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Paṭisambhidā Jāla-Abaddha Paripanti Tipiṭaka Anvesanā ca Paricaya Nikhilavijjālaya ca ñātibhūta Pavatti Nissāya 
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(19) LESSON Fri Jul 14 2007- (2671 Wed 4 Jul LESSON) பாரம்பரிய இசைத்தமிழ் செம்மொழி Buddhist Websites தர்ம போதனைகள் (காணொளிகள்) புத்த பகவான் தன் திருவாய் மலர்ந்து போதித்தருளிய உன்னத தர்மத்தினை எமது தாய் மொழியிலேயே விபரமாகவும் விரிவாகவும் கற்றுக்கொள்வதற்கு உங்களாலும் முடியும். அதற்காக எமது இணையத்தளத்தினூடாக வெளியிடப்படும் தர்ம காணொளிகளை நீங்கள் இங்கே பார்க்க முடியும்.
Filed under: General, Vinaya Pitaka, Sutta Pitaka, Abhidhamma Pitaka, Tipiṭaka, ಅಭಿಧಮ್ಮಪಿಟಕ, ವಿನಯಪಿಟಕ, ತಿಪಿಟಕ (ಮೂಲ)
Posted by: @ 10:49 am
(19) LESSON Fri Jul  14  2007- (2671 Wed 4 Jul  LESSON) 

பாரம்பரிய இசைத்தமிழ் செம்மொழி
Buddhist Websites

தர்ம போதனைகள் (காணொளிகள்)



புத்த
பகவான் தன் திருவாய் மலர்ந்து போதித்தருளிய உன்னத தர்மத்தினை எமது தாய்
மொழியிலேயே விபரமாகவும் விரிவாகவும் கற்றுக்கொள்வதற்கு உங்களாலும்
முடியும். அதற்காக எமது இணையத்தளத்தினூடாக வெளியிடப்படும் தர்ம காணொளிகளை
நீங்கள் இங்கே பார்க்க முடியும்.

http://www.tripitakatamil.com/tripitaka.php




























































































http://www.buddhanet.net/10_best.htm

BuddhaNet's Top 10 Buddhist Websites


Below is a list of Top 10 Buddhist Websites, as recommended by
BuddhaNet, in no particular order. For a full list of other Buddhist
websites available on BuddhaNet, please visit our Buddhist Links section

Himalayan
Art

Features over 1500 artworks from Tibet, Nepal, Bhutan,
India,
China and Mongolia. Art from leading private and museum
collections, accompanied
by scholarship, cataloging and interpretation.
Firstly, the Website exhibits images of art from museum, university and
private collections around the world. Secondly, the Website catalogs all
Himalayan art objects that are known through past or present
collections or publications.
Quiet
Mountain

Quiet Mountain Tibetan Buddhist Resource Guide is one of
the most comprehensive Buddhist resources on the web period. With its
newly designed entry page, it continues to be a work in progress worth
visiting over and over. A must see for those interested in Tibetan lineages.
Zen
Art by Monk SongYoon

This is the Web site of a Zen monk-artist in
Korea, Ven. SongYoon: “As
a contemporary seeker on the Path, I have chosen painting as my own special
way of living amongst the people. My training as a monk — sutra study,
chanting, meditation — prepared me well for this experience. Particularly
the meditation”.
Women
Active in Buddhism

The Web’s first comprehensive collection of links
and resources on contemporary Buddhist women. Female teachers, activists,
scholars, nuns, and yoginis (practitioners) may be found on these pages,
as well as teachings and special events, projects, organisations, bibliographic
and contact information. We also offer a complete guide to the many female
meditational deities found in Tibetan Buddhist practice.

The
Alan Watts Electronic University

Alan Watts become widely recognized for his Zen writings
and for The Book On the Taboo Against Knowing Who You Are. He died in
1973 at his home in California, and is survived by his second wife and
seven children. This site features the work of Alan Watts as compiled by
his son, Mark. It includes a Library and Galley, an Audio Collection,
Rare Books and Pamphlets, Animations and MP3s and Videos.

Access
to Insight

Readings in Theravada Buddhism. Access to Insight is an
Internet website dedicated to providing accurate, reliable, and useful
information concerning the practice and study of Theravada Buddhism, as
it has been handed down to us through both the written word of the Pali
Canon and the living example of the Sangha.One of the best places on the
Net to find Theravada texts.

Journal
of Global Buddhism

The Journal of Global Buddhism has been established
to promote the study of Buddhism’s globalization and its transcontinental
interrelatedness. The Journal of Global Buddhism is a scholarly academic
journal employing a blind peer review evaluation process, and is innovative
in adopting a totally electronic mode of publication.
Osel
Shen Phen Ling

A Tibetan centres
affiliated to the Dalai Lama inspired “The Foundation for the Preservation
of the Mahayana Tradition”. This Tibetan Buddhist site has some great
graphics and good content, so is certainly worth a visit.  It has
a Virtual Thangka gallery with excellent graphics and brilliant Buddhist
screen saver which can be downloaded for free!
 

Shambala
Publications

A major Buddhist publisher - well worth a visit for the
excellent
offerings. Shambhala has specialized in books that present
creative and conscious ways of transforming the individual, the society,
and the planet. Shambhala worldview publishes in a wide variety of
subject areas, including psychology and the sciences, the arts and
creativity, business and economics, and health and healing.

Tricycle
eZine version of Tricycle: The Buddhist Review (Magazine)
Tricycle was
founded
in 1991 as a non-profit quarterly magazine. The essential
components of a tricycle–three, vehicle, and wheel–correspond to
concepts found throughout Buddhist history. We speak of three treasures:
the Buddha, dharma, sangha; of turning the wheel of dharma; and of the
three great vehicles of Buddhism: Theravada, Mahayana, and Vajrayana.

 

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Stock Photography: Thursday Buddha



28) Classical English

A table of Awakening Wings
The first seven will be set

Four frames (satipatthana)

Serious, alert, and mindfulness - 1. 1. The body’s focus will be set aside for the greed & pain with the rest of the world.

Serious,
alert, and mindful - 2. 2. Respect the emotions of yourself and the
rest of the world with the rest of the world will be set aside.

Serious, alert, and mindful - 3. 3. The focus of the mind will be set aside for the greed & pain with the rest of the world.

Serious,
alert, and mindful - 4. & Mental qualities focusing on the rest of
the world’s relationship with the rest of the world.

Four right exertions (sammappadhana)

1.
The endeavor of endurance stimulates & destroys the evil,
unskillful yet creates an intention in order to qualities that have not
yet emerged, creates desire.

2.
The endlessness of the endurance creates and destroys the evil that has
arisen and creates the desire for an intentional purpose in order to
unskillful qualities.

3.
Creates a desire for an intent in order to arrive at the stimulus
stimulus stimulates and the more effective qualities that are not yet
emerging.

3.
Efforts to maintain stimulates the persistence of persistence and
create anxiety, nonsense, increase, plenitude, growth, and culinary
skills.

Power Four Sites (iddhipada)

1. The desire for the concentration and the power base of the foundation of desire and labor fiction.

2. Establishment of persistence and labor fiction is a sense of concentration and power base.

3. Establishment of purpose and labor fiction is the power base of the concentration of the established concentration.

4. Identity of discrimination and hard work founded on the power base.

Five facets (indriya)

1. Punishment (saddha) faculty.

2. Stabilization (viriya) faculty.

3. Mentors (conspirator) faculty.

4. Concentration (Samadhi) Teacher.

Feeling (Panna) 5. Faculty.

Five strengths (Bala)

1. Punishment (saddha) strength.

2. Strength (viriya) strength.

3. Mindfulness (conspiracy) strength.

4. Concentration (Samadhi) strength.

Feeling (Panna) 5. Strength.

Awakening Seven Factors (bojjhanga)

1. The uprising (conspiracy-sambojjhanga) is a factor of norms.

An aspect of awakening (Dhamma-vicaya-sambojjhanga)

3. Rise (viriya-sambojjhanga) is a factor.

4. Rise (PITI-sambojjhanga) is a factor behind.

5. Peace (passaddhi-sambojjhanga) is a factor of peace.

6. Rise (Samadhi-sambojjhanga) is a factor concentration.

7. The Uprising (Upeca-sambojjhanga) is a factor in the factor.

Noble Eightmath Path (Aryan-magga)

1. Perfect view (sammā-diṭṭhi).

2. To fix (sammā-saṅkappa).

3. The right speech (sammā-vācā).

4. Right action (sammā-kammanta).

5. Right Livelihood (sammā-ajiva).

6. Right effort (sammā-vayama).

7. Right minds (sammā-sati).

8. Right concentration (sammā-samādhi).
II. Five facets are categorized under, seven sets of factors

Yoga

    Perfect speech (eight-way path)
    
Perfect action (eight-way path)
    
Right Livelihood (Eightmath Path)
    
Desire (power sites)

Persistence

    Perfect effort (eight-way path)
    
Four right exertions
    
Extend (power sites)
    
Expulsion (awakening factors)

Mindfulness

    Four frames of reference
    
Proper caretaking (eight-way path)
    
Custom (Power Sites)
    
Mindfulness (awakening factors)

Concentration

    Power Four Sites
    
Perfect harmonization (eight-way path)
    
The Rapture (Awakening Factors)
    
Peace (awakening factors)
    
Concentration (alert factors)
    
Peace of mind (awakening factors)

Wisdom

    Perfect view (eight-way path)
    
Right wing (eight-way path)
    
Qualities analysis (awakening factors)
    
Discrimination (Power Sites)
    
Peace of mind (awakening factors)

99) தமிழ் செம்மொழி
99) பாரம்பரிய இசைத்தமிழ் செம்மொழி

1980 வெ செப் 9 2016

விழிப்பு   இறகுகள் ஒரு அட்டவணை
முதல் ஏழு அமைக்கப்பட்டிருக்கும்

நான்கு சட்டங்கள் (சதி)

தீவிரம், எச்சரிக்கை, மற்றும் கவனம் - 1. அவரது உடல் கவனம் உலகின் மற்ற பேராசை மற்றும் பேராசைக்கு ஒதுக்கி வைக்கப்படும்.

தீவிரம், எச்சரிக்கை, மற்றும் கவனம் - 2. மற்றும் அவர்களின் உணர்ச்சிகளின் மையம் உலகின் மற்ற பகுதிகளோடு பேராசை மற்றும் வலிக்கு ஒதுக்கி வைக்கப்படும்.

தீவிரம், எச்சரிக்கை மற்றும் கவனம் - - 3. அவரது மனதில் கவனம் செலுத்தும் உலகின் மற்ற பகுதிகளோடு பேராசை மற்றும் வேதனையிலிருந்து விலக்கப்படும்.

தீவிரம், எச்சரிக்கை, மற்றும் கவனம் - 4 - மற்றும் அவர்களின் மனநல குணங்கள் பேராசிரியரிடமும், வேதனையிலிருந்தும் மீதமுள்ள உலக விவகாரங்களில் இருந்து விலக்கப்படும்.

நான்கு சரியான முயற்சிகள் (coeducation)

1. சகிப்புத்தன்மையின் முயற்சியை தூண்டுகிறது மற்றும் தீமைகளை அழிக்கும், இன்னும் திறமையற்றது இன்னும் இன்னும் வெளிப்படாத குணங்களுக்கு ஒரு எண்ணத்தை உருவாக்குகிறது, ஆசை உருவாக்குகிறது.

2. சகிப்புத்தன்மையின் முடிவில்லாமல், தீங்கு விளைவிக்கும் தீமைகளை உருவாக்கி அழித்து, தகுதியற்ற குணாதிசயங்களுக்கு வேண்டுமென்ற நோக்கத்திற்காக ஆசைகளை உருவாக்குகிறது.

3. தூண்டுதல் தூண்டுதல் தூண்டுதல்கள் மற்றும் இன்னும் வளர்ந்து வரும் இன்னும் பயனுள்ள குணங்களை பெற பொருட்டு ஒரு நோக்கம் ஒரு ஆசை உருவாக்குகிறது.

3. தொடர்ந்து நிலைத்திருப்பதைத் தூண்டுகிறது மற்றும் பதட்டம், முட்டாள்தனம், அதிகரிப்பு, இருமை, வளர்ச்சி, மற்றும் சமையல் திறமை ஆகியவற்றை உருவாக்குவதற்கான முயற்சிகள்.

வலிமையான நான்கு  தளங்கள் (iddhipada)

1. ஆசை மற்றும் உழைப்பு அறிவியல் அடித்தளத்தின் செறிவு மற்றும் ஆற்றல் அடிப்படைக்கான ஆசை.

2. தொடர்ந்து நிலைத்திருத்தல் மற்றும் தொழிலாளர் புனைகதை என்பது செறிவு மற்றும் ஆற்றல் தளத்தின் ஒரு உணர்வு ஆகும்.

3. நோக்கம் மற்றும் உழைப்பு புனைவு நிறுவுதல் நிறுவப்பட்ட செறிவூட்டலின் செறிவுக்கான ஆற்றல் தளமாகும்.

4. அதிகார அடிப்படையிலான பாகுபாடு மற்றும் கடின உழைப்பு ஆகியவற்றின் அடையாளங்கள்.

ஐந்து முகங்கள் (indriya)

1. தண்டனை (சாச்சா) ஆசிரியர்.

2. உறுதிப்படுத்தல் (விரியா) ஆசிரியர்.

3. வழிகாட்டிகள் (சதித்திட்டம்) ஆசிரியர்.

4. செறிவு (சமாதி) ஆசிரியர்.

உணர்கிறேன் (பன்னா) 5. ஆசிரியர்.

ஐந்து பலம் (பாலா)

1. தண்டனை (சாதா) வலிமை.

2. வலிமை (விரியா) வலிமை.

3. அறிவாற்றல் (சதி) வலிமை.

4. செறிவு (சமாதி) வலிமை.

உணர்வு (பன்ன) 5. வலிமை.

விழிப்புணர்வு ஏழு காரணிகள் (bojjhanga)

1. எழுச்சி (சதி-சபோ போஜங்கா) என்பது விதிமுறைகளின் காரணியாகும்.

விழிப்புணர்வின் ஒரு அம்சம் (தாமமா-விகிகா-சாபோஜஞ்சங்கா)

3. எழுச்சி (விரியா-சம்போஜஜங்கா) ஒரு காரணியாகும்.

4. எழுச்சி (PITI-sambojjhanga) பின்னால் ஒரு காரணி.

5. சமாதானம் (passaddhi-sambojjhanga) சமாதான ஒரு காரணியாகும்.

6. எழுச்சி (சமாதி-சாம்போஜஞ்சங்கா) ஒரு காரணி செறிவு ஆகும்.

7. எழுச்சியை (Upeca-sambojjhanga) காரணி ஒரு காரணி.

நோபல் எட்மாத் பாதை (ஆரிய-மகா)

1. சரியான பார்வை (சம்மா-தத்ஹிதி).

2. சரிசெய்ய (சம்சா-சாகப்பா).

3. சரியான பேச்சு (சம்மா-வக்கா).

4. வலது நடவடிக்கை (சம்மா-காம்மாண்டா).

5. சரியான வாழ்வாதாரங்கள் (சம்மா-அஜிவா).

6. சரியான முயற்சி (சம்வா-வையாமா).

7. வலது மனதில் (சமாசதி).

8. வலது செறிவு (சம்மா சமாதி).
இரண்டாம். ஐந்து முகங்கள், ஏழு காரணிகள் கீழ் வகைப்படுத்தப்படுகின்றன

யோகா

சரியான பேச்சு (எட்டு வழி பாதை)
சரியான நடவடிக்கை (எட்டு வழி பாதை)
சரியான வாழ்வாதாரம் (எட்டுப்பாட்டு பாதை)
ஆசை (சக்தி தளங்கள்)

நிலைத்தன்மையே

சரியான முயற்சி (எட்டு வழி பாதை)
நான்கு சரியான முயற்சிகள்
நீட்டிக்க (சக்தி தளங்கள்)
வெளியேற்றம் (விழிப்புணர்வு காரணிகள்)

நெறிகள்

குறிப்பு நான்கு பிரேம்கள்
முறையான கவனிப்பு (எட்டு வழி பாதை)
விருப்ப (பவர் தளங்கள்)
புத்தியீனம் (விழிப்புணர்வு காரணிகள்)

செறிவு

பவர் நான்கு தளங்கள்
சரியான ஒத்திசைவு (எட்டு வழி பாதை)
பேரானந்தம் (விழிப்புணர்வு காரணிகள்)
அமைதி (விழிப்புணர்வு காரணிகள்)
செறிவு (எச்சரிக்கை காரணிகள்)
மன அமைதி (விழிப்புணர்வு காரணிகள்)

விஸ்டம்

சரியான காட்சி (எட்டு வழி பாதை)
வலதுசாரி (எட்டு வழி பாதை)
பண்புகள் பகுப்பாய்வு (விழிப்புணர்வு காரணிகள்)
பாகுபாடு (பவர் தளங்கள்)
மன அமைதி (விழிப்புணர்வு காரணிகள்)


http://www.dailymirror.lk/article/Buddhists-heritage-of-Tamil-Nadu-and-links-with-SL-118460.html

The cultural affinities between Tamil Nadu, our closest neighbour and
Sri  Lanka are many but little is known of the religious ties which
bound the two countries between the early years of the Christian era and
the 14thcentury AD, during which time Buddhism was prevalent in South
 India.   
Buddhism came to South India before the third Sangam period in the 2nd
century BC. Pandit Hisselle Dharmaratana Maha Thera, “Buddhism in South
India” states that there is evidence that Ven. Mahinda Thera, Emperor
Asoka’s son, also spread the Dhamma in Tamil Nadu. The Maha Thera
states, “although the chronicles say he arrived through his supernatural
powers, scholars are of the opinion that he travelled by sea and called
at Kaveripattinam on the east coast of Tamil Nadu on his way to Sri
Lanka,” Dr. Shu Hikosaka, Director Professor of Buddhism, Institute of
Asian Studies in Madras, in his book ‘Buddhism in Tamil Nadu a new
perspective’ also takes the same view.
Hsuan Tsang, the Chinese 7th Century, Buddhist monk, scholar, traveller,
mentions that in the Pandyan kingdom near Madurai, there is a monastery
built by Mahinda Thera. He also mentions a stupa built by King Asoka in
Kanchipuram. Stone inscriptions of the Emperor Asoka, Rock Edict no 3,
refers to the Dhamma being spread in the Chola, and Pandya country
(Tamil Nadu) and Tambapanni (Sri Lanka). 
Buddhism flourished in Tamil Nadu in two phases, firstly in the early
years of the Pallava rule 400-650 AD, and secondly in the Chola period
mid 9th to the early 14th century AD. There were many centres of
Buddhism in Tamil Nadu among them were Kanchipuram, Kaveripattinam,
Uraiyur and Nagapattinam. The Chinese Buddhist monk scholar, Hsuan
Tsang, who visited India in the 7th century AD, describes Kanchipuram as
a flourishing city and states that most of its population was Buddhist.
He says there were over 100 Buddhist monasteries and over a thousand
Buddhist monks. He also mentions the presence of 300 monks from Sri
Lanka in the monastery at the Southern sector of Kanchipuram. The
Pallava king Mahendra Varman in his Sanskrit work Mattavilasa Prahasana
refers to the existence of many Buddhist Viharas, chief of which was the
Raja Vihara. 
Among the notable Buddhist scholars who were natives of or resident in
the city, he mentions Rev. Dharmapala, rector of Nalanda  University,
who was a native of the city as was Anuruddha Thera, author of the
Abhidammathsasangaha. Although there is evidence that the Rev.
Buddhaghosha was resident in Kanchipuram for some time, it is not
certain whether he was a native of the city although he was in all
probability from the Tamil country. 

 

“The interaction between
Tamil Nadu monks and Sri Lankan monks is also mentioned in the
Manimakalai, the 6th Century Tamil literary epic by Sattanar”

 


Dr. Hikosaka in his book points out that during the Pallava period Tamil
Nadu had outstanding Tamil monks who made remarkable contributions to
Buddhist thought and learning. Among them we may mention Buddhadatte
Thera who authored many books. In the Abhidhammaratana, he gives a
glowing account inter-alia of Kaveripattinam and Kanchipuram and the
Mahavihare at Sri  Lanka. While he was
in Sri  Lanka, he composed many Buddhist works such as Uttara
Viniccaya, Ruparupa Vibhaga and Jinalankara. Another famous Tamil monk,
Buddhaghosha, contemporary of Bhuddhadatta, composed many Buddhist
commentaries. Buddhaghosha made a remarkable contribution to Buddhism in
Sri  Lanka. He stayed and studied Buddhist precepts at the Maha Vihare
in Anuradhapura. The Visuddimagga was the first work of Buddhaghosha
while in Sri  Lanka. While staying at the Granthakara Pirivena at
Anuradhapura, he rendered Sinhalese commentaries of the Tripitakas into
Pali. Another vibrant Tamil monk was Dhammapala. 

 

“Dr. Hikosaka concludes that
a study of the three monks shows that Tamil Nadu Buddhists were closely
associated with Sri Lankan Buddhists. It will be noticed that the monks
used the Pali language in their treatises just as in Europe in the
middle ages, the Christian monks used Latin”



He lived in the Maha Vihare at Anuradhapura and composed a commentary on
Buddhaghoshas work. Dr. Hikosaka concludes that a study of the three
monks shows that Tamil Nadu Buddhists were closely associated with Sri
Lankan Buddhists. It will be noticed that the monks used the Pali
language in their treatises just as in Europe in the middle ages, the
Christian monks used Latin. 
The interaction between Tamil Nadu monks and Sri Lankan monks is also
mentioned in the Manimakalai, the 6th Century Tamil literary epic by
Sattanar. Among the other Tamil literary epics which show the influence
of Buddhism are the ‘Sillappadhihkaram,’ ‘Valaiyapathi Kundalakesi’ and
‘Jivaka Cintamani.’ The ‘Manimekalai’ is a Buddhist work that expounds
the doctrines and values of Buddhism. The book also mentions Tamil
Buddhists in the island  of Nagadipa off the coast of Jaffna. Since
Tamil Nadu was largely Buddhist, one can easily conclude that the Tamil
population in the North and East of Sri Lanka was also largely
Buddhist. 
“The Tamil Buddhists who followed Theravada Buddhism shared common
places of worship with the Sinhalese. There were also Tamil Buddhists
who were followers of Mahayana Buddhism, and they had their own Mahayana
temples,” states L.K. Devanda in his Book ‘Tamil Buddhism in Ancient
South India and Sri  Lanka.’ 
He points out that there are still some Tamil Buddhist establishments
‘Palli’ in the East of Sri Lanka, and possibly in the Jaffna peninsula.
The best known is Velgam Vihara, which was renamed Rajaraja Perun Palli
after the Chola emperor. Another was the Vikkirama Calamekan Perumpalli.
Velgam Vihara also known as Natanar Kovil by the present day Tamils
which stands out as the only known example of a Tamil Vihara or Buddhist
Palli. In the words of Dr. Senerath Paranavithana, “an Ancient Buddhist
shrine of the Tamil people.” 
Some of the Tamil inscriptions found at the site record donations to
this shrine and are dated in the reigns of the Chola kings Raja Raja
Chola and Rajendra Chola. It was the view of Dr. Paranavithana that the
date of the original foundation of the Vihara was considerably earlier. 
Devanada writes today Buddhism in Sri Lanka is monopolized by the
Sinhalese. There are even those who call it “Sinhala Buddhism,”
seemingly unaware of the fact that it is a universal religion. This
notion was propagated only in the early 20th century by revivalists such
as Anagarika Dharmapala. Unfortunately, he says today the Tamils of Sri
Lanka also believe that Buddhism is a Sinhalese religion and alien to
them, but this was not the case in the past.

 

 

“Devanada writes today
Buddhism in Sri Lanka is monopolized by the Sinhalese. There are even
those who call it “Sinhala Buddhism,” seemingly unaware of the fact that
it is a universal religion. This notion was propagated only in the
early 20th century by revivalists such as Anagarika Dharmapala”

 


Unlike today, the ancient Buddhist /Hindu civilization in Sri Lanka and
the ancient Palli /Sanskrit place names has nothing to do with
ethnicity. Hence the Pali, Sanskrit place names in the North and East of
Sri Lanka are part of the Tamil Buddhist heritage. The author states
that the Tamil politicians, scholars, intellectuals and the Tamil media
should make every effort to educate the Tamil public to be aware that
Buddhism was a part of Tamil civilization, and in fact the most
important part of the Tamil heritage of the North and East of Sri Lanka
is its Hindu /Buddhist heritage. Hence the recent efforts by some
elements to place Buddha statues in these areas to mark their ethnic
presence is entirely misplaced apart from being contrary to the
universal values and teachings of Buddhism. 
The situation in Tamil Nadu began to change after the 7th century. With
the rise of Vaishnavism and Saivism, there was a significant increase in
Hindu Braminical influence. The Buddhist and Jain institutions in Tamil
Nadu came under attack and they began to lose popular support and the
patronage of the rulers. The Chinese scholar monk Hsuan Tsang records
instances of Tamil Buddhist monks fleeing to Sri Lanka when they were
worsted in religious debates and feared the repercussions of the ruler’s
change of religion.

Pandit Hisselle Dharmaratana Maha Thera writes, “although Buddhism
declined in the Tamil country from the 7th century onwards it was by no
means eradicated.” For several centuries Buddhism still survived though
in a state of decline. The continuation of the Mahavamsa states that in
the 13th Century King Parakramabahu of Dambadeniya brought down Buddhist
monks and scriptures from the Chola country in Tamil Nadu to revive
Buddhism in Sri  Lanka. During this time there was a great deal of
cultural exchange between South India and Sri  Lanka.”

The chief of the monks who was brought from South India was Ven.
Dhammakitti. He wrote the continuation of the Mahavamsa from the time of
king Srimevan up to his time. The Ven. Dipankara of Chola known as
Buddhappiya came to Sri Lanka for his studies in Buddhism. He wrote the
Pali poem Pajjamadhu (nectar of verses) in adoration of the Buddha. He
is also the author of a Pali grammar. The Ven. Buddhamitta and Maha
Kassapa were also two monks from the Chola country of Tamil Nadu. They
studied the Dhamma in Sri  Lanka and rendered great service to the
religion, states Pandit Hisselle Dharmaratane Maha Thera.
He goes on to say that this shows that up to the 14th century there were
Buddhists monasteries and centres of learning in South India. There is
also evidence that during the invasion of Magha of Kalinga in Sri  Lanka
and the destruction of Buddhist monasteries there, monks from Sri Lanka
fled to and sought refuge in monasteries in Tamil Nadu. However after
the 14th century Buddhism disappeared in South India leaving only traces
of its heyday in the many ruins such as we find in Amaravati. 
Dr. Nirmala Chandrahasan LL.B (Ceylon) LL.M (Cambridge) Ph.D. (Colombo), Attorney-at Law 
Consultant – Office for National Unity and Reconciliation (ONUR)



Gibbs


http://bodhidharma-kanchi.blogspot.com/

Monday, 16 January 2017

Aimpon Buddha Statue Found at Pazhaverkadu, Thiruvallur District, Chennai


பொன்னேரியை அடுத்த பழவேற்காடு பகுதியில்
நேற்று காணும் பொங்கலை முன்னிட்டு திரளான பொதுமக்கள் குவிந்து இருந்தனர்.
மீஞ்சூரை அடுத்த திருநிலை கிராமத்தைச் சேர்ந்த சங்கர் மற்றும் அவரது
உறவினரான சென்னை வண்ணாரப்பேட்டையை சேர்ந்த பெண் போலீஸ் சுமதி ஆகியோர் குடும்பத்தினருடன் பழவேற்காடு வந்து இருந்தனர்.

இவர்கள் அங்குள்ள லைட்அவுஸ் குப்பம் பகுதியில் கடலில் குளித்துக் கொண்டிருந்தனர். அப்போது ஒரு மர்ம பொருள் அவர்களின் காலில் தட்டுப்பட்டது. அதை கையில் எடுத்து பார்த்தபோது சுமார் 3 அடி உயரம் உள்ள ஐம்பொன் புத்தர் சிலை என்பது தெரியவந்தது.

கடலில் கண்டெடுத்த புத்தர் சிலையை திருப்பாலைவனம் போலீஸ் இன்ஸ்பெக்டர்
மனோகரிடம் ஒப்படைத்தனர். அவர், பொன்னேரி தாசில்தார் செந்தில்நாதனிடம் அதை
ஒப்படைத்தார். அந்த சிலையை பெற்றுக்கொண்ட தாசில்தார் செந்தில்நாதன்,
இதுபற்றி தொல்பொருள் ஆய்வு அதிகாரிகளுக்கு தகவல் கொடுத்தார்.

தொல்பொருள் ஆய்வு அதிகாரிகளின் ஆய்வுக்கு பிறகே இந்த புத்தர் சிலை எந்த
காலத்தில் செய்யப்பட்டது?, அதன் மதிப்பு என்ன? என்பது உள்ளிட்ட விவரங்கள்
தெரியவரும் என பொன்னேரி வருவாய்த்துறை அதிகாரிகள் தெரிவித்தனர்.

Post from: http://www.dailythanthi.com/News/Districts/Tiruvallur/2017/01/17021855/Palavetkadu-sea–AimponBuddha-statue-found.vpf


Sunken, 600-year-old Buddha emerges in China

































A 600-year-old Buddha statue has been discovered in a reservoir in east
China’s Jiangxi Province after water levels fell during renovation work.










BEIJING, China (CNN) - A 600-year-old Buddha statue has been discovered in a reservoir in east China’s Jiangxi Province after water levels fell during renovation work.


A local villager first spotted the head of the Buddha last month when
the water level fell by more than 10 meters during work on a hydropower
gate, official state news agency Xinhua reported.


The Buddha’s head sits against a cliff and gazes serenely over the body
of water. It has attracted many tourists as well as locals, who see it
as an auspicious sign.



Archaeologists said the statue could date back to Ming Dynasty (1368-1644).


“A preliminary study of the statue suggests it was probably built during
early Ming Dynasty, maybe even earlier as the Yuan Dynasty,” Xu
Changqing, director of the Research Institute of Archaeology of Jiangxi
province, told CNN in a phone interview.


The statue is potentially just the tip of an untapped archeological
treasure trove. A base of a temple hall was also found under the water.
Local records suggest the reservoir was located on the ruins of an
ancient town called Xiaoshi.


Xu said an underwater archeology team is investigating both the ancient town and the statue and working on a preservation plan.


Water helps protect statue
Xu added that being submerged in water could have preserved the statue, which features surprisingly detailed carving.


“If the statue wasn’t preserved in the water, it could have suffered weathering, oxidation or other risks, we reckon,” Xu said.


Many cultural relics were destroyed during the country’s Cultural
Revolution in the 1960s when people were told to get rid of everything
old, feudalistic and superstitious.



The statue is around 12.5 feet (3.8 meters) tall and carved into a cliff.


China is home to a number of striking Buddhist cliff and cave carvings.
The most famous is Leshan Giant Buddha, the world’s tallest Buddha
statue.


Guan Zhiyong, a local official, told Xinhua that the Buddha statue was
built by ancient people as a spiritual protector to calm the
rapid-flowing current where two rivers converge.


The statue was submerged in 1960 when the Hongmen reservoir was built.
At that time, local authorities weren’t aware of heritage protection,
said Xu.


The re-emergence of the Buddha has brought back memories for some
village elders. Huang Keping, a 82-year-old local blacksmith, said he
saw the Buddha first time in 1952.


“I remember the statue was gilded at that time,” Huang told Xinhua.


Posted: Jan 16, 2017 08:43 AM CST from http://edition.cnn.com/2017/01/16/travel/china-buddha-statue-resurfaces/


Wednesday, 2 November 2016

Buddhists Heritage of Tamil Nadu and links with SL


The
cultural affinities between Tamil Nadu, our closest neighbour and Sri
 Lanka are many but little is known of the religious ties which bound
the two countries between the early years of the Christian era and the
14thcentury AD, during which time Buddhism was prevalent in South  India.
   Buddhism came to South India before the third Sangam period in the
2nd century BC. Pandit Hisselle Dharmaratana Maha Thera, “Buddhism
in South India” states that there is evidence that Ven. Mahinda Thera,
Emperor Asoka’s son, also spread the Dhamma in Tamil Nadu. The Maha
Thera states, “although the chronicles say he arrived through his
supernatural powers,
scholars
are of the opinion that he travelled by sea and called at
Kaveripattinam on the east coast of Tamil Nadu on his way to Sri Lanka,”
Dr. Shu Hikosaka, Director Professor of Buddhism, Institute of Asian
Studies in Madras, in his book ‘Buddhism in Tamil Nadu a new
perspective’ also takes the same view.



Hsuan Tsang, the Chinese 7th Century, Buddhist monk, scholar, traveller,
mentions that in the Pandyan kingdom near Madurai, there is a monastery
built by Mahinda Thera. He also mentions a stupa built by King Asoka in
Kanchipuram. Stone inscriptions of the Emperor Asoka, Rock Edict no 3,
refers to the Dhamma being spread in the Chola, and Pandya country
(Tamil Nadu) and Tambapanni (Sri Lanka).  Buddhism flourished in Tamil
Nadu in two phases, firstly in the early years of the Pallava rule
400-650 AD, and secondly in the Chola period mid 9th to the early 14th
century AD. There were many centres of Buddhism in Tamil Nadu among them
were Kanchipuram, Kaveripattinam, Uraiyur and Nagapattinam. The Chinese
Buddhist monk scholar, Hsuan Tsang, who visited India in the 7th
century AD, describes Kanchipuram as a flourishing city and states that
most of its population was Buddhist. He says there were over 100
Buddhist monasteries and over a thousand Buddhist monks. He also
mentions the presence of 300 monks from Sri Lanka in the monastery at
the Southern sector of Kanchipuram. The Pallava king Mahendra Varman in
his Sanskrit work Mattavilasa Prahasana refers to the existence of many
Buddhist Viharas, chief of which was the Raja Vihara.  Among the notable
Buddhist scholars who were natives of or resident in the city, he
mentions Rev. Dharmapala, rector of Nalanda  University, who was a
native of the city as was Anuruddha Thera, author of the
Abhidammathsasangaha. Although there is evidence that the Rev.
Buddhaghosha was resident in Kanchipuram for some time, it is not
certain whether he was a native of the city although he was in all
probability from the Tamil country.

“The interaction
between Tamil Nadu monks and Sri Lankan monks is also mentioned in the
Manimakalai, the 6th Century Tamil literary epic by Sattanar”


Dr. Hikosaka in his book points out that during the Pallava period Tamil
Nadu had outstanding Tamil monks who made remarkable contributions to
Buddhist thought and learning. Among them we may mention Buddhadatte
Thera who authored many books. In the Abhidhammaratana, he gives a
glowing account inter-alia of Kaveripattinam and Kanchipuram and the
Mahavihare at Sri  Lanka. While he was in Sri  Lanka, he composed many
Buddhist works such as Uttara Viniccaya, Ruparupa Vibhaga and
Jinalankara. Another famous Tamil monk, Buddhaghosha, contemporary of
Bhuddhadatta, composed many Buddhist commentaries. Buddhaghosha made a
remarkable contribution to Buddhism in Sri  Lanka. He stayed and studied
Buddhist precepts at the Maha Vihare in Anuradhapura. The Visuddimagga
was the first work of Buddhaghosha while in Sri  Lanka. While staying at
the Granthakara Pirivena at Anuradhapura, he rendered Sinhalese
commentaries of the Tripitakas into Pali. Another vibrant Tamil monk was
Dhammapala.

“Dr. Hikosaka concludes that a study of the
three monks shows that Tamil Nadu Buddhists were closely associated with
Sri Lankan Buddhists. It will be noticed that the monks used the Pali
language in their treatises just as in Europe in the middle ages, the
Christian monks used Latin” 


He lived in the Maha Vihare at Anuradhapura and composed a commentary on
Buddhaghoshas work. Dr. Hikosaka concludes that a study of the three
monks shows that Tamil Nadu Buddhists were closely associated with Sri
Lankan Buddhists. It will be noticed that the monks used the Pali
language in their treatises just as in Europe in the middle ages, the
Christian monks used Latin.  The interaction between Tamil Nadu monks
and Sri Lankan monks is also mentioned in the Manimakalai, the 6th
Century Tamil literary epic by Sattanar. Among the other Tamil literary
epics which show the influence of Buddhism are the ‘Sillappadhihkaram,’
‘Valaiyapathi Kundalakesi’ and ‘Jivaka Cintamani.’ The ‘Manimekalai’ is a
Buddhist work that expounds the doctrines and values of Buddhism. The
book also mentions Tamil Buddhists in the island  of Nagadipa off the
coast of Jaffna. Since Tamil Nadu was largely Buddhist, one can easily
conclude that the Tamil population in the North and East of Sri Lanka
was also largely Buddhist.  “The Tamil Buddhists who followed Theravada
Buddhism shared common places of worship with the Sinhalese.

There were also Tamil Buddhists who were followers of Mahayana Buddhism, and they had their own Mahayana temples,”
states L.K. Devanda in his Book ‘Tamil Buddhism in Ancient South India
and Sri  Lanka.’  He points out that there are still some Tamil Buddhist
establishments ‘Palli’ in the East of Sri Lanka, and possibly in the
Jaffna peninsula. The best known is Velgam Vihara, which was renamed
Rajaraja Perun Palli after the Chola emperor. Another was the Vikkirama
Calamekan Perumpalli. Velgam Vihara also known as Natanar Kovil by the
present day Tamils which stands out as the only known example of a Tamil Vihara or Buddhist Palli.
In the words of Dr. Senerath Paranavithana, “an Ancient Buddhist shrine
of the Tamil people.”  Some of the Tamil inscriptions found at the site
record donations to this shrine and are dated in the reigns of the
Chola kings Raja Raja Chola and Rajendra Chola. It was the view of Dr.
Paranavithana that the date of the original foundation of the Vihara was
considerably earlier.  Devanada writes today Buddhism in Sri Lanka is
monopolized by the Sinhalese. There are even those who call it “Sinhala
Buddhism,” seemingly unaware of the fact that it is a universal
religion. This notion was propagated only in the early 20th century by
revivalists such as Anagarika Dharmapala. Unfortunately, he says today
the Tamils of Sri Lanka also believe that Buddhism is a Sinhalese
religion and alien to them, but this was not the case in the past. 


“Devanada writes today Buddhism in Sri Lanka is monopolized by the
Sinhalese. There are even those who call it “Sinhala Buddhism,”
seemingly unaware of the fact that it is a universal religion. This
notion was propagated only in the early 20th century by revivalists such
as Anagarika Dharmapala”


Unlike today, the ancient Buddhist /Hindu civilization in Sri Lanka and
the ancient Palli /Sanskrit place names has nothing to do with
ethnicity. Hence the Pali, Sanskrit place names in the North and East of
Sri Lanka are part of the Tamil Buddhist heritage. The author states
that the Tamil politicians, scholars, intellectuals and the Tamil media
should make every effort to educate the Tamil public to be aware that
Buddhism was a part of Tamil civilization, and in fact the most
important part of the Tamil heritage of the North and East of Sri Lanka
is its Hindu /Buddhist heritage. Hence the recent efforts by some
elements to place Buddha statues in these areas to mark their ethnic
presence is entirely misplaced apart from being contrary to the
universal values and teachings of Buddhism.

The situation in
Tamil Nadu began to change after the 7th century. With the rise of
Vaishnavism and Saivism, there was a significant increase in Hindu
Braminical influence. The Buddhist and Jain institutions in Tamil Nadu
came under attack and they began to lose popular support and the
patronage of the rulers. The Chinese scholar monk Hsuan Tsang
records instances of Tamil Buddhist monks fleeing to Sri Lanka when
they were worsted in religious debates and feared the repercussions of
the ruler’s change of religion.

Pandit Hisselle Dharmaratana
Maha Thera writes, “although Buddhism declined in the Tamil country from
the 7th century onwards it was by no means eradicated.” For several
centuries Buddhism still survived though in a state of decline. The
continuation of the Mahavamsa
states that in the 13th Century King Parakramabahu of Dambadeniya
brought down Buddhist monks and scriptures from the Chola country in
Tamil Nadu to revive Buddhism in Sri  Lanka.

 During this time
there was a great deal of cultural exchange between South India and Sri
 Lanka.” The chief of the monks who was brought from South India was
Ven. Dhammakitti. He wrote the continuation of the Mahavamsa from the
time of king Srimevan up to his time. The Ven. Dipankara of Chola known
as Buddhappiya came to Sri Lanka for his studies in Buddhism. He wrote
the Pali poem Pajjamadhu (nectar of verses) in adoration of the Buddha.
He is also the author of a Pali grammar. The Ven. Buddhamitta and Maha
Kassapa were also two monks from the Chola country of Tamil Nadu. They
studied the Dhamma in Sri  Lanka and rendered great service to the
religion, states Pandit Hisselle Dharmaratane Maha Thera. He goes on to
say that this shows that up to the 14th century there were Buddhists
monasteries and centres of learning in South India.

There is also evidence that during the invasion of Magha of Kalinga
in Sri  Lanka and the destruction of Buddhist monasteries there, monks
from Sri Lanka fled to and sought refuge in monasteries in Tamil Nadu.
However after the 14th century Buddhism disappeared in South India
leaving only traces of its heyday in the many ruins such as we find in
Amaravati.

Dr. Nirmala Chandrahasan LL.B (Ceylon) LL.M
(Cambridge) Ph.D. (Colombo), Attorney-at Law Consultant – Office for
National Unity and Reconciliation (ONUR)


Source from: http://www.dailymirror.lk/article/Buddhists-heritage-of-Tamil-Nadu-and-links-with-SL-118460.html

Tuesday, 1 November 2016

The Beauty of Mes Aynak - world’s great heritage sites


SAVING MES AYNAKA race against time to save a 5,000-year-old archaeological site in Afghanistan threatened by a Chinese state-owned copper mine 





Saving Mes Aynak follows Afghan archaeologist Qadir Temori as he
races against time to save a 5,000-year-old archaeological site in
Afghanistan from imminent demolition. A Chinese state-owned mining
company is closing in on the ancient site, eager to harvest $100 billion
dollars worth of copper buried directly beneath the archaeological
ruins. Only 10% of Mes Aynak has been excavated, though, and some
believe future discoveries at the site have the potential to redefine
the history of Afghanistan and the history of Buddhism itself. Qadir
Temori and his fellow Afghan archaeologists face what seems an
impossible battle against the Chinese, the Taliban and local politics to
save their cultural heritage from likely erasure.  
www.savingmesaynak.com

Sunday, 18 September 2016

Naropa festival gets underway with pervading spiritualism


Leh, (Ladakh), Sept. 15: With the Naropa Festival in full swing,
monasteries in Ladakh are swarming with devotees and tourists alike and
resonating with prayers, music and dance. But the main activity of the
festival is centred in and around Hemis Gompa , the largest monastery of
its kind. It belongs to the Drukpa Kagyu order and is a living hub of
Tibetan Buddhism.





Every
great town or region anywhere has its own character and flavour. And in
Ladakh, Buddhist monasteries make for a unique spiritual experience.
For Ladakhis, who are predominantly of Tibetan descent, it’s the
monasteries which set the pattern of their daily life, culture and
celebrations. Indeed, Ladakh is known as the land of lamas.


Hemis
Monastery has a special place in the hearts of Buddhists, especially
those belonging to the Drukpa Kagyu order. Nothing in the region can
match its size, architectural beauty and calming effect on the mind.
Rising on the western bank of the Indus River on the Leh-Manali Highway,
it’s 50 km from Leh town.


The
King of Ladakh, Singey Namgail, who was himself an architect, designed
the shrine. He is said to have invited a Buddhist monk, the first
reincarnation of Stagsang Raspa Nawang Gyatso, in 1620 to establish the
monastery.


The
central courtyard of the gompa is 60 metres long and 18 metres wide.
It’s in this courtyard where dances take place during festivals and
other religious occasions. The monastery also has some mesmerising wall
paintings of Sakyamuni (the historical Buddha), other Buddha figures and
paintings of Tantric deities. So Ladakh provides a visual feast
wherever a visitor steps out to explore.
Source: By Newzstreet Media Desk (yahooinnews16 September 2016)

Monday, 11 July 2016

இந்திய நாணயம் - 1839


இந்தியாவை கிழக்கு இந்திய கம்பெனி ஆளும்பொழுது 1839 ஆம் ஆண்டு வெளியிட்ட பகவான் புத்தர் உருவம் பொறித்த நாணயம்…

Sunday, 1 May 2016

Lord Buddha Mantra


நமது வீட்டில் அமைதியும், நலமும் பெற தினமும் ஒலிக்க
வேண்டிய மந்திரம்

http://www.awaken.com/2013/03/how-bodhidharma-and-his-buddhism-disappeared-from-tamil-nadu-2/

How Bodhidharma and his Buddhism disappeared from Tamil Nadu?

by Sidharth Gautham Sunder: The
Tamil film 7 am arivu has evoked much interest about Bodhidharma. The
story of the film revolves around this Buddhist monk who preached
Buddhism, martial arts and medicine in China.

Bodhidharma
was a Tamil prince born in Kancheepuram, the Pallava capital in 440 AD.
After learning Buddhism, he travelled to China to spread the true
Buddhist way of life.

Buddhism – a school of thought in philosophy, as a religion was born
in Northern India but evolved and spread to Tamil Nadu and from there it
crossed the seas to Sri Lanka and Indonesia. In the 5th and 6th
centuries Buddhism thrived in Tamil Nadu.

When Bodhidharma landed in China as a Buddhist monk, he was invited
with honour to the court of Emperor Wu of the Liang dynasty. The
dialogue of Philosophy was a practice of many Tamil kings in those days.
We have history of Tamil Kings getting converted to another faith after
a convincing conversation with the god men. It happened in China too.
Bodhidharma too is known to have had a philosophical conversation with
Emperor Wu. Later on, Bodhidharma stayed in China and he is considered a
philosopher of Zen Buddhism and an expert who framed the rules for the
physical training of monks which transformed into martial arts in China.

The question is why he is unknown in his place of birth?  If he was
born and brought up in Tamil Nadu and was practicing Buddhism here, what
happened to the ancient Buddhist religious establishments in
Kancheepuram? Why there is no Buddhist temple or monastery in
Kancheepuram?

We have to look back in History.

Buddhism disappeared from Kancheepuram to give way to indigenous
religious practices interwoven with vedic religions. In fact many
practices, customs and stories believed now in Hinduism are adopted from
Buddhism. We come to know about this from the book Bouthamum Thamizhum
by the research scholar Mylai Seeni Venkatasamy ( MSV) (1900 to 1980).
The book  reveals some startling details. We share what we learn and the
facts inferred from this book briefly.

The following seven were adopted by the Hinduism from Buddhism

1.Hindu religion accepted Buddha as one avatar of Thirumal

2.The mini dheivams and village angels of buddhism were absorbed

3.The animal sacrifice was abandoned by caste Brahmin priests and
they converted themselves to vegetarian food for defending their
profession

4.The Bodhi tree worship of buddhism was accepted as it was popular among people

5. Maths were established following such practice by Buddhists

6.Adi Sankara adopted Soonyavadha of Buddhism to get Mayavadha

7.The Buddhist Jataka tales were also accepted

We need to know the following to understand how it happened in Tamil Nadu:

1.Originally there was Tamil religion in Tamil Nadu, where Maayon,
Seyon, Vendhan, Varunan were worshipped (refer Tholkappiam period dated
BC). The absence of other (later additions) gods of Hinduism in
Tholkappiam shows the practice of Tamil Religion in pre-Aryan age. In
Tholkappiam age and Sangam age, the arrival of Aryans and their rituals
can be spotted not on a mass following of a vedic religion but as
arrival of unorganized individual Aryans and their influence on Tamil
Society.

2. Buddhism came to Tamil Nadu and Sri Lanka during the rule of Asoka
in BC time. At the same time the other religions of Jainism, Vedic
Brahminism and Aasivaham came to Tamil Nadu and commenced their
philosophic fights and priestly contests and competitions to gain
popularity among the rulers and the people and to create assets for
their religions. We have references for all these religions in
Silappathiharam and Manimehalai which represent a later period than
Tholkappiam.

Initially Buddhism got popularity among people of Tamil Nadu as is
evident from reading Manimegalai. But Buddhism as a religion fell by
itself as the followers fought among themselves by divisions.

3.Jains replaced the Buddhists in Tamil Nadu. The Buddhist temples
were converted into Jain temples and the caves, where Buddhist monks
were living, were occupied by Jains. The Jains set a precedent of
capturing Buddhist temples which was followed by Vedic/Hindu priests.

4.When the Jains were powerful in Tamil Nadu among the followers
including the traders and ruling class (between about 500 AD to 900 AD),
the Vedic religion got mixed with the Tamil religious practices and
cults in Tamil Nadu, made compromises of accepting the gods and goddess
of Tamil Nadu, including festivals etc, organized itself into Saivism
and Vaishnavism by Bhakthi movements and began a fight against Jain
religion and succeeded (definitely not by following Ahimsa principle.)

While the Saiva and Vaishnava had to fight it out with Jains, as
ample evidences are available through Appar, Sambandar…., it seems that
it was easy to capture the Buddhist temples as they were already under
ruin for lack of patronage.

5. The Bhakthi Movement washed away, cleared, Jain and Buddhism from
entire India. Further it went on to propagate itself positively in the
South East Asian countries.

Regarding the temples the researcher says:

1. In Kumbakaonam Nageswaran thirumanjana veedhi, there was a
buddha statue called bagavarishi. The Nigandu says that Buddha was
called by the name Vinayaka. In later periods many Buddha temples were
converted as Vinayaka temples.

2. The Chinese traveller who visited Kancheepuram in 640 AD,
has recorded that Kanchi was having hundred Buddha temples and thousand
monks.

3. According to Ananatha nayinar (1932 ), in Kanchi
Kacheeswar temple Buddha images were found in the foundation base of the
gopuram. The lake on the west of the temple was called as Buththeri and
the street as Buththeriththeru. But when I visited that temple those
stones could not be identified. I could see Buddha images only in the
pillars.

4. I visited Pallavapuram near Kanchi on 15.7.1946. Nearby in
Kinikiluppai, a Buddha statue was found on the banks of a lake in the
same village, I could find the base of the Buddha statue very near the
Vinayaka temple. There was also a standing stone with Dharma Chakra.
They had constructed Vinayaka temple by demolishing Buddha temple.

Mylai Seeni Venkatasamy has collected many more information in his
book describing evidence of the existence of Buddha temples and the
conversion of those temples into Jain or Hindu temples.

………..Originally Kamatchi amman temple was a Buddhist temple.There
were many Buddha images in this temple. One of the images of Buddha, a 6
feet standing statue is now in the Chennai Museum. The statues of
Buddha found in the temple tank could not be found now. Once I myself
saw some other stone statues of Buddha in good condition in this temple.
Later I found the same images broken into pieces.. Now I could not
trace the same………

……….Manimehalai, Sambapathi, Tharadevi were the deivams
worshipped by Buddhists in Tamil Nadu. Later these goddess were taken
over by Hindus and renamed as Kali, Pidari and Throubathai. Researches
say that the Annapoorani amman in Kamatchi Amman temple is actually
Manimehalai, who attained Veeduperu at Kancheepuram and the Kamatchi
Amman temple is actually Tharadeviamman temple belonging to Buddhists.

Therefore it cannot be said that the wisdom of
Bodhidharma or Manimehalai are forgotten. They live in some other forms
or in some other names.

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One Response to How Bodhidharma and his Buddhism disappeared from Tamil Nadu?

  1. Nalliah Thayabharan says:

    South India boasted of outstanding
    Buddhist monks, who had made remarkable contributions to Buddhist
    thought and learning. Three of the greatest Pali scholars of this period
    were Buddhaghosa, Buddhadatta, and Dhammapala and all three of them
    were associated with Buddhist establishments in South India..

    South Indian Buddhist monk Thera Buddhaatta lived during the time of
    Accyutarikkanta, the Kalabra ruler of the Cola-Nadu; was a senior
    contemporary of Buddhaghosa. He was born in the Chola kingdom and lived
    in the 5th Century AD. Under the patronage of this ruler, Buddhadatta
    wrote many books. Among his best known Pali writings are the
    Vinaya-Vinicchaya, the Uttara-Vinicchaya and the Jinalankara-Kavya.
    Among the commentaries written by him are the Madhurattha-Vilasini and
    the Abhidhammavatara. In the Abhidhammaratara he gives a glowing account
    at Kaveripattinum, Uragapuram, Bhutamangalam and Kanchipuram and the
    Mahavihara at Anuradapura, (Sri Lanka). While he was at Sri Lanka, he
    composed many Buddhist works such as Uttara-viniccaya Ruparupa Vibhaga
    Jinalankara etc. Buddhaghosha, contemporary of Buddhadatta also composed
    many Buddhist commentaries.

    Buddhaghosha is a South Indian monk, who made a remarkable
    contribution to Buddhism in Sri Lanka. He stayed and studied Buddhist
    precepts at Mahavihara in Anuradhapura. The Visuddhimagga was the first
    work of Buddhaghosha which was written while he was in Sri Lanka.

    After Buddhaghosha, the important Theravada monk from South India was
    Dhammapala. Dhammapala lived in the Mahavihara at Anuradhapura. He
    composed Paramathadipani which was a commentary on Buddhaghosha’s work
    on Khuddaka Nikaya and Paramathamanjusa, which was a commentary on
    Buddhaghosha’s Visuddhimagga. A close study of the three Buddhist monks
    viz Buddhadatta, Buddhaghosha and Dhammapala shows that South Indian
    Buddhists were closely associated with the Sri Lankan Buddhists around
    the 5th century AD.

    The author of Nettipakarana is another Dhammapala who was a resident
    of a monastery in Nagapattinam, another important Buddhist centre from
    ancient times. One more example is the Chola monk Kassapa, in his Pali
    work, Vimatti-Vinodani, this South Indian monk provides interesting
    information about the rise of heretical views in the Chola Sangha and
    the consequent purification that took place. There are so many other
    South Indian monks who are attributed to the Pali works some of them
    were resident at Mayura-rupa-pattana (Mylapore, Madras) along with
    Buddhagosha.

    The South Indian Buddhist monks used Pali languages because the
    Buddha spoke in Magadi Prakrit (Pali). Sanskrit is the sacred language
    of the Hindus, and similarly Pali is considered as the sacred language
    of the Buddhists.

    On the other hand, the well known Tamil Buddhist epics found were
    Manimekalai, Silappadhikaram, Valaiyapathi, Kundalakesi, and Jivaka
    Cintamani. The lost Tamil Buddhist works include the grammar
    Virasoliyam, the Abhidhamma work Siddhantattokai, the panegyric
    Tiruppadigam, and the biography Bimbisara Kada. Manimekalai, a purely
    Buddhist work of the 3rd Sangam period in Tamil literature is the most
    supreme and famous among the Buddhist work done in Tamil. It is a work
    expounding the doctrines and propagating the values of Buddhism.It also
    talks about the South Indian Buddhists in the island/Nagadipa even
    though Manimekalai and Silappathikaram were considered as Tamil literary
    work and not as historical work.

    The Chinese traveller, Tsuan Tsang, wrote that there were around 300
    Sri Lankan monks in the monastery at the Southern sector of Kanchipuram.
    Ancient Kanchipuram, the capital of Tondaimandalam, ruled by the South
    Indian Pallava dynasty, an offshoot of Chola rulers was the major seat
    of Tamil learning and is also known as the city of thousand temples.
    Even Thirukkural, the ancient Tamil couplets/aphorisms celebrated by
    Tamils is based on Buddhist principals. Although Buddhism has become
    almost extinct from South India, it has contributed a great deal to the
    enrichment of South Indian culture and has exerted a significant
    influence, both directly and indirectly, on the South Indian religious
    and spiritual consciousness, present as well as past.

    It is also believed that Bodhidharma who lived during the 5th/6th
    century AD was a South Indian Buddhist monk and the son of a Pallava
    king from Kanchipuram. Bodhidharma had travelled from South India by sea
    to the Far East for the purpose of spreading the Mahayana doctrine,
    transmitting his knowledge of Buddhism and martial arts. According to
    Chinese legend, he also began the physical training of the Shaolin monks
    that led to the creation of Shaolinquan.

    As Buddhism was one of the dominant religions in both South India and
    Sri Lanka, naturally there were very close relations between the two
    regions. The monks from Sri Lanka, too, went across to the South India
    and stayed in the monasteries. The co-operation between the Buddhist
    Sangha of South India and Sri Lanka produced important results which are
    evident in the Pali works of this period`.South Indian Buddhist monks
    were more orthodox than their counterparts in Sri Lanka.

    In Sri Lanka, the Tamil Buddhists who followed Theravada Buddhism
    shared the common places of worship with the Sinhalese, but there were
    also Tamil Buddhists who were following the Mahayana Buddhism and they
    had their own Mahayana temples. There are still some Tamil Mahayana
    Buddhist establishments (Palli) in the east and possibly in the Jaffna
    peninsula. The best known was Velgam Vehera which was renamed
    Rajaraja-perumpalli after the Chola emperor. Another was the
    Vikkirama-Kalamekan-perumpalli.

    It is a historical fact that among the many ancient Buddhist shrines
    in Sri Lanka Velgam Vehera which was renamed Rajaraja-perumpalli, also
    called Natanar Kovil by the present day Tamils stands out as the only
    known example of a `Tamil Vihare or Buddhist Palli` or as an `Ancient
    Buddhist shrine of the Tamil people`. Some of the Tamil inscriptions
    found at the site record donations to this shrine and are dated in the
    reigns of the Chola Kings, Rajaraja and Rajendradeva. The date of the
    original foundation of the vihare was no doubt considerably earlier than
    the reign of King Bhatika Tissa II.

    The situation in South India, however, began to change towards the
    beginning of the 7th Century AD when the rise of Vaishnavism and Saivism
    posed a serious challenge to Buddhism and Jainism. There was a
    significant increase in Hindu/Brahmanical influence and soon the worship
    of Siva and Visnu began to gain prominence. The Buddhist and Jaina
    institutions in South India came under attack when they began to lose
    popular support and the patronage from the rulers.

    Even though today there are no Tamil Buddhists in Sri Lanka, the
    majority of the early Tamils of Sri Lanka (before the 10th century Chola
    invasion) were Buddhists. The ancient Buddhist remains in the North and
    East of Sri Lanka are the remnants left by the Tamil Buddhists and not
    anybody else. They are part of the heritage of Sri Lankan Tamils. Only
    the Buddhist temples, statues and structures build in the recent past
    and present in the North and East can be considered as Sinhala-Buddhist.

    Why does the Sri Lankans believe that the Buddhist sites in Sri Lanka
    belong only to the Sinhalese (Sinhala heritage) and not to the Tamils?
    Why are the Sri Lankans ignorant about the early Tamil Buddhists of Sri
    Lanka and South India? Why do the Sri Lankans think, in Sri Lanka a
    Buddhist should be a Sinhalese and a Hindu should be a Tamil even though
    the Sinhalese worship most of the Hindu/Brahmanical Gods

    Unfortunately, the majority of Sri Lankans are ignorant of their
    ancient past. They think of the ancient past in today’s context.

    Today, the Buddhism in Sri Lanka is monopolized by the Sinhalese and
    they call it Sinhala-Buddhism. The fusion of Sinhala and Buddhism into
    Sinhala-Buddhism took place only in the early 20th century by
    revivalists such as Anagarika Dharmapala. Unfortunately today the Sri
    Lankan Tamils also believe that Buddhism is a Sinhala religion and is
    alien to them, but this was not the case in the early past. Unlike
    today, the Ancient Buddhist/Hindu civilization in Sri Lanka and the
    ancient Pali/Sanskrit place names has nothing to do with the
    ethnicity.In otherwords, the Ancient Buddhist/Hindu heritage and the
    ancient Pali/Sanskrit place names in the North and East of Sri Lanka has
    nothing to do with Sinhala.

    The Tamil politicians, scholars, intellects and the Tamil media
    should take every effort to educate the Sri Lankan Tamils to be aware
    and to understand that Buddhism was a part of Tamil civilization in the
    ancient past. The Tamil politicians should engage in preserving the
    `Tamil heritage’ of North & East of Sri Lanka. The most important
    part of the Tamil Heritage of North & East is its Buddhist and Hindu
    civilization.

    The lost Tamil Buddhism should be restored back in the North &
    East. The erection of new Buddha statues in the North & East should
    be welcomed and the Tamils should consider Buddha also as a part of
    their religion. Just like in Sri Lanka where in every Buddhist temple
    you find Hindu Gods, if you go to India, especially the North, in every
    Hindu temple there is a Buddha statue. There is nothing wrong in having a
    Buddha statue in the Hindu temples. Also, Tamil Buddhist temples should
    come up; Tamils should embrace Buddhist monkhood; Buddhism must be
    taught in Tamil; preaching and worshipping Buddhism in Tamil; Tamil
    Buddhist monks and a Tamil Buddhist Maha Sangam should be formed.

    If there are Tamil speaking Hindus, Christians, and Muslims in Sri
    Lanka today, why cannot there be Tamil speaking Buddhists also? After
    all, we were all Buddhists once upon a time. It all depends on how the
    Tamil leaders and the Tamil media can enlighten the Sri Lankan Tamils to
    understand their ancient past and convince, inspire and persuade them
    to accept Buddhism and the Buddha statues with an open heart and make
    them a part of their belief system.

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buddhism_amongst_Tamils

Buddhism amongst Tamils


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Bodhidharma, founder of Chan Buddhism, is believed to have originated from Kanchipuram, Tamil Nadu.

Buddhism amongst Tamils was historically found in Tamilakam and the Jaffna Peninsula.


Contents


India

Tamil Nadu

The ancient Tamil Buddhist poem Manimekalai by the poet Chithalai Chathanar is set in the town of Kaveripattanam.[1][2]


Ancient ruins of a 4th-5th century Buddhist monastery, a Buddha
statue, and a Buddhapada (footprint of the Buddha) were found in another
section of the ancient city, now at Pallavanesvaram.[3]


The heritage of the town of Nākappaṭṭinam is found in the Burmese historical text of the 3rd century BCE, and gives evidences of a Budha Vihar built by the great Ashoka.


Nākappaṭṭinam was a Buddhist centre of the 4th-5th century CE. Its stupa
dates from this era. Buddhism disappeared from this city as of an
unknown date, but was revided as of the 9th century. (H.P.Ray, The Winds
of Change, Delhi 1994, p. 142) In the 11th century, Chudamani Vihara was built by the Javanese king Sri Vijaya Soolamanivarman with the patronage of Raja Raja Chola I.[4]
The “Animangalam Copperplate” of Kulothungachola notes that “Kasiba
Thera” [Buddhist Monk] renovated the Buddhist temple in the 6th century
with the help of Buddhist monks of “Naga Nadu“.
This “nagar annam vihar” later came to be known as “Nagananavihar.
Buddhism flourished until the 15th century and the buildings of the
vihara survived until the 18th century.


Kanchipuram is one of the oldest cities in South India, and was a city of learning for Tamil, Sanskrit, and Pali and was believed to be visited by Xuanzang.
He visited the city in the 7th century and said that this city was 6
miles in circumference and that its people were famous for bravery and
piety as well as for their love of justice and veneration for learning.
He further recorded that Gautama Buddha had visited the place. It was during the reign of the Pallava dynasty from the 4th to the 9th centuries that Kanchipuram
attained its limelight. The city served as the Pallava capital, and
many of the known temples were built during their reign. According to
Tamil tradition, the founder of Zen, Bodhidharma was born here,[5][6][note 1]. Great Buddhist scholars such as Dignāga, Buddhaghosa, and Dhammapala lived here too.



Sri Lanka

Jaffna peninsula




Jaffna Naga Vihara



9th Century Buddhist Stupas[9] of Kadurugoda Vihara in Kandarodai, Jaffna Peninsula.



Nāka Tivu/ Nāka Natu was the name of the whole Jaffna Peninsula
in some historical documents. There are number of Buddhist myths
associated with the interactions of people of this historical place with
Buddha.[11] This Nagadeepa Purana Viharaya was located close to the ancient Nainativu Nagapooshani Amman Temple of Nainativu, one of the Shakti Peethas.[12][13]
The word Naga was sometimes written in early inscriptions as Nāya, as
in Nāganika - this occurs in the Nanaghat inscription of 150 BCE.


The famous Vallipuram Buddha statue built with Dravidian sculptural traditions from Amaravathi village, Guntur district
(Amaravati school) was found in excavations below the Hindu Temple. The
language of the inscription is Tamil-Prakrit, which shares several
similarities with script inscriptions used in Andhra at the time, when
the Telugu Satavahana dynasty was at the height of its power and its 17th monarch Hāla (20-24 CE) married a princess from the island.[14][15]
Peter Schalk writes, “Vallipuram has very rich archaeological remains
that point at an early settlement. It was probably an emporium in the
first centuries AD. […] From already dated stones with which we compare
this Vallipuram statue, we can conclude that it falls in the period 3-4
century AD. During that period, the typical Amaravati-Buddha sculpture
was developed.”[16] The Buddha statue found here was given to King of Thailand by the then British Governor Henry Blake in 1906.[citation needed]


Indrapala argued for a flourishing pre-Christian buddhist
civilization in Jaffna, in agreement with Paranavithana, and Mudliyar C.
Rasanayakam, Ancient Jaffna in an earlier work, 1965.


This place is similar to Nagapatnam
where all Asian vessels used it as a stopover point and the Buddhist
and Hindu Dagobas are just a resting and worshipping places for the
sailors and international traders.[citation needed] .


A group of Dagobas situated close together at the Kadurugoda Vihara site in Kandarodai served as a monastery for Tamil monks[citation needed] and reflect the rise in popularity of Mahayana Buddhism amongst Jaffna Tamils and the Tamils of the ancient Tamil country in the first few centuries of the common era before the revivalism of Hinduism amongst the population.[9]



Trincomalee

Thiriyai is referred to as Thalakori in the 2nd century AD map of Ptolemy. Pre-Christian-Buddhist Tamil Brahmi[citation needed]
inscriptions have been found in the area, the oldest belonging to the
2nd century BCE. Thiriyai formed a prominent village of Jaffna’s Vannimai
districts in the medieval period. The site is home to Mahayana Buddhist
vatadage ruins worshipped by the locals during the rise of Tamil
Buddhism[citation needed] in the area. During Paramesvaravarman I’s reign, the famous Tiriyai Pallava Grantha inscriptions of 7th-8th century Tamilakkam were recorded in the village.[citation needed] The inscription refers to Tamil merchant mariners from Tamil Nadu,[citation needed] their seafaring and commerce to Trincomalee.[17][better source needed] It details their endowment of this shrine dedicated to the Buddhist deity Avalokitesvara and his consort Tara.[citation needed] Dvarapala sculptures found at the ruins are early contributions of the Pallava school of art to the island.[citation needed]


The Chola Dynasty
patronised several religions amongst Tamils, including Saivism,
Vaishnavism and Buddhism. They built Buddhist temples known as
“Perrumpallis”.[citation needed] In the eleventh century the Velgam Vehera of Periyakulam was renovated and renamed by the Cholas as Rajarajaperumpalli after they conquered the Anuradhapura and established their rule in Polonnaruwa.[18] Tamil inscriptions excavated from this site point to the attention the Cholas paid to the development of Trincomalee District
as a strong Saiva Tamil principality and for their contributions to the
upkeep of several shrines including the monumental Shiva Koneswaram temple of Trincomalee.[19]



See also



Notes




  1. Little contemporary biographical information on Bodhidharma is extant, and subsequent accounts became layered with legend.[7] There are three principal sources for Bodhidharma’s biography.[8]None of them mentions specifically Tamil Nadu, only “the western regions” and “Souther India”. See Bodhidharma#Birthplace sources for an extensive overview of possible origins, and the reliability of the sources provided for these possible origins.


References




  • Rao Bahadur Krishnaswāmi Aiyangar, Maṇimekhalai in its Historical Setting, London, 1928. Available at www.archive.org [1]

  • Hisselle Dhammaratana,Buddhism in South India, Buddhist Publication Society, Kandy, 1964. Available on Buddhist Publication Society Online Library [2]

  • Marine archaeological explorations of Tranquebar-Poompuhar region on Tamil Nadu coast., Rao, S.R.. Journal of Marine Archaeology, Vol. II, July 1991, pp. 6. Available online at [3]

  • “Archived copy” (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 8 February 2007. Retrieved 2006-10-16.

  • Kambe & year unknown.

  • Zvelebil 1987, p. 125-126.

  • McRae 2003.

  • Dumoulin 2005, p. 85-90.

  • Schalk, Peter (2002). Buddhism among Tamils in pre-colonial Tamilakam and Īlam: Prologue. The Pre-Pallava and the Pallava period, Uppsala: Upplala Universitet; pp. 1

  • http://www.buddhanet.net/sacred-island/nagadipa.html

  • Malalasekera, G.P. (2003). Dictionary of Pali Proper Names: Pali-English. Asian Educational Services. p. 42. ISBN 81-206-1823-8.

  • Laura
    Smid (2003). South Asian folklore: an encyclopedia: Afghanistan,
    Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka. Great Britain: Routledge. 429.

  • Chelvadurai
    Manogaran (1987). Ethnic conflict and reconciliation in Sri Lanka.
    United States of America: University of Hawaii Press. 21.

  • Ponnampalam Ragupathy. (1987). Early settlements in Jaffna: an archaeological survey. pp. 183

  • Schalk, Peter (2002). Buddhism among Tamils in pre-colonial Tamilakam and Īlam: Prologue. The Pre-Pallava and the Pallava period. pp.151

  • Schalk, Peter. “The Vallipuram Buddha Image”. Tamilnation.org. Retrieved 2013-01-10. Vallipuram
    has very rich archaeological remains that point at an early settlement.
    It was probably an emporium in the first centuries AD. […] From already
    dated stones with which we compare this Vallipuram statue, we can
    conclude that it falls in the period 3-4 century AD. During that period,
    the typical Amaravati-Buddha sculpture was developed.

  • Meera Abraham (1988). Two medieval merchant guilds of south India. Manohar Publications. pp. 136

  • “Velgamvehera”. Department of Archaeology. Retrieved 17 April 2017.

    1. Peter
      Schalk, Ālvāppillai Vēluppillai. Buddhism among Tamils in pre-colonial
      Tamilakam and Īlam: Prologue. The Pre-Pallava and the Pallava period,
      Page 157-159.

    Sources

    External links

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    December 17, 2014

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SKXtPOKd3ls
    First Tamil Buddhist Dhamma School in Jaffna Commenced
    cimicjaffna
    Published on Oct 2, 2012
    “Regardless Baseless Allegations, Jaffna People Know How Army is Helping Them” — SF-J Commander


    “Sections of Tamil Diaspora and some interested parties may cry over
    excess of number of troops present in Jaffna. Those who are supposed to
    represent the public are most of the time living in Colombo. But Army
    has always been with the people of Jaffna. So they know how Army is
    helping the needy people here”, Commander Security Forces Jaffna (SF-J)
    Major General Mahinda Hathurusinghe said addressing villagers of
    Atchuvely North and Atchelu Colony on Saturday (29).

    Attending
    two functions to hand over two houses constructed by the Army to their
    owners, Commander SF-J further told that Army is not here to grab
    civilians’ property but for the protection of those and to help
    peace-loving people.

    “We have reduced the troops in large number
    and most of the civilians’ houses and lands occupied by the troops are
    being handed back to their owners since the end of the war. Army has so
    far built 1778 permanent houses for the homeless in Jaffna. On my
    opinion, the number of troops present is immaterial. What matters is the
    community service they do for the improvement of Jaffna and its people.
    We hope to hand over the remaining few houses back to owners by the end
    of this year,” Maj. Gen. Hathurusinghe further said.

    The
    ceremonies had been organized by the 511 Brigade at Atchelu to hand over
    the two houses, one to Mr. A. Jeganathan, a father of three at
    Atchuvely North and the other to Mr. Devadas Sudarshan, a father of four
    at Atchelu Colony. Soldiers of the 5th Battalion Sri Lanka Light
    Infantry (5 SLLI) and the 3rd Battalion Vijayabahu Infantry Regiment (3
    VIR) constructed the houses worth of Rs. 300,000 each.

    General
    Officer Commanding 51 Division Brigadier Chandana Gunawardane,
    Divisional Secretary Kopay Mr. M. Pratheepan, Commander 511 Brigade
    Colonel Wijendra Gunathilake, Commander 512 Brigade Colonel Ajith
    Pallawala, Commander 3 VIR Lieutenant Colonel W.B. Panditha, Commander 5
    SLLI Lieutenant Colonel G.A.L. Kithsiri and villagers were present on
    the occasions.
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    Vipassana Fellowship - Calm and Insight meditation inspired by the early Buddhist tradition.


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    Twenty-one years of online meditation courses

    Welcome to Vipassana Fellowship


    “Make an effort to recognize those energies that confine and limit
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    Vipassana Fellowship Meditation Course

    An established online course in Mindfulness Meditation as found in the Serenity and Insight traditions of early Buddhism.



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    Vipassana Fellowship’s online meditation courses have been offered since
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    Australia

    “As we near the end of the course I just want to say ‘thank you’ for
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    point. Ive found the different aproaches to meditation interesting and
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    Earlier comments

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    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JMItDmvZXBE
    Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta by Bhante Devananda Indiana Buddhist Temple





    Indiana Buddhist Temple
    Published on Feb 5, 2013
    The Setting in Motion of the Wheel of Dharma is a Buddhist text that is
    considered to be a record of the first teaching given by the Buddha
    after he attained awakenment. The main topic of this sutta is the
    Four Noble Truths, which are the central teachings of Buddhism that
    provide a unifying theme, or conceptual
    framework, for all of Buddhist thought. This sutta also introduces the
    Buddhist concepts of the middle way, impermanence, and dependent
    origination.

    It is taught
    that the Buddha attained awakenment while sitting under the Bodhi
    tree by the river Neranjara, in Bodhgaya, India, and afterwards, he
    remained silent for forty-nine days. The Buddha then journeyed from
    Bodhgaya to Sarnath, a small town near the sacred city of Varanasi in
    central India. There he met his five former companions, the ascetics
    with whom he had shared six years of hardship. His former companions
    were at first suspicious of the Buddha, thinking he had given up his
    search for the truth when he renounced their ascetic ways. But upon
    seeing the radiance of the Buddha, they requested him to teach what he
    had learned. Thereupon the Buddha gave the teaching that was later
    recorded as the Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta, which introduces the
    fundamental concepts of Buddhist thought, such as the middle way and the
    four noble truths.

    Chant-a-long with Bhante Devananda, the Abbot
    of Indiana Buddhist Temple. The Temple is located at 7528 Thompson Road
    Hoagland, IN, USA. Phone: 260-447-5269. Facebook Page: Indiana Buddhist
    Temple. Website: www.indianabuddhistvihara.org. May all living beings be well and happy.

    The CD is available for sale to support the temple’s driveway and repair parking lot. http://www.indianabuddhistvihara.org/
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    The Setting in Motion of the Wheel of Dharma is a Buddhist text that is considered to be a record of…

    https://addicted2success.com/quotes/the-top-60-buddha-quotes/

    “In the end these things matter most: How well did you love? How fully did you live? How deeply did you let go?” – Buddha

    http://photobucket.com/gallery/user/Ind1955/media/bWVkaWFJZDozNjEzMjg3Mw==/?ref=



    To enjoy good health, to bring true happiness to one’s family, to bring
    peace to all, one must first discipline and control one’s own mind. If a
    man can control his mind he can find the way to Enlightenment, and all
    wisdom and virtue will naturally come to him.” – Buddha

    Just as treasures are uncovered from the earth, so virtue appears from
    good deeds, and wisdom appears from a pure and peaceful mind. To walk
    safely through the maze of human life, one needs the light of wisdom and
    the guidance of virtue.” – Buddha
    “There is no path to happiness: happiness is the path.” – Buddha

    “When you realize how perfect everything is you will tilt your head back and laugh at the sky” – Buddha


    “Teach this triple truth to all: A generous heart, kind speech, and a life of service and compassion are the things which renew humanity.” – Buddha

    “If we could see the miracle of a single flower clearly, our whole life would change.” – Buddha


    https://www.daimanuel.com/2013/09/10/10-awesome-buddha-quotes-that-will-inspire-and-motivate-you/
    Buddha Quote Picture Quote 10
    Buddha Quote Picture Quote 7Buddha Quote Picture Quote 4
    Buddha
    Buddha Quote Picture Quote 3Buddha Quote Picture Quote 2


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zMHeHnnkoa0




    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zMHeHnnkoa0
    Buddha - Episode 1 - September 8, 2013
    Zee TV
    Published on Sep 23, 2013
    Watch latest “Buddha” Episodes on http://www.zeetv.com #zeetv
    #zeetvshow
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    Watch latest “Buddha” Episodes on http://www.zeetv.com #zeetv #zeetvshow

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