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http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org anto 105 Seṭṭhaganthāyatta Bhāsā
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01/27/11
150 LESSON 27 01 2011 Kathavatthu Sutta Topics for Discussion FREE ONLINE eNālandā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY to VOTE for BSP ELEPHANT for Social Transformation and Economic Emancipation to attain Ultimate Bliss-VOICE OF SARVAJAN-HONEYLEAKS-Happy Constitution Day!-
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Posted by: site admin @ 7:03 am




Pali Canon

  Vinaya Pitaka    

                                       
Sutta-


vibhanga Khandhaka Pari-


vara
               

    Sutta Pitaka    

                                                      
Digha


Nikaya Majjhima


Nikaya Samyutta


Nikaya
                     

    

                                                                     
Anguttara


Nikaya Khuddaka


Nikaya
                           

    Abhidhamma Pitaka    

                                                           
Dhs. Vbh. Dhk.


Pug. Kvu. Yamaka Patthana
                       

     

Sacred Buddhist Sites

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The grounds of the original palace in Lumbini, Nepal, where Buddha’s family lived.

The World Peace Pagoda built by the Japanese near Vulture’s Peak, Rajgir in Bihar, where Buddha delivered his second sermon.

The Mahabodhi temple at Budhgaya in Bihar is popular with pilgrims.

The reclining Buddha at Kushinagar.

The Matha Kuar Shrine at Kushinagar where Buddha is believed to have breathed his last.

The Mahaparinirvana stupa at Kushinagar.

 

The pavilion sheltering the Goddess of Mercy which was lit up at night.

An Icon of Faith

Malaysia’s largest temple complex opens to public

 


Read more:
 http://www.answers.com/topic/kathavatthu#ixzz1CF8jzUb8

150 LESSON 27 01 2011 Kathavatthu Sutta Topics for Discussion FREE ONLINE eNālandā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY to VOTE for BSP ELEPHANT for Social Transformation and Economic Emancipation to attain Ultimate Bliss

 through

 http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org

http://www.orgsites.com/oh/awakenedone/

Awakeness Practices

All 84,000 Khandas As Found in the Pali Suttas

Traditionally the are 84,000 Dharma Doors - 84,000 ways to get Awakeness. Maybe so; certainly the Buddha taught a large number of practices that lead to Awakeness. This web page attempts to catalogue those found in the Pali Suttas (DN, MN, SN, AN, Ud & Sn 1). There are 3 sections:

The discourses of Buddha are divided into 84,000, as to separate addresses. The division includes all that was spoken by Buddha.”I received from Buddha,” said Ananda, “82,000 Khandas, and  from the priests 2000; these are 84,000 Khandas maintained by me.” They are divided into 275,250, as to the stanzas of the original text, and into 361,550, as to the stanzas of the commentary. All the discourses including both those of Buddha and those of the commentator, are divided  into 2,547 banawaras, containing 737,000 stanzas, and 29,368,000 separate letters.

Course Programs:

LESSON 150

Kathavatthu

Kathavatthu

Kathavatthu

Kathavatthu

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/an/an03/an03.067.than.html

AN 3.67 

PTS: A i 197

Kathavatthu Sutta: Topics for Discussion

translated from the Pali by

Thanissaro Bhikkhu

© 2005–2011

“Monks, there are these three topics for discussion. Which three?

“One may talk about the past, saying, ‘Thus it was in the past.’ One may talk about the future, saying, ‘Thus it will be in the future.’ Or one may talk about now in the present, saying, ‘Thus it is now in the present.’

“Monks, it’s through his way of participating in a discussion that a person can be known as fit to talk with or unfit to talk with. If a person, when asked a question, doesn’t give a categorical answer to a question deserving a categorical answer, doesn’t give an analytical (qualified) answer to a question deserving an analytical answer, doesn’t give a counter-question to a question deserving a counter-question, doesn’t put aside a question deserving to be put aside, then — that being the case — he is a person unfit to talk with. But if a person, when asked a question, gives a categorical answer to a question deserving a categorical answer, gives an analytical answer to a question deserving an analytical answer, gives a counter-question to a question deserving a counter-question, and puts aside a question deserving to be put aside, then — that being the case — he is a person fit to talk with.

“Monks, it’s through his way of participating in a discussion that a person can be known as fit to talk with or unfit to talk with. If a person, when asked a question, doesn’t stand by what is possible and impossible, doesn’t stand by agreed-upon assumptions, doesn’t stand by teachings known to be true,[1] doesn’t stand by standard procedure, then — that being the case — he is a person unfit to talk with. But if a person, when asked a question, stands by what is possible and impossible, stands by agreed-upon assumptions, stands by teachings known to be true, stands by standard procedure, then — that being the case — he is a person fit to talk with.

“Monks, it’s through his way of participating in a discussion that a person can be known as fit to talk with or unfit to talk with. If a person, when asked a question, wanders from one thing to another, pulls the discussion off the topic, shows anger & aversion and sulks, then — that being the case — he is a person unfit to talk with. But if a person, when asked a question, doesn’t wander from one thing to another, doesn’t pull the discussion off the topic, doesn’t show anger or aversion or sulk, then — that being the case — he is a person fit to talk with.

“Monks, it’s through his way of participating in a discussion that a person can be known as fit to talk with or unfit to talk with. If a person, when asked a question, puts down [the questioner], crushes him, ridicules him, grasps at his little mistakes, then — that being the case — he is a person unfit to talk with. But if a person, when asked a question, doesn’t put down [the questioner], doesn’t crush him, doesn’t ridicule him, doesn’t grasp at his little mistakes, then — that being the case — he is a person fit to talk with.

“Monks, it’s through his way of participating in a discussion that a person can be known as drawing near or not drawing near. One who lends ear draws near; one who doesn’t lend ear doesn’t draw near. Drawing near, one clearly knows one quality, comprehends one quality, abandons one quality, and realizes one quality.[2] Clearly knowing one quality, comprehending one quality, abandoning one quality, and realizing one quality, one touches right release. For that’s the purpose of discussion, that’s the purpose of counsel, that’s the purpose of drawing near, that’s the purpose of lending ear: i.e., the liberation of the mind through no clinging.

Those who discuss

when angered, dogmatic, arrogant,

following what’s not the noble ones’ way,

seeking to expose each other’s faults,

delight in each other’s             misspoken word,

slip, stumble, defeat.

Noble ones

don’t speak in that way.

If wise people, knowing the right time,

want to speak,

then, words connected with justice,

following the ways of the noble ones:

That’s what the enlightened ones speak,

without anger or arrogance,

with a mind not boiling over,

without vehemence, without spite.

Without envy

they speak from right knowledge.

They would delight in what’s well-said

and not disparage what’s not.

They don’t study to find fault,

don’t grasp at little mistakes.

don’t put down, don’t crush,

don’t speak random words.

For the purpose of knowledge,

for the purpose of [inspiring] clear confidence,

counsel that’s true:

That’s how noble ones give counsel,

That’s the noble ones’ counsel.

Knowing this, the wise

should give counsel without arrogance.”

Notes

1.

Reading aññaatavaada with the Burmese edition. An alternate translation would be, “the teachings of those who know.”

2.

According to the Commentary, these qualities are, respectively, the noble truth of the path, the noble truth of stress, the noble truth of the origination of stress, and the noble truth of the cessation of stress.

AN 3.72

AN 5.159.

DN 21

AN 3.72;

Sn 4.8.

 AN 4.42

AN 5.165

 Sn 4.8

BUDDHA (EDUCATE)!    DHAMMA (MEDITATE)!  SANGHA (ORGANISE)!

WISDOM IS POWER

Awakened One Shows the Path to Attain Eternal Bliss

Using such an instrument

The Free ONLINE e-Nālandā Research and Practice University has been re-organized to function through the following Schools of Learning :

Buddha’s Sangha Practiced His Dhamma Free of cost, hence the Free- e-Nālandā Research and Practice University follows suit

As the Original Nālandā University did not offer any Degree, so also the Free  e-Nālandā Research and Practice University.

The teachings of Buddha are eternal, but even then Buddha did not proclaim them to be infallible. The religion of Buddha has the capacity to change according to times, a quality which no other religion can claim to have…Now what is the basis of Buddhism? If you study carefully, you will see that Buddhism is based on reason. There is an element of flexibility inherent in it, which is not found in any other religion.

Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar , Indian scholar, philosopher and architect of Constitution of India, in his writing and speeches

IKAMMA,REBIRTH,AWAKEN-NESS,BUDDHA,THUS COME ONE,DHAMMA II.ARHA ,FOUR HOLY TRUTHS,EIGHTFOLD PATH,TWELVEFOLD CONDITIONED ARISING,BODHISATTVA,PARAMITA,SIX PARAMITAS III.SIX SPIRITUAL POWERS,SIX PATHS OF REBIRTH,TEN DHARMA REALMS,FIVE SKANDHAS,EIGHTEEN REALMS,FIVE MORAL PRECEPTS IV. MEDITATION,MINDFULNESS,FOUR APPLICATIONS OF MINDFULNESS,LOTUS POSTURE,SAMADHI,CHAN SCHOOL,FOUR JHANAS,FOUR FORMLESS REALMS V. FIVE TYPES OF BUDDHIST STUDY AND PRACTICE,MAHAYANA AND HINAYANA COMPARED,PURE LAND,BUDDHA RECITATION,EIGHT CONSCIOUSNESSES,ONE HUNDRED DHARMAS,EMPTINESS VI. DEMON,LINEAGE

with

Level I: Introduction to Buddhism,Level II: Buddhist Studies,

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Jambudvipa, i.e, PraBuddha Bharath scientific thought in

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Philosophy and Comparative Religions;Historical Studies;International Relations and Peace Studies;Business Management in relation to Public Policy and Development Studies;Languages and Literature;and Ecology and Environmental Studies

Jambudvipa, i.e, PraBuddha Bharath scientific thought in

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GOOD GOVERNANCE

Press Information Bureau

(C.M. Information Campus)

Information and Public Relations Department, U.P.

C.M. greets people of State on occasion of Republic Day

Lucknow : 25 January, 2011

The Hon

’ble Chief Minister of Uttar Pradesh Ms. Mayawati ji has extended her heartiest greetings and good wishes to thepeople of the State on occasion of 61th anniversary of the Republic Day.

Ms. Mayawati ji said that 26

th January was a day to remember and pay homage to all known and unknownmartyrs and freedom fighters, who laid down their lives forachieving freedom. She said that because of their supremeefforts, today we are citizens of a free country.

The Hon

’ble Chief Minister ji further said that it was also a day to pay tributes to the heroes of social change, whofought for the rights of the exploited, deprived and SC/STsections of the society. They also waged battle against a socialsystem based on inequality and always fought to establish egalitarian society.

The Hon

’ble Chief Minister ji said that the Republic Day was also an occasion to introspect how far we succeeded inenforcing the provisions of the Indian Constitution.

Ms. Mayawati ji expressed the confidence that the people of the State would continue to extend their cooperation to the effective steps being taken by the Government for prosperity and development of Uttar Pradesh and the State would become a leading State of the Country. She said that we would also have to take resolve today to realise the dream of establishing a society based on equality and also to realise the dream of 

‘Sarvjan Hitay, Sarvjan Sukhay’.

*********

VOICE OF SARVAJAN

HONEYLEAKS

Tue, 25 January, 2011 8:16:15 PM

[The Buddhist Circle] Re: Happy Constitution Day!

From:

vinaya rakkhita  < ?xml:namespace prefix = v ns = “urn:schemas-microsoft-com:vml” />

View Contact

To:

dp bauddha

Dear Upasak,

                   much merits to you for sharing such Enlightening views. Most of the educated and well to do Ambedkarites  and other beneficiaries of reservation given by Babasaheb’s  constitution are showing disrespect to Babasaheb by not following Buddhism. Venerable Nagasena has mentioned about such  people in Question of Milinda as follows:

Disrespectful  Persons.

There are these twelve kinds of persons, O king who pay no respect- “The lustful man in his lust, the angry man in his malice, the dull man in his stupidity, the puffed-up man in his pride, the bad man in his want of discrimination, the obstinate man in his want of docility, the mean man in his littleness, the talkative man in his vanity, the wicked man in his cruelty, the wretched man in his misery, the gambler overpowered by his greed and the busy man in his search after gain.”

 Wish you all Happy Constitution Day.

with metta,

Bhanteji

Wed, 26 January, 2011 12:14:07 AM

[mfc_mumbai] My heartiest best wishes to all fellow Indians on occassion of 62nd Republic Day of “The Republic Of India”.

From:

Jayant RAMTEKE  

View Contact

To:

HPS ; mfc ; mulnivasibahujans@googlegroups.com; Apnaiimforum ; apnaiit@yahoogroups.com





 

My heartiest best wishes to all fellow Indians on occassion of 62nd Republic Day of “The Republic Of India”.

The freedom that we celebrate on Republic Day is the liberty to rule ourselves under a Constitution that we have created; one which safeguards our rights and allows us to be good citizens while not trampling over the rights of others.

“India is a peculiar country and her nationalists and patriots are a peculiar people. A patriot and a nationalist in India is one who sees with open eyes his fellow men treated as being less than man. But his humanity does not rise in protest. He knows that men and women for no cause are denied their rights. But it does not prick his civil sense of helpful action. He finds a whole class of people shut out from public employment. But it does not rouse his sense of justice and fair play. Hundreds of evil practices that injure man and society are perceived by him. But they do not sicken him with disgust. The patriot’s one cry is power for him and his class. I am glad I do not belong to that class of patriots. I belong to that class which takes its stand on democracy and which seeks to destroy monopoly in every form. Our aim is to realise in practice our ideal of one man one value in all walks of life - political, economical and social.”

“Walter Bagehot defined democracy as ‘Government by discussion’. Abraham Lincoln defined democracy as ‘ A Government of the people, by the people and for the people’.

My definition of democracy is - A form and a method of Government whereby revolutionary changes in the social life are brought about without bloodshed. That is the real test. It is perhaps the severest test. But when you are judging the quality of the material you must put it to the severest test.”

“Democracy is not merely a form of Government. It is primarily a mode of associated living, of conjoint communicated experience. It is essentially an attitude of respect and reverence towards our fellow men.”

 

 ”A democratic form of Government presupposes a democratic form of a society, The formal framework of democracy is of no value and would indeed be a misfit if there was no social democracy. It may not be necessary for a democratic society to be marked by unity, by community of purpose, by loyalty to public ends and by mutuality of sympathy. But it does unmistakably involve two things. The first is an attitude of mind, and attitude of respect and equality towards their fellows. The second is a social organisation free from rigid social barriers. Democracy is incompatible and inconsistent with isolation and exclusiveness resulting in the distinction between the privileged and the unprivileged.”

“Without social union, political unity is difficult to be achieved. If achieved, it would be as precarious as a summer sapling, liable to be uprooted by the gust of wind. With mere political unity, India may be a state. But to be a state is not to be a nation and a state which is not a nation has small prospects of survival in the struggle of existence. This is especially true where nationalism - the most dynamic force of modern times, is seeking everywhere to free itself by the destruction and disruption of all mixed states. The danger to a mixed and composite state, therefore lies not so much in external aggression as in the internal resurgence of nationalities which are fragmented, entrapped, suppressed and held against their will.”

“Indians today are governed by two different ideologies. Their political ideal set in the preamble of the Constitution affirms a life of liberty, equality and fraternity. Their social ideal embodied in their religion denies them.”

“Constitutional morality is not a natural sentiment. It has to be cultivated. We must realise that our people have yet to learn it. Democracy in India is only a top dressing on an Indian soil which is essentially undemocratic.”

“On the 26th January 1950, we are going to enter into a life of contradictions. In politics we will have equality and in social and economic life we will have inequality. In politics we will be recognising the principle of one man one vote and one vote one value. In our social and economic life, we shall by reason of our social and economic structure, continue to deny the principle of one man one value. How long shall we continue to live this life of contradictions? How long shall we continue to deny equality in our social and economic life? If we continue to deny it for long, we will do so only by putting our political democracy in peril. We must remove this contradiction at the earliest possible moment else those who suffer from inequality will blow up the structure of democracy which this Constituent Assembly has so laboriously built up.”

“No Constitution is perfect (but) I feel that it is workable, it is flexible and it is strong enough to hold the country together both in peacetime and in wartime. Indeed, if I may say so, if things go wrong under the new constitution, the reason will not be that we have had a bad constitution. What we will have to say is, that Man was vile.”

      - Dr Babasaheb Ambedkar- the builder of modern India 

Kind Regards,

Jayant Ramteke

 

 

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