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08/14/11
346LESSONS 15 08 2011 Aparihani Sutta No Falling Away FREE ONLINE eNālandā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY and BUDDHIST GOOD NEWS letter to VOTE for BSP ELEPHANT to attain Ultimate Bliss-Through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org- Free Buddhist Studies for Young Students- Lesson 11: Law of Kamma
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346LESSONS 15 08 2011 Aparihani Sutta  No Falling Away FREE ONLINE eNālandā Research and Practice
UNIVERSITY and BUDDHIST GOOD NEWS letter to VOTE for BSP ELEPHANT to attain
Ultimate Bliss-Through
http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org- Free Buddhist Studies for Young Students-
Lesson 11: Law
of Kamma






































































































































































http://watsriboenruang.wordpress.com/2011/07/18/aparihani-sutta-no-falling-away-an-4-37/

Aparihani Sutta: No Falling
Away

-AN 4.37

18 Jul

“Endowed with four qualities, a monk is incapable of falling
away and is right in the presence of Unbinding. Which four?

“There is the case where a monk is consummate in virtue, guards
the doors to his sense faculties, knows moderation in eating, & is devoted
to wakefulness.

“And how is a monk consummate in virtue? There is the case where
a monk is virtuous. He dwells restrained in accordance with the Patimokkha,
consummate in his behavior & sphere of activity. He trains himself, having
undertaken the training rules, seeing danger in the slightest faults. This is
how a monk is consummate in virtue.

“And how does a monk guard the doors to his sense faculties?
There is the case where a monk, on seeing a form with the eye, does not grasp
at any theme or variations by which — if he were to dwell without restraint
over the faculty of the eye — evil, unskillful qualities such as greed or
distress might assail him. He practices with restraint. He guards the faculty
of the eye. He achieves restraint with regard to the faculty of the eye.

“On hearing a sound with the ear…

“On smelling an aroma with the nose…

“On tasting a flavor with the tongue…

“On feeling a tactile sensation with the body…

“On cognizing an idea with the intellect, he does not grasp at
any theme or variations by which — if he were to dwell without restraint over
the faculty of the intellect — evil, unskillful qualities such as greed or
distress might assail him. He practices with restraint. He guards the faculty
of the intellect. He achieves restraint with regard to the faculty of the
intellect. This is how a monk guards the doors to his sense faculties.

“And how does a monk know moderation in eating? There is the
case where a monk, considering it appropriately, takes his food not playfully,
nor for intoxication, nor for putting on bulk, nor for beautification, but
simply for the survival & continuance of this body, for ending its
afflictions, for the support of the holy life, thinking, ‘I will destroy old
feelings [of hunger] & not create new feelings [from overeating]. Thus I
will maintain myself, be blameless, & live in comfort.’ This is how a monk
knows moderation in eating.

“And how is a monk devoted to wakefulness? There is the case
where a monk during the day, sitting & pacing back & forth, cleanses
his mind of any qualities that would hold the mind in check. During the first
watch of the night,[1] sitting & pacing back & forth, he cleanses his
mind of any qualities that would hold the mind in check. During the second
watch of the night,[2] reclining on his right side, he takes up the lion’s
posture, one foot placed on top of the other, mindful, alert, with his mind set
on getting up [either as soon as he awakens or at a particular time]. During
the last watch of the night,[3] sitting & pacing back & forth, he
cleanses his mind of any qualities that would hold the mind in check. This is
how a monk is devoted to wakefulness.

“Endowed with these four qualities, a monk is incapable of
falling away and is right in the presence of Unbinding.”
The monk established in virtue, restrained with regard to the sense faculties,
knowing moderation in food, & devoted to wakefulness: dwelling thus
ardently, day & night, untiring, he develops skillful qualities for the
attainment of rest from the yoke. The monk delighting in heedfulness and seeing
danger in heedlessness is incapable of falling away, is right in the presence
of Unbinding.

Lesson 11: Law of Kamma

1. What kind of vision did
Siddhattha gain while meditating under the

Bodhi tree? What did he see?

2. What did the Buddha teach
about life after death and rebirth?

3. Where did the Buddha die?
Why did he choose that place?

4. Describe what happened
during the Buddha’s last day.

5. What were the Buddha’s
last words?

6. Was the Buddha afraid of
death? Justify your answer.

7. What is Parinibbana? 􀀊

 Law of Kamma

Kamma means volitional
(intentional) actions. These actions are

thinking, speech and bodily
actions. The Law of Kamma is the law of

the volitional actions. It
determines our future lives, be it today,

tomorrow or after death.
Basically, the Buddha taught that good

actions lead to freedom from
suffering, happiness and Nibbana, and

bad actions lead to more
suffering, unhappiness and away from

Nibbana.

1.

a) Name and describe some
well-known natural laws (e.g. law of

gravity, laws of
electromagnetic energy).

b) Describe some natural
non-living cycles (oscillations or vibrations

of energy and crystals, day
cycles, moon cycles, annual cycles), and

living cycles (e.g. breathing
(in-out), day (day-night), life (birthdeath)).

2. Reflect on and describe
how your life depends on others and on

your own actions.

3. Describe the Law of Kamma
and discuss the 3 kammas (bodily

actions, speech and
thinking):

a) Give examples of
intentional and not intentional bodily actions, and

their consequences.

b) Give examples of good
speech and bad speech towards others, and

their consequences.

c) Give examples of good
thoughts and bad thoughts about yourself

and about others, and their
consequences.

4. Create short stories,
songs, or cartoons, describing real life

situations, that illustrate
the Law of Kamma. Then create a short book

and present it to others. For
example, write how harming others brings

suffering, and helping brings
happiness and peace.

Use your knowledge of
mathematics to work out your chances for a

good rebirth on Earth. Here I
define a good rebirth as: no wars + no

poverty + no violence + no
drugs. So you have 4 categories (variables)

to use. If you have
difficulties, ask your math teacher for help.

a) Assume that the process of
rebirth is entirely at random. This means

that everyone has an equal
chance for being born in any place to any

parents. Then find out the
approximate proportion of the children born

each year into each of the
above 4 categories, and then calculate the

probability of the good
rebirth.

b) Find out how many babies
are born each year. Then calculate how

many babies each year will
have the good rebirth, and how many will

miss out.

c) Add another category, that
you consider important, and recalculate

(a) and (b).

d) Discuss how you can
improve your and others chances for a good

rebirth.

1. Can you possibly prove to
yourself or others that there is no life

after death? Can you prove
there is life after death? If so, how?

2. If we do not really know
what happens to us after death, what is a

wise way to live, and why?

3. Investigate what various
people believe happens after death. Ask

your parents, friends, and
teachers, or use Internet resources, to find

out. Share your findings with
others.

a) What do your parents and
friends believe, and why?

b) What did ancient
Egyptians, Indians, Chinese and others believe?

c) What did some great
religious teachers teach about life after death?

4. Why is it good to reflect
on the law of Kamma? How can we and


others benefit from that?

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