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01/14/11
Two 55-kg cakes for Mayawati’s birthday Saturday-Wishing Happy Birthday Today to MAYAWATIJI, not just for the Next, but for the First PRIME MINISTER of PRABUDDHA BHARATH-138 LESSON 15 01 2011 FREE ONLINE eNālandā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY to VOTE for BSP ELEPHANT for Social Transformation and Economic Emancipation -
Filed under: General
Posted by: site admin @ 9:12 pm

 

Mayawati

watch latest Birthday video:http://www.in.com/videos/watchvideo-mayawati-birthday1mp4-8025851.html

Mayawati Birthday: Mayathi

Mayawati Birthday: 2003011703301201

Mayawati Birthday: 2006011613910401

Mayawati Birthday: 2005011604660801

Mayawati Birthday: Untouchables Queen Mayawati cuts cake at her 52nd birthday party

Mayawati Birthday: 15nlook

Mayawati Birthday: 15nlook2

Mayawati Birthday: mayab313

Mayawati Birthday: 2009011657450701

Mayawati Birthday: Mayawati has said there is not even the remotest link between

Mayawati Birthday: up sycophancy 171 m

Mayawati Birthday: maya 313

Mayawati Birthday: BSP Members Celebrate 54th Birthday of Uttar Pradesh CM Mayawati 25334 medium

Mayawati Birthday: mayawati south 313

Mayawati Birthday: C897B1CDD76DDA2C61E8A8DF87C6E

 

Wishing Happy Birthday Today to MAYAWATIJI, not just for the Next, but for the First PRIME MINISTER of PRABUDDHA BHARATH

Two 55-kg cakes for Mayawati’s birthday Saturday

Two 55-kg cakes are waiting to be cut on Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Mayawati’s 55th birthday Saturday.

Mayawati herself will cut one of them at the official celebration in the morning at the newly constructed state-of-art Ambedkar Auditorium of the Ram Manohar Lohia Law University here. The other cake will be cut by a group of local citizens later in the day.

This is being done at the initiative of the Lucknow Sindhi Association in collaboration with traders of the city’s main shopping street Hazratganj, which has undegone a remarkable makeover on its completion of 200 years.

“We are cutting the cake to celebrate the chief minister’s 55th birthday which coincides with the 200th anniversary of Hazratganj whose old glory has been restored because of her kind disposition”, Sindhi Samaj president and leading Hazratganj trader Murlidhar Ahuja told IANS.

The official birthday celebrations will commence at 10 a.m. with the inauguration of Ambedkar Auditorium , which would be followed by unveiling of plaques of various welfare schemes and development projects worth Rs.4000 crores by the chief minister.

The projects include memorials, statues, roads, bridges, flyovers, sewage treatment plants, water supply and drainage schemes, power installations and other major and minor infrastructure for different parts of the state.

A group of Buddhist monks have been specially invited to bless Mayawati on the occasion.

Meanwhile, the entire state capital literally turned blue, the ruling Bahujan Samaj Party (BSP) colour. While canopies of blue lights were put around each of the memorials, dedicated to BSP icons, including herself, virtually the city’s key thoroughfares were flanked by hoardings emboldened with birthday greetings.

Late Friday night the chief minister personally went around the blue illuminations along with her father, mother, brother, sister and other family members who arrived here from New Delhi earlier in the day.

No sooner than she expressed her desire to undertake a round on the eve of her birthday, officials suddenly got into action to get the roads and pavements clear of dirt. Water was sprinkled all along her route while a huge contingent of police was busy clearing the roads not only of vehicular traffic but even pedestrians.

138 LESSON 15 01 2011 FREE ONLINE eNālandā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY to VOTE for BSP ELEPHANT for Social Transformation and Economic Emancipation

http://www.orgsites.com/oh/awakenedone/

Awakeness Practices

All 84,000 Khandas As Found in the Pali Suttas

Traditionally the are 84,000 Dharma Doors - 84,000 ways to get Awakeness. Maybe so; certainly the Buddha taught a large number of practices that lead to Awakeness. This web page attempts to catalogue those found in the Pali Suttas (DN, MN, SN, AN, Ud & Sn 1). There are 3 sections:

The discourses of Buddha are divided into 84,000, as to separate addresses. The division includes all that was spoken by Buddha.”I received from Buddha,” said Ananda, “82,000 Khandas, and  from the priests 2000; these are 84,000 Khandas maintained by me.” They are divided into 275,250, as to the stanzas of the original text, and into 361,550, as to the stanzas of the commentary. All the discourses including both those of Buddha and those of the commentator, are divided  into 2,547 banawaras, containing 737,000 stanzas, and 29,368,000 separate letters.

Course Programs:

LESSON 138

Ahara Sutta (Canonical)

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/sn/sn46/sn46.051.than.html

SN 46.51 

PTS: S v 102 

CDB ii 1597

Ahara Sutta: Food

(For the Factors for Awakening)

translated from the Pali by

Thanissaro Bhikkhu

© 2008–2011

“Monks, I will teach you the feeding & starving of the five hindrances & of the seven factors for Awakening. Listen & pay close attention. I will speak…

Feeding the Hindrances

“And what is the food for the arising of unarisen sensual desire, or for the growth & increase of sensual desire once it has arisen? There is the theme of beauty. To foster inappropriate attention to it: This is the food for the arising of unarisen sensual desire, or for the growth & increase of sensual desire once it has arisen.

“And what is the food for the arising of unarisen ill will, or for the growth & increase of ill will once it has arisen? There is the theme of resistance. To foster inappropriate attention to it: This is the food for the arising of unarisen ill will, or for the growth & increase of ill will once it has arisen.

“And what is the food for the arising of unarisen sloth & drowsiness, or for the growth & increase of sloth & drowsiness once it has arisen? There are boredom, weariness, yawning, drowsiness after a meal, & sluggishness of awareness. To foster inappropriate attention to them: This is the food for the arising of unarisen sloth & drowsiness, or for the growth & increase of sloth & drowsiness once it has arisen.

“And what is the food for the arising of unarisen restlessness & anxiety, or for the growth & increase of restlessness & anxiety once it has arisen? There is non-stillness of awareness. To foster inappropriate attention to that: This is the food for the arising of unarisen restlessness & anxiety, or for the growth & increase of restlessness & anxiety once it has arisen.

“And what is the food for the arising of unarisen uncertainty, or for the growth & increase of uncertainty once it has arisen? There are phenomena that act as a foothold for uncertainty. To foster inappropriate attention to them: This is the food for the arising of unarisen uncertainty, or for the growth & increase of uncertainty once it has arisen.

Feeding the Factors for Awakening

“Now, what is the food for the arising of unarisen mindfulness as a factor for Awakening, or for the growth & increase of mindfulness as a factor for Awakening once it has arisen? There are mental qualities that act as a foothold for mindfulness as a factor for Awakening [well-purified virtue & views made straight]. To foster appropriate attention to them: This is the food for the arising of unarisen mindfulness as a factor for Awakening, or for the growth & increase of mindfulness as a factor for Awakening once it has arisen.

“And what is the food for the arising of unarisen analysis of qualities as a factor for Awakening, or for the growth & increase of analysis of qualities… once it has arisen? There are mental qualities that are skillful & unskillful, blameworthy & blameless, gross & refined, siding with darkness & with light. To foster appropriate attention to them: This is the food for the arising of unarisen analysis of qualities as a factor for Awakening, or for the growth & increase of analysis of qualities… once it has arisen.

“And what is the food for the arising of unarisen persistence as a factor for Awakening, or for the growth & increase of persistence… once it has arisen? There is the potential for effort, the potential for exertion, the potential for striving. To foster appropriate attention to them: This is the food for the arising of unarisen persistence as a factor for Awakening, or for the growth & increase of persistence… once it has arisen.

“And what is the food for the arising of unarisen rapture as a factor for Awakening, or for the growth & increase of rapture… once it has arisen? There are mental qualities that act as a foothold for rapture as a factor for Awakening. To foster appropriate attention to them: This is the food for the arising of unarisen rapture as a factor for Awakening, or for the growth & increase of rapture… once it has arisen.

“And what is the food for the arising of unarisen serenity as a factor for Awakening, or for the growth & increase of serenity… once it has arisen? There is physical serenity & there is mental serenity. To foster appropriate attention to them: This is the food for the arising of unarisen serenity as a factor for Awakening, or for the growth & increase of serenity… once it has arisen.

“And what is the food for the arising of unarisen concentration as a factor for Awakening, or for the growth & increase of concentration… once it has arisen? There are themes for calm, themes for non-distraction [these are the four frames of reference]. To foster appropriate attention to them: This is the food for the arising of unarisen concentration as a factor for Awakening, or for the growth & increase of concentration… once it has arisen.

“And what is the food for the arising of unarisen equanimity as a factor for Awakening, or for the growth & increase of equanimity… once it has arisen? There are mental qualities that act as a foothold for equanimity as a factor for Awakening. To foster appropriate attention to them: This is the food for the arising of unarisen equanimity as a factor for Awakening, or for the growth & increase of equanimity as a factor for Awakening once it has arisen.

Starving the Hindrances

“Now, what is lack of food for the arising of unarisen sensual desire, or for the growth & increase of sensual desire once it has arisen? There is the theme of unattractiveness. To foster appropriate attention to it: This is lack of food for the arising of unarisen sensual desire, or for the growth & increase of sensual desire once it has arisen.

And what is lack of food for the arising of unarisen ill will, or for the growth & increase of ill will once it has arisen? There is awareness-release.[1] To foster appropriate attention to that: This is lack of food for the arising of unarisen ill will, or for the growth & increase of ill will once it has arisen.

“And what is lack of food for the arising of unarisen sloth & drowsiness, or for the growth & increase of sloth & drowsiness once it has arisen? There is the potential for effort, the potential for exertion, the potential for striving. To foster appropriate attention to them: This is lack of food for the arising of unarisen sloth & drowsiness, or for the growth & increase of sloth & drowsiness once it has arisen.

“And what is lack of food for the arising of unarisen restlessness & anxiety, or for the growth & increase of restlessness & anxiety once it has arisen? There is the stilling of awareness. To foster appropriate attention to that: This is lack of food for the arising of unarisen restlessness & anxiety, or for the growth & increase of restlessness & anxiety once it has arisen.

“And what is lack of food for the arising of unarisen uncertainty, or for the growth & increase of uncertainty once it has arisen? There are mental qualities that are skillful & unskillful, blameworthy & blameless, gross & refined, siding with darkness & with light. To foster appropriate attention to them: This is lack of food for the arising of unarisen uncertainty, or for the growth & increase of uncertainty once it has arisen.

Starving the Factors for Awakening

“Now, what is lack of food for the arising of unarisen mindfulness as a factor for Awakening, or for the growth & increase of mindfulness as a factor for Awakening once it has arisen? There are mental qualities that act as a foothold for mindfulness as a factor for Awakening. Not fostering attention to them: This is lack of food for the arising of unarisen mindfulness as a factor for Awakening, or for the growth & increase of mindfulness as a factor for Awakening once it has arisen.

“And what is lack of food for the arising of unarisen analysis of qualities as a factor for Awakening, or for the growth & increase of analysis of qualities… once it has arisen? There are mental qualities that are skillful & unskillful, blameworthy & blameless, gross & refined, siding with darkness & with light. Not fostering attention to them: This is lack of food for the arising of unarisen analysis of qualities as a factor for Awakening, or for the growth & increase of analysis of qualities… once it has arisen.

“And what is lack of food for the arising of unarisen persistence as a factor for Awakening, or for the growth & increase of persistence… once it has arisen? There is the potential for effort, the potential for exertion, the potential for striving. Not fostering attention to them: This is lack of food for the arising of unarisen persistence as a factor for Awakening, or for the growth & increase of persistence… once it has arisen.

“And what is lack of food for the arising of unarisen rapture as a factor for Awakening, or for the growth & increase of rapture… once it has arisen? There are mental qualities that act as a foothold for rapture as a factor for Awakening. Not fostering attention to them: This is lack of food for the arising of unarisen rapture as a factor for Awakening, or for the growth & increase of rapture… once it has arisen.

“And what is lack of food for the arising of unarisen serenity as a factor for Awakening, or for the growth & increase of serenity… once it has arisen? There is bodily serenity & there is mental serenity. To foster inappropriate attention to them: This is lack of food for the arising of unarisen serenity as a factor for Awakening, or for the growth & increase of serenity… once it has arisen.

“And what is lack of food for the arising of unarisen concentration as a factor for Awakening, or for the growth & increase of concentration… once it has arisen? There are the themes for concentration, themes for non-confusion. Not fostering attention to them: This is lack of food for the arising of unarisen concentration as a factor for Awakening, or for the growth & increase of concentration… once it has arisen.

“And what is lack of food for the arising of unarisen equanimity as a factor for Awakening, or for the growth & increase of equanimity as a factor for Awakening once it has arisen? There are mental qualities that act as a foothold for equanimity as a factor for Awakening. Not fostering attention to them: This is lack of food for the arising of unarisen equanimity as a factor for Awakening, or for the growth & increase of equanimity as a factor for Awakening once it has arisen.”

Note

1.

Through good will, compassion, appreciation, or equanimity.

See also: AN 5.51

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/an/an05/an05.051.than.html

N 5.51 

PTS: A iii 63

Avarana Sutta: Obstacles

translated from the Pali by

Thanissaro Bhikkhu

© 2003–2011

On one occasion the Blessed One was staying at Savatthi, in Jeta’s Grove, Anathapindika’s Monastery. There he addressed the monks, “Monks!”

“Yes, lord,” the monks replied to the Blessed One.

The Blessed One said: “These five are obstacles, hindrances that overwhelm awareness and weaken discernment. Which five?

“Sensual desire is an obstacle, a hindrance that overwhelms awareness and weakens discernment. Ill will… Sloth & drowsiness… Restlessness & anxiety… Uncertainty is an obstacle, a hindrance that overwhelms awareness and weakens discernment. These are the five obstacles, hindrances that overwhelm awareness and weaken discernment. And when a monk has not abandoned these five obstacles, hindrances that overwhelm awareness and weaken discernment, when he is without strength and weak in discernment: for him to understand what is for his own benefit, to understand what is for the benefit of others, to understand what is for the benefit of both, to realize a superior human state, a truly noble distinction in knowledge & vision: that is impossible.

Suppose there were a river, flowing down from the mountains — going far, its current swift, carrying everything with it — and a man would open channels leading away from it on both sides, so that the current in the middle of the river would be dispersed, diffused, & dissipated; it wouldn’t go far, its current wouldn’t be swift, and it wouldn’t carry everything with it. In the same way, when a monk has not abandoned these five obstacles, hindrances that overwhelm awareness and weaken discernment, when he is without strength and weak in discernment for him to understand what is for his own benefit, to understand what is for the benefit of others, to understand what is for the benefit of both, to realize a superior human state, a truly noble distinction in knowledge & vision: that is impossible.

“Now, when a monk has abandoned these five obstacles, hindrances that overwhelm awareness and weaken discernment, when he is strong in discernment: for him to understand what is for his own benefit, to understand what is for the benefit of others, to understand what is for the benefit of both, to realize a superior human state, a truly noble distinction in knowledge & vision: that is possible.

“Suppose there were a river, flowing down from the mountains — going far, its current swift, carrying everything with it — and a man would close the channels leading away from it on both sides, so that the current in the middle of the river would be undispersed, undiffused, & undissipated; it would go far, its current swift, carrying everything with it. In the same way, when a monk has abandoned these five obstacles, hindrances that overwhelm awareness and weaken discernment, when he is strong in discernment: for him to understand what is for his own benefit, to understand what is for the benefit of others, to understand what is for the benefit of both, to realize a superior human state, a truly noble distinction in knowledge & vision: that is possible.”

See also: SN 46.51.

o    BUDDHA (EDUCATE)!    DHAMMA (MEDITATE)!  SANGHA (ORGANISE)!

o    WISDOM IS POWER

o    Awakened One Shows the Path to Attain Eternal Bliss

o    Using such an instrument

o    The Free ONLINE e-Nālandā Research and Practice University has been re-organized to function through the following Schools of Learning :

o    Buddha’s Sangha Practiced His Dhamma Free of cost, hence the Free- e-Nālandā Research and Practice University follows suit

o    As the Original Nālandā University did not offer any Degree, so also the Free  e-Nālandā Research and Practice University.

o    The teachings of Buddha are eternal, but even then Buddha did not proclaim them to be infallible. The religion of Buddha has the capacity to change according to times, a quality which no other religion can claim to have…Now what is the basis of Buddhism? If you study carefully, you will see that Buddhism is based on reason. There is an element of flexibility inherent in it, which is not found in any other religion.

o    Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar , Indian scholar, philosopher and architect of Constitution of India, in his writing and speeches

o    IKAMMA,REBIRTH,AWAKEN-NESS,BUDDHA,THUS COME ONE,DHAMMA II.ARHA ,FOUR HOLY TRUTHS,EIGHTFOLD PATH,TWELVEFOLD CONDITIONED ARISING,BODHISATTVA,PARAMITA,SIX PARAMITAS III.SIX SPIRITUAL POWERS,SIX PATHS OF REBIRTH,TEN DHARMA REALMS,FIVE SKANDHAS,EIGHTEEN REALMS,FIVE MORAL PRECEPTS IV. MEDITATION,MINDFULNESS,FOUR APPLICATIONS OF MINDFULNESS,LOTUS POSTURE,SAMADHI,CHAN SCHOOL,FOUR JHANAS,FOUR FORMLESS REALMS V. FIVE TYPES OF BUDDHIST STUDY AND PRACTICE,MAHAYANA AND HINAYANA COMPARED,PURE LAND,BUDDHA RECITATION,EIGHT CONSCIOUSNESSES,ONE HUNDRED DHARMAS,EMPTINESS VI. DEMON,LINEAGE

o    with

o    Level I: Introduction to Buddhism,Level II: Buddhist Studies,

o    TO ATTAIN

o    Level III: Stream-Enterer,Level IV: Once – Returner,Level V: Non-Returner,Level VI: Arhat

o    Jambudvipa, i.e, PraBuddha Bharath scientific thought in

o    mathematics,astronomy,alchemy,andanatomy

o    Philosophy and Comparative Religions;Historical Studies;International Relations and Peace Studies;Business Management in relation to Public Policy and Development Studies;Languages and Literature;and Ecology and Environmental Studies

Jambudvipa, i.e, PraBuddha Bharath scientific thought in

Mathematics

Astronomy

Alchemy

And

Anatomy

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Wishing Happy Birthday on 15-01-2011 to MAYAWATIJI not just for the Next, but for the First PRIME MINISTER of PRABUDDHA BHARATH-132 to 137 LESSONS 09 to 14 01 2011 Aggi Vacchagotta to Aghatavinaya Suttas FREE ONLINE eNālandā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY to VOTE for BSP ELEPHANT for Social Transformation and Economic Emancipation -GOOD GOVERNANCE-Severe cold wave : Hon’ble C.M. orders closure of all educational institutions up to intermediate level till January 15-VOICE OF SARVAJAN-HONEYLEAKS-UPA-3: The Dream Of Congress Ends With 2G
Filed under: General
Posted by: site admin @ 3:30 am

 

Wishing Happy Birthday on 15-01-2011 to MAYAWATIJI not just for  the Next, but for the First PRIME MINISTER of PRABUDDHA BHARATH

132 to 137 LESSONS 09 to 14 01 2011 Aggi Vacchagotta to Aghatavinaya Suttas FREE ONLINE eNālandā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY to VOTE for BSP ELEPHANT for Social Transformation and Economic Emancipation

http://www.orgsites.com/oh/awakenedone/

Awakeness Practices

All 84,000 Khandas As Found in the Pali Suttas

Traditionally the are 84,000 Dharma Doors - 84,000 ways to get Awakeness. Maybe so; certainly the Buddha taught a large number of practices that lead to Awakeness. This web page attempts to catalogue those found in the Pali Suttas (DN, MN, SN, AN, Ud & Sn 1). There are 3 sections:

The discourses of Buddha are divided into 84,000, as to separate addresses. The division includes all that was spoken by Buddha.”I received from Buddha,” said Ananda, “82,000 Khandas, and  from the priests 2000; these are 84,000 Khandas maintained by me.” They are divided into 275,250, as to the stanzas of the original text, and into 361,550, as to the stanzas of the commentary. All the discourses including both those of Buddha and those of the commentator, are divided  into 2,547 banawaras, containing 737,000 stanzas, and 29,368,000 separate letters.

Course Programs:

LESSON 132

Aggi-Vacchagotta Sutta (Canonical)

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/mn/mn.072.than.html

MN 72 

PTS: M i 483

Aggi-Vacchagotta Sutta: To Vacchagotta on Fire

translated from the Pali by

Thanissaro Bhikkhu

© 1997–2011

I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying in Savatthi, at Jeta’s Grove,Anathapindika’s monastery. Then the wanderer Vacchagotta went to the Blessed One and, on arrival, exchanged courteous greetings with him. After an exchange of friendly greetings & courtesies, he sat to one side. As he was sitting there he asked the Blessed One: “How is it, Master Gotama, does Master Gotama hold the view: ‘The cosmos is eternal: only this is true, anything otherwise is worthless’?”

“…no…”

“Then does Master Gotama hold the view: ‘The cosmos is not eternal: only this is true, anything otherwise is worthless’?”

“…no…”

“Then does Master Gotama hold the view: ‘The cosmos is finite: only this is true, anything otherwise is worthless’?”

“…no…”

“Then does Master Gotama hold the view: ‘The cosmos is infinite: only this is true, anything otherwise is worthless’?”

“…no…”

“Then does Master Gotama hold the view: ‘The soul & the body are the same: only this is true, anything otherwise is worthless’?”

“…no…”

“Then does Master Gotama hold the view: ‘The soul is one thing and the body another: only this is true, anything otherwise is worthless’?”

“…no…”

“Then does Master Gotama hold the view: ‘After death a Tathagata exists: only this is true, anything otherwise is worthless’?”

“…no…”

“Then does Master Gotama hold the view: ‘After death a Tathagata does not exist: only this is true, anything otherwise is worthless’?”

“…no…”

“Then does Master Gotama hold the view: ‘After death a Tathagata both exists & does not exist: only this is true, anything otherwise is worthless’?”

“…no…”

“Then does Master Gotama hold the view: ‘After death a Tathagata neither exists nor does not exist: only this is true, anything otherwise is worthless’?”

“…no…”

“How is it, Master Gotama, when Master Gotama is asked if he holds the view ‘the cosmos is eternal…’… ‘after death a Tathagata neither exists nor does not exist: only this is true, anything otherwise is worthless,’ he says ‘…no…’ in each case. Seeing what drawback, then, is Master Gotama thus entirely dissociated from each of these ten positions?”

Vaccha, the position that ‘the cosmos is eternal’ is a thicket of views, a wilderness of views, a contortion of views, a writhing of views, a fetter of views. It is accompanied by suffering, distress, despair, & fever, and it does not lead to disenchantment, dispassion, cessation; to calm, direct knowledge, full Awakening, Unbinding.

“The position that ‘the cosmos is not eternal’…

“…’the cosmos is finite’…

“…’the cosmos is infinite’…

“…’the soul & the body are the same’…

“…’the soul is one thing and the body another’…

“…’after death a Tathagata exists’…

“…’after death a Tathagata does not exist’…

“…’after death a Tathagata both exists & does not exist’…

“…’after death a Tathagata neither exists nor does not exist’… does not lead to disenchantment, dispassion, cessation; to calm, direct knowledge, full Awakening, Unbinding.”

“Does Master Gotama have any position at all?”

“A ‘position,’ Vaccha, is something that a Tathagata has done away with. What a Tathagata sees is this: ‘Such is form, such its origin, such its disappearance; such is feeling, such its origin, such its disappearance; such is perception… such are mental fabrications… such is consciousness, such its origin, such its disappearance.’ Because of this, I say, a Tathagata — with the ending, fading out, cessation, renunciation, & relinquishment of all construings, all excogitations, all I-making & mine-making & obsession with conceit — is, through lack of clinging/sustenance, released.”

“But, Master Gotama, the monk whose mind is thus released: Where does he reappear?”

“‘Reappear,’ Vaccha, doesn’t apply.”

“In that case, Master Gotama, he does not reappear.”

“‘Does not reappear,’ Vaccha, doesn’t apply.”

“…both does & does not reappear.”

“…doesn’t apply.”

“…neither does nor does not reappear.”

“…doesn’t apply.”

“How is it, Master Gotama, when Master Gotama is asked if the monk reappears… does not reappear… both does & does not reappear… neither does nor does not reappear, he says, ‘…doesn’t apply’ in each case. At this point, Master Gotama, I am befuddled; at this point, confused. The modicum of clarity coming to me from your earlier conversation is now obscured.”

“Of course you’re befuddled, Vaccha. Of course you’re confused. Deep, Vaccha, is this phenomenon, hard to see, hard to realize, tranquil, refined, beyond the scope of conjecture, subtle, to-be-experienced by the wise. For those with other views, other practices, other satisfactions, other aims, other teachers, it is difficult to know. That being the case, I will now put some questions to you. Answer as you see fit. What do you think, Vaccha: If a fire were burning in front of you, would you know that, ‘This fire is burning in front of me’?”

“…yes…”

“And suppose someone were to ask you, Vaccha, ‘This fire burning in front of you, dependent on what is it burning?’ Thus asked, how would you reply?”

“…I would reply, ‘This fire burning in front of me is burning dependent on grass & timber as its sustenance.’”

“If the fire burning in front of you were to go out, would you know that, ‘This fire burning in front of me has gone out’?”

“…yes…”

“And suppose someone were to ask you, ‘This fire that has gone out in front of you, in which direction from here has it gone? East? West? North? Or south?’ Thus asked, how would you reply?”

“That doesn’t apply, Master Gotama. Any fire burning dependent on a sustenance of grass and timber, being unnourished — from having consumed that sustenance and not being offered any other — is classified simply as ‘out’ (unbound).”

“Even so, Vaccha, any physical form by which one describing the Tathagata would describe him: That the Tathagata has abandoned, its root destroyed, made like a palmyra stump, deprived of the conditions of development, not destined for future arising. Freed from the classification of form, Vaccha, the Tathagata is deep, boundless, hard to fathom, like the sea. ‘Reappears’ doesn’t apply. ‘Does not reappear’ doesn’t apply. ‘Both does & does not reappear’ doesn’t apply. ‘Neither reappears nor does not reappear’ doesn’t apply.

“Any feeling… Any perception… Any mental fabrication…

“Any consciousness by which one describing the Tathagata would describe him: That the Tathagata has abandoned, its root destroyed, made like a palmyra stump, deprived of the conditions of development, not destined for future arising. Freed from the classification of consciousness, Vaccha, the Tathagata is deep, boundless, hard to fathom, like the sea. ‘Reappears’ doesn’t apply. ‘Does not reappear’ doesn’t apply. ‘Both does & does not reappear’ doesn’t apply. ‘Neither reappears nor does not reappear’ doesn’t apply.”

When this was said, the wanderer Vacchagotta said to the Blessed One: “Master Gotama, it is as if there were a great sala tree not far from a village or town: From inconstancy, its branches and leaves would wear away, its bark would wear away, its sapwood would wear away, so that on a later occasion — divested of branches, leaves, bark, & sapwood — it would stand as pure heartwood. In the same way, Master Gotama’s words are divested of branches, leaves, bark, & sapwood and stand as pure heartwood.

“Magnificent, Master Gotama! Magnificent! Just as if he were to place upright what was overturned, to reveal what was hidden, to show the way to one who was lost, or were to carry a lamp into the dark so that those with eyes could see forms, in the same way has Master Gotama has — through many lines of reasoning — made the Dhamma clear. I go to Master Gotama for refuge, to the Dhamma, and to the Sangha of monks. May Master Gotama remember me as a lay follower who has gone to him for refuge, from this day forward, for life.”

See also: AN 4.24; AN 4.42; Mind Like Fire Unbound.

LESSON 133

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/an/an04/an04.024.than.html

AN 4.24 

PTS: A ii 23

Kalaka Sutta: At Kalaka’s Park

translated from the Pali by

Thanissaro Bhikkhu

© 2002–2011

On one occasion the Blessed One was staying in Saketa at Kalaka’s park. There he addressed the monks: “Monks!”

“Yes, lord,” the monks responded.

The Blessed One said: “Monks, whatever in the cosmos — with its devas, Maras, & Brahmas, its generations with their contemplatives & priests royalty & common people — is seen, heard, sensed, cognized, attained, sought after, pondered by the intellect: That do I know. Whatever in the cosmos — with its devas, Maras, & Brahmas, its generations with their contemplatives & priests, their royalty & common people — is seen, heard, sensed, cognized, attained, sought after, pondered by the intellect: That I directly know. That has been realized by the Tathagata, but in the Tathagata[1] it has not been established.[2]

“If I were to say, ‘I don’t know whatever in the cosmos… is seen, heard, sensed, cognized… pondered by the intellect,’ that would be a falsehood in me. If I were to say, ‘I both know and don’t know whatever in the cosmos… is seen, heard, sensed, cognized… pondered by the intellect,’ that would be just the same. If I were to say, ‘I neither know nor don’t know whatever in the cosmos… is seen, heard, sensed, cognized… pondered by the intellect,’ that would be a fault in me.

“Thus, monks, the Tathagata, when seeing what is to be seen, doesn’t construe an [object as] seen. He doesn’t construe an unseen. He doesn’t construe an [object] to-be-seen. He doesn’t construe a seer.

“When hearing…

“When sensing…

“When cognizing what is to be cognized, he doesn’t construe an [object as] cognized. He doesn’t construe an uncognized. He doesn’t construe an [object] to-be-cognized. He doesn’t construe a cognizer.

Thus, monks, the Tathagata — being the same with regard to all phenomena that can be seen, heard, sensed, & cognized — is ‘Such.’ And I tell you: There’s no other ‘Such’ higher or more sublime.

“Whatever is seen or heard or sensed

          and fastened onto as true by others,

One who is Such — among the self-fettered —

wouldn’t further claim to be true or even false.

“Having seen well in advance that arrow

where generations are fastened & hung

 — ‘I know, I see, that’s just how it is!’ —

there’s nothing of the Tathagata fastened.”

Notes

1.

Reading tathagate with the Thai edition.

2.

I.e., the Tathagata hasn’t taken a stance on it.

See also: MN 2; MN 58; MN 63; MN 72; AN 10.93; AN 10.94; AN 10.95; AN 10.96; Ud 1.10; Ud 8.1.

LESSON 134

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/an/an04/an04.042.than.html

AN 4.42 

PTS: A ii 46

Pañha Sutta: Questions

translated from the Pali by

Thanissaro Bhikkhu

© 1997–2011

“There are these four ways of answering questions. Which four? There are questions that should be answered categorically [straightforwardly yes, no, this, that]. There are questions that should be answered with an analytical (qualified) answer [defining or redefining the terms]. There are questions that should be answered with a counter-question. There are questions that should be put aside. These are the four ways of answering questions.”

First the categorical answer,

then the qualified,

third, the type to be counter-questioned,

& fourth, the one to be set aside.

Any monk who knows which is which,

          in line with the Dhamma,

is said to be skilled

in the four types of questions:

          hard to overcome, hard to beat,

          profound, hard to defeat.

He knows what’s worthwhile

          & what’s not,

proficient in (recognizing) both,

he rejects the worthless,

          grasps the worthwhile.

He’s called one who has broken through

to what’s worthwhile,

                   prudent,

          wise.

See also: MN 58; MN 72; suttas in the Avyakata Samyutta; AN 3.67; AN 3.78; AN 5.165;AN 10.96

LESSON 134

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/thanissaro/likefire/index.html

Mind Like Fire Unbound

An Image in the Early Buddhist Discourses

Fourth Edition

by

Thanissaro Bhikkhu (Geoffrey DeGraff)

© 1999–2011

·         Preface

·         Abstract

·         Intro

·         Ch I

·         Ch II

·         Ch III

·         Ch IV

·         Backmatter

Very well then, my friend, I will give you an analogy; for there are cases where it is through the use of an analogy that intelligent people can understand the meaning of what is being said.

 MN 24

Contents

·         Abbreviations

·         Preface

·         Part One: The Abstract —“Released… with unrestricted awareness.”

·         Part Two: The Essay

o    Introduction —“The enlightened go out like this flame.”

o    Chapter I “This fire that has gone out… in which direction from here has it gone?”

o    Chapter II “Fire burns with clinging, and not without clinging.”

o    Chapter III “Forty cartloads of timber.”

§  Sensuality

§  Views

§  Habits & practices

§  Doctrines of the self

·         Chapter IV “And taking a pin, I pulled out the wick.”

·         End Notes

·         Bibliography

Abbreviations   

Vedic Texts

AV

Atharva Veda

BAU

Bṛhadāraṇyaka Upaniṣad

ChU

Chāndogya Upaniṣad

KathU

Kaṭha Upaniṣad

KauU

Kauśītakī Upaniṣad

MaiU

Maitrī Upaniṣad

RV

Ṛg Veda

SvU

Ŝvetāśvatara Upaniṣad

Pali Buddhist Texts

AN

Aṅguttara Nikāya

DN

Dīgha Nikāya

Iti

Itivuttaka

Khp

Khuddaka Pāṭha

MN

Majjhima Nikāya

Mv

Mahāvagga

SN

Saṃyutta Nikāya

Sn

Sutta Nipāta

Thag

Theragāthā

Thig

Therīgāthā

Ud

Udāna

References to DN, Iti, Khp, & MN are to discourse (sutta). The reference to Mv is to chapter, section, & sub-section. References to other Pali texts are to section (saṃyutta, nipāta orvagga) & discourse.

All translations are the author’s own. Those from the Pali canon are from the Royal Thai Edition (Bangkok: Mahamakut Rajavidyalaya, 1982).

Terms marked in the text with an asterisk (*) are explained in the End Notes.

Because Pali has many ways of expressing the word ‘and,’ I have — to avoid monotony — used the ampersand (&) to join lists of words & short phrases, and the word ‘and’ to join long phrases & clauses.

Preface   

To study ancient texts is like visiting a foreign city: Time & inclination determine whether you want a quick, pre-packaged tour of the highlights, a less structured opportunity for personal exploration, or both. This book on the connotations of the words nibbāna (nirvāṇa) &upādāna in the early Buddhist texts is organized on the assumption that both approaches to the topic have their merits, and so it consists of two separate but related parts. Part I, The Abstract, is the quick tour — a brief survey to highlight the main points of the argument.Part II, The Essay, is a chance to make friends with the natives, soak up the local atmosphere, and gain your own insights. It takes a more oblique approach to the argument, letting the texts themselves point the way with a minimum of interference, so that you may explore & ponder them at leisure. Part I is for those who need their bearings and who might get impatient with the seeming indirection of Part II; Part II is for those who are interested in contemplating the nuances, the tangential connections, & the sense of context that usually get lost in a more structured approach.

Either part may be read on its own, but I would like to recommend that anyone seriously interested in the Buddha’s teachings take the time to read reflectively the translations that form the main body of Part II. People in the West, even committed Buddhists, are often remarkably ignorant of the Buddha’s original teachings as presented in the early texts. Much of what they know has been filtered for them, at second or third hand, without their realizing what was added or lost in the filtration. Although the quotations in Part II, by their sheer length & numbers, may at times seem like overkill, they are important for the context they give to the teachings. Once the teachings have context, you can have a surer sense of what is true Buddha Dhamma and what are filtration products.

This book has been many years in preparation. It began from a casual remark made one evening by my meditation teacher — Phra Ajaan Fuang Jotiko — to the effect that the mind released is like fire that has gone out: The fire is not annihilated, he said, but is still there, diffused in the air; it simply no longer latches on to any fuel. This remark gave me food for thought for a long time afterwards. When I came to learn Pali, my first interest was to explore the early texts to learn what views they contained about the workings of fire and how these influenced the meaning of nibbāna — literally, ‘extinguishing’ — as a name for the Buddhist goal. The result of my research is this book.

Many people have helped in this project, directly or indirectly, and I would like to acknowledge my debts to them. First of all, Phra Ajaan Fuang Jotiko, in addition to being the original inspiration for the research, provided me with the training that has formed the basis for many of the insights presented here. The example of his life & teachings was what originally convinced me of Buddhism’s worth. A. K. Warder’s excellent Introduction to Pali made learning Pali a joy. Marcia Colish & J. D. Lewis, two of my professors at Oberlin College, taught me — with no small amount of patience — how to read & interpret ancient texts. Ven. Bhikkhu Bodhi, Donald Swearer, John Bullitt, Margaret Dornish, Robert Ebert, Michael Grossi, Lawrence Howard, & Doris Weir all read earlier incarnations of the manuscript and made valuable suggestions for improvements. I, of course, am responsible for any mistakes that may still remain.

Finally, I would like to dedicate this book in gratitude to my father, Henry Lewis DeGraff, and to the memory of my mother, Esther Penny Boutcher DeGraff, who taught me the value of truth, inner beauty, & goodness from an early age.

Thanissaro Bhikkhu
(Geoffrey DeGraff)
Metta Forest Monastery
August, 1993

LESSON 135

Aggikkhandopama Sutta (Canonical)

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/an/an07/an07.068.yaho.html

AN 7.68 

PTS: A iv 128

Aggikkhandopama Sutta: The Mass of Fire Comparison

translated from the Pali by

Yahoo! Pali Group

© 2002–2011

Translators’ note: In this sutta, from the Anguttara Nikaya’s Book of the Sevens, the Buddha compares seven pairs of situations a monk might hypothetically face and asks the monks to choose which of each pair is the better. While listening to the Buddha’s explanations of the correct choice in each case, sixty monks become enlightened — another instance of enlightenment directly from hearing a talk by the Buddha.

Thus have I heard. Once the Blessed One was wandering among the Kosala people together with a large company of monks. Entering a major path, the Blessed One saw in a certain spot a great mass of fire, burning, blazing, glowing. After seeing it and stepping down from the path he sat on the appointed seat at the root of a tree. After sitting down the Blessed One said to the monks: “Do you see, monks, that great mass of fire, burning, blazing, glowing?” — ” Yes, venerable Sir.”

[1] “What do you think, monks? Which would in fact be the better? Embracing that great mass of fire, burning, blazing, glowing, and sitting or lying down close to it? Or, embracing a kshatriya or brahman or householder woman with young and tender hands and feet, and sitting or lying down close to her?” — “This, venerable Sir, would surely be the better: Embracing a kshatriya or brahman or householder woman with young and tender hands and feet, and sitting or lying down close to her. For it would be painful, venerable Sir, to embrace that great, burning, blazing, glowing mass of fire, and sit or lie down close to it.”

“Let me tell you, monks, let me explain to you, monks, that this would surely be the better for one who is of poor conduct, an evil-minded one, a filthy doer of complete wickedness who acts in an underhand manner, who pretends to be a recluse yet is not a recluse, who pretends to lead the holy life yet does not lead the holy life, an inwardly-putrid, impure-natured one: Embracing that great mass of fire, burning, blazing, glowing, and sitting or lying down close to it. What is the reason for this? Because on account of that, monks, he would go to death, or to a pain like that of death, but he would not, on account of that, on the break-up of the body after death be reborn into a place of woe, a realm of misery, a place of suffering, a purgatory.”

“But, monks, if one who is of poor conduct, an evil-minded one, a filthy doer of complete wickedness who acts in an underhand manner, who pretends to be a recluse yet is not a recluse, who pretends to lead the holy life yet does not lead the holy life, an inwardly-putrid, impure-natured one, were to embrace a kshatriya or brahman or householder woman with young and tender hands and feet, and sit or lie down close to her — for him, monks, there would be a long period of harm and suffering, and on the break-up of the body after death he would be reborn into a place of woe, a realm of misery, a place of suffering, a purgatory.”

[2] “What do you think, monks? Which would in fact be the better? If a strong man, having twisted a firm horse-hair rope around both calves, were to rub, so that the rope cut the skin, and having cut the skin it cut the under-skin, and having cut the under-skin it cut the flesh, and having cut the flesh it cut the sinew, and having cut the sinew it cut the bone, and having cut the bone it left the marrow exposed? Or, to derive enjoyment from the homage of rich kshatriyas, or rich brahmans, or rich householders?” — “This, venerable Sir, is surely the better: To derive enjoyment from the homage of rich kshatriyas, or rich brahmans, or rich householders. For it would be painful, venerable Sir, if a strong man, having twisted a firm hair-rope around both calves, were to rub, so that the rope cut the skin and so on until it left the marrow exposed.”

“Let me tell you, monks, let me explain to you, monks, that this would surely be the better for one who is of poor conduct, an impure-natured one: If a strong man, having twisted a firm horse-hair rope around both calves, were to rub, so that the rope cut the skin and so on until it left the marrow exposed. What is the reason for this? Because on account of that, monks, he would go to death, or to a pain like that of death, but on account of that he would not, on the break-up of the body after death, be reborn into a place of woe, a realm of misery, a place of suffering, a purgatory.”

“But, monks, if one who is of poor conduct, an evil-minded one, a filthy doer of complete wickedness, an impure-natured one, were to derive enjoyment from the homage of rich kshatriyas, or rich brahmans, or rich householders — for him, monks, there would be a long period of harm and suffering, and on the break-up of the body after death he would be reborn into a place of woe, a realm of misery, a place of suffering, a purgatory.”

[3] “What do you think, monks? Which would in fact be the better? If a strong man were to strike the nether-quarters with a sharp, oil-cleaned sword? Or, to derive enjoyment when rich kshatriyas, brahmans, or householders press the palms together in prayer?”

“Let me tell you, monks, let me explain to you, that this would surely be the better for one who is of poor conduct, an impure-natured one: If a strong man were to strike the nether-quarters with a sharp, oil-cleaned sword.”

[4] “What do you think, monks? Which would in fact be the better? If a strong man were to wrap the body with a red-hot sheet of iron, burning, blazing, glowing? Or, to derive enjoyment from the robes given in faith by rich kshatriyas, brahmans, or householders?”

“Let me tell you, monks, let me explain to you, that this would surely be the better for one who is of poor conduct, an impure-natured one: If a strong man were to wrap the body with a red-hot sheet of iron.”

[5] “What do you think, monks? Which would in fact be the better? If a strong man, having opened the mouth with a red-hot iron spike, were to hurl into the mouth a red-hot iron ball, burning, blazing, glowing, so that one’s lips would burn, then the mouth would burn, then the tongue would burn, then the throat would burn, then the chest would burn, and when it was received by the lower intestine, it would be expelled from the lower part of the body? Or, to derive enjoyment from the food received on alms-round and given in faith by rich kshatriyas, brahmans, or householders?”

“Let me tell you, monks, let me explain to you, that this would surely be the better for one who is of poor conduct, an impure-natured one: If a strong man, having opened the mouth with a red-hot iron spike were to hurl into the mouth a red-hot iron ball.”

[6] “What do you think, monks? Which would in fact be the better? If a strong man, having gripped the head or shoulder, were to force one sit or lie on a red-hot iron bed or chair? Or, to derive enjoyment from a chair given in faith by rich kshatriyas, or brahmans, or householders?”

“Let me tell you, monks, let me explain to you, that this would surely be the better for one who is of poor conduct, an impure-natured one: If a strong man, having gripped the head or shoulder, were to force one sit or lie on a red-hot iron bed or chair.”

[7] “What do you think, monks? Which would in fact be the better? If a strong man, having gripped one, heels up, head down, were to force one down into a red-hot iron cauldron, burning, blazing, glowing, and where there is boiling scum on top, he were to go once up, once down, and then once sideways? Or, to derive enjoyment from an abode given in faith by rich kshatriyas, or brahmans, or householders?”

“Let me tell you, monks, let me explain to you, that this would surely be the better for one who is of poor conduct, an impure-natured one: If a strong man, having gripped one, heels up, head down, were to force one down into a red-hot iron cauldron.”

“Because of what I have said here, monks, you should train yourselves such that the gifts of those whose requisites we use — the robes, alms-bowl, chair, bed, and medicine as a support when sick — will have great fruits, great merits [for the people who give them], and our going forth will not be in vain, will be fruitful, will have a result. Thus should you train yourselves, thoroughly seeing that for your own benefit, monks, it is right to strive with heedfulness; thoroughly seeing that for the benefit of others, monks, it is right to strive with heedfulness; and thoroughly seeing that for the benefit of both, monks, it is right to strive with heedfulness.”

Thus spoke the Blessed One. And while this explanation was being delivered, hot blood rose out of the mouths of sixty monks; another sixty monks abandoned the training and returned to the lower life, saying, “It is too difficult to do, Blessed One, it is too difficult to do”; while the minds of another sixty monks abandoned clinging and were liberated from theaasava-s.

Welcome to the Free Online e-Nālandā Research and Practice University

LESSON 136

Aghata Sutta (Canonical)

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/an/an10/an10.080.than.html

AN 10.80 

PTS: A v 150

Aghata Sutta: Hatred

translated from the Pali by

Thanissaro Bhikkhu

© 1997–2011

“There are these ten ways of subduing hatred. Which ten?

[1] “Thinking, ‘He has done me harm. But what should I expect?’ one subdues hatred.

[2] “Thinking, ‘He is doing me harm. But what should I expect?’ one subdues hatred.

[3] “Thinking, ‘He is going to do me harm. But what should I expect?’ one subdues hatred.

[4] “Thinking, ‘He has done harm to people who are dear & pleasing to me. But what should I expect?’ one subdues hatred.

[5] “Thinking, ‘He is doing harm to people who are dear & pleasing to me. But what should I expect?’ one subdues hatred.

[6] “Thinking, ‘He is going to do harm to people who are dear & pleasing to me. But what should I expect?’ one subdues hatred.

[7] “Thinking, ‘He has aided people who are not dear or pleasing to me. But what should I expect?’ one subdues hatred.

[8] “Thinking, ‘He is aiding people who are not dear or pleasing to me. But what should I expect?’ one subdues hatred.

[9] “Thinking, ‘He is going to aid people who are not dear or pleasing to me. But what should I expect?’ one subdues hatred.

[10] “One does not get worked up over impossibilities.

“These are ten ways of subduing hatred.”

LESSON 137

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/an/an05/an05.161.than.html

AN 5.161 

PTS: A iii 185

Aghatavinaya Sutta: Subduing Hatred (1)

translated from the Pali by

Thanissaro Bhikkhu

© 1998–2011

Alternate translation: Ñanamoli

“There are these five ways of subduing hatred by which, when hatred arises in a monk, he should wipe it out completely. Which five?

“When one gives birth to hatred for an individual, one should develop good will for that individual. Thus the hatred for that individual should be subdued.

“When one gives birth to hatred for an individual, one should develop compassion for that individual. Thus the hatred for that individual should be subdued.

“When one gives birth to hatred for an individual, one should develop equanimity toward that individual. Thus the hatred for that individual should be subdued.

“When one gives birth to hatred for an individual, one should pay him no mind & pay him no attention. Thus the hatred for that individual should be subdued.

“When one gives birth to hatred for an individual, one should direct one’s thoughts to the fact of his being the product of his actions: ‘This venerable one is the doer of his actions, heir to his actions, born of his actions, related by his actions, and has his actions as his arbitrator. Whatever action he does, for good or for evil, to that will he fall heir.’ Thus the hatred for that individual should be subdued.

“These are five ways of subduing hatred by which, when hatred arises in a monk, he should wipe it out completely.”

See also: AN 5.162

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/an/an05/an05.162.than.html

AN 5.162 

PTS: A iii 186

Aghatavinaya Sutta: Subduing Hatred (2)

translated from the Pali by

Thanissaro Bhikkhu

© 2004–2011

Then Ven. Sariputta addressed the monks: “Friend monks.”

“Yes, friend,” the monks responded to him.

Ven. Sariputta said: “There are these five ways of subduing hatred by which, when hatred arises in a monk, he should wipe it out completely. Which five?

“There is the case where some people are impure in their bodily behavior but pure in their verbal behavior. Hatred for a person of this sort should be subdued.

“There is the case where some people are impure in their verbal behavior but pure in their bodily behavior. Hatred for a person of this sort should also be subdued.

“There is the case where some people are impure in their bodily behavior & verbal behavior, but who periodically experience mental clarity & calm. Hatred for a person of this sort should also be subdued.

“There is the case where some people are impure in their bodily behavior & verbal behavior, and who do not periodically experience mental clarity & calm. Hatred for a person of this sort should also be subdued.

“There is the case where some people are pure in their bodily behavior & their verbal behavior, and who periodically experience mental clarity & calm. Hatred for a person of this sort should also be subdued.

“Now as for a person who is impure in his bodily behavior but pure in his verbal behavior, how should one subdue hatred for him? Just as when a monk who makes use of things that are thrown away sees a rag in the road: Taking hold of it with his left foot and spreading it out with his right, he would tear off the sound part and go off with it. In the same way, when the individual is impure in his bodily behavior but pure in his verbal behavior, one should at that time pay no attention to the impurity of his bodily behavior, and instead pay attention to the purity of his verbal behavior. Thus the hatred for him should be subdued.

“And as for a person who is impure in his verbal behavior, but pure in his bodily behavior, how should one subdue hatred for him? Just as when there is a pool overgrown with slime & water plants, and a person comes along, burning with heat, covered with sweat, exhausted, trembling, & thirsty. He would jump into the pool, part the slime & water plants with both hands, and then, cupping his hands, drink the water and go on his way. In the same way, when the individual is impure in his verbal behavior but pure in his bodily behavior, one should at that time pay no attention to the impurity of his verbal behavior, and instead pay attention to the purity of his bodily behavior. Thus the hatred for him should be subdued.

“And as for a person who is impure in his bodily behavior & verbal behavior, but who periodically experiences mental clarity & calm, how should one subdue hatred for him? Just as when there is a little puddle in a cow’s footprint, and a person comes along, burning with heat, covered with sweat, exhausted, trembling, & thirsty. The thought would occur to him, ‘Here is this little puddle in a cow’s footprint. If I tried to drink the water using my hand or cup, I would disturb it, stir it up, & make it unfit to drink. What if I were to get down on all fours and slurp it up like a cow, and then go on my way?’ So he would get down on all fours, slurp up the water like a cow, and then go on his way. In the same way, when an individual is impure in his bodily behavior & verbal behavior, but periodically experiences mental clarity & calm, one should at that time pay no attention to the impurity of his bodily behavior…the impurity of his verbal behavior, and instead pay attention to the fact that he periodically experiences mental clarity & calm. Thus the hatred for him should be subdued.

“And as for a person who is impure in his bodily behavior & verbal behavior, and who does not periodically experience mental clarity & calm, how should one subdue hatred for him?Just as when there is a sick man — in pain, seriously ill — traveling along a road, far from the next village & far from the last, unable to get the food he needs, unable to get the medicine he needs, unable to get a suitable assistant, unable to get anyone to take him to human habitation. Now suppose another person were to see him coming along the road. He would do what he could out of compassion, pity, & sympathy for the man, thinking, ‘O that this man should get the food he needs, the medicine he needs, a suitable assistant, someone to take him to human habitation. Why is that? So that he won’t fall into ruin right here.’ In the same way, when a person is impure in his bodily behavior & verbal behavior, and who does not periodically experience mental clarity & calm, one should do what one can out of compassion, pity, & sympathy for him, thinking, ‘O that this man should abandon wrong bodily conduct and develop right bodily conduct, abandon wrong verbal conduct and develop right verbal conduct, abandon wrong mental conduct and develop right mental conduct. Why is that? So that, on the break-up of the body, after death, he won’t fall into the plane of deprivation, the bad destination, the lower realms, purgatory.’ Thus the hatred for him should be subdued.

“And as for a person who is pure in his bodily behavior & verbal behavior, and who periodically experiences mental clarity & calm, how should one subdue hatred for him? Just as when there is a pool of clear water — sweet, cool, & limpid, with gently sloping banks, & shaded on all sides by trees of many kinds — and a person comes along, burning with heat, covered with sweat, exhausted, trembling, & thirsty. Having plunged into the pool, having bathed & drunk & come back out, he would sit down or lie down right there in the shade of the trees. In the same way, when an individual is pure in his bodily behavior & verbal behavior, and periodically experiences mental clarity & calm, one should at that time pay attention to the purity of his bodily behavior…the purity of his verbal behavior, and to the fact that he periodically experiences mental clarity & calm. Thus the hatred for him should be subdued. An entirely inspiring individual can make the mind grow serene.

“These are five ways of subduing hatred by which, when hatred arises in a monk, he should wipe it out completely.”

See also: AN 5.161.

o    BUDDHA (EDUCATE)!    DHAMMA (MEDITATE)!  SANGHA (ORGANISE)!

o    WISDOM IS POWER

o    Awakened One Shows the Path to Attain Eternal Bliss

o    Using such an instrument

o    The Free ONLINE e-Nālandā Research and Practice University has been re-organized to function through the following Schools of Learning :

o    Buddha’s Sangha Practiced His Dhamma Free of cost, hence the Free- e-Nālandā Research and Practice University follows suit

o    As the Original Nālandā University did not offer any Degree, so also the Free  e-Nālandā Research and Practice University.

o    The teachings of Buddha are eternal, but even then Buddha did not proclaim them to be infallible. The religion of Buddha has the capacity to change according to times, a quality which no other religion can claim to have…Now what is the basis of Buddhism? If you study carefully, you will see that Buddhism is based on reason. There is an element of flexibility inherent in it, which is not found in any other religion.

o    Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar , Indian scholar, philosopher and architect of Constitution of India, in his writing and speeches

o    IKAMMA,REBIRTH,AWAKEN-NESS,BUDDHA,THUS COME ONE,DHAMMA II.ARHA ,FOUR HOLY TRUTHS,EIGHTFOLD PATH,TWELVEFOLD CONDITIONED ARISING,BODHISATTVA,PARAMITA,SIX PARAMITAS III.SIX SPIRITUAL POWERS,SIX PATHS OF REBIRTH,TEN DHARMA REALMS,FIVE SKANDHAS,EIGHTEEN REALMS,FIVE MORAL PRECEPTS IV. MEDITATION,MINDFULNESS,FOUR APPLICATIONS OF MINDFULNESS,LOTUS POSTURE,SAMADHI,CHAN SCHOOL,FOUR JHANAS,FOUR FORMLESS REALMS V. FIVE TYPES OF BUDDHIST STUDY AND PRACTICE,MAHAYANA AND HINAYANA COMPARED,PURE LAND,BUDDHA RECITATION,EIGHT CONSCIOUSNESSES,ONE HUNDRED DHARMAS,EMPTINESS VI. DEMON,LINEAGE

o    with

o    Level I: Introduction to Buddhism,Level II: Buddhist Studies,

o    TO ATTAIN

o    Level III: Stream-Enterer,Level IV: Once – Returner,Level V: Non-Returner,Level VI: Arhat

o    Jambudvipa, i.e, PraBuddha Bharath scientific thought in

o    mathematics,astronomy,alchemy,andanatomy

o    Philosophy and Comparative Religions;Historical Studies;International Relations and Peace Studies;Business Management in relation to Public Policy and Development Studies;Languages and Literature;and Ecology and Environmental Studies

Jambudvipa, i.e, PraBuddha Bharath scientific thought in

Mathematics

Astronomy

Alchemy

And

anatomy

GOOD GOVERNANCE

Press Information Bureau

(C.M. Information Campus)

Information & Public Relations Department, U.P.

Severe cold wave : Hon

ble C.M. orders closure of all educational institutions up to intermediate level till January 15

Lucknow: 08 January 2011

Keeping in view the severe cold wave and foggy conditions

prevailing in the State for the past few days, the Hon

ble Chief

Minister of Uttar Pradesh Ms. Mayawati ji has further ordered

closure of all the Government/non Government schools up to 12

th

level till January 15.

The Hon

ble Chief Minister ji took this decision in view of

difficulties faced by children and students in going to school.

********

VOICE OF SARVAJAN< ?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = “urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office” />

HONEYLEAKS

UPA-3: The Dream Of Congress Ends With 2G

With the influence of Sonia Gandhi decreasing in the Congress and Rahul Gandhi emerging as the most powerful leader of the cadre, the Congress has been on a continuous decline.

Intoxicated with success in the 2009 Lok Sabha general elections, the Congress party thought now it can easily retain the pre 1990s status. Just few days ago, the buzz of Rahul’s young factor was presented as if he alone can attract all the young Indians to Congress. But the abysmal performance of the party in Bihar and U.P. showed where it stands

Before the ghost of the corruption caught Congress, not making any exception to its Mr. Clean (Mr. Manmohan Singh) image, the gaddi of 2014 seems like a low-hanging fruit, there for the plucking. In a statement, the party spokesman Manish Tiwari was quoted as having said, “From now on there will be only Congress as a unifying force in national politics and a cluster of strong regional parties in the states.”

In the recently held Panchayat polls of Uttar Pradesh, too, the Congress lost miserably to Bahujan Samaj Party. The ruling party led by Mayawati won 55 of the 72 zilla panchayat chairmen seats. The party’s performance even in the Amethi-Rae Bareli bastions was far worse.

How effectively the Congress party manages to convince the public that it will no more plunder the public property will determine its fate in the assembly elections of West Bengal, Kerala, Assam, Tamil Nadu and Pondicherry which will ultimately point out whether or not UPA-111 can be expected in 2014.

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