pitaka, is the conventional teaching (vohāra
desanā),
and the Abhidhamma is the ultimate teaching (paramattha desanā)

In the Abhidhamma both mind and matter, which constitute this complex
machinery of man, are microscopically analyzed. Chief events connected with the process of
birth and death are explained in detail. Intricate points of the Dhamma are clarified. The
Path of Emancipation is set forth in clear terms.

Modern Psychology, limited as it is comes within the scope of
Abhidhamma inasmuch as it deals with the mind, with thoughts, thought-processes, and
mental states but it does not admit of a psyche or a soul. Buddhism teaches a psychology
without a psyche.

If one were to read the Abhidhamma as a modern textbook on psychology,
one would be disappointed. No attempt has here been made to solve all the problems that
confront a modern psychologist.

Consciousness is defined. Thoughts are analyzed and classified chiefly
from an ethical standpoint. All mental states are enumerated. The composition of each type
of consciousness is set forth in detail. The description of thought-processes that arise
through the five sense-doors and the mind-door is extremely interesting. Such a clear
exposition of thought-processes cannot be found in any other psychological treatise.

Bhavanga and Javana thought-moments, which are explained
only in the Abhidhamma, and which have no parallel in modern psychology, are of special
interest to a research student in psychology.

That consciousness flows like a stream, a view propounded by some
modern psychologists like William James, becomes extremely clear to one who understands
the Abhidhamma. It must be added that an Abhidhamma student can fully comprehend the Anattā
(No-soul) doctrine, the crux of Buddhism, which is important both from a philosophical and
an ethical standpoint.

The advent of death, process of rebirth in various planes without
anything to pass from one life to another, the evidently verifiable doctrine of Kamma and
Rebirth are fully explained.

Giving a wealth of details about mind, Abhidhamma discusses the second
factor of man-matter or rūpa. Fundamental units of matter, material forces,
properties of matter, source of matter, relationship of mind and matter, are described.

In the Abhidhammattha Sangaha there is a brief exposition of the Law of
Dependent Origination, followed by a descriptive account of the Causal Relations that
finds no parallel in any other philosophy.

A physicist should not delve into Abhidhamma to get a thorough
knowledge of physics.

It should be made clear that Abhidhamma does not attempt to give a
systematized knowledge of mind and matter. It investigates these two composite factors of
so-called being to help the understanding of things as they truly are. A philosophy has
been developed on these lines. Based on that philosophy, an ethical system has been
evolved to realize the ultimate goal, Nibbāna.

As Mrs. Rhys Davids rightly says, Abhidhamma deals with “(1) What
we find (a) within us (b) around us and of (2) what we aspire to find.”

In Abhidhamma all irrelevant problems that interest students and
scholars, but having no relation to one’s Deliverance, are deliberately set aside.

The Abhidhammattha Sangaha, the authorship of which is attributed to
venerable Anuruddha Thera, an Indian monk of Kanjevaram (Kāñcipura), gives an epitome of
the entire Abhidhamma Pitaka. It is still the most fitting introduction to Abhidhamma. By
mastering this book, a general knowledge of Abhidhamma may easily be acquired.

To be a master of Abhidhamma all the seven books, together with
commentaries and sub-commentaries, have to be read and re-read patiently and critically.

Abhidhamma is not a subject of fleeting interest designed for the
superficial reader.

To the wise truth-seekers, Abhidhamma is an indispensable guide and an
intellectual treat. Here there is food for thought to original thinkers and to earnest
students who wish to increase their wisdom and lead an ideal Buddhist life.

However, to the superficial, Abhidhamma must appear as dry as dust.

It may be questioned, “Is Abhidhamma absolutely essential to
realize Nibbāna, the summum bonum of Buddhism, or even to comprehend things as they truly
are?”

Undoubtedly Abhidhamma is extremely helpful to comprehend fully the
word of the Buddha and realize Nibbāna, as it presents a key to open the door of reality.
It deals with realities and a practical way of noble living, based on the experience of
those who have understood and realized. Without a knowledge of the Abhidhamma one at
times’ finds it difficult to understand the real significance of some profound teachings
of the Buddha. To develop Insight (vipassanā) Abhidhamma is certainly very useful.

But one cannot positively assert that Abhidhamma is absolutely
necessary to gain one’s Deliverance.

Understanding or realization is purely personal (sanditthika).
The four Noble Truths that form the foundation of the Buddha’s teaching are dependent on
this one fathom body. The Dhamma is not apart from oneself. Look within, Seek thyself. Lo,
the truth will unfold itself.

Did not sorrow-afflicted Patācārā, who lost her dear and near ones,
realize Nibbāna; reflecting on the disappearance of water that washed her feet?

Did not Cūlapanthaka, who could not memorize a verse even for four
months, attain Arahantship by comprehending the impermanent nature of a clean handkerchief
that he was handling, gazing at the sun?

Did not Upatissa, later venerable Sāriputta Thera, realize Nibbāna,
on hearing half a stanza relating to cause and effect?

To some a fallen withered leaf alone was sufficient to attain Pacceka
Buddha hood.

It was mindfulness on respiration (ānāpāna-sati) that acted
as the basis for the Bodhisatta to attain Buddha hood.

To profound thinkers, a slight indication is sufficient to discover
great truths.

According to some scholars, Abhidhamma is not a teaching of the Buddha,
but is a later elaboration of scholastic monks.

Tradition, however, attributes the nucleus of the Abhidhamma to the
Buddha Himself.

Commentators state that the Buddha, as a mark of gratitude to His
mother who was born in a celestial plane, preached the Abhidhamma to His mother Deva and
others continuously for three months. The principal topics (mātikā) of the
advanced teaching such as moral states (kusalā dhammā), immoral states (akusalā
dhammā)
and indeterminate states (abyākatā dhammā), etc., were taught by
the Buddha to venerable Sāriputta Thera, who subsequently elaborated them in the six
books (Kathāvatthu being excluded) that comprise the Abhidhamma Pitaka.

Whoever the great author or authors of the Abhidhamma may have been, it
has to be admitted that he or they had intellectual genius comparable only to that of the
Buddha. This is evident from the intricate and subtle Patthāna Pakarana which minutely
describes the various causal relations.

It is very difficult to suggest an appropriate English equivalent for
Abhidhamma.

There are many technical terms, too, in Abhidhamma which cannot be
rendered into English so as to convey their exact connotation. Some English equivalents
such as consciousness, will, volition, intellect, perception are used in a specific sense
in Western Philosophy. Readers should try to understand in what sense these technical
terms are employed in Abhidhamma. To avoid any misunderstanding, due to preconceived
views, Pāli words, though at times cumbersome to those not acquainted with the language,
have judiciously been retained wherever the English renderings seem to be inadequate. To
convey the correct meaning implied by the Pāli terms, the etymology has been given in
many instances.

At times Pāli technical terms have been used in preference to English
renderings so that the reader may be acquainted with them and not get confused with
English terminology.

Sometimes readers will come across unusual words such as corruption,
defilement, volitional activities, functional, resultants, and so forth, which are of
great significance from an Abhidhamma standpoint. Their exact meaning should be clearly
understood.

In preparing this translation, Buddhist Psychology by Mrs. Rhys Davids
and the Compendium of Philosophy (Abhidhammattha Sangaha) by Mr. Shwe Zan Aung proved
extremely helpful to me. Liberty has been taken to quote them wherever necessary with due
acknowledgment.

My grateful thanks are due to the Kandy Buddhist Publication Society
for the printing of this fourth revised volume, to the printers for expediting the
printing, to Miss Rañjani Goonatilaka for correcting the proofs, and to Ven. Bhikkhu
Bodhi for his useful suggestions.

Above all I have to thank Mr. Lankatilaka, a most distinguished artist
of Sri Lanka, for his beautiful and symbolical dust jacket design.

Nārada 14.7.1978/2522.


  Oben 



ages/pitsanu.gif” width=”40″ height=”40″> Oben 



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J9oUWhF-j8o
Abhidhamma Class Day 1 : Basic Buddhism

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ske abhidhamma
Published on Jan 7, 2017
The Deciples of the Buddha/ Buddha’s Teaching Intro
Category
Education

youtube.com
The Deciples of the Buddha/ Buddha’s Teaching Intro

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i2XWtK_jaj0&t=461s
1. ABHIDHAMMA - THE PROCESS OF COGNITION

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London Buddhist Videos
Published on Oct 5, 2017
“René Descartes famously pronounced ” I think therefore I am” but the
Abhidhamma doesn’t go along with that. There is no thinker behind the
thoughts; no controller in charge. All there are is psychic processes
arising and falling with great rapidity.” Richard Jones. London Buddhist
Vihara.

The Abhidhamma
presents a system of Buddhist Psychology and Philosophy at in an
intensely detailed analysis of the process of thinking (cognition) and
ultimately of being.

In this talk, Richard Jones starts his deep
dive into the ‘process of cognition’ with an example of the kind of
analysis that can be conducted with the Abhidhamma.

Other videos in the playlist can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list

Concepts introduced in this video are:
BHAVANGA - Life Continuum which flows like a river from conception to death.

FIVE NIYAMAS - the five explanations of the way things are:
1. Utu Niyama - pertains to the inorganic order
2. Bija Niyama - the functioning of the organic world
3. Kamma Niyama - Law of cause and effect
4. Dhamma Niyama - Certain doctrines like ‘No Self.’
5. Citta Niyama - How the mind works according to certain principles

Full Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list
Category
Education

youtube.com
“René Descartes famously pronounced ” I think therefore I am” but the Abhidhamma doesn’t go…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ngiaZeK1Z3s
2. CLASSIFYING CITTA - The Classes of Consciousness
London Buddhist Videos
Published on Oct 8, 2017
There are different ways of classifying Citta (types of consciousness):
by ethical nature; by strength (11:00) and by the plane of existence..
Category
Education

youtube.com
There are different ways of classifying Citta (types of consciousness): by ethical nature; by strength and…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ogITKuj2C4k
3a. THE SENSE SPHERE PLANE
London Buddhist Videos
Published on Oct 14, 2017
Richard Jones continues his deep dive into the Abhidhamma with a look
at the planes in which the Citta (consciousness) can arise.

There are 31 Realms of Existence and they are subdivided into four:
‘Sense-Sphere Plane’ (of which there are11 types); ‘Fine-material Sphere
Plane’ (16); Immaterial-Sphere Plane (4 of those). We have to make a
distinction between a realm of Existence and a sense sphere.

Richard also explains the Mundane, the Supramundane, the Jhanic states
(which can be attained by human beings) and beings with immensely long
life-spans of thousands of great aeons. However none of these states is
permanent.
Category
Education

youtube.com
Richard
Jones continues his deep dive into the Abhidhamma with a look at the
planes in which the Citta (consciousness) can arise. There are 31…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2tg0FSQRuN8
3b. THE TEN FETTERS

London Buddhist Videos
Published on Oct 15, 2017
Fetters means something that holds us back. They hold back our progress towards the attainment of Nibbana (enlightenment).

Richard Jones explores in detail, each of ten fetters and how they impede our spiritual progress. The Ten Fetters are: ‘
Self’ delusion;
Sceptical doubt;
attachment to mere rites and rituals;
sensual desire;
ill will;
lusting after material (or immaterial) existence;
conceit,
restlessness
and ignorance.

Each fetter can be eradicated through meditation and as each is
eradicated, spiritual progress is made. EG. A person who manages to
eradicate the first three fetters becomes a ’stream-enterer’ - a
Sotapanna. He has entered the stream that leads to Nibbana. This means
he has purified his mind to such an extent that he cannot perform any
actions that would lead to an unhappy rebirth. He will be reborn a
maximum of seven more lives. The Buddha said that upon stream-entry,
99% of the work towards enlightenment has been done. Other stages are
Once-Returner; Non-Returner and Arahant.

Richard ends this part of the talk with an exploration of the types of meditation that assist progress along this path.
Category
Education

youtube.com
Fetters
means something that holds us back. They hold back our progress towards
the attainment of Nibbana (enlightenment). Richard Jones explores in…

·

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x3vMxOlFFIQ
3c. THE 89 KINDS OF CITTA (Consciousness)
London Buddhist Videos
Published on Oct 17, 2017
Richard Jones guides the dhamma class through the system of
classification of Cittas (Consciousness) into 89 different kinds,
according to its most prominent root.

The roots are Greed (Lobha), Hatred (Dosa,) and Ignorance / Delusion
(Moha) which are further classified by feeling tones (Vedana). There are
also variations according to its association with wrong view or whether
or not the Citta is prompted or spontaneous.

Recorded at The London Buddhist Vihara on Thursday 12th October 2017.
Category
Education

youtube.com
Richard Jones guides the dhamma class through the system of…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TWoOV2iokHE
4. CITTA - Review & Analysis

London Buddhist Videos
Published on Oct 24, 2017
Richard Jones’ review and analysis of the recent lessons on the Citta
(types of conscious) and their multi-levelled classifications.

Previous classes Link:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fo9AI

There is some class discussion included to clarify some of the more elusive aspects of this topic.

Please email londonbuddhistvideos@gmail.com for copies of the handouts used in this lesson.

Teacher. Richard Jones
London Buddhist Vihara
19th October 2017
Category
Education

youtube.com
Richard Jones’ review and analysis of the recent lessons on the Citta…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qzl-ar51xTs
5. JHANA - Attaining Higher States of Citta (consciousness)

London Buddhist Videos
Published on Nov 4, 2017
To attain what we call ‘Jhana Cittas’ (higher states of consciousness)
we have to practise Samatha meditation (wholesome one-pointedness of
mind).

Jhana has two
meanings: 1) to contemplate a particular object and examine it closely,
and 2) to eliminate hindrances or burn away mental defilements.
There are 40 different objects of meditation. If practised seriously,
the meditation object should match the character of the meditator. We
recognise six different kinds of character:

1. Lustful / Passionate (Raga) 4. Faithful (Saddha)
2. Hateful / Angry (Dosa) 5. Intellectual (Buddhi)
3. Deluded / Ignorant (Moha) 6. Agitated / Speculative (Vitakka)

A meditator’s character can be assessed by a teacher watching how the pupil performs everyday activities.

Email your questions: londonbuddhistvideos@gmail.com

For Copies of Handouts: http://londonbuddhist.wixsite.com/bud

London Buddhist Vihara Events Calendar: http://www.londonbuddhistvihara.org/r

Twitter: goo.gl/9w29n6
Category
Education

youtube.com
To attain what we call ‘Jhana Cittas’ (higher states of consciousness) we have to practise Samatha…


DOCTRINE-TRUE PRACTICE OF THE PATH SHOWN BY THE BLESSED NOBLE AWAKENED ONE - THE TATHAGATA



Walking the Path of
THE BLESSED NOBLE AWAKENED ONE - THE TATHAGATA-DOCTRINE-TRUE PRACTICE
OF THE PATH SHOWN BY THE BLESSED NOBLE AWAKENED ONE - THE TATHAGATA



Naturally people
who wish to reach their home are not those who merely sit and think of
traveling. They must actually undertake the process of traveling step by
step, and in the right direction as well, in order to finally reach
home. If they take the wrong path they may eventually run into
difficulties such as swamps or other obstacles which are hard to get
around. Or they may run into dangerous situations in this wrong
direction, thereby possibly never reaching home.


Those who
reach home can relax and sleep comfortably — home is a place of comfort
for body and mind. Now they have really reached home. But if the
traveler only passed by the front of his home or only walked around it,
he would not receive any benefit from having traveled all the way home.


In the same
way, walking the path to reach the THE BLESSED NOBLE AWAKENED ONE - THE
TATHAGATA-DOCTRINE-TRUE PRACTICE OF THE PATH SHOWN BY THE BLESSED NOBLE
AWAKENED ONE - THE TATHAGATA is something each one of us must do
individually ourselves, for no one can do it for us. And we must travel
along the proper path of morality, concentration and wisdom until we
find the blessings of purity, radiance and peacefulness of mind that are
the fruits of traveling the path. However, if one only has knowledge of
books and scriptures, sermons and sutras, that is, only knowledge of
the map or plans for the journey, even in hundreds of lives one will
never know purity, radiance and peacefulness of mind. Instead one will
just waste time and never get to the real benefits of practice. Teachers
are those who only point out the direction of the Path. After listening
to the teachers, whether or not we walk the Path by practicing
ourselves, and thereby reap the fruits of practice, is strictly up to
each one of us.


Another way
to look at it is to compare practice to a bottle of medicine a doctor
leaves for his patient. On the bottle is written detailed instructions
on how to take the medicine, but no matter how many hundred times the
patient reads the directions, he is bound to die if that is all he does.
He will gain no benefit from the medicine. And before he dies he may
complain bitterly that the doctor wasn’t any good, that the medicine
didn’t cure him! He will think that the doctor was a fake or that the
medicine was worthless, yet he has only spent his time examining the
bottle and reading the instructions. He hasn’t followed the advice of
the doctor and taken the medicine.


However, if
the patient actually follows the doctor’s advice and takes the medicine
regularly as prescribed, he will recover. And if he is very ill, it
will be necessary to take a lot of medicine, whereas if he is only
mildly ill, only a little medicine will be needed to finally cure him.
The fact that we must use a lot of medicine is a result of the severity
of our illness. It’s only natural and you can see it for yourself with
careful consideration.


Doctors
prescribe medicine to eliminate disease from the body. The Practice of
the THE BLESSED NOBLE AWAKENED ONE - THE TATHAGATA are prescribed to
cure disease of the mind, to bring it back to its natural healthy state.
So the  THE BLESSED NOBLE AWAKENED ONE - THE TATHAGATA be considered to
be a doctor who prescribes cures for the ills of the mind. He is, in
fact, the greatest doctor in the world.


Mental ills
are found in each one of us without exception. When you see these
mental ills, does it not make sense to look to the DOCTRINE-TRUE
PRACTICE OF THE PATH SHOWN BY THE BLESSED NOBLE AWAKENED ONE - THE
TATHAGATA as support, as medicine to cure your ills? Traveling the path
of the THE BLESSED NOBLE AWAKENED ONE - THE TATHAGATA-DOCTRINE-TRUE
PRACTICE OF THE PATH SHOWN BY THE BLESSED NOBLE AWAKENED ONE - THE
TATHAGATA is not done with the body. You must travel with the mind to
reach the benefits. We can divide these travelers into three groups:


First
Level: this is comprised of those who understand that they must practice
themselves, and know how to do so. They take the THE BLESSED NOBLE
AWAKENED ONE-THE TATHAGATA,DOCTRINE-TRUE PRACTICE OF THE PATH SHOWN BY
THE BLESSED NOBLE AWAKENED ONE - THE TATHAGATA and  SPIRITUAL COMMUNITY
OD THE TRUE FOLLOWERS OF THE PATH SHOWN BY THE BLESSED NOBLE AWAKENED
ONE - THE TATHAGATA as their refuge and have resolved to practice
diligently according to the Practices. These persons have discarded
merely following customs and traditions, and instead use reason to
examine for themselves the nature of the world. These are the group of “
Practioners of Doctrine Practiced by The Blessed Noble Awakened One-The Tathagata believers.”


Middle
Level: This group is comprised of those who have practiced until they
have an unshakable faith in the Teachings of the THE BLESSED NOBLE
AWAKENED ONE-THE TATHAGATA,DOCTRINE-TRUE PRACTICE OF THE PATH SHOWN BY
THE BLESSED NOBLE AWAKENED ONE - THE TATHAGATA and  SPIRITUAL COMMUNITY
OD THE TRUE FOLLOWERS OF THE PATH SHOWN BY THE BLESSED NOBLE AWAKENED
ONE - THE TATHAGATA . They also have penetrated to the understanding of
the true nature of all compounded formations. These persons gradually
reduce clinging and attachment. They do not hold onto things and their
minds reach deep understanding of the DOCTRINE-TRUE PRACTICE OF THE PATH
SHOWN BY THE BLESSED NOBLE AWAKENED ONE - THE TATHAGATA . Depending
upon the degree of non-attachment and wisdom they are progressively
known as stream-enterers, once-returners and non-returners, or simply,
Noble Ones.


Highest
Level: This is the group of those whose practice has led them to the
body, speech and mind of THE BLESSED NOBLE AWAKENED ONE - THE
TATHAGATA . They are above the world, free of the world, and free of all
attachment and clinging. They are known as Arahats or Free Ones, the
highest level of the Noble Ones.



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(59)SPIRITUAL COMMUNITY OF THE TRUE FOLLOWERS OF THE PATH SHOWN BY THE BLESSED NOBLE AWAKENED ONE -THE TATHAGATA-I. The Essential Meaning of Sila
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2718 Sun 19 Aug 2018 LESSON (59) Sun 19 Aug 2007
  
Do Good Be Mindful  -  Awakened One with Awareness (AOA)

Sunday 7 Hours  Morning 9:30 am - 11:30 am Sutta (Discourse)


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WELCOME TO MAHABODHI RESEARCH CENTRE

(Affiliated to Karnataka Sanskrit University, Govt. of Karnataka, Bengaluru)

A Centre for Theravada Buddhist Studies


Diploma in Theravada Buddhist Studies P1 Pali Language and Literature

http://www.mbrc.info/
Time Table [Class Room 1]
DIPLOMA In Buddhist Studies (DBS)
(15 HOURS)



SYLLABUS
Paper -1,

Sunday 7 Hours  Morning 9:30 am - 11:30 am Sutta (Discourse)
Lunch Break
2 pm - 3 pm Life of Buddha Dr B V Rajaram
https://www.thoughtco.com/the-life-of-the-buddha-449997

The Life of the Buddha, Siddhartha Gautama

A Prince Renounces Pleasure and Founds Buddhism

Happy Buddha
Marianne Williams / Getty Images

The life of Siddhartha Gautama, the person we call the Buddha, is
shrouded in legend and myth. Although most historians believe there was
such a person, we know very little about him. The “standard” biography
appears to have evolved over time. It was largely completed by the Buddhacarita,” an epic poem written by Aśvaghoṣa in the second century CE.

Siddhartha Gautama’s Birth and Family

The future Buddha, Siddhartha Gautama, was born
in the 5th or 6th century BCE in Lumbini (in modern day Nepal).
Siddhartha is a Sanskrit name meaning “one who has accomplished a
goal” and Gautama is a family name.

His father, King Suddhodana, was the leader of a large clan called
the Shakya (or Sakya). It’s not clear from the earliest texts whether he
was a hereditary king or more of a tribal chief. It is also possible
that he was elected to this status.

Suddhodana married two sisters, Maya and Pajapati Gotami. They are
said to be princesses of another clan, the Koliya from what is northern
India today. Maya was the mother of Siddhartha and he was her only
child, dying shortly after his birth. Pajapati, who later became the first Buddhist nun, raised Siddhartha as her own.

By all accounts, Prince Siddhartha and his family were of the
Kshatriya caste of warriors and nobles.  Among Siddhartha’s more
well-known relatives was his cousin Ananda, the son of his father’s
brother. Ananda would later become the Buddha’s disciple and personal
attendant. He would have been considerably younger than Siddhartha,
however, and they didn’t know each other as children.

The Prophecy and a Young Marriage

When Prince Siddhartha was a few days old, a holy man prophesied over
the Prince (by some accounts it was nine Brahmin holy men). It was
foretold that the boy would be either a great military conqueror or a
great spiritual teacher. King Suddhodana preferred the first outcome and
prepared his son accordingly.

He raised the boy in great luxury and shielded him from knowledge of
religion and human suffering. At the age of 16, he was married to his
cousin, Yasodhara, who was also 16. This was no doubt a marriage
arranged by the families.

Yasodhara was the daughter of a Koliya chief and her mother was a sister to King Suddhodana. She was also a sister of Devadatta, who became a disciple of the Buddha and then, by some accounts, a dangerous rival.

The Four Passing Sights

The Prince reached the age of 29 with little experience of the world
outside the walls of his opulent palaces. He was oblivious to the
realities of sickness, old age, and death.

One day, overcome with curiosity, Prince Siddhartha asked a
charioteer to take him on a series of rides through the countryside. On
these journeys he was shocked by the sight of an aged man, then a sick
man, and then a corpse. The stark realities of old age, disease, and
death seized and sickened the Prince.

Finally, he saw a wandering ascetic. The charioteer explained that
the ascetic was one who had renounced the world and sought release from
the fear of death and suffering. 

These life-changing encounters would become known in Buddhism as the Four Passing Sights.

Siddhartha’s Renunciation

For a time the Prince returned to palace life, but he took no
pleasure in it. Even the news that his wife Yasodhara had given birth to
a son did not please him. The child was called Rahula, which means “fetter.”

One night he wandered the palace alone. The luxuries that had once
pleased him now seemed grotesque. Musicians and dancing girls had fallen
asleep and were sprawled about, snoring and sputtering. Prince
Siddhartha reflected on the old age, disease, and death that would
overtake them all and turn their bodies to dust.

He realized then that he could no longer be content living the life
of a prince. That very night he left the palace, shaved his head, and
changed from his royal clothes into a beggar’s robe. Renouncing all the
luxury he had known, he began his quest for enlightenment.

The Search Begins

Siddhartha started by seeking out renowned teachers. They taught him
about the many religious philosophies of his day as well as how to
meditate. After he had learned all they had to teach, his doubts and
questions remained. He and five disciples left to find enlightenment by
themselves.

The six companions attempted to find release from suffering through
physical discipline: enduring pain, holding their breath, fasting nearly
to starvation. Yet Siddhartha was still unsatisfied.

It occurred to him that in renouncing pleasure he had grasped the
opposite of pleasure, which was pain and self-mortification. Now
Siddhartha considered a Middle Way between those two extremes.

He remembered an experience from his childhood when his mind had settled into a state of deep peace. The path of liberation was through the discipline of mind.
He realized that instead of starvation, he needed nourishment to build
up his strength for the effort. When he accepted a bowl of rice milk
from a young girl, his companions assumed he had given up the quest and
abandoned him.

The Enlightenment of the Buddha

Siddhartha sat beneath a sacred fig tree (Ficus religiosa), known ever after as the Bodhi Tree (Bodhi means “awakened”). It was there that he settled into meditation.

The work of Siddhartha’s mind came to be mythologized as a great battle with Mara.
The demon’s name means “destruction” and represents the passions that
snare and delude us. Mara brought vast armies of monsters to attack
Siddhartha, who sat still and untouched. Mara’s most beautiful daughter
tried to seduce Siddhartha, but this effort also failed.

Finally, Mara claimed the seat of enlightenment rightfully belonged
to him. Mara’s spiritual accomplishments were greater than Siddhartha’s,
the demon said. Mara’s monstrous soldiers cried out together, “I am his
witness!” Mara challenged Siddhartha, Who will speak for you?

Then Siddhartha reached out his right hand to touch the earth, and the earth itself roared, “I bear you witness!” Mara disappeared. As the morning star rose in the sky, Siddhartha Gautama realized enlightenment and became a Buddha.

The Buddha as a Teacher

At first, the Buddha was reluctant to teach because what he had
realized could not be communicated in words. Only through discipline and
clarity of mind would delusions fall away and one could experience the
Great Reality. Listeners without that direct experience would be stuck
in conceptualizations and would surely misunderstand everything he said.
Compassion persuaded him to make the attempt.

After his enlightenment, he went to the Deer Park in Isipatana,
located in what is now the province of Uttar Pradesh, India. There he
found the five companions who had abandoned him and he preached his
first sermon to them.

This sermon has been preserved as the Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta and centers on the Four Noble Truths.
Instead of teaching doctrines about enlightenment, the Buddha chose to
prescribe a path of practice through which people can realize
enlightenment for themselves.

The Buddha devoted himself to teaching and attracted hundreds of
followers. Eventually, he became reconciled with his father, King
Suddhodana. His wife, the devoted Yasodhara, became a nun and disciple. Rahula, his son, became a novice monk at the age of seven and spent the rest of his life with his father.

The Last Words of the Buddha

The Buddha traveled tirelessly through all areas of northern India
and Nepal. He taught a diverse group of followers, all of whom were
seeking the truth he had to offer.

At the age of 80, the Buddha entered Parinirvana, leaving his physical body behind. In this, he abandoned the endless cycle of death and rebirth.

Before his last breath, he spoke final words to his followers:

“Behold, O monks, this is my last advice to you. All
compounded things in the world are changeable. They are not lasting.
Work hard to gain your own salvation.”

The Buddha’s body was cremated. His remains were placed in stupas—domed structures common in Buddhism—in many places, including China, Myanmar, and Sri Lanka.

The Buddha Has Inspired Millions

Some 2,500 years later, the Buddha’s teachings remain significant for
many people throughout the world. Buddhism continues to attract new
followers and is one of the fastest-growing religions, though many do not refer to it as a religion but
as a spiritual path or a philosophy. An estimated 350 to 550 million
people practice Buddhism today.
://video.search.yahoo.com/search/video?fr=tightropetb&p=featured+animated+Life+of+the+Buddha#id=1&vid=19dbeffd67991a59ac162004d9ca99ec&action=click

https://video.search.yahoo.com/search/video?fr=tightropetb&p=featured+animated+Life+of+the+Buddha#id=1&vid=19dbeffd67991a59ac162004d9ca99ec&action=click

·

Cinema ModeOff
Life Of The Buddha (Animation) [English]


“Do Good, Avoid Evil, Purify One’s Mind.” This is the teaching of all
the Buddhas. Disclaimer: This video is owned by Buddhist Research
Society.


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“Do
Good, Avoid Evil, Purify One’s Mind.” This is the teaching of all the
Buddhas. Disclaimer: This video is owned by Buddhist Research Society.
3 pm - 4 pm Pali Language and Literature Bhikkhu Pammokkho/Bhikkhu Manissara https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rdZwH9YeILA

Learn Basic Pāli Grammar Episode 02: Pāli Vowels

The People
Published on Jun 25, 2016

Navaneetham Chandrasekharan

Just now ·
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V5W2t9tXW-Y&t=28s
Learn Basic Pāli Grammar Episode 02: Pāli Vowels
The People
Published on Jun 25, 2016
Hello,
and welcome back, in this lesson we are going to study the Pali
Pronunciation. The first thing to know about Pali is that it was an oral
language, it had no script of its own. All Theravada countries has its
own script for Pali and we shall use roman script for this course.

There
are 41 letters in Pali, 8 Vowels, and 33 consonants. For this lesson,
we will study 8 Vowels and see how to pronounce them. The eight Vowels
are: a, ā, i, ī, u, ū, e, o.

A= cut=Dhamma
Ā=Father =Dāna
I=east=Sila
Ī=Bee=Dīgha
U=oops=Sutta
Ū=Cool=Bhūpāla
E=Pay=Nare
O=Open=Putto
Category
Education

youtube.com
Pali (Pāli) is a Prakrit language
Pali
(Pāli) is a Prakrit language native to the Indian subcontinent. It is
widely studied because it is the language of many of the earliest extant
literatur…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_nGl2l1Ls7U&pbjreload=10

The People
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_nGl2l1Ls7U&pbjreload=10
PALI CONSONANTS PART 1
The People
Published on Aug 1, 2013
PALI CONSONANTS PART 1
Category
Education

youtube.com
PALI CONSONANTS PART 1
PALI CONSONANTS PART 1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rdZwH9YeILA

Learn Basic Pāli Grammar Episode 02: Pāli Vowels

The People
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rdZwH9YeILA
Learn Basic Pāli Grammar Episode 02: Pāli Vowels
The People
Published on Jun 25, 2016
Hello,
and welcome back, in this lesson we are going to study the Pali
Pronunciation. The first thing to know about Pali is that it was an oral
language, it had no script of its own. All Theravada countries has its
own script for Pali and we shall use roman script for this course.

There
are 41 letters in Pali, 8 Vowels, and 33 consonants. For this lesson,
we will study 8 Vowels and see how to pronounce them. The eight Vowels
are: a, ā, i, ī, u, ū, e, o.

A= cut=Dhamma
Ā=Father =Dāna
I=east=Sila
Ī=Bee=Dīgha
U=oops=Sutta
Ū=Cool=Bhūpāla
E=Pay=Nare
O=Open=Putto
Category
Education

youtube.com
Learn Basic Pāli Grammar Episode 02: Pāli Vowels
Hello, and welcome back, in this lesson we are going to study the Pali Pronunciation. The first thing to…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9jAPBTF9SWU
 
Dhamma Us

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9jAPBTF9SWU
How to learn Pali Language? - 1

Dhamma Us
Published on Apr 28, 2017
About UWest Pali Society:

UWest
Pali Society is committed to promoting Theravada Pali tradition both
academically and ritually. We welcome all the UWest community members to
join us and feel good with us. Individuals outside the UWest community
can be included with the invitation from the members.

The objectives of the UWest Pali Society would be:

1. Pali Sutta Reading & Translation (Free):
Here
we read & translate selected original Pali suttas and discuss the
key Pali terms leading to further discussions. We invite all those
like-minded faculty, staff and students to join us and learn research
and share the experience.

2. Pali Learning (Free):

We are
more than happy to introduce Pali language to those who are interested.
We teach Pali language from the very beginning to advanced level.

3. Online Pali Group (Free):

We have already started an online Pali teaching program. Those who are interested in joining, please contact admin@dhammausa.com

3. Guest Speeches (Free):

We
organize monthly guest speeches by eminent scholars and visiting
Buddhist monks to propagate and promote Pali Language and Literature.

Meeting Dates: Please check for updates here www.dhammausa.com
About DhammaUS:

DHAMMA
US is a non-profit, charity organization engaged in Community Care,
Spiritual Care & Pali Studies. We conduct Meditation, Yoga,
Spiritual Counselling, Healing & Therapeutic Chanting and Teaching
Pali Language. We promote peace, harmony, non-violence along with the
message of the Buddha. We are happy to share the Theravada Buddhist
Studies with any like minded individual or community. However, we
support and promote unconditionally all the other Buddhist schools
without any discrimination. We also respect all the other religions and
their teachings on humanity, world peace, non-violence, and
environmental care.

Contact:

Website: http://www.dhammausa.com/
Blog: http://dhammaus.blogspot.com
Twitter: https://twitter.com/Dhamma_Us
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dhammaus15
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6dg…
Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dhamma-us…
Google+: https://plus.google.com/1085636941523…
Email: info@dhammausa.com

Keywords:
UWest Pali Society
UWest
University of the West
Pali
Buddhism
Buddhist
Chanting
Spiritual
Religion
USA
California
Lankarama Buddhist Institute
Category
Education

youtube.com
How to learn Pali Language? - 1
About
UWest Pali Society: UWest Pali Society is committed to promoting
Theravada Pali tradition both academically and ritually. We welcome all
the…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AKKg07tv72I

How to learn Pali language? - 2

 
Dhamma Us
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AKKg07tv72I
How to learn Pali language? - 2

Dhamma Us
Published on Apr 28, 2017
About UWest Pali Society:

UWest
Pali Society is committed to promoting Theravada Pali tradition both
academically and ritually. We welcome all the UWest community members to
join us and feel good with us. Individuals outside the UWest community
can be included with the invitation from the members.

The objectives of the UWest Pali Society would be:

1. Pali Sutta Reading & Translation (Free):
Here
we read & translate selected original Pali suttas and discuss the
key Pali terms leading to further discussions. We invite all those
like-minded faculty, staff and students to join us and learn research
and share the experience.

2. Pali Learning (Free):

We are
more than happy to introduce Pali language to those who are interested.
We teach Pali language from the very beginning to advanced level.

3. Online Pali Group (Free):

We have already started an online Pali teaching program. Those who are interested in joining, please contact admin@dhammausa.com

3. Guest Speeches (Free):

We
organize monthly guest speeches by eminent scholars and visiting
Buddhist monks to propagate and promote Pali Language and Literature.

Meeting Dates: Please check for updates here www.dhammausa.com
About DhammaUS:

DHAMMA
US is a non-profit, charity organization engaged in Community Care,
Spiritual Care & Pali Studies. We conduct Meditation, Yoga,
Spiritual Counselling, Healing & Therapeutic Chanting and Teaching
Pali Language. We promote peace, harmony, non-violence along with the
message of the Buddha. We are happy to share the Theravada Buddhist
Studies with any like minded individual or community. However, we
support and promote unconditionally all the other Buddhist schools
without any discrimination. We also respect all the other religions and
their teachings on humanity, world peace, non-violence, and
environmental care.

Contact:

Website: http://www.dhammausa.com/
Blog: http://dhammaus.blogspot.com
Twitter: https://twitter.com/Dhamma_Us
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dhammaus15
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6dg…
Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dhamma-us…
Google+: https://plus.google.com/1085636941523…
Email: info@dhammausa.com

Keywords:
UWest Pali Society
UWest
University of the West
Pali
Buddhism
Buddhist
Chanting
Spiritual
Religion
USA
California
Lankarama Buddhist Institute
Category
Education

youtube.com
How to learn Pali language? - 2
About
UWest Pali Society: UWest Pali Society is committed to promoting
Theravada Pali tradition both academically and ritually. We welcome all
the…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fHuiyblfP_A&t=5s

Monk Radio: Learning Pali

 
Yuttadhammo Bhikkhu
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fHuiyblfP_A&t=5s
Monk Radio: Learning Pali

Yuttadhammo Bhikkhu
Published on Aug 8, 2012
Ask questions at our live radio session every Sunday:
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or via our Question and Answer Forum:

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Monk Radio: Learning Pali
Ask
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http://radio.sirimangalo.org/ or via our Question and Answer Forum:
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4.00 - 4.30 pm Break

4.30
pm - 5.30 pm Sutta Pitaka Bhikkhu Gandhhama/Bhikkhu Dhammaloka

https://www.dhamma.uk/tipitaka/sutta-pitaka/

*Dhamma

~ Buddha ~ Dhamma ~ Sangha ~



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Tipitaka Scripture

Tipitaka Scripture


The Sutta Pitaka is one section of the Pali Buddhist cannon called the
Tipitaka, or Three Baskets. The Tipitaka consists of three divisions:

The Vinaya Pitaka: Commentaries and regulations mainly dealing with monastic life


The Sutta Pitaka: Discourses by the Buddha to various audiences about
how to live in a peaceful manner, how to meditate, how to discern truth,
the nature of reality etc.

The Abidhamma Pitaka: is a detailed
scholastic reworking of material appearing in the Suttas containing
summaries of the Suttas and lists.

This website will be primarily
concerned with the Sutta Pitaka because that particular ‘basket’ is the
one that is most pertinent to the likes of you and me, the every day
person in the street who just wishes for a bit more tranquility between
car horns and arguments.


dhamma.uk
The Sutta Pitaka is one section of the Pali Buddhist cannon called the…
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6.30 pm Vinaya Pitaka Bhikkhu Ariyavamsa/Bhikkhu Ayupala
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6.30 pm -
37.30 pm Abhidhamma Pitaka Sayalay Uttamanyani/Ven Bodhicitta

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What is Abhidhamma

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nobelpathfinder
Published on Feb 8, 2011
The ultimate objective in Buddhism is attained by purifying and
improving mind. However, understanding what “mind” is a quite
complicated act for any person. This is a barrier for someone who is
interested in learning Buddhism in‐depth. One of the teachings in
Buddhism which provides a comprehensive analysis on mind is
“Abhidhamma”.

The Buddhist
doctrine is categorized into three, which is known to anyone, as
“Thripitaka” namely Suthra Pitaka, Vinya Pitaka and Abhidhamma Pitaka.
Vinaya Pitaka consists rules of conduct for Sangha and Suthra Pitaka
consists of Suttas containing the central teachings of Buddhism. Suthra
Pitaka is mostly on “Conventional Teachings” (Sammuthi Dheshana) of
Buddhism. Abhidhamma Pitaka provides a theoretical framework for the
doctrine principles in Suthra Pitaka which could be used to describe
“Mind and Matter”. Hence, Abhidhamma embraces the “Ultimate Teachings”
(Paramaththa Dheshana) in Buddhism.

Abhidhamma Pitaka consists of seven treatises;

1. Dhammasangani

2. Vibhanga

3. Dhatukatha

4. Puggalapannatti

5. Kathavatthu

6. Yamaka

7. Pattthana

The term “Abhidhamma” simply means “Higher Doctrine”. It is an in‐depth
investigation to mind and matter. It answers many intricate points of
Dhamma. It analyses complex machinery of human, world, mind, thoughts,
thought‐process, mental formations and etc. Therefore it is indeed a
complex doctrine to understand. However, there are many who are
interested in learning this beautiful branch of doctrine. Amongst them
there are plenty of non‐Buddhists as well. This effort is to present
this doctrine in an “Easy to Understand” manner.

( 8th FEB 2011)
Category
Education


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The
ultimate objective in Buddhism is attained by purifying and improving
mind. However, understanding what “mind” is a quite complicated act for
any person….
lished on Feb 8, 2011





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SPIRITUAL COMMUNITY OF THE TRUE FOLLOWERS OF THE PATH SHOWN BY THE BLESSED NOBLE AWAKENED ONE -THE TATHAGATA

They say……'’The first step to awakenment is to say I am not a fool. The second step is to know that you are. Become Blessed Noble Awakened One. ‘’…..This is really important to understand

Kindly visit:

http://www.chiangmai-chiangrai.com/buddhist_ceremonies_1.html

http://buddhism.kalachakranet.org/general_symbols_buddhism.html

The 8 Auspicious SignsTHE EIGHT AUSPICIOUS SYMBOLS

 

 

 

 

I. The Essential Meaning of Sila

The Pali word for moral discipline, sila, has three levels of meaning: (1) inner virtue, i.e., endowment with such qualities as kindness, contentment, simplicity, truthfulness, patience, etc.; (2) virtuous actions of body and speech which express those inner virtues outwardly; and (3) rules of conduct governing actions of body and speech designed to bring them into accord with the ethical ideals. These three levels are closely intertwined and not always distinguishable in individual cases. But if we isolate them, sila as inner virtue can be called the aim of the training in moral discipline, sila as purified actions of body and speech the manifestation of that aim, and sila as rules of conduct the systematic means of actualizing the aim. Thus sila as inner virtue is established by bringing our bodily and verbal actions into accord with the ethical ideals, and this is done by following the rules of conduct intended to give these ideals concrete form.

The Practioners of Doctrine Practiced by The Blessed Noble Awakened One-The Tathagata’s texts explain that sila has the characteristic of harmonizing our actions of body and speech. Sila harmonizes our actions by bringing them into accord with our own true interests, with the well-being of others, and with universal laws. Actions contrary to sila lead to a state of self-division marked by guilt, anxiety, and remorse. But the observance of the principles of sila heals this division, bringing our inner faculties together into a balanced and centered state of unity. Sila also brings us into harmony with other men. While actions undertaken in disregard of ethical principles lead to relations scarred by competitiveness, exploitation, and aggression, actions intended to embody such principles promote concord between man and man — peace, cooperation, and mutual respect. The harmony achieved by maintaining sila does not stop at the social level, but leads our actions into harmony with a higher law — the law of kamma, of action and its fruit, which reigns invisibly behind the entire world of sentient existence.

The need to internalize ethical virtue as the foundation for the path translates itself into a set of precepts established as guidelines to good conduct. The most basic set of precepts found in the Blessed Noble Awakened One-The Tathagata’s teaching is the pañcasila, the five precepts, consisting of the following five training rules:

(1) the training rule of abstaining from taking life;

(2) the training rule of abstaining from taking what is not given;

(3) the training rule of abstaining from sexual misconduct;

(4) the training rule of abstaining from false speech; and

(5) the training rule of abstaining from fermented and distilled intoxicants which are the basis for heedlessness.

These five precepts are the minimal ethical code binding on the  Practioners of Doctrine Practiced by The Blessed Noble Awakened One-The Tathagata’s  laity. They are administered regularly by the monks to the lay disciples at almost every service and ceremony, following immediately upon the giving of the three refuges. They are also undertaken afresh each day by earnest lay  Practioners of Doctrine Practiced by The Blessed Noble Awakened One-The Tathagata’s as part of their daily recitation.

The precepts function as the core of the training in moral discipline. They are intended to produce, through methodical practice, that inner purity of will and motivation which comes to expression as virtuous bodily and verbal conduct. Hence the equivalent term for precept, sikkhapada, which means literally “factor of training,” that is, a factor of the training in moral discipline. However, the formulation of ethical virtue in terms of rules of conduct meets with an objection reflecting an attitude that is becoming increasingly widespread. This objection, raised by the ethical generalist, calls into question the need to cast ethics into the form of specific rules. It is enough, it is said, simply to have good intentions and to let ourselves be guided by our intuition as to what is right and wrong. Submitting to rules of conduct is at best superfluous, but worse tends to lead to a straightjacket conception of morality, to a constricting and legalistic system of ethics.

The Practioners of Doctrine Practiced by The Blessed Noble Awakened One-The Tathagata’s  reply is that while moral virtue admittedly cannot be equated flatly with any set of rules, or with outward conduct conforming to rules, the rules are still of value for aiding the development of inner virtue. Only the very exceptional few can alter the stuff of their lives by a mere act of will. The overwhelming majority of men have to proceed more slowly, with the help of a set of stepping stones to help them gradually cross the rough currents of greed, hatred, and delusion. If the process of self-transformation which is the heart of The Practioners of Doctrine Practiced by The Blessed Noble Awakened One-The Tathagata’s  path begins with moral discipline, then the concrete manifestation of this discipline is in the lines of conduct represented by the five precepts, which call for our adherence as expedient means to self-transformation. The precepts are not commandments imposed from without, but principles of training each one takes upon himself through his own initiative and endeavors to follow with awareness and understanding. The formulas for the precepts do not read: “Thou shalt abstain from this and that.” They read: “I undertake the training rule to abstain from the taking of life,” etc. The emphasis here, as throughout the entire path, is on self-responsibility.

The precepts engender virtuous dispositions by a process involving the substitution of opposites. The actions prohibited by the precepts — killing, stealing, adultery, etc. — are all motivated by unwholesome mental factors called in The Practioners of Doctrine Practiced by The Blessed Noble Awakened One-The Tathagata’s  terminology the “defilements” (kilesa). By engaging in these actions knowingly and willingly we reinforce the grip of the defilements upon the mind to the point where they become our dominant traits. But when we take up the training by observing the precepts we then put a brake upon the current of unwholesome mental factors. There then takes place a process of “factor substitution” whereby the defilements are replaced by wholesome states which become increasingly more deeply ingrained as we go on with the training.

In this process of self-transformation the precepts draw their efficacy from another psychological principle, the law of development through repetition. Even though at first a practice arouses some resistance from within, if it is repeated over and over with understanding and determination, the qualities it calls into play pass imperceptibly into the makeup of the mind. We generally begin in the grip of negative attitudes, hemmed in by unskillful emotions. But if we see that these states lead to suffering and that to be free from suffering we must abandon them, then we will have sufficient motivation to take up the training designed to counter them. This training starts with the outer observance of sila, then proceeds to internalize self-restraint through meditation and wisdom. At the start to maintain the precepts may require special effort, but by degrees the virtuous qualities they embody will gather strength until our actions flow from them as naturally and smoothly as water from a spring.

The five precepts are formulated in accordance with the ethical algorithm of using oneself as the criterion for determining how to act in relation to others. In Pali the principle is expressed by the phrase attanam upamam katva, “consider oneself as similar to others and others as similar to oneself.” The method of application involves a simple imaginative exchange of oneself and others. In order to decide whether or not to follow a particular line of action, we take ourselves as the standard and consider what would be pleasant and painful for ourselves. Then we reflect that others are basically similar to ourselves, and so, what is pleasant and painful to us is also pleasant and painful to them; thus just as we would not want others to cause pain for us, so we should not cause pain for others. As The Blessed Noble Awakened One-The Tathagata explains:

In this matter the noble disciple reflects: ‘Here am I, fond of my life, not wanting to die, fond of pleasure and averse from pain. Suppose someone should deprive me of my life, it would not be a thing pleasing or delightful to me. If I, in my turn, were to deprive of his life one fond of life, not wanting to die, one fond of pleasure and averse from pain, it would not be a thing pleasing or delightful to him. For that state which is not pleasant or delightful to me must be not pleasant or delightful to another: and a state undear and unpleasing to me, how could I inflict that upon another?’ As a result of such reflection he himself abstains from taking the life of creatures and he encourages others so to abstain, and speaks in praise of so abstaining.

Samyuttanikaya, 55, No. 7

This deductive method The Blessed Noble Awakened One-The Tathagata  uses to derive the first four precepts. The fifth precept, abstaining from intoxicants, appears to deal only with my relation to myself, with what I put into my own body. However, because the violation of this precept can lead to the violation of all the other precepts and to much further harm for others, its social implications are deeper than is evident at first sight and bring it into range of this same method of derivation.

The Practioners of Doctrine Practiced by The Blessed Noble Awakened One-The Tathagata’s  ethics, as formulated in the five precepts, is sometimes charged with being entirely negative. It is criticized on the ground that it is a morality solely of avoidance lacking any ideals of positive action. Against this criticism several lines of reply can be given. First of all it has to be pointed out that the five precepts, or even the longer codes of precepts promulgated by The Blessed Noble Awakened One-The Tathagata, do not exhaust the full range of The Practioners of Doctrine Practiced by The Blessed Noble Awakened One-The Tathagata’s  ethics. The precepts are only the most rudimentary code of moral training, but The Blessed Noble Awakened One-The Tathagata also proposes other ethical codes inculcating definite positive virtues. The Mangala Sutta, for example, commends reverence, humility, contentment, gratitude, patience, generosity, etc. Other discourses prescribe numerous family, social, and political duties establishing the well being of society. And behind all these duties lie the four attitudes called the “immeasurables” — loving-kindness, compassion, sympathetic joy, and equanimity.

But turning to the five precepts themselves, some words have to be said in defense of their negative formulation. Each moral principle included in the precepts contains two aspects — a negative aspect, which is a rule of abstinence, and a positive aspect, which is a virtue to be cultivated. These aspects are called, respectively, varitta (avoidance) and caritta (positive performance). Thus the first precept is formulated as abstaining from the destruction of life, which in itself is a varitta, a principle of abstinence. But corresponding to this, we also find in the descriptions of the practice of this precept a caritta, a positive quality to be developed, namely compassion. Thus in the suttas we read: “The disciple, abstaining from the taking of life, dwells without stick or sword, conscientious, full of sympathy, desirous of the welfare of all living beings.” So corresponding to the negative side of abstaining from the destruction of life, there is the positive side of developing compassion and sympathy for all beings. Similarly, abstinence from stealing is paired with honesty and contentment, abstinence from sexual misconduct is paired with marital fidelity in the case of lay people and celibacy in the case of monks, abstinence from falsehood is paired with speaking the truth, and abstinence from intoxicants is paired with heedfulness.

Nevertheless, despite this recognition of a duality of aspect, the question still comes up: if there are two sides to each moral principle, why is the precept worded only as an abstinence? Why don’t we also undertake training rules to develop positive virtues such as compassion, honesty, and so forth?

The answer to this is twofold. First, in order to develop the positive virtues we have to begin by abstaining from the negative qualities opposed to them. The growth of the positive virtues will only be stunted or deformed as long as the defilements are allowed to reign unchecked. We cannot cultivate compassion while at the same time indulging in killing, or cultivate honesty while stealing and cheating. At the start we have to abandon the unwholesome through the aspect of avoidance. Only when we have secured a foundation in avoiding the unwholesome can we expect to succeed in cultivating the factors of positive performance. The process of purifying virtue can be compared to growing a flower garden on a plot of uncultivated land. We don’t begin by planting the seeds in expectation of a bountiful yield. We have to start with the duller work of weeding out the garden and preparing the beds. Only after we have uprooted the weeds and nourished the soil can we plant the seeds in the confidence that the flowers will grow healthily.

Another reason why the precepts are worded in terms of abstinence is that the development of positive virtues cannot be prescribed by rules. Rules of training can govern what we have to avoid and perform in our outer actions but only ideals of aspiration, not rules, can govern what develops within ourselves. Thus we cannot take up a training rule to always be loving towards others. To impose such a rule is to place ourselves in a double bind since inner attitudes are just simply not so docile that they can be determined by command. Love and compassion are the fruits of the work we do on ourselves inwardly, not of assenting to a precept. What we can do is to undertake a precept to abstain from destroying life and from injuring other beings. Then we can make a resolution, preferably without much fanfare, to develop loving-kindness, and apply ourselves to the mental training designed to nourish its growth.

One more word should be added concerning the formulation of the precepts. Despite their negative wording, even in that form the precepts are productive of tremendous positive benefits for others as well as for oneself. The Blessed Noble Awakened One-The Tathagata says that one who abstains from the destruction of life gives immeasurable safety and security to countless living beings. How the simple observance of a single precept leads to such a result is not immediately obvious but calls for some thought. Now by myself I can never give immeasurable safety and security to other beings by any program of positive action. Even if I were to go on protest against all the slaughterhouses in the world, or to march against war continuously without stopping, by such action I could never stop the slaughter of animals or ensure that war would come to an end. But when I adopt for myself the precept to abstain from the destruction of life, then by reason of the precept I do not intentionally destroy the life of any living being. Thus any other being can feel safe and secure in my presence; all beings are ensured that they will never meet harm from me. Of course even then I can never ensure that other living beings will be absolutely immune from harm and suffering, but this is beyond anyone’s power. All that lies within my power and the sphere of my responsibility are the attitudes and actions that emanate from myself towards others. And as long as these are circumscribed by the training rule to abstain from taking life, no living being need feel threatened in my presence, or fear that harm and suffering will come from me.

The same principle applies to the other precepts. When I undertake the precept to abstain from taking what is not given, no one has reason to fear that I will steal what belongs to him; the belongings of all other beings are safe from me. When I undertake the precept to abstain from sexual misconduct, no one has reason to fear that I will try to transgress against his wife. When I undertake the precept to abstain from falsehood, then anyone who speaks with me can be confident that they will hear the truth; my word can be regarded as trustworthy and reliable even in matters of critical importance. And because I undertake the precept of abstaining from intoxicants, then one can be assured that the crimes and transgression that result from intoxication will never be committed by myself. In this way, by observing the five precepts I give immeasurable safety and security to countless beings simply through these five silent but powerful determinations established in the mind.

 

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