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http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org anto 105 Seṭṭhaganthāyatta Bhāsā
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2685 Wed & 2686 Thu 18 & 19 Jul LESSON (33) LESSON Thu Jul 28 2007 As Rector of Analytic Insight Net - FREE Online Tipiṭaka Research and Practice University and related GOOD NEWS through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org in 112 CLASSICAL LANGUAGES Paṭisambhidā Jāla-Abaddha Paripanti Tipiṭaka Anvesanā ca Paricaya Nikhilavijjālaya ca ñātibhūta Pavatti Nissāya http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org anto 112 Seṭṭhaganthāyatta Bhāsā Attempting to propagate Tipitaka to all societies to enable them to attain Eternal Bliss as Final Goal by taking lessons for their Research and Fellowship. Present them the teachings in latest Visual Format including 7D/3D Laser Holograms and Circarama Cinema cum Meditation Hall.
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2685 Wed & 2686 Thu 18 & 19 Jul LESSON (33) LESSON Thu Jul 28 2007 As Rector of Analytic Insight Net - FREE Online Tipiṭaka Research and Practice University and related GOOD NEWS through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org in 112 CLASSICAL LANGUAGES Paṭisambhidā Jāla-Abaddha Paripanti Tipiṭaka Anvesanā ca Paricaya Nikhilavijjālaya ca ñātibhūta Pavatti Nissāya http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org anto 112 Seṭṭhaganthāyatta Bhāsā Attempting to propagate Tipitaka to all societies to enable them to attain Eternal Bliss as Final Goal by taking lessons for their Research and Fellowship. Present them the teachings in latest Visual Format including 7D/3D Laser Holograms and Circarama Cinema cum Meditation Hall.

http://buddhasutra.com/files/ajaniya_sutta.htm

http://buddhasutra.com/files/bbBuddhist_Sutra_A1.doc
Ajaniya Sutta

The Thoroughbred

Translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.
For free distribution only.

“Endowed with three characteristics, a king’s excellent thoroughbred steed is worthy of a king, the wealth of a king, and counts as one of the king’s own limbs. Which three? There is the case where a king’s excellent thoroughbred steed is consummate in beauty, consummate in strength, and consummate in speed. Endowed with these three characteristics is a king’s excellent thoroughbred steed worthy of a king, the wealth of a king, and counts as one of the king’s own limbs.

“In the same way, a monk endowed with these three qualities is worthy of gifts, worthy of hospitality, worthy of offerings, worthy of respect, an unexcelled field of merit for the world. Which three? There is the case where a monk is consummate in beauty, consummate in strength, and consummate in speed.

“And how is a monk consummate in beauty? There is the case where a monk is virtuous. He dwells restrained in accordance with the Patimokkha, consummate in his behavior & sphere of activity. He trains himself, having undertaken the training rules, seeing danger in the slightest fault. This is how a monk is consummate in beauty.

“And how is a monk consummate in strength? There is the case where a monk keeps his persistence aroused for abandoning unskillful mental qualities and taking on skillful mental qualities. He is steadfast, solid in his effort, not shirking his duties with regard to skillful mental qualities. This is how a monk is consummate in strength.

“And how is a monk consummate in speed? There is the case where a monk discerns as it actually is present that ‘This is stress.’ He discerns as it actually is present that ‘This is the origination of stress.’ He discerns as it actually is present that ‘This is the cessation of stress.’ He discerns as it actually is present that ‘This is the path of practice leading to the cessation of stress.’ This is how a monk is consummate in speed.

“Endowed with these three qualities is a monk worthy of gifts, worthy of hospitality, worthy of offerings, worthy of respect, an unexcelled field of merit for the world.”

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http://buddhasutra.com/files/akankha_sutta.htm

https://youtu.be/K6XhCNGWtOk

Akankha Sutta

Wishes

Translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu
For free distribution only

On one occasion the Blessed One was staying near Savatthi in Jeta’s Grove, Anathapindika’s monastery. There he addressed the monks, “Monks!”

“Yes, lord,” the monks responded.

The Blessed One said: “Monks, dwell consummate in virtue, consummate in terms of the Patimokkha. Dwell restrained in accordance with the Patimokkha, consummate in your behavior and sphere of activity. Train yourselves, having undertaken the training rules, seeing danger in the slightest faults.

[1] “If a monk would wish, ‘May I be dear and pleasing to my fellows in the holy life, respected by and inspiring to them,’ then he should be one who brings the precepts to perfection, who is committed to mental calm, who does not neglect jhana, who is endowed with insight, and who frequents empty dwellings.

[2] “If a monk would wish, ‘May I be someone who receives robes, alms-food, lodgings, and medical requisites for curing the sick,’ then he should be one who brings the precepts to perfection, who is committed to mental calm, who does not neglect jhana, who is endowed with insight, and who frequents empty dwellings.

[3] “If a monk would wish, ‘Whatever I use or consume in terms of robes, alms-food, lodgings, and medical requisites for curing the sick, may that be of great fruit, of great benefit to those who provided them,’ then he should be one who brings the precepts to perfection, who is committed to mental calm, who does not neglect jhana, who is endowed with insight, and who frequents empty dwellings.

[4] “If a monk would wish, ‘May it also be of great fruit, of great benefit, to whatever dead relatives they [the donors] recollect with brightened minds,’ then he should be one who brings the precepts to perfection, who is committed to mental calm, who does not neglect jhana, who is endowed with insight, and who frequents empty dwellings.

[5] “If a monk would wish, ‘May I be content with whatever robes, alms-food, lodgings, and medical requisites for curing the sick are available,’ then he should be one who brings the precepts to perfection, who is committed to mental calm, who does not neglect jhana, who is endowed with insight, and who frequents empty dwellings.

[6] “If a monk would wish, ‘May I be resistant to cold, heat, hunger, and thirst; to the touch of gadflies and mosquitoes, wind and sun and creeping things; to abusive, hurtful language; to bodily feelings that, when they arise, are painful, sharp, stabbing, fierce, distasteful, deadly,’ then he should be one who brings the precepts to perfection, who is committed to mental calm, who does not neglect jhana, who is endowed with insight, and who frequents empty dwellings.

[7] “If a monk would wish, ‘May I overcome displeasure, and not be overcome by displeasure. May I dwell having conquered any displeasure that has arisen,’ then he should be one who brings the precepts to perfection, who is committed to mental calm, who does not neglect jhana, who is endowed with insight, and who frequents empty dwellings.

[8] “If a monk would wish, ‘May I overcome fear and dread, and not be overcome by fear and dread. May I dwell having conquered any fear and dread that have arisen,’ then he should be one who brings the precepts to perfection, who is committed to mental calm, who does not neglect jhana, who is endowed with insight, and who frequents empty dwellings.

[9] “If a monk would wish, ‘May I attain — whenever I want, without strain, without difficulty — the four jhanas that are heightened mental states, pleasant abiding in the here-and-now,’ then he should be one who brings the precepts to perfection, who is committed to mental calm, who does not neglect jhana, who is endowed with insight, and who frequents empty dwellings.

[10] “If a monk would wish, ‘May I — with the ending of mental fermentations — remain in the fermentation-free release of awareness and release of discernment, having directly known and realized them for myself in the here-and-now,’ then he should be one who brings the precepts to perfection, who is committed to mental calm, who does not neglect jhana, who is endowed with insight, and who frequents empty dwellings.

“‘Monks, dwell consummate in virtue, consummate in terms of the Patimokkha. Dwell restrained in accordance with the Patimokkha, consummate in your behavior and sphere of activity. Train yourselves, having undertaken the training rules, seeing danger in the slightest faults.’ Thus was it said and in reference to this was it said.”

https://youtu.be/94UJFh9jXos
Alagagadduupama Sutta

“The Simile of the Snake”

Thus I heard:

At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anathapindika in Jeta’s grove in Savatthi. At that time to a Bhikkhu named Arittha, a vulture trainer in his previous birth, this evil view had arisen. As I know the Teaching of the Blessed One, to one who pursues those impedimental things declared as impediments are not suitable impediments. Then many Bhikkhus heard that this evil view had arisen to the Bhikkhu Arittha, a vulture trainer in his previous birth As I know the Teaching of the Blessed One, to one who pursues those impedimental things declared as impediments are not suitable impediments.

Then they approached the Bhikkhu Arittha and asked him: Friend Arittha is it true that such an evil view has arisen to you: As I know the Teaching of the Blessed One, to one who pursues those impedimental things declared as impediments are not suitable impediments. Yes, friends, as I know the Teaching of the Blessed One, to one who pursues those impedimental things declared, as impediments are not suitable impediments. Then those Bhikkhus thinking to dissuade the Bhikkhu Arittha from that evil view, cross questioned him, asked for reasons and discussed with him. Friend, Arittha do not say that, do not accuse the Blessed One. The Blessed One did not say that. The Blessed One has shown in various ways how these impedimental things are impediments to one who pursues them. The Blessed One has said that sensuality brings little satisfaction much unpleasantness and much trouble, there are many dangers there. The Blessed One has said that sensuality is comparable to a skeleton, a tendon of flesh, a burning grass torch, a pit full of burning charcoal, a dream, something borrowed, like a tree full of fruits, a slaughter house, the blade of a weapon, the head of a serpent. The Blessed One has said that sensuality brings much unpleasantness, much trouble and many dangers. Even when so much was told the Bhikkhu Arittha held on tenaciously to his view and would not give it up; as I know the Teaching of the Blessed One, to one who pursues those impedimental things declared as impediments are not suitable impediments

When the Bhikkhus could not dissuade the Bhikkhu Arittha from that evil view, they approached the Blessed One, worshipped, sat on a side and said thus: Venerable sir, to a Bhikkhu named Arittha, a vulture trainer in his previous birth, this evil view had arisen. As I know the Teaching of the Blessed One, to one who pursues those impedimental things declared as impediments are not suitable impediments. Then many of us heard that this evil view had arisen to the Bhikkhu Arittha, a vulture trainer in his previous birth As I know the Teaching of the Blessed One, to one who pursues those impedimental things declared as impediments are not suitable impediments.

Then we approached the Bhikkhu Arittha and asked him : Friend Arittha is it true that such an evil view has arisen to you: As I know the Teaching of the Blessed One, to one who pursues those impedimental things declared as impediments are not suitable impediments. He said, yes, friends, as I know the Teaching of the Blessed One, to one who pursues those impedimental things declared as impediments are not suitable impediments. Then we Bhikkhus thinking to dissuade the Bhikkhu Arittha from that evil view, cross questioned him, asked for reasons and discussed with him. Friend, Arittha do not say that, do not accuse the Blessed One. The Blessed One did not say that. The Blessed One has shown in various ways how these impedimental things are impediments to one who pursues them. The Blessed One has said that sensuality brings little satisfaction much unpleasantness and much trouble, there are many dangers there. The Blessed One has said that sensuality is comparable to a skeleton, a tendon of flesh, a burning grass torch, a pitfull of burning charcoal, a dream, something borrowed, like a tree full of fruits, a slaughter house, the blade of a weapon, the head of a serpent. The Blessed One has said that sensuality brings much unpleasantness, much trouble and many dangers. Even when so much was told the Bhikkhu Arittha held on tenaciously to his view and would not give it up; as I know the Teaching of the Blessed One, to one who pursues those impedimental things declared as impediments are not suitable impediments As we could not dissuade the Bhikkhu Arittha from that evil view, we came to inform you about it.

Then the Blessed One addressed a certain Bhikkhu and said, Come Bhikkhu, in my words call the Bhikkhu Arittha, tell, the Teacher wants him. That Bhikkhu consenting approached the Bhikkhu Arittha and told him, Friend, the Teacher wants you.. The Bhikkhu Arittha saying yes, friend, approached the Blessed One, worshipped and sat on a side. Then the Blessed One said, Arittha, is it true, that such a view has arisen to you, As I know the Teaching of the Blessed One, to one who pursues those impedimental things declared as impediments, are not suitable impediments. Then he said, yes, venerable sir, as I know the Teaching of the Blessed One, to one who pursues those impedimental things, declared as impediments, are not suitable impediments.- Foolish man, to whom do you know me teaching this. Haven’t I in many ways told that the impedimental things are impediments, indeed to one who pursues them they are impediments. I have told that sensuality brings little satisfaction, much un-pleasantness and trouble, the dangers here are many. - I have told that sensuality is comparable to a skeleton, a tendon of flesh, a burning grass torch, a pit of burning charcoal, a dream, something borrowed, a tree full of fruits, the blade of a weapon, the head of a serpent, I have told it has much unpleasantness, much trouble and the dangers there are many. Yet you foolish man, on account of your wrong view you accuse me and destroy yourself and accumulate much demerit, which will be for your unpleasantness for a long time. Then the Blessed One addressed :Bhikkhus, what do you think, shouldn’t we chastise this Bhikkhu Arittha, a vulture trainer in his earlier birth from this dispensation When this was said the Bhikkhu Arittha a vulture trainer in his earlier birth became silent, and unable to reply back, with a drooping form sat with eyes turned down. Then the Blessed One knowing that the Bhikkhu Arittha a vulture trainer in his earlier birth has become silent, unable to reply back, with a drooping form sitting with eyes turned down told him, foolish man, you will be pointed out on account of this evil view, now I will question the Bhikkhus on this

Then the Blessed One addressed the Bhikkhus; Bhikkhus, do you too know of this Teaching, the wrong view of the Bhikkhu Arittha, a vulture trainer in his earlier birth on account of which he brings blame on us and also destroys himself and accumulates much unpleasantness. -No venerable sir, The impedimental things are told by the Blessed One and indeed to one who pursues them, they are impediments. The Blessed One has said that there is little satisfaction in sensuality, much unpleasantness and much trouble, the dangers there are many. The Blessed One has said that sensuality is comparable to a skeleton, a tendon of flesh, a burning grass torch, a pit of burning charcoal, a dream, something borrowed, a tree full of fruits, the blade of a weapon, and the head of a serpent. The Blessed On has said it has much unpleasantness, much trouble and the dangers there are many.. Good! Bhikkhus, Good, that you know the Teaching taught by me. In various ways I have shown the impedimental things and indeed it is impedimental to pursues them. I have told that sensuality brings little satisfaction, much unpleasantness and the dangers there are many. I have told it is comparable to skeleton–to the head of a serpent brings little satisfaction, much unpleasantness and the dangers there are many. Yet the Bhikkhu Arittha holding to this wrong view blames us and destroys himself and accumulates much demerit, and it will be for his unpleasantness for a long time.

Bhikkhus, someone could indulge in sensuality, without sensual perceptions, without sensual thoughts is not possible

Bhikkhus, a certain foolish man learns the prose sections, prose and verse sections, the answers and explanation expositions, stanzas, solemn utterances, thus said sections, birth stories, wonderful things, a series of questions and answers. He thoroughly learns the Teaching but does not examine the meanings with wisdom. So he cannot take pleasure in the Teaching. He learns the Teaching for the purpose of finding fault. He takes a wrong grasp of the Teaching and that conduces for his unpleasantness for a long time. The reason is the wrong grasp of the Teaching. Like a man wandering in search of a serpent would come to a huge serpent, he would take hold of the serpent by the hood or the tail and it would turn round and sting the hand or foot or any other limb. On account of this wrong grasp of the serpent he would meet death or deadly unpleasantness. In the same manner a certain foolish man learns the prose sections, prose and verse sections, the answers and explanation expositions, stanzas, solemn utterances, thus said sections, birth stories, wonderful things, a series of questions and answers. He thoroughly learns the Teaching but does not examine the meanings with wisdom. So he cannot take pleasure in the Teaching. He learns the Teaching for the purpose of finding fault. He takes a wrong grasp of the Teaching and that conduces for his unpleasantness for a long time. The reason is the wrong grasp of the Teaching.

Bhikkhus, a certain son of a clansman learns the prose sections, prose and verse sections, the answers and explanation expositions, stanzas, solemn utterances, thus said sections, birth stories, wonderful things, a series of questions and answers. He thoroughly learns the Teaching and examines the meanings with wisdom and is convinced of the Teaching. He does not learn the Teaching to find fault with it, nor does he learn it for the purpose of release through hearsay. He experiences the meanings. He has taken hold of the Teaching correctly, and it conduces for his pleasantness for a long time. It is because of the correct grasp of the Teaching. Like a man wandering in search of a serpent would come to a huge serpent and would take hold of it with a forked stick or hold it by the neck, it may coil round the man’s hand or foot or any other limb small or large, yet he would not come to death or deadly unpleasantness, because of the correct hold of the snake. In the same manner, a certain son of a clansman learns the prose sections, prose and verse sections, the answers and explanation expositions, stanzas, solemn utterances, thus said sections, birth stories, wonderful things, a series of questions and answers. He thoroughly learns the Teaching and examines the meanings with wisdom and is convinced of the Teaching. He does not learn the Teaching to find fault with it, nor does he learn it for the purpose of release through hearsay. He experiences the meanings. He has taken hold of the Teaching correctly, and it conduces for his pleasantness for a long time. It is because of the correct grasp of the Teaching

Bhikkhus, this Teaching is for giving up not for taking hold of, listen to it carefully. Like a man come to the highway would see a large stretch of water, the hither shore dangerous and fearful, the thither shore peaceful and without fear. There is no ship or overhead bridge to cross over from the hither shore to the thither. What if I build a raft collecting grass, sticks, branches and creepers. So he built a raft collecting grass sticks branches and creepers, and making effort with hands and feet reached the other shore safely. Then to the one who has crossed over this thought occurred This raft was of great service to me, I safely crossed over to the other shore boarding it and putting forth effort with my hands and feet. What if I balance it on my head or haul it on my back and go where I like. Bhikkhus, is he doing the right thing if he does so with the raft.- Doing what will he be doing the right thing with the raft.. Bhikkhus, to the man who has crossed over it occurs thus: This raft was of great service to me, I safely crossed over to the other shore boarding it and putting forth effort with my hands and feet. What if I pulled it up to dry ground , or sink it in the water and go where I like. A man doing that would be doing the right thing. Just so, Bhikkhus, my Teaching is comparable to a raft for the purpose of crossing over and not for getting hold of. You should give up even the Teaching that should be known, and what about that which should not be known…

Bhikkhus, these six are the views. What six. Bhikkhus, the ordinary man who has not seen the noble ones and Great Beings, not clever in their Teaching, and not trained in their Teaching Sees matter: that is me, I am that, that is my self. Sees feelings,; that is me, I am that, that is my self. Sees determinations: that is me, I am that, that is my self. Whatever seen, heard, tasted, smelt and bodily felt, cognized, attained, sought after, and reflected in the mind: that is me, I am that, that is my self The world, the self, I will be in the future, permanent, not changing, an eternal thing.; that is me, I am that, that is my self.

Bhikkhus, the learned noble disciple, who has seen noble ones and Great Beings, clever in their Teaching, and trained in their Teaching sees matter: that is not me, am not that, that is not my self. Sees feelings: that is not me ,am not that, that is not my self. Sees determinations: that is not me am not that, that is not my self, Whatever seen, heard, tasted, smelt, bodily felt, cognized, attained, sought after, and reflected in the mind: that is not me, am not that, that is not my self. The world, the self, I will be in the future, permanent, not changing, an eternal thing, that is not me, am not that, that is not my self.. Seeing it is not present, is not excited. .

When this was said, a certain Bhikkhu said to the Blessed One: Venerable sir, is there excitement for external non presence. The Blessed One said, there is Bhikkhu. Here, Bhikkhu, it occurs to someone thus: There was to me, now it is not to me, I had, now I do not gain, he grieves, laments and beats the breast and comes to bewilderment of mind. Thus there is excitement for external non-presence. - Venerable sir, is there non-excitement for external non-presence. The Blessed One said, there is Bhikkhu. Here, Bhikkhu, it does not occur to someone: There was to me, now it is not to me, I had, now I do not gain, he does not grieve or lament, does not beat the breast and come to bewilderment of mind. Thus there is no excitement for external non-presence. -Venerable sir, is there excitement for internal non-presence: The Blessed One said, there is Bhikkhu. Here, Bhikkhu, to a certain one there is this view. The world, the self, I will be in the future, permanent, not changing, an eternal thing. Then he hears this Teaching from the Thus Gone One or from a disciple of the Thus Gone One for the complete abolishment of views, determinant resolutions, prepossessions, latent tendencies for settlements, for the appeasement of all determinations, for the giving up of all endearments, for the destruction of craving, for non attachment, cessation and extinction. Then it occurs to him, indeed it will be my annihilation, my destruction, I will not be. He grieves, laments, beats the breast and comes to bewilderment of mind. Thus, there is excitement for internal non-presence. Venerable sir, is there non-excitement for internal non-presence. There is Bhikkhu, said the Blessed One: Here Bhikkhu. to a certain one there is not this view. This world, this self, I will be in the future, permanent, not changing, an eternal thing. Then he hears this Teaching from the Thus Gone One or from a disciple of the Thus Gone One for the complete abolishment of views, determinant resolutions, prepossessions, latent tendencies for settlements, for the appeasement of all determinations, for the giving up of all endearments, for the destruction of craving, for non attachment, cessation and extinction. Then it does not occur to him, indeed it will be my annihilation, my destruction, I will not be. He does not grieve, lament, beat the breast and come to bewilderment of mind. Thus, there is non-excitement for internal non-presence. Thus there is non-excitement for internal non-presence.

Bhikkhus, do you see anything permanent, not changing, eternal, to seize. No, venerable sir. Good! I too do not see anything to seize that which is permanent, not changing, and stands eternity. Bhikkhus, is there the holding of a self view which does not give birth to grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress. No, venerable sir. Good! I too do not see a self view which does not give birth to grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress. Bhikkhus is there a settled view which does not give birth to grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress. No, venerable sir. Good! I too do not see a settled view which does not give birth to grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress.

Bhikkhus, when there are belongings of a self, is there a satisfaction, these are mine. Yes, venerable sir.. A self or the belongings of a self, in reality and truth cannot be gained. Bhikkhus, this settled view, about the world, and the self, I will be in the future, permanent, not changing, standing eternity, isn’t it a completely foolish notion- Why isn’t it, venerable sir, it is a completely foolish notion- What do you think:– Is matter permanent or impermanent.– Impermanent, venerable sir.– That which is impermanent, is it unpleasant or pleasant.– -Unpleasant venerable sir. –That which is impermanent, unpleasant, a changing thing is it good to be considered that is me, that I am that is my self. — No, venerable sir.– Is feeling permanent or impermanent.– Impermanent, venerable sir.– That which is impermanent, is it unpleasant or pleasant.– -Unpleasant venerable sir. –That which is impermanent, unpleasant, a changing thing is it good to be considered that is me, that I am, that is my self.– No, venerable sir –Are perceptions permanent or impermanent.– Impermanent, venerable sir.– That which is impermanent, is it unpleasant or pleasant.– -Unpleasant venerable sir. –That which is impermanent, unpleasant, a changing thing is it good to be considered that is me, that I am, that is my self.– No, venerable sir.- -Are determinations permanent or impermanent.– Impermanent, venerable sir.– That which is impermanent, is it unpleasant or pleasant.– -Unpleasant venerable sir. –That which is impermanent, unpleasant, a changing thing is it good to be considered that is me, that I am, that is my self.– No, venerable sir. –Is consciousness permanent or impermanent.– Impermanent, venerable sir.– That which is impermanent, is it unpleasant or pleasant.– -Unpleasant venerable sir. –That which is impermanent, unpleasant, a changing thing is it good to be considered that is me, that I am, that is my self.– No, venerable sir. — Therefore Bhikkhus, whatever matter, in the past, future or present, internal or external, exalted or un-exalted, far or near, all matter is not me, that am not, that is not my self- should be realized as it really is, with right wisdom. Whatever feelings– whatever perceptions, –whatever determinations–whatever consciousness, in the past, future or present, internal or external, exalted or un-exalted, far or near, all consciousness is not me, that am not, that is not my self, should be realized as it really is, with right wisdom.

The learned noble disciple seeing thus detaches from matter, detaches from feelings, detaches from perceptions, detaches from determinations, detaches from consciousness. Detached is released. Released knowledge arises am released. Birth destroyed, the holy life lived to the end, what should be done is done, there is nothing more to wish for, he knows. To this is called removing the obstacle, filling the trenches, pulling out desires, seeing results, the noble one puts down the flag and is unyoked Bhikkhus, how does the Bhikkhu remove the obstacle; Here the Bhikkhus ignorance is dispelled, pulled out from the roots, and made a palm stump of it, so that it may not rise again. Thus the obstacle is removed. How does the Bhikkhu fill up the trenches; Here the Bhikkhu dispels the recurring births, making a palm stump of it so that it may not rise again. Thus the Bhikkhu fills up the trenches. How does the Bhikkhu pull out desires. Here the Bhikkhu dispels greed, together with the roots, makes it a palm stump, so that it may not rise again. Thus the Bhikkhu pulls out desires. How does the Bhikkhu see results. Here the Bhikkhu dispels the bonds to the sensual world, cuts them up completely, so that they may not rise again. Thus the Bhikkhu sees results. How does the noble one put down the flag and unyoke. Here the Bhikkhu dispels the conceit ‘I be’ pulling it out from the roots makes a palm stump of it, so that it may not rise again. Thus the Bhikkhu puts down the flag and unyokes.

Bhikkhus, if that released mind of the Bhikkhu was to be searched by Inda, Brahma, Pajapati and their retinue, it would not be found; thus unsupported is the consciousness of the Thus Gone One. What is the reason: I say that the Thus Gone One cannot be found even here and now. To me who says thus and preaches thus, certain recluses and Brahmins ingenuinely, untruthfully blame, the recluse Gotama the discipliner, purposefully shows the annihilation, destruction, and non evidence of beings. Bhikkhus, whatever I am not, that I do not proclaim, as a result these good recluses and Brahmins ingenuinely, untruthfully blame, the recluse Gotama the discipliner purposefully shows the annihilation, destruction and non-evidence of beings. Earlier and now also I declare -Unpleasant and its cessation. Others abuse, blame and annoy the Thus Gone One, for that the Thus Gone One has no ill feeling , aversion or discontent .Some others honor, revere and worship the Thus Gone One, for that the Thus Gone One has no blissful pleasurable joy. When others honor, revere and worship the Thus Gone One, it occurs to him, it is on account of what I have thoroughly understood that they do it. Bhikkhus, when others abuse, blame and annoy you, ill feeling, aversion and discontent should not be to you. Again Bhikkhus, when others honor, revere and worship you, a blissful pleasurable joy should not be to you. It should occur to you, it is on account of what I have thoroughly understood, that they do it..

Therefore Bhikkhus, if people carry away, burn or do what they like to grass-sticks-branches-creepers in this same Jeta’s grove, would it occur to you; People are carrying away, burning and doing what they like to us– No, venerable sir.- What is the reason: Venerable sir, they are not our selves or the belongings of ourselves. — Bhikkhus, in the same manner, whatever is not yours, dispel it., for your good welfare and pleasantness for a long time. Bhikkhus, what is not yours. Matter is not yours, dispel it for your good, welfare and pleasantness for a long time. Feeling is not yours, dispel it for your good, welfare and pleasantness for a long time. Perception is not yours, dispel it for your good, welfare and pleasantness for a long time. Determinations are not yours, dispel it for your good, welfare and pleasantness for a long time. Consciousness is not yours, dispel it for your good welfare and pleasantness for a long time.

Bhikkhus, my Teaching is well proclaimed, made manifest, open and threadbare Those Bhikkhus, who have perfected, destroyed desires, lived the holy life, done what should be done, put down the weight, attained to the highest good, destroyed the bonds of being, and released rightfully knowing , they have no further proceeding to show them. My Teaching is so well proclaimed, made manifest, open and threadbare

Those Bhikkhus who have dispelled the five lower fetters, they all arise spontaneously, and extinguish there itself, do not proceed from that world. My Teaching is so well proclaimed, made manifest, open and threadbare. Those Bhikkhus, who have dispelled the three fetters and diminishing greed, hate and delusion, they all become once returners, coming only once more to this world, to make an end of un-pleasantness. My Teaching is so well proclaimed, made manifest, open and threadbare. Those Bhikkhus who have dispelled the three fetters, all of them enter the stream of the Teaching, do not fall from there intending only extinction. My Teaching is so well proclaimed, made manifest, open and threadbare. Those who have some faith in me, some love for me they all are intent on heaven.

The Blessed One said thus and those Bhikkhus delighted in the words of the Blessed One.

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Alavaka Sutta

To the Alavaka Yakkha

Translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.
For free distribution only.

Translator’s note: This discourse is the source of many proverbs frequently quoted in Theravadin countries. In 1982, when Thailand was celebrating the 200th anniversary of the founding of the current dynasty, His Majesty the King structured his chief address to the Thai people around the four qualities mentioned in the Buddha’s last verse.

I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying at Alavi in the haunt of the Alavaka yakkha. Then the Alavaka yakkha went to the Blessed One and on arrival said to him: “Get out, contemplative!”

[Saying,] “All right, my friend,” the Blessed One went out.
“Come in, contemplative!”
[Saying,] “All right, my friend,” the Blessed One went in.
A second time… A third time, the Alavaka yakkha said to the Blessed One, “Get out, contemplative!”
[Saying,] “All right, my friend,” the Blessed One went out.
“Come in, contemplative!”
[Saying,] “All right, my friend,” the Blessed One went in.
Then a fourth time, the Alavaka yakkha said to the Blessed One, “Get out, contemplative!”
“I won’t go out, my friend. Do what you have to do.”
“I will ask you a question, contemplative. If you can’t answer me, I will possess your mind or rip open your heart or, grabbing you by the feet, hurl you across the Ganges.”
“My friend, I see no one in the cosmos with its devas, Maras & Brahmas, its contemplatives & priests, its royalty & commonfolk, who could possess my mind or rip open my heart or, grabbing me by the feet, hurl me across the Ganges. But nevertheless, ask me what you wish.”
[Alavaka:]
What is a person’s highest wealth?
What, when well-practiced, brings bliss?
What is the highest of savors?
Living in what way
is one’s life called the best?

[The Buddha:]
Conviction is a person’s highest wealth.
Dhamma, when well-practiced, brings bliss.
Truth is the highest of savors.
Living with discernment,
one’s life is called best.

[Alavaka:]
How does one cross over the flood?
How cross over the sea?
How does one overcome suffering & stress?
How is a person purified?

[The Buddha:]
Through conviction one crosses over the flood.
Through heedfulness, the sea.
Through persistence one overcomes
suffering & stress.
Through discernment a person is purified.

[Alavaka:]
How does one gain discernment?
How does one find wealth?
How does one attain honor?
How bind friends to oneself?
Passing from this world
to
the next world,
how does one not grieve?

[The Buddha:]
Convinced of the arahants’ Dhamma
for attaining Unbinding,
– heedful, observant –
one listening well
gains discernment.
Doing what’s fitting,
enduring burdens,
one with initiative
finds wealth.
Through truth
one attains honor.
Giving
binds friends to oneself.

Endowed with these four qualities,
— truth,
self-control,
stamina,
relinquishment –
a householder of conviction,
on passing away, doesn’t grieve.

Now, go ask others,
common priests & contemplatives,
if anything better than
truth,
self-control,
endurance,
& relinquishment
here can be found.

[Alavaka:]
How could I go ask
common priests & contemplatives? –
now that today I understand
what benefits
the next life.

It was truly for my well-being
that the Awakened One came
to stay in Alavi.
Today I understand
where what is given
bears great fruit.

I will wander from village to village,
town to town,
paying homage to the Self-awakened One
& the true rightness of the Dhamma.

https://youtu.be/ONtOh4rQ3Wk
All the Taints

I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying at Savatthi, in Jeta’s Grove, Anathapindika’s monastery. There he addressed the monks: “Monks!”

“Yes, lord,” the monks replied.

The Blessed One said, “Monks, the ending of the fermentations is for one who knows and sees, I tell you, not for one who does not know and does not see. For one who knows what and sees what? Appropriate attention and inappropriate attention. When a monk attends inappropriately, un-arisen fermentations arise, and arisen fermentations increase. When a monk attends appropriately, un-arisen fermentations do not arise, and arisen fermentations are abandoned. There are fermentations to be abandoned by seeing, those to be abandoned by restraining, those to be abandoned by using, those to be abandoned by tolerating, those to be abandoned by avoiding, those to be abandoned by destroying, and those to be abandoned by developing.

“[1] And what are the fermentations to be abandoned by seeing? There is the case where an uninstructed, run-of-the-mill person — who has no regard for noble ones, is not well-versed or disciplined in their Dhamma; who has no regard for men of integrity, is not well-versed or disciplined in their Dhamma — does not discern what ideas are fit for attention or what ideas are unfit for attention. This being so, he does not attend to ideas fit for attention and attends [instead] to ideas unfit for attention.

“And what are the ideas unfit for attention that he attends to? Whatever ideas such that, when he attends to them, the un-arisen fermentation of sensuality arises in him, and the arisen fermentation of sensuality increases; the un-arisen fermentation of becoming arises in him, and arisen fermentation of becoming increases; the un-arisen fermentation of ignorance arises in him, and the arisen fermentation of ignorance increases. These are the ideas unfit for attention that he attends to.

“And what are the ideas fit for attention that he does not attend to? Whatever ideas such that, when he attends to them, the un-arisen fermentation of sensuality does not arise in him, and the arisen fermentation of sensuality is abandoned; the un-arisen fermentation of becoming does not arise in him, and arisen fermentation of becoming is abandoned; the un-arisen fermentation of ignorance does not arise in him, and the arisen fermentation of ignorance is abandoned. These are the ideas fit for attention that he does not attend to. Through his attending to ideas unfit for attention and through his not attending to ideas fit for attention, both un-arisen fermentations arise in him, and arisen fermentations increase.

“This is how he attends inappropriately: ‘Was I in the past? Was I not in the past? What was I in the past? How was I in the past? Having been what, what was I in the past? Shall I be in the future? Shall I not be in the future? What shall I be in the future? How shall I be in the future? Having been what, what shall I be in the future?’ Or else he is inwardly perplexed about the immediate present: ‘Am I? Am I not? What am I? How am I? Where has this being come from? Where is it bound?’

“As he attends inappropriately in this way, one of six kinds of view arises in him: The view I have a self arises in him as true and established, or the view I have no self …or the view It is precisely by means of self that I perceive self …or the view It is precisely by means of self that I perceive not-self …or the view It is precisely by means of not-self that I perceive self arises in him as true and established, or else he has a view like this: This very self of mine — the knower that is sensitive here and there to the ripening of good and bad actions — is the self of mine that is constant, everlasting, eternal, not subject to change, and will endure as long as eternity. This is called a thicket of views, a wilderness of views, a contortion of views, a writhing of views, a fetter of views. Bound by a fetter of views, the uninstructed run-of-the-mill person is not freed from birth, aging, and death, from sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, and despair. He is not freed, I tell you, from suffering and stress.

“The well-instructed disciple of the noble ones — who has regard for noble ones, is well-versed and disciplined in their Dhamma; who has regard for men of integrity, is well-versed and disciplined in their Dhamma — discerns what ideas are fit for attention and what ideas are unfit for attention. This being so, he does not attend to ideas unfit for attention and attends [instead] to ideas fit for attention.

“And what are the ideas unfit for attention that he does not attend to? Whatever ideas such that, when he attends to them, the un-arisen fermentation of sensuality arises in him, and the arisen fermentation of sensuality increases; the un-arisen fermentation of becoming arises in him, and arisen fermentation of becoming increases; the un-arisen fermentation of ignorance arises in him, and the arisen fermentation of ignorance increases. These are the ideas unfit for attention that he does not attends to.

“And what are the ideas fit for attention that he does attend to? Whatever ideas such that, when he attends to them, the un-arisen fermentation of sensuality does not arise in him, and the arisen fermentation of sensuality is abandoned; the un-arisen fermentation of becoming does not arise in him, and the arisen fermentation of becoming is abandoned; the un-arisen fermentation of ignorance does not arise in him, and the arisen fermentation of ignorance is abandoned. These are the ideas fit for attention that he does attend to. Through his not attending to ideas unfit for attention and through his attending to ideas fit for attention, un-arisen fermentations do not arise in him, and arisen fermentations are abandoned.

“He attends appropriately, this is stress…This is the origination of stress…This is the cessation of stress…This is the way leading to the cessation of stress. As he attends appropriately in this way, three fetters are abandoned in him: identity-view, doubt, and grasping at precepts and practices. These are called the fermentations to be abandoned by seeing.

“[2] And what are the fermentations to be abandoned by restraining? There is the case where a monk, reflecting appropriately, dwells restrained with the restraint of the eye-faculty. The fermentations, vexation, or fever that would arise if he were to dwell unrestrained with the restraint of the eye-faculty do not arise for him when he dwells restrained with the restraint of the eye-faculty.

Reflecting appropriately, he dwells restrained with the restraint of the ear-faculty…

Reflecting appropriately, he dwells restrained with the restraint of the nose-faculty…

Reflecting appropriately, he dwells restrained with the restraint of the tongue-faculty…

Reflecting appropriately, he dwells restrained with the restraint of the body-faculty…

Reflecting appropriately, he dwells restrained with the restraint of the intellect-faculty. The fermentations, vexation, or fever that would arise if he were to dwell unrestrained with the restraint of the intellect-faculty do not arise for him when he dwells restrained with the restraint of the intellect-faculty. These are called the fermentations to be abandoned by restraining.

“[3] And what are the fermentations to be abandoned by using? There is the case where a monk, reflecting appropriately, uses the robe simply to counteract cold, to counteract heat, to counteract the touch of flies, mosquitoes, wind, sun, and reptiles; simply for the purpose of covering the parts of the body that cause shame.

“Reflecting appropriately, he uses alms food, not playfully, nor for intoxication, nor for putting on bulk, nor for beautification; but simply for the survival and continuance of this body, for ending its afflictions, for the support of the holy life, thinking, ‘Thus will I destroy old feelings [of hunger] and not create new feelings [from overeating]. I will maintain myself, be blameless, and live in comfort.’

“Reflecting appropriately, he uses lodging simply to counteract cold, to counteract heat, to counteract the touch of flies, mosquitoes, wind, sun, and reptiles; simply for protection from the inclemency’s of weather and for the enjoyment of seclusion.

“Reflecting appropriately, he uses medicinal requisites that are used for curing the sick simply to counteract any pains of illness that have arisen and for maximum freedom from disease.

“The fermentations, vexation, or fever that would arise if he were not to use these things [in this way] do not arise for him when he uses them [in this way]. These are called the fermentations to be abandoned by using.

“[4] And what are the fermentations to be abandoned by tolerating? There is the case where a monk, reflecting appropriately, endures. He tolerates cold, heat, hunger, and thirst; the touch of flies, mosquitoes, wind, sun, and reptiles; ill-spoken, unwelcome words and bodily feelings that, when they arise, are painful, racking, sharp, piercing, disagreeable, displeasing, and menacing to life. The fermentations, vexation, or fever that would arise if he were not to tolerate these things do not arise for him when he tolerates them. These are called the fermentations to be abandoned by tolerating.

“[5] And what are the fermentations to be abandoned by avoiding? There is the case where a monk, reflecting appropriately, avoids a wild elephant, a wild horse, a wild bull, a wild dog, a snake, a stump, a bramble patch, a chasm, a cliff, a cesspool, and an open sewer. Reflecting appropriately, he avoids sitting in the sorts of unsuitable seats, wandering to the sorts of unsuitable habitats, and associating with the sorts of bad friends that would make his knowledgeable friends in the holy life suspect him of evil conduct. The fermentations, vexation, or fever that would arise if he were not to avoid these things do not arise for him when he avoids them. These are called the fermentations to be abandoned by avoiding.

“[6] And what are the fermentations to be abandoned by destroying? There is the case where a monk, reflecting appropriately, does not tolerate an arisen thought of sensuality. He abandons it, destroys it, dispels it, and wipes it out of existence.

Reflecting appropriately, he does not tolerate an arisen thought of ill will …

Reflecting appropriately, he does not tolerate an arisen thought of cruelty…

Reflecting appropriately, he does not tolerate arisen evil, unskillful mental qualities. He abandons them, destroys them, dispels them, and wipes them out of existence. The fermentations, vexation, or fever that would arise if he were not to destroy these things do not arise for him when he destroys them. These are called the fermentations to be abandoned by destroying.

“[7] And what are the fermentations to be abandoned by developing? There is the case where a monk, reflecting appropriately, develops mindfulness as a factor of awakening dependent on seclusion…dispassion…cessation, resulting in letting go. He develops analysis of qualities as a factor of awakening…persistence as a factor of awakening…rapture as a factor of awakening…serenity as a factor of awakening…concentration as a factor of awakening…equanimity as a factor of awakening dependent on seclusion…dispassion…cessation, resulting in letting go. The fermentations, vexation, or fever that would arise if he were not to develop these qualities do not arise for him when he develops them. These are called the fermentations to be abandoned by developing.

“When a monk’s fermentations that should be abandoned by seeing have been abandoned by seeing, his fermentations that should be abandoned by restraining have been abandoned by restraining, his fermentations that should be abandoned by using have been abandoned by using, his fermentations that should be abandoned by tolerating have been abandoned by tolerating, his fermentations that should be abandoned by avoiding have been abandoned by avoiding, his fermentations that should be abandoned by destroying have been abandoned by destroying, his fermentations that should be abandoned by developing have been abandoned by developing, then he is called a monk who dwells restrained with the restraint of all the fermentations. He has severed craving, thrown off the fetters, and — through the right penetration of conceit — has made an end of suffering and stress.”

That is what the Blessed One said. Gratified, the monks delighted in the Blessed One’s words.

https://youtu.be/c3qKTai3M7g
Ambalatthikaraahulovada Sutta

“Advice to Venerable Rahula At Ambalatthika”

I heard thus:

At one time the Blessed One was living in the Squirrels’ Sanctuary in the bamboo grove in Rajagaha. At that time venerable Rahula lived in Ambalatthika. Then the Blessed One getting up from his seclusion in the evening approached venerable Rahula in Ambalatthika. Venerable Rahula saw the Blessed One coming in the distance, prepared a seat and administered water. The Blessed One sat on the prepared seat and washed his feet. Venerable Rahula too worshipped the Blessed One and sat on a side.

Then the Blessed One retained a little water in the vessel and addressed venerable Rahula. ‘Rahula, do you see this little water left over in the vessel?’ ‘Yes, venerable sir.’ ‘So little is his recluse-ship, that has no shame, to tell lies, aware’ Then the Blessed One threw away that little bit of water and addressed venerable Rahula. ‘Rahula, did you see that little water thrown away?’ ‘Yes, venerable sir’ ‘Thus thrown away is the recluse-ship of one who has no shame, to tell lies with awareness’. Then the Blessed One turned that vessel upside down and addressed venerable Rahula ‘Rahula, do you see this vessel turned upside down?’ ‘Yes, venerable sir’ ‘Thus turned upside down is the recluse-ship of one who has no shame to tell lies with awareness’. Then the Blessed One put the vessel upright and addressed venerable Rahula. ‘Rahula, do you see this vessel empty and deserted?’ ‘Yes, venerable sir’ ‘So empty is the recluse-ship of one who has no shame to tell lies with awareness.

Rahula, the king’s huge well trained tusker, gone to the battle field, would work with his fore feet, hind feet, the fore part of his body, the hind part of his body, the head, his ears, tusks and with his tail, while protecting his trunk. Then it occurs to the elephant driver: This kings’ elephant the huge tusker gone to the battle field works with his fore feet and hind feet, fore part of the body and hind part of the body, with head, ears, tusks and tail, while protecting its trunk. There is nothing more to do to him. Rahula, just as there is nothing the king’s huge tusker gone to the battle field could not do with is limbs large and small, in the same manner, there is nothing that could not be done by one who has no shame to tell lies with awareness. Therefore you should train, I will not tell lies even for play.

Rahula, what is the purpose of a mirror?’ ‘Venerable sir, for the purpose of reflection.’ ‘Rahula in the same manner reflecting you should do bodily actions, reflecting you should do verbal actions, reflecting you should do mental actions.

‘Rahula, when a desire arises to do some bodily action, you should reflect. Doing this bodily action, will I be troubled, will others be troubled, will both be troubled. Is this bodily action demerit? Is it unpleasant? When reflecting if you know, ‘This bodily action will bring trouble to me, to others and to both it is demerit, it is unpleasant. If possible you should not do it. Rahula, when, reflecting, if you know, ‘This bodily action I desire to do, will not bring me, trouble, others trouble, nor trouble to either. It’s merit and brings pleasantness. Rahula, you should do such bodily actions. Even while doing that bodily action, you should reflect. Does this bodily action give me trouble, give others trouble or does it give trouble to either? Is it demerit? Is it unpleasant? Rahula, when reflecting if you know this bodily action is unpleasant, give up such bodily actions. If you know, ‘this bodily action does not give me, others or either, trouble. It is merit, and it brings pleasantness’, Then follow up that bodily action. Rahula, having done such actions too you should reflect. Did this bodily action cause me, others, or either, trouble? Was it demerit? Did it arouse unpleasantness? When reflecting if you know, this bodily action caused me and others, trouble, it isn’t merit, aroused unpleasantness. Then you should declare it to the Teacher or a wise co-associate in the holy life, manifest it and make amends for future restraint. Rahula, when reflecting, if you know, this bodily action did not cause me, others or either trouble. It was merit and pleasant. Then you should abide delighted pursuing such things of merit day and night..

Rahula, when a desire arises to you to do some verbal action, you should reflect thus: Doing this verbal action, will I trouble my self, others or both? Is this verbal action demerit? Is it unpleasant? When reflecting if you know, this verbal action will bring me, others and both trouble it is demerit and unpleasant. If possible you should not do it. Rahula, when, reflecting, if you know. This verbal action, if done, would not trouble either, ‘It is merit and is pleasant. Then Rahula, you should do such verbal actions. Even while doing that verbal action, you should reflect, ‘Does this verbal action give me, others, or either, trouble? Is it demerit? Is it unpleasant?’ Rahula, if it is unpleasant, give up such verbal actions. If you know, ‘this verbal action does not bring me, others, or either, trouble. It is merit and is pleasant.’ Follow up such verbal actions. Rahula, having done such verbal actions too you should reflect, ‘Did this cause me, others, or either, trouble? Was it demerit? Was it unpleasant? When reflecting if you know, this verbal action caused me, others, and both, trouble. It is demerit, and unpleasant.’ It should be declared to the Teacher or a wise co-associate in the holy life, manifest it and make amends for future restraint. Rahula, when reflecting you know, ‘this verbal action did not cause me, others or either trouble. It was merit and it was pleasant. Then you should abide delighted pursuing such things of merit day and night.

Rahula, when you desire to do some mental action, you should reflect, ‘In doing this mental action, will I trouble myself? Is it demerit? Is it unpleasant? When reflecting if you know, ‘this mental action will trouble me. It is demerit and unpleasant.’ Then, if possible you should not do it. Rahula, when reflecting if you know, ‘this mental action will not bring me trouble. It is merit and pleasant.’ Then Rahula, you should do such mental actions. Even while doing that mental action, you should reflect, ‘Does this mental action give me, others, trouble? Is it demerit and unpleasant?’ Rahula, if that is so, give up that mental action. If you know, ‘this mental action does not bring me, others trouble. It’s merit, and pleasant.’ Then follow it up. Having done such mental actions too you should reflect, ‘Did it cause me, others, trouble? Was it demerit? Was it unpleasant?’ When reflecting if you know, ‘this mental action caused me, others, trouble. It is demerit and unpleasant.’ Then you should be disgusted and loathe such mental actions. Rahula, when reflecting if you know, ‘this mental action did not cause me, others, trouble, it was merit and it was pleasant.’ Then you should pursue such things of merit day and night delightedly.

Rahula, whoever recluses or Brahmins purified their bodily actions, verbal actions and mental actions in the past, did by reflecting. Whoever recluses or Brahmins will purify their bodily, verbal and mental actions in the future will do so reflecting. Whoever recluses or Brahmins purify their bodily, verbal, and mental actions at present do so reflecting. Therefore Rahula, you should train thus, ‘Reflecting I will purify my bodily, verbal and mental actions.’

The Blessed One said thus and venerable Rahula delighted in the words of the Blessed One.

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