Analytic Insight Net - FREE Online Tipiṭaka Research & Practice Universitu 
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Paṭisambhidā Jāla-Abaddha Paripanti Tipiṭaka Anvesanā ca Paricaya Nikhilavijjālaya ca ñātibhūta Pavatti Nissāya 
http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org anto 105 Seṭṭhaganthāyatta Bhāsā
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10/12/18
LESSON 2774 Sat 13 Oct 2018 PRACTICE BUDDHA VACANA for PEACE (PBVP) DO GOOD BE MINDFUL (DGBM) Structured Tree Flow of TIPITAKA in Classical English,Classical Danish-Klassisk dansk, Classical Dutch-Klassiek Nederlands Vipassana Fellowship September to December 2018 Meditation Course
Filed under: General, Vinaya Pitaka, Sutta Pitaka, Abhidhamma Pitaka, Tipiṭaka, ಅಭಿಧಮ್ಮಪಿಟಕ, ವಿನಯಪಿಟಕ, ತಿಪಿಟಕ (ಮೂಲ)
Posted by: site admin @ 8:50 pm

LESSON 2774  Sat 13 Oct 2018
PRACTICE BUDDHA VACANA for PEACE (PBVP)
DO GOOD BE MINDFUL (DGBM)

Structured Tree Flow of  TIPITAKA

in Classical English,Classical  Danish-Klassisk dansk,
Classical  Dutch-Klassiek Nederlands

 

Vipassana Fellowship from September to December 2018 Meditation Course

https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/…
Tripitaka Song

Structured Tree Flow of TIPITAKA

Vinaya Piμaka
https://www.youtube.com/watch
Vinaya Piṭaka: Mahāvagga (~1st-2nd century) [Excerpt: The Evolution of
Ordination]Sutta Vibhaaga [two books containing rules for the bhikkhus
and
bhikkhunis, outlining eight classes of offences]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eWteUSs-8m4
Important Role of Women in Buddhism and Monks Rules -From MN-44

(Five nik±yas, or collections)
The Sutta Piṭaka contains the essence of the Buddha’s teaching
regarding the Dhamma. It contains more than ten thousand suttas. It is
divided in five collections called Nikāyas (A multitude, assemblage; a
collection; a class, order, group; an association, fraternity,
congregation; a house, dwelling).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9exdLBS6Y7A&t=607s
Ask A Monk: The Tipitaka

https://www.youtube.com/watch

Sutta Piμaka

https://www.youtube.com/watch
DN 01 The All embracing Net of Views I II

Dīgha Nikāya
[dīgha:long] The Dīgha Nikāya gathers 34 of the longest discourses
given by the Buddha. There are various hints that many of them are late
additions to the original corpus and of questionable authenticity.

https://www.youtube.com/watch

“The Majjhima Nikaya, the Middle Length Discourses”


The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus seven methods for restraining and
abandoning the taints, the fundamental defilements that maintain bondage
to the round of birth and death.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mfcteN91nnk
Saṃyutta Nikāya
[samyutta: group] The Saṃyutta Nikāya gathers the suttas according to
their subject in 56 sub-groups called saṃyuttas. It contains more than
three thousand discourses of variable length, but generally relatively
short.

https://www.youtube.com/watch
Aṅguttara Nikāya
[aṅg: factor | uttara: additionnal] The Aṅguttara Nikāya is subdivized
in eleven sub-groups called nipātas, each of them gathering discourses
consisting of enumerations of one additional factor versus those of the
precedent nipāta. It contains thousands of suttas which are generally
short.

Khuddaka Nikāya
[khuddha: short, small] The Khuddhaka
Nikāya short texts and is considered as been composed of two stratas:
Dhammapada, Udāna, Itivuttaka, Sutta Nipāta,
Theragāthā-Therīgāthā
and Jātaka form the ancient strata, while other books are late additions
and their authenticity is more questionable.

Classical  Danish

Klassisk dansk

https://www.youtube.com/results…
Fini Henriques - Children’s Trio in G Major for Violin, Cello & Piano, Op.31
Classical Music goturhjem2
Published on Dec 28, 2011
Børne Trio in G Major for Violin, Cello & Piano, Op.31

Tre Musici

Ulrikke Høst-Madsen, cello.

John Damgaard, piano.

Elisabeth Zeuthen, violin.


Henriques composed the Børne Trio (Danish for Children’s Trio) was
composed in 1900. Although, the composer titled it children’s trio, if
children are to play, they would have to be rather accomplished players.
Although the trio presents no great technical difficulties and is
written in a mid rather than late romantic style, its beautiful thematic
material raises it to the level, deserving of concert hall performance,
especially for amateurs seeking a very effective work. The trio opens
with a charming Moderato. The middle movement, Andantino-allegro vivo,
combines a slow movement and a scherzo. An exciting finale, Allegro con
fuoco, brings this appealing work to a close.

Fini Henriques
(1867-1940) was born in Copenhagen. He studied the violin and piano in
his youth was considered a child prodigy on both instruments. He
initially concentrated on violin, first studying at the Royal Danish
Conservatory with Valdemar Tofft, a student of Louis Spohr. However, he
also took composition lessons from Johan Svendsen. He concluded his
studies at the Berlin Hochschule, with Joseph Joachim for violin and
Woldemar Bargiel for composition.

Klassisk dansk

LESSON 2774 lør 13 okt. 2018
PRAKSIS BUDDHA VACANA FOR FRED (PBVP)
IKKE SAMME (DGBM)

Struktureret strøm af træet af TIPITAKA

https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/
Tripitaka sang

Struktureret strøm af træet af TIPITAKA

Vinaya Piμaka
https://www.youtube.com/watch
Vinaya Piṭaka: Mahāvagga (~ 1. til 2. århundrede) [Uddrag: Evolutionen af
Sortering] Sutta Vibhaaga [to bøger, der indeholder regler for bhikkhus
jeg
bhikkhunis, der beskriver otte former for forbrydelser]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eWteUSs-8m4
Kvinders vigtige rolle i buddhismen og reglerne for munke - fra MN-44

(Fem nics eller samlinger)
Sutta Piṭaka indeholder essensen af ​​Buddhas undervisning
om Dhamma. Den indeholder mere end ti tusinde suttas. Er
opdelt i fem samlinger kaldet Nikāyas (En skare, forsamling;
kollektion; en klasse, rækkefølge, gruppe; en forening, broderskab,
menighed; et hus, bolig).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9exdLBS6Y7A&t=607s
Spørg en munk: Tipitaka

https://www.youtube.com/watch

Under Piμaka

https://www.youtube.com/watch
DN 01 Det samlede antal visninger af jeg II

Dīgha Nikāya
[dgha: long] Dīgha Nikāya indsamler 34 af de længste taler
givet af Buddha. Der er flere tip, at mange af dem ankommer sent
tilføjelser til den oprindelige korpus og tvivlsom ægthed.

https://www.youtube.com/watch

“Majjhima Nikaya, talerne om den gennemsnitlige længde”

Buddha lærer bhikkhus syv metoder til begrænsning og
bortfaldet af farvestofferne, de grundlæggende mangler, der opretholder slaveri
til fødsels- og dødsrunden.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mfcteN91nnk
Saṃyutta Nikāya
[samyutta: group] Saṃyutta Nikāya samler suttas i henhold til
Dets emne i 56 undergrupper kaldes saṃyuttas. Den indeholder mere end
Tre tusinde taler af forskellig længde, men generelt relativt
kort

https://www.youtube.com/watch
Aṅguttara Nikāya
[aṅg: factor | uttara: additionalnal] Aṅguttara Nikāya er opdelt
I elleve undergrupper kaldes nipātas, hver og en af ​​dem indsamler taler
som består af opgørelser af en yderligere faktor i forhold til den af
forrige nipta Det indeholder tusindvis af suttas som er generelt
kort

Khuddaka Nikāya
[khuddha: kort, lille] The Khuddhaka
Kortfattede tekster af Nikāya betragtes som forbindelser af to lag:
Dhammapada, Udana, Itivuttaka, Sutta Nipāta,
Theragatha-Therigatha
og Jātaka danner de gamle lag, mens andre bøger er sene tilføjelser
og dens ægthed er mere tvivlsom.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vv_mtv94_WU

https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/
Tripitaka sang


youtube.com
Enjoy the videos and music you love, upload original content, and share it all with friends, family, and the world on YouTube.
Classical  DutchKlassiek Nederlands

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MWgQXlSQ7Dk&pbjreload=10
2 Hours Bach Violin Concertos | Classical Baroque Music | Focus Reading Studying

Classical Tunes
Published on Nov 30, 2017

Facebook ►https://www.facebook.com/Classical-Mu
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2004 ITS Philharmonic Orchestra, Louis Jullien / All Rights Reserved

Violin Concerto in A minor, BWV 1041
00:00:00 Allegro moderato
00:03:46 Andante
00:09:26 Allegro assai

Violin Concerto in E major, BWV 1042
00:12:56 Allegro
00:20:47 Adagio
00:26:38 Allegro assai

Double Violin Concerto in D minor, BWV 1043
00:29:16 Vivace
00:32:59 Largo, ma non tanto
00:39:19 Allegro

Concerto for 3 Violins and Strings in D major, BWV 1064r
00:43:55 Adagio
00:50:30 Allegro
00:56:07 Allegro

Violin Concerto G minor, BWV 1056r
01:00:42 Allegro
01:04:23 Largo
01:06:58 Presto

Concerto for Violin and Oboe in C minor, BWV 1060r
01:10:06 Allegro
01:14:52 Adagio/ Largo
01:19:31 Allegro

Violin Concerto in D minor BWV 1052a
01:23:03 Allegro
01:31:03 Adagio
01:37:31 Allegro

Concerto for Flute, Violin, Harpsichord and Strings in A minor, BWV 1044
01:45:32 Allegro
01:53:51 Adagio ma non tanto e dolce
01:59:44 Tempo di Allabreve

Our Fantastic Selection With The Best Classical Music Is For Relaxation, Meditation, Focus, Reading And Stress Relief.
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https://course.org/campus/course/view.php?id=3


September 2018 Meditation Course


Weekly outline

  • This week

    13 October - 19 October

    This week we begin to explore the first of the Sublime Abode practices -
    Mettā or Lovingkindness Meditation. If you are able to meditate for
    more than one sitting each day, please work with Mettā in one session
    and Mindfulness of Breathing in the other.

    • Sunday - Mettā: Lovingkindness Meditation Book
      Restricted Available from 14 October 2018
    • Audio Player - Lovingkindness Meditation Page
      Restricted Available from 14 October 2018
    • Audio Download - Lovingkindness Meditation File
      Restricted Available from 14 October 2018
    • Contemplation - Day 16 Page
      Restricted Available from 14 October 2018
    • Monday - The Discourse on Mettā Book
      Restricted Available from 15 October 2018
    • Contemplation - Day 17 Page
      Restricted Available from 15 October 2018
    • Tuesday - Expectations, Strengths, Cultivation Book
      Restricted Available from 16 October 2018
    • Contemplation - Day 18 Page
      Restricted Available from 16 October 2018
    • Wednesday - Connection and Extension Book
      Restricted Available from 17 October 2018
    • Contemplation - Day 19 Page
      Restricted Available from 17 October 2018
    • Thursday - Unconditional and Whole-hearted Book
      Restricted Available from 18 October 2018
    • Contemplation - Day 20 Page
      Restricted Available from 18 October 2018
    • Friday - The Third Precept Book
      Restricted Available from 19 October 2018
    • Contemplation - Day 21 Page
      Restricted Available from 19 October 2018
    • Chant Workshop 3 (optional) Page
      Restricted Available from 19 October 2018
  • 20 October - 26 October

    In
    this fourth week we continue to focus mainly on Mettā (lovingkindness)
    Meditation. This is the foundation for the other 3 “sublime abode”
    practices. If you are able to meditate for more than one sitting each
    day, please work with Mettā in one session and Mindfulness of Breathing
    in the other.

    • Saturday - Phrases and Images Book
      Restricted Available from 20 October 2018
    • Contemplation - Day 22 Page
      Restricted Available from 20 October 2018
    • Sunday - Sections and Subjects Book
      Restricted Available from 21 October 2018
    • Contemplation - Day 23 Page
      Restricted Available from 21 October 2018
    • Monday - Benefactor and Friend Book
      Restricted Available from 22 October 2018
    • Contemplation - Day 24 Page
      Restricted Available from 22 October 2018
    • Tuesday - Neutral and Difficult Book
      Restricted Available from 23 October 2018
    • Contemplation - Day 25 Page
      Restricted Available from 23 October 2018
    • Wednesday - All Sentient Beings Book
      Restricted Available from 24 October 2018
    • Contemplation - Day 26 Page
      Restricted Available from 24 October 2018
    • Thursday - When There’s No Mettā Book
      Restricted Available from 25 October 2018
    • Contemplation - Day 27 Page
      Restricted Available from 25 October 2018
    • Friday - The Fourth Precept Book
      Restricted Available from 26 October 2018
    • Contemplation - Day 28 Page
      Restricted Available from 26 October 2018
    • Chant Workshop 4 (optional) Page
      Restricted Available from 26 October 2018
  • 27 October - 2 November

    For
    our fifth week we introduce Karuna Meditation, the cultivation of
    compassion, and begin to explore one of the central teachings of the
    tradition: the Four Noble Truths.

    • Saturday - Karuna: Compassion Meditation Book
      Restricted Available from 27 October 2018
    • Audio Player - Compassion Meditation Page
      Restricted Available from 27 October 2018
    • Audio Download - Compassion Meditation File
      Restricted Available from 27 October 2018
    • Contemplation - Day 29 Page
      Restricted Available from 27 October 2018
    • Sunday - Empathy not Pity Book
      Restricted Available from 28 October 2018
    • Contemplation - Day 30 Page
      Restricted Available from 28 October 2018
    • Monday - Recognition, Response, Capacity Book
      Restricted Available from 29 October 2018
    • Contemplation - Day 31 Page
      Restricted Available from 29 October 2018
    • Tuesday - Four Noble Truths Book
      Restricted Available from 30 October 2018
    • On Lovingkindness and Compassion (Video) Page
      Restricted Available from 30 October 2018
    • Contemplation - Day 32 Page
      Restricted Available from 29 October 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Wednesday - The Truth of Dukkha Book
      Restricted Available from 30 October 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Contemplation - Day 33 Page
      Restricted Available from 30 October 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Thursday - Dukkha’s Origin Book
      Restricted Available from 31 October 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Contemplation - Day 34 Page
      Restricted Available from 31 October 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Friday - Extinction of Dukkha Book
      Restricted Available from 1 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Contemplation - Day 35 Page
      Restricted Available from 1 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Chant Workshop 5 (optional) Page
      Restricted Available from 1 November 2018, 11:00 pm
  • 3 November - 9 November

    In
    this sixth week we explore Appreciative Joy meditation. If you are
    sitting twice each day, then please pick a complementary technique from
    those we have already met for your other session. Work steadily and
    gently to establish your regular sittings. We’ll also briefly outline
    the final brahmavihara practice (for use beyond the course) and conclude
    our look at the precepts.

    • Saturday - Mudita: Appreciative Joy Meditation Book
      Restricted Available from 2 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Audio Player - Appreciative Joy Meditation Page
      Restricted Available from 3 November 2018
    • Download Audio - Appreciative Joy Meditation File
      Restricted Available from 3 November 2018
    • Contemplation - Day 36 Page
      Restricted Available from 2 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Sunday - Recognising Joy and Sorrow Book
      Restricted Available from 3 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • On Appreciative Joy (Video) Page
      Restricted Available from 3 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Contemplation - Day 37 Page
      Restricted Available from 3 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Monday - Envy and Fairness Book
      Restricted Available from 4 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Contemplation - Day 38 Page
      Restricted Available from 4 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Tuesday - Fifth Precept Book
      Restricted Available from 5 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Contemplation - Day 39 Page
      Restricted Available from 5 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Wednesday - Eight Precepts Book
      Restricted Available from 6 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Contemplation - Day 40 Page
      Restricted Available from 6 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Thursday - Introducing Equanimity Book
      Restricted Available from 7 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Contemplation - Day 41 Page
      Restricted Available from 7 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Friday - The Practice of Equanimity Meditation Book
      Restricted Available from 8 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Audio Player - Equanimity Meditation Page
      Restricted Available from 9 November 2018
    • Audio Download - Equanimity Meditation File
      Restricted Available from 9 November 2018
    • Contemplation - Day 42 Page
      Restricted Available from 8 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Chant Workshop 6 (optional) Page
      Restricted Available from 8 November 2018, 11:00 pm
  • 10 November - 16 November

    We
    begin our first
    vipassanā meditation practice and will be working with vipassanā for the
    rest of the course. If you are sitting twice each day please
    use one session for vipassanā and the other for one of the samatha
    methods we have been using thus far. If meditating once each day please
    always focus on the current technique.

    • Saturday - Vipassanā: the U Ba Khin Method Book
      Restricted Available from 9 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Audio Player - Vipassanā U Ba Khin Style Page
      Restricted Available from 10 November 2018
    • Audio Download - Vipassanā U Ba Khin Style File
      Restricted Available from 10 November 2018
    • Contemplation - Day 43 Page
      Restricted Available from 9 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Sunday - A Different Approach Book
      Restricted Available from 10 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Introducing Insight (Video) Page
      Restricted Available from 10 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Contemplation - Day 44 Page
      Restricted Available from 10 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Monday - Pace and Observation Book
      Restricted Available from 11 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Contemplation - Day 45 Page
      Restricted Available from 11 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Tuesday - Honest Experience Book
      Restricted Available from 12 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Contemplation - Day 46 Page
      Restricted Available from 12 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Wednesday - Just What Is Present Book
      Restricted Available from 13 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Contemplation - Day 47 Page
      Restricted Available from 13 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Thursday - Theoretical Background Book
      Restricted Available from 14 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Contemplation - Day 48 Page
      Restricted Available from 14 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Friday - Impermanence As The Key Book
      Restricted Available from 15 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Contemplation - Day 49 Page
      Restricted Available from 15 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Chant Workshop 7 (optional) Page
      Restricted Available from 15 November 2018, 11:00 pm
  • 17 November - 23 November

    We
    continue, in this eighth week, with the U Ba Khin vipassanā practice
    and consider our identity, its transience and the spiritual faculties
    that we each can utilize.

    • Saturday - Effort and the Fixed View Book
      Restricted Available from 16 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Contemplation - Day 50 Page
      Restricted Available from 16 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Sunday - Fleeting Life and Death Book
      Restricted Available from 17 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Contemplation - Day 51 Page
      Restricted Available from 17 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Monday - Transience Book
      Restricted Available from 18 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Contemplation - Day 52 Page
      Restricted Available from 18 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Tuesday - Darts and Mustard Seeds Book
      Restricted Available from 19 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Contemplation - Day 53 Page
      Restricted Available from 19 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Wednesday - Grief, Attended to Book
      Restricted Available from 20 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Contemplation - Day 54 Page
      Restricted Available from 20 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Thursday - Five Spiritual Faculties (1) Book
      Restricted Available from 21 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Contemplation - Day 55 Page
      Restricted Available from 21 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Friday - Five Spiritual Faculties (2) Book
      Restricted Available from 22 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Contemplation - Day 56 Page
      Restricted Available from 22 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Chant Workshop 8 (optional) Page
      Restricted Available from 22 November 2018, 11:00 pm
  • 24 November - 30 November

    In
    this ninth week we begin Choiceless Awareness - a form of vipassanā
    meditation that is fluid and unstructured, freeing us to explore all
    kinds of sensory phenomena. We also explore the Noble Eightfold Path
    which is an approach to life that brings freedom from suffering and
    ultimately aids liberation.

    • Saturday - Vipassanā: Choiceless Awareness Book
      Restricted Available from 23 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Contemplation - Day 57 Page
      Restricted Available from 23 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Sunday - Structure and Freedom Book
      Restricted Available from 24 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Beginning Choiceless Awareness (Video) Page
      Restricted Available from 24 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Contemplation - Day 58 Page
      Restricted Available from 24 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Monday - Physical and Mental Connection Book
      Restricted Available from 25 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Contemplation - Day 59 Page
      Restricted Available from 25 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Tuesday - Open, Attentive, Receptive Book
      Restricted Available from 26 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Contemplation - Day 60 Page
      Restricted Available from 26 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Wednesday - Noble Path: Understanding, Thought Book
      Restricted Available from 27 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Contemplation - Day 61 Page
      Restricted Available from 27 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Thursday - Noble Path: Speech, Action, Livelihood Book
      Restricted Available from 28 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Contemplation - Day 62 Page
      Restricted Available from 28 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Friday - Noble Path: Effort, Mindfulness, Concentration Book
      Restricted Available from 29 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Contemplation - Day 63 Page
      Restricted Available from 29 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Chant Workshop 9 (optional) Page
      Restricted Available from 29 November 2018, 11:00 pm
  • 1 December - 7 December

    In
    our final week we continue with Choiceless Awareness as our vipassanā
    practice, explore The Perfections, and begin to think about building a
    sustainable practice beyond the course.

    • Saturday - The Perfections (1) Book
      Restricted Available from 30 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Contemplation - Day 64 Page
      Restricted Available from 30 November 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Sunday - The Perfections (2) Book
      Restricted Available from 1 December 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Contemplation - Day 65 Page
      Restricted Available from 1 December 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Monday - Preparation and Walking Book
      Restricted Available from 2 December 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Contemplation - Day 66 Page
      Restricted Available from 2 December 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Tuesday - Mindful Activity Book
      Restricted Available from 3 December 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Contemplation - Day 67 Page
      Restricted Available from 3 December 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Wednesday - Building Sustainable Practice Book
      Restricted Available from 4 December 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Contemplation - Day 68 Page
      Restricted Available from 4 December 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Thursday - Markers and Retreats Book
      Restricted Available from 5 December 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Contemplation - Day 69 Page
      Restricted Available from 5 December 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Friday - Friends and The Raft Book
      Restricted Available from 6 December 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Contemplation - Day 70 Page
      Restricted Available from 6 December 2018, 11:00 pm
    • Daily Contemplations Page
      Restricted Available from 6 December 2018, 11:00 pm
    • A Farewell Request Page
      Restricted Available from 6 December 2018, 11:00 pm








https://course.org/campus/mod/page/view.php?id=58


Welcome from Andrew

AndrewWelcome

I’m very glad that you’ve decided to join me for this 10 week course.

This
Vipassanā Fellowship course is a practical guide to Buddhist meditation
that I hope will be useful to those who are new to meditation and to
established meditators wishing to further explore a rich and vital
tradition. The course is intended for those of all religious traditions
(and none) but aims for clarity by keeping the descriptive and
explanatory material in the context from which it grew. Our beliefs,
cultures and circumstances may be very different but it is often
fruitful to have a window into another framework so that our habitual
patterns can be re-examined in the light of the challenge. The emphasis
is on dedicated practice: it is hoped that you will absorb a little of
the material and then apply it in daily meditation sessions over an
extended period. These closely related meditation techniques are rooted
in the earliest Buddhist texts and have the capacity to transform both
heart and mind, and serve any meditator well for a lifetime of fruitful,
and often joyous, practice.

Meditation
is by no means the whole of the Buddhist Path; but for those who would
seek enlightenment it is certainly central to it. My aim is to clearly
explain the method of practice, the practical difficulties that may be
encountered and to explore strategies for overcoming them. Each practice
is placed in context so that you will come to appreciate why a
particular route has been suggested and its relationship to the Buddha’s
teaching. Rather than choosing to separate meditation from a tradition
that can sustain it, or presenting a single technique as a panacea, I
have tried to advocate a balanced and consistent approach to Buddhist
practice cognizant of the conditions that the Buddha deemed necessary
for an awakening to be possible.

Each
of the techniques is a meditation practice that can stand alone, but
there is a logical progression in the way that they are introduced.
Although it may be tempting to select the technique that one is most
drawn to at the outset, I’d recommend that you work with each technique
in the order in which it is given. Mastery of any practice will take
many years, but a few weeks of introductory work with each of the
techniques offered in this course will enable you to become aware of the
correspondence and differences between the techniques and will, in a
sense, bring them into your repertoire for further use throughout your
meditating life. It will also give an indication of the range of skills
that need to be developed and the areas where particular work may be
needed.

New
material is presented to you each day in this Course Campus. The
text ranges from detailed instructions on each new technique, to short
practical notes and brief theoretical sketches. Over the 10 weeks you
should gain an appreciation of the broader picture and will have an
understanding of the breadth of Buddhist forms of meditation and ethical
practice. There is also a selection of verses from our version of the
Dhammapada: one of the best-loved collections in the Canon offered for
reflection. These thematically-arranged stanzas offer an accessible
introduction to major aspects of the Buddhist path and an experience of Affective Reading.

You
should try to visit the Course Campus on a regular basis. The
web site will be updated regularly throughout the course in response to
the practice questions raised by your fellow participants. There is a
database of past questions (just follow the “In Practice” link) and the
opportunity to engage in Dhamma discussion for those who find this type
of activity fruitful. You can also contact me directly with your
meditation queries and related questions by using one of the Contact
links.

There
are downloadable audio guided meditations when new techniques are
introduced in the text, a series of chant workshops with accompanying
audio files and a glossary of Pali terms. The recordings become
available on the site for instant streaming or individual download as
the course progresses.

How long should I meditate?

If
you are a beginner you should try to incorporate at least one session
into each day, lasting for about 20-30 minutes. This time may be
increased gradually and another daily session can be added when you feel
ready.

For
those with previous meditation experience, I recommend two sessions per
day lasting from 30 minutes to one hour each (or longer). If you have
additional time, perhaps at weekends, then additional sessions can be
incorporated.

The
audio guided meditation files become available to you as new techniques
are introduced. They are intended to as illustrative material, so that
you can become familiar with how to construct your own meditation
sitting. It is not a good idea to use any guided meditation recordings
on a long-term basis.

Try
not to mix different meditation techniques into the same sitting,
unless this is suggested in the text. If you are able only to
incorporate one session into your day give priority to familiarizing
yourself with the fundamentals of the newest technique.

What is the chanting about?

The
audio chants included in the course are supplementary, and their use is
entirely optional. These are presented as a Chant Workshop, each
Friday, for the first part of our course session. The whole sequence can
be downloaded in the final Workshop. Some people find traditional
Buddhist ritual helps them to settle into their meditation practice; for
others it is a hindrance. Please use these, or other, Buddhist chants
to frame your meditation sittings if you wish. Translations are given
for each of the Pāli chants.


Approaching this path

These
are not dry academic exercises, mental gymnastics or philosophical
debates: meditation can bring real wisdom and unparalleled states of
calmness and bliss. The danger is to expect these results immediately.
It will take some time and in the early stages all of us will experience
doubt about the validity of working in this way. The lokiya - or
mundane - benefits will start to become apparent quite soon if we
practise with commitment and determined effort. It is important that we
don’t settle for these, of course, but such glimpses of the positive
outcome of our work may inspire a certain degree of confidence or saddhā
in the value of meditation and the Path.

There
are hundreds of methods of meditation, several varieties of Buddhism
and many varied spiritual paths. Many offer something of value; but to
be of use any valid path or method will require commitment. No technique
will prove effective unless followed with discipline and effort. It is
recommended that whilst working with this course you follow the outline
as it is given rather than trying to accommodate different approaches
from other traditions within the same sittings. There is always the
desire to experiment and see if anyone else has got a different handle
on the challenges we face, but why not make best use of this current
experience? Try to work with any difficulties that are encountered
rather than substituting unrelated alternatives. Many of the challenges
we face during meditation are effective pointers to those areas
requiring most attention, and if we simply shift ground every time
something seems difficult we will learn very little from the experience
and our progress, if any, will be slow. We must become aware of our
hunger for novelty: the constant seeking of newer, better, faster, is
still craving whether we are talking about a new car or a new meditation
technique. Craving, as we shall see, is at the root of the suffering we
experience.

So,
take it gently but seriously. Apply the practices with commitment and,
in time, you will become convinced of their efficacy. Please remember
that I am available to help where I can and that you can contact me
whenever you have questions about the practices we are using. I look
forward to getting to know you better over the coming days.

I
would like to offer any merits of this course to the teachers who have
blessed me with advice and encouragement over the past decades - and
especially to those from Sri Lanka. May they and all beings attain
peace.

With mettā,

Andrew

Last modified: Wednesday, 11 January 2017, 7:43 pm

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https://course.org/campus/mod/page/view.php?id=59


September 2018 Meditation Course


Introduction to Meditation and the Course

Introduction to Meditation and the Course

The
Buddha taught a path of liberation that is open to all. His main
concern was not for our temporary happiness, nor that our relationships
and communities be harmonious, nor even that we live long and healthy
lives. These, and many other beneficial things, may indeed happen as we
apply the Buddha’s teaching; but they are not its purpose. Territorial
disputes, environmental crises and social inequality are all burning
issues of our time; but whilst our response may be aided by acting on
Buddhist principles, they are not what his teaching is about.

The
Buddha’s only concern was that we should open our eyes and see the
reality of existence for ourselves so that we may, like him, take the
steps that are necessary to be released from all forms of suffering,
forever. Meditation is a way to begin this process of awakening.

 

“I teach not only the fact of Suffering,

but also the deliverance from it.

    ……

Mind is the originator of (unhappy) states.

Mind is chief; they are mind made.

If one speaks or acts with a wicked mind,

then suffering follows one,

like the wheel follows the hoof of the draught-ox.

Mind is the originator of (happy) states.

Mind is chief; they are mind made.

If one speaks or acts with a pure mind,

then happiness follows one,

like one’s own shadow that never leaves.”

- The Buddha

Meditation
is a method of training the mind. Much of our life is conducted
unconsciously, thoughtlessly. We operate on automatic pilot most of the
time, behaving in ways to which we have become accustomed; without much
regard for the current situation, our motivation, or the outcome of our
actions. This unconscious way of living brings suffering,
unsatisfactoriness and stress into our own lives and to the
relationships we have with others. Through our ignorance and selfishness
we engineer our suffering and deny ourselves the possibility of greater
happiness.

This
careless way of living brings us much grief: not only are our
relationships often tainted by anger, hurt and jealousy, but even our
self-view is distorted through clouded perceptions and muddled thinking.
Living consciously is a way of changing our relationship to the world
around us, and beginning a journey into discovering its (and our) true
nature.

Meditation
is a tool to help us develop greater awareness, and this awareness
allows us to develop insight into the nature of reality. Why do we
behave the way we do? Who are we anyway? Why do so many things
ultimately seem so disappointing and unsatisfactory? Why do beings
suffer so much? Is there an end to suffering? The experience of
meditation allows us for the first time to develop the clarity that can
facilitate a dramatic change in our perceptions. We can begin to live in
a way that is mindful. Life can be transformed by this new awareness
and the insights it brings; it can become kinder, more compassionate,
joyful, and balanced.

Meditation
has been a feature of the major religious traditions for millennia but
somewhere along the way most of us have become separated from it and no
longer use it in our daily lives. Maybe we had a problem with the
particular belief system with which the contemplative experience was
associated, or perhaps the practice of meditation had been deemed the
special preserve of the professionally religious within that tradition.
Whatever the reason, many of us reach a stage at which we realize that
we need to reintroduce a measure of contemplation into our lives - we
need to slow down, take time to consider, to live consciously. Often we
are drawn to those traditions that have kept the meditative experience
as a core teaching and this may lead us to explore what Buddhism has to
offer. We may not be looking to take up a different religion but
recognise that some spiritual traditions have useful and practical
methods of supporting our spiritual development and awakening regardless
of the religious framework we maintain.

In
this course, and on our cushions, we shall be exploring techniques
derived from the Buddha’s teaching as contained in the suttas of the
Pāli Canon. These teachings from 2500 years ago were given by the Buddha
and his close disciples in India, and were preserved by oral recitation
until they found written expression in the Pāli language in Sri Lanka.
Buddhism may seem very foreign to some of us but, fear not, this course -
and indeed Buddhism itself - does not ask anyone to adopt any beliefs
that are not confirmed by their own experience.

Until
faith arises, through direct evidence of the efficacy of a particular
teaching, it can be difficult to determine the path we should follow.
The Buddha gave some solid advice to non-Buddhists as to how they should
most profitably judge the validity of the myriad competing theories and
belief systems:

“Do
not be led by reports, tradition or hearsay. Do not be led by the
authority of religious texts, nor by mere logic or speculation, nor by
considering appearances, nor by delighting in speculative views, nor by
seeming possibilities, nor by the idea: ‘this is our teacher’. But …
when you know for yourselves that certain things are unwholesome, wrong
and bad, then give them up … And when you know for yourselves that
certain things are wholesome and good, then accept them and follow
them.”

Try
to keep this in mind as you work through the units of this course.
Accept nothing simply because it is written down here or even because it
is contained in a particular discourse. We will be using techniques
that have stood the test of time and that others have found helpful. All
that is required at this preliminary stage is that we have a degree of
confidence that because these techniques have proven beneficial to
others there is a reasonable likelihood that they may also be of value
in our lives.

We
should remain aware that the practices introduced in the course are
derived from a living tradition. The explanations given will be
consistent with this tradition, but are couched in modern language. In
the interest of clarity we will try to avoid references to other
spiritual traditions and western psychology. Buddhism based on the texts
of the Pāli Canon has valuable teachings beyond the scope of what can
be covered here, and you are warmly encouraged to explore it further.

The Path Of Meditation And Action

Buddhist
meditation styles can be divided into two groups: there are forms of
meditation that are undertaken with the objective of acquiring a greater
degree of calmness, tranquillity or serenity through concentration on a
single object (usually called samatha meditation), and other forms that
aim at gaining insight into the nature of existence (usually called
vipassanā meditation). It is probably more helpful to see samatha and
vipassanā as the beneficial results of a developed meditation practice
rather than a strict division referring to types of techniques as they
can co-exist in harmony. The Buddhist path has a single goal, and
engagement with any of these practices may help us to work towards it.

Venerable
Nyanatiloka, a Western monk of the last century, summed up the
complementary nature of the two categories very well: he wrote that
samatha or tranquillity is “an unperturbed, peaceful and lucid state of
mind attained by strong mental concentration. Though as a distinct way
of practice, it aims at the attainment of the meditative Absorptions
(jhāna), a high degree of tranquil concentration … is indispensable
for Insight too. Tranquillity frees the mind from impurities and inner
obstacles, and gives it greater penetrative strength.” In contrast,
vipassanā or insight “is the penetrative understanding by direct
meditative experience, of the impermanency, unsatisfactoriness and
impersonality of all material and mental phenomena of existence. It is
Insight that leads to entrance into the supermundane states of Holiness
and to final liberation”.

You
will notice how prominent are the words ‘act’ and ‘action’ in these
pages; and you may find this surprising for a text on Buddhist
meditation. Meditation is not just about sitting on cushions. There is
certainly merit in taking timeout for concentration and mindfulness but
it is also part of a broader path to the complete cessation of all
suffering, and this can only be viable if our every action is informed
by our practice and by wholesome ethical considerations. One of the best
measures we have of the effectiveness of our meditation sittings is in
the actions that result from the time we spend on the cushion. If they
are more skilful then they would otherwise be, then this is an
indication that our time has not been wasted. Volitional actions - those
actions of body, speech and mind that we intentionally commit - are
what shape our lives. This kamma is the major determinant of the degree
of happiness and sorrow we will experience. Through working with gentle
determination on this path of bhāvanā, or development, we will be better
able to ensure that the fruits of those actions are wholesome and that
we create the conditions where liberation may be possible.

Although
it should never be seen as its primary purpose, Buddhist meditation can
be very effective in improving our everyday lives and the happiness of
others. By the changes wrought in our own minds, through the meditative
process, our understanding of behaviour improves immeasurably. This
allows us to bring kindness, respect and compassion to all our
interactions in a way that was perhaps absent or compromised before. Our
actions are informed by the mindfulness we bring to our daily
activities, and become more balanced and appropriate to the reality of
the situations we meet.

The Route Of Serenity And Bliss

Samatha
meditation, and the sorts of mental states achieved through it, are
common to many religious traditions but take distinctive forms in the
Buddhist tradition and are central to it. To see samatha as only a
preparation for vipassanā would be erroneous as the samatha approach
forms an authentic and deep training and one for which many people are
most suited. The jhānas, the highly developed mental states that arise
from samatha practice, can offer the potential of a more joyful path
than could be expected through vipassanā practice alone. The
descriptions of the jhānas that we find in the Pāli Canon are replete
with beautiful terms like joy, happiness, bliss, rapture, the
abandonment of pain and grief. Whilst complete liberation within a
single lifetime is a goal for some, and that would require insight,
others take the longer view and choose to work methodically to create
the optimum conditions for achieving that final liberation in a later
birth. For these people samatha meditation may continue to provide the
sustenance and development that they seek.

The
first technique that we will use as a samatha practice is Mindfulness
of Breathing or ānāpānasati and this will form the foundation for the
rest of our work. Through training the mind by fixing our attention on a
simple object such as the breathing we develop a skill that is needed
in all other forms of meditation: the ability to hone in precisely on an
object and to be completely with it for a sustained period. Besides
acquiring this necessary skill, the practice of itself brings greater
calm and serenity.

From
ānāpānasati we begin to work with a series of interrelated techniques
that are perhaps a little less abstract. Still part of the samatha
grouping, the cultivation of the brahmavihāras or sublime abiding works
primarily on an emotional level to bring about positive mental states.
The method used could be summarised as empathy, and we approach each of
four qualities in a methodical way; gradually building our skills by
focusing on them in turn and working in distinct sections for the
purpose of training.

The
practical result of working with these four techniques is that we open
our hearts to what is wholesome and nurturing and cease to be capable of
acting in ways that are hostile and destructive. We open to
lovingkindness - working to include every sentient being. If we fully
develop lovingkindness we become considerate and caring in relationships
with others. Through the application of lovingkindness, our actions are
incapable of being influenced by ill will.

From
lovingkindness we move on to work with compassion; feeling with people
who suffer. When we understand the universality of suffering then at the
deepest level we can begin to act in ways that minimise our
contribution to the pain that the world endures. Again, this works on a
personal level - we act to reduce our own suffering - and also in
relation to every being with which we are connected. Through the
application of compassion, our actions are incapable of being influenced
by cruelty.

When
we come to the third brahmavihāra, appreciative joy, we consider what
is glorious in the lives around us. This is celebratory and distinctly
unselfish. We develop an awareness of the beauty that exists even in the
lives of people who usually present us with difficulties; fully aware
that in some cases it may be us who fit this category. By developing the
ability to “enjoy the joy”, wherever it is found, we reinforce our
understanding of commonality and our resolution to work to extend
happiness through our actions. Through the application of appreciative
joy, our actions are incapable of being influenced by apathy or
discontent.

The
fourth practice is on equanimity and is the culmination of all that has
gone before. We will only touch on it briefly during the course as it
requires a firm foundation in the other sublime abodes; but the method
is outlined so that it can be used beyond the course. With Equanimity we
work very deeply to see the patterns that usually allow
us to be partial. We normally selectively give and selectively withhold
throughout our interactions with others. We like, we dislike; we
favour, we act with prejudice. The other three brahmavihāra practices
have shown us, and developed in us, an understanding of how non-separate
we really are from others: we seek happiness and freedom from suffering
just like everyone else; we engage in destructive activities just like
others. Once that commonality is acknowledged at the deepest level,
through our meditation practice, we come to a realisation that the
respect we show for any other being can be no different from that which
we ourselves would wish to enjoy. Through this practice we work at
balancing and overcoming partiality. Through the application of
equanimity, our actions are incapable of being influenced by resentment
or aversion.

As
a process of training, we will work methodically through various
sections and take a person-centred approach with each of the
brahmavihāras; but the canonical goal is of an all-encompassing,
universal application of these qualities. Once we have acquired the
ability to freely share each of the brahmavihāra in a strong and
equanimous way, then we can move forward to impartial, fully inclusive
and boundless application of all four qualities. By being exposed to the
different brahmavihāra techniques the subtle differences between the
different qualities will become more readily apparent. Without this
approach it is common for meditators to lack precision during their
sittings: all positive emotions are classed as lovingkindness, for
example, rather than carefully ascertaining how lovingkindness differs
from compassion. Until we have this clarity it is difficult to optimally
develop these positive states; we descend instead into generalised
pleasant thoughts rather than creating an environment in which serious
work can happen and transformation of the heart may occur.

That
is the theory. It may all at this stage seem a little far-fetched (and
some of it may seem undesirable or even unwise) but very soon the value
of working in this way will become apparent. We begin to notice it first
in small ways through our improved everyday communications with others.
By opening to, and developing, what is already there - lovingkindness,
compassion, appreciative joy, and equanimity - we can ensure that we are
well equipped to cause least harm and greatest help to ourselves and
others. Whatever destructive patterns we may currently employ, or have
engaged in previously, the effort expended on working with the
brahmavihāras will be entirely beneficial. It is a gradual path but the
opening of the heart and the effect that this has on our behaviour is
tangible, even after a relatively short period of sustained application.

The Route Of Insight

Vipassanā
is often regarded as a specifically Buddhist form of meditation;
different from anything presented elsewhere. What is distinctive about
vipassanā - literally ’special seeing’ or ‘clear vision’ - is that
through one’s own effort it brings an understanding of things as they
are: impermanent (anicca), inherently unsatisfactory (dukkha), and
not-Self (anattā). With the arising of insight, we no longer need rely
on scriptural accounts, or on what others have told us, because we know
for ourselves.

The
modern favouring of vipassanā meditation, particularly in the West,
stems from a belief that one cannot attain complete liberation through
the jhānas (the attainments of samatha practice). Whilst this is
technically correct, most of us have quite a way to go before such lofty
concerns present us with any such obstacle. One should not forget that
the results of samatha meditation are of value in themselves as well as
in the essential preparation they represent as we begin vipassanā
practice. In these days of instant gratification vipassanā is sometimes
presented as the form of meditation with “go faster stripes” and, for
some, samatha practice is seen as second best; but this is an immature
assessment as there are no short cuts to liberation. It is also a
misreading of the texts and a denial of the practical requirement for
engagement with at least some form of samatha meditation to develop the
degree of concentration and precision required if we are to succeed with
vipassanā.

The
later part of the course introduces two techniques drawn from those
usually classified as vipassanā bhāvanā (the cultivation of insight),
and shows how these relate to the samatha practices that we have already
met. One of the techniques focuses on clearly seeing the arising and
ceasing of physical and mental feelings by observation of the body. The
other technique moves beyond structure to bring the same precision and
mindfulness to all the phenomena of which we are aware.

The Conjoined Route

Traditionally,
most Buddhist meditation teachers would advocate the practice of
samatha meditation before embarking on vipassanā meditation and this is
the approach that we will pursue. In the Pāli Canon we read, “when one
practices samatha followed by vipassanā the path arises”. It is not
necessary to specialise only in the samatha form of meditation or only
vipassanā meditation, as the Buddha’s own example shows us the value of
working with both. This approach is known as yuganaddha; the yoking
together of distinct elements in a congruent and harmonious way so that
no area of our development is neglected. Our work on samatha will not be
eclipsed when we come to consider vipassanā but will instead continue
to accompany and enrich it until we reach the final goal. The first part
of this course is devoted to techniques normally considered samatha
meditation and beyond that we work mainly with two forms of vipassanā
meditation.

We
will also look at bringing a meditative approach to daily life, through
the practice of mindfulness, and the importance of bringing awareness
to the teachings that life can show us in some of the major mileposts we
encounter.

Meditation
enables us to see things from different perspectives. The Buddha
emphasised the critical importance of right understanding as essential
for our development. We shall look at three cardinal concepts of the
Buddhist path: dukkha (suffering or unsatisfactoriness), anicca
(impermanence) and anattā (not-self, egolessness). From an intellectual
grasp of these ideas we can, through meditation, gain a real
understanding of the nature of the conditioned world, and realise our
place within it. Armed with this understanding we can act in skilful
ways to benefit the lives of those with whom we come into contact. This
ethical behaviour produces harmonious conditions for further meditation.
The results are cumulative and significant, and both the meditator and
those with whom he or she interacts will feel the impact.

“When
tranquillity is developed, the mind is developed and lust is abandoned;
when insight is developed, right understanding is developed and
ignorance is abandoned. The mind defiled with lust is not liberated;
when there is defilement through ignorance, right understanding is not
developed… ” - Anguttara Nikāya

Last modified: Wednesday, 11 January 2017, 8:01 pm

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September 2018 Meditation Course


Daily Practice Focus

Practice Focus

You
should aim to incorporate at least one meditation sitting each day for
the 10 weeks of the course. If you are able to manage two separate
sessions daily, so much the better.

The broad focus for each of the days is as follows. In any second sitting
please review one of the techniques we met earlier in the course.

  • Week 1 and 2 - Mindfulness of Breathing (anapanasati)
  • Week 3 and 4 - Lovingkindness Meditation (metta)
  • Week 5 - Compassion Meditation (karuna)
  • Week 6 - Appreciative Joy Meditation (mudita) plus a brief overview of Equanimity (upekkha)
  • Week 7 and 8 - Vipassana Meditation (U Ba Khin style)
  • Week 9 and 10 - Vipassana Meditation (Choiceless Awareness)

There
is an optional chant tutorial each Friday for the first 9 weeks of
the course. This builds to a puja sequence that some may find helpful in
rededicating their practice from time to time.

Last modified: Friday, 13 January 2017, 12:58 pm

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LESSON 2773 Fri 12 Oct 2018 PRACTICE BUDDHA VACANA for PEACE (PBVP) DO GOOD BE MINDFUL (DGBM) Structured Tree Flow of TIPITAKA in Classical English,Classical Catalan,Clàssic català,Classical Cebuano-Cebuano clàssic,Classical Chichewa Chichewa chachikale,Classical (ChineseSimplified)古典奇切瓦,Classical Chinese (Traditional) - 古典中文(繁體),Classical Corsican-Corsa Corsicana,Classical Czech,
Filed under: General, Vinaya Pitaka, Sutta Pitaka, Abhidhamma Pitaka, Tipiṭaka, ಅಭಿಧಮ್ಮಪಿಟಕ, ವಿನಯಪಿಟಕ, ತಿಪಿಟಕ (ಮೂಲ)
Posted by: site admin @ 3:20 am

LESSON 2773  Fri 12 Oct 2018
PRACTICE BUDDHA VACANA for PEACE (PBVP)
DO GOOD BE MINDFUL (DGBM)

Structured Tree Flow of  TIPITAKA

in Classical English,Classical Catalan,Clàssic català,Classical Cebuano-Cebuano clàssic,Classical Chichewa Chichewa chachikale,Classical  (ChineseSimplified)古典奇切瓦,Classical Chinese (Traditional)  - 古典中文(繁體),Classical  Corsican-Corsa Corsicana,
Classical Czech,


 

https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/…
Tripitaka Song

Structured Tree Flow of TIPITAKA

Vinaya Piμaka
https://www.youtube.com/watch
Vinaya Piṭaka: Mahāvagga (~1st-2nd century) [Excerpt: The Evolution of
Ordination]Sutta Vibhaaga [two books containing rules for the bhikkhus
and
bhikkhunis, outlining eight classes of offences]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eWteUSs-8m4
Important Role of Women in Buddhism and Monks Rules -From MN-44

(Five nik±yas, or collections)
The Sutta Piṭaka contains the essence of the Buddha’s teaching
regarding the Dhamma. It contains more than ten thousand suttas. It is
divided in five collections called Nikāyas (A multitude, assemblage; a
collection; a class, order, group; an association, fraternity,
congregation; a house, dwelling).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9exdLBS6Y7A&t=607s
Ask A Monk: The Tipitaka

https://www.youtube.com/watch

Sutta Piμaka

https://www.youtube.com/watch
DN 01 The All embracing Net of Views I II

Dīgha Nikāya
[dīgha:long] The Dīgha Nikāya gathers 34 of the longest discourses
given by the Buddha. There are various hints that many of them are late
additions to the original corpus and of questionable authenticity.

https://www.youtube.com/watch

“The Majjhima Nikaya, the Middle Length Discourses”


The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus seven methods for restraining and
abandoning the taints, the fundamental defilements that maintain bondage
to the round of birth and death.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mfcteN91nnk
Saṃyutta Nikāya
[samyutta: group] The Saṃyutta Nikāya gathers the suttas according to
their subject in 56 sub-groups called saṃyuttas. It contains more than
three thousand discourses of variable length, but generally relatively
short.

https://www.youtube.com/watch
Aṅguttara Nikāya
[aṅg: factor | uttara: additionnal] The Aṅguttara Nikāya is subdivized
in eleven sub-groups called nipātas, each of them gathering discourses
consisting of enumerations of one additional factor versus those of the
precedent nipāta. It contains thousands of suttas which are generally
short.

Khuddaka Nikāya
[khuddha: short, small] The Khuddhaka
Nikāya short texts and is considered as been composed of two stratas:
Dhammapada, Udāna, Itivuttaka, Sutta Nipāta,
Theragāthā-Therīgāthā
and Jātaka form the ancient strata, while other books are late additions
and their authenticity is more questionable.

Classical Catalan 
Clàssic català

TEMA 2773 Div 12 Oct. 2018
PRACTICA BUDDHA VACANA per PEACE (PBVP)
NO ES MATEIX (DGBM)

Flux estructurat de l’arbre de TIPITAKA

https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/...
Cançó Tripitaka

Flux estructurat de l’arbre de TIPITAKA

Vinaya Piμaka
https://www.youtube.com/watch
Vinaya Piṭaka: Mahāvagga (~ 1er-II e segle) [Extracte: L’evolució de
Ordenació] Sutta Vibhaaga [dos llibres que contenen regles per als bhikkhus
i
bhikkhunis, esbossant vuit classes de delictes]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eWteUSs-8m4
Paper important de la dona en el budisme i les regles dels monjos -des del MN-44

(Cinc nics, o col·leccions)
El Sutta Piṭaka conté l’essència de l’ensenyament del Buda
sobre el Dhamma. Conté més de deu mil suttas. És
dividit en cinc col·leccions anomenades Nikāyas (Una multitud, assemblea; a
col · lecció; una classe, ordre, grup; una associació, fraternitat,
congregació; una casa, habitatge).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9exdLBS6Y7A&t=607s
Pregunti a un monjo: el Tipitaka

https://www.youtube.com/watch

Sutta Piμaka

https://www.youtube.com/watch
DN 01 The All Net of Views of I II

Dīgha Nikāya
[dīgha: long] El Dīgha Nikāya recull 34 dels discursos més llargs
donat pel Buda. Hi ha diversos consells que molts d’ells arriben tard
addicions al corpus original i d’autenticitat qüestionable.

https://www.youtube.com/watch

“El Majjhima Nikaya, els discursos de la longitud mitjana”

El Buda ensenya als bhikkhus set mètodes per a la restricció i
l’abandonament de les tints, les deficiències fonamentals que mantenen l’esclavitud
a la ronda de naixement i mort.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mfcteN91nnk
Saṃyutta Nikāya
[samyutta: grup] El Saṃyutta Nikāya recull les suttas segons
el seu tema en 56 subgrups anomenats saṃyuttas. Conté més que
tres mil discursos de longitud variable, però generalment relativament
curt.

https://www.youtube.com/watch
Aṅguttara Nikāya
[aṅg: factor | uttara: additionalnal] The Aṅguttara Nikāya està subdividida
en onze subgrups anomenats nipātas, cadascun d’ells recollint discursos
que consisteix en enumeracions d’un factor addicional versus el de la
precedent nipāta. Conté milers de suttas que són generalment
curt.

Khuddaka Nikāya
[khuddha: curta, petita] The Khuddhaka
Els textos curts de Nikāya es consideren compostos de dues estrates:
Dhammapada, Udāna, Itivuttaka, Sutta Nipāta,
Theragāthā-Therīgāthā
i Jātaka formen els antics estrats, mentre que altres llibres són addicions tardanes
i la seva autenticitat és més qüestionable.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vv_mtv94_WU

https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/...

Cançó Tripitaka

Classical Cebuano-Cebuano clàssic
Sugilanon sa klasiko

ITEM 2773 Div 12 Okt. 2018
PRACTICE BUDDHA VACANA FOR PEACE (PBVP)
DILI KAAYO (DGBM)

Gitukod nga dagan sa kahoy sa MATANG

https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/ …
Tripitaka song

Gitukod nga dagan sa kahoy sa MATANG

Vinaya Piμaka
https://www.youtube.com/watch …
Vinaya Piṭaka: Mahāvagga (~ 1st to 2nd century) [Extract: Ang ebolusyon sa
Paghan-ay] Sutta Vibhaaga [duha ka libro nga adunay mga lagda alang sa bhikkus
i
bhikkhunis, nga naglatid sa walo ka matang sa mga krimen]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eWteUSs-8m4
Importante papel de las mujeres sa el Budismo ug las reglas de los monjes - desde el MN-44

(Lima nics o koleksyon)
Ang Sutta Piṭaka naglangkob sa diwa sa pagtulon-an sa Buddha
mahitungod sa Dhamma. Naglangkob kini sa kapin sa napulo ka libo nga sutta. Mao ba
gibahin sa lima ka koleksyon nga gitawag ug Nikāyas (usa ka panon sa katawhan, katilingban;
pagkolekta; sa klase, han-ay, grupo; usa ka asosasyon, panag-igsoonay,
kongregasyon; usa ka balay, pabalay).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9exdLBS6Y7A&t=607s
Pangutan-a ang usa ka monghe: ang Tipitaka

https://www.youtube.com/watch …

Ubos sa Piμaka

https://www.youtube.com/watch …
DN 01 Ang Tanang Pula sa Pagtan-aw sa II

Dīgha Nikāya
[dgha: taas] Si Dīgha Nikāya mikolekta sa 34 sa pinakataas nga mga pakigpulong
nga gihatag sa Buddha. Adunay ubay-ubay nga mga tip nga daghan kanila ang naulahi
pagdugang ngadto sa orihinal nga corpus ug kaduhaduhaan nga pagkatinuod.

https://www.youtube.com/watch …

“Majjhima Nikaya, ang mga pakigpulong sa average length”

Ang Buddha nagtudlo sa mga bhikkhuus nga pito ka mga pamaagi alang sa pagdili ug
ang pagsalikway sa mga tina, ang mga sukaranan nga mga kakulangan nga nagpadayon sa pagpangulipon
ngadto sa hugna sa pagkatawo ug kamatayon.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mfcteN91nnk
Saṃyutta Nikāya
[samyutta: grupo] Saṃyutta Nikāya nangolekta sa mga sutta sumala sa
Ang hilisgutan niini sa 56 nga mga subgroup nga gitawag sa saṃyuttas. Naglangkob kini labaw pa kay sa
Tulo ka libo nga mga pakigpulong nga nagkalainlain ang gitas-on, apan sa kasagaran medyo
mubo

https://www.youtube.com/watch …
Aṅguttara Nikāya
[aṅg: factor | uttara: additionalnal] Ang Aṅguttara Nikāya gibahin
Sa napulo’g usa ka mga subgroup nga gitawag ug nipātas, ang matag usa kanila nagkolekta sa mga pakigpulong
nga naglangkob sa mga pagsaysay sa usa ka dugang nga butang batok sa sa
Nauna nga nipta Naglangkob kini sa libu-libong suttas nga kasagaran
mubo

Khuddaka Nikāya
[khuddha: mubo, gamay] Ang Khuddhaka
Ang mubo nga mga teksto sa Nikāya gikonsiderar nga mga compound sa duha ka strata:
Dhammapada, Udāna, Itivuttaka, Sutta Nipāta,
Theragāthā-Therīgāthā
ug Jātaka mao ang porma sa daan nga sapin, samtang ang uban nga mga basahon mga ulahing pagdugang
ug ang pagkatinuod niini mas pangutana.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vv_mtv94_WU

https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/ …
Tripitaka song

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vv_mtv94_WU

https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/
Cançó Tripitaka


youtube.com
http://SupremeMasterTV.com
• BMD1098; Aired on 16 Sep 2009 This episode features the sage
teachings of the Buddha in the holy Tipitaka,…
Classical Chichewa Chichewa chachikale

ITEM 2773 Div 12 Oct. 2018
KUCHITA BUDDHA VACANA YA CHIKONDI (PBVP)
SINAYAMBA (DGBM)

Mtengo wa TYPES umayenda bwino

https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/ …
Nyimbo ya Tripitaka

Mtengo wa TYPES umayenda bwino

Vinaya Piμaka
https://www.youtube.com/watch …
Vinaya Piṭaka: Mahāvagga (~ 1st mpaka 2nd century) [Kuchokera: Kusinthika kwa
Kusankha] Sutta Vibhaaga [mabuku awiri omwe ali ndi malamulo a bhikkhus
i
bhikkhunis, kufotokoza mitundu eyiti ya milandu]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eWteUSs-8m4
Papels de las mujeres yofunika kwambiri pa mapulogalamu ena - kuyambira MN-44

(Zina zisanu kapena zokopa)
Sutta Piṭaka ili ndi chiyambi cha chiphunzitso cha Buddha
za Dhamma. Lili ndi suttas zikwi khumi. Ndi
Anagawidwa m’magulu asanu omwe amatchedwa Nikāyas (khamu, msonkhano; a
kusonkhanitsa; kusukulu, dongosolo, gulu; chiyanjano, ubale,
mpingo; nyumba, nyumba).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9exdLBS6Y7A&t=607s
Funsani mulungu: Tipitaka

https://www.youtube.com/watch …

Pansi pa Piμaka

https://www.youtube.com/watch …
DN 01 Zonse za Net Views za II

Dīgha Nikāya
[dgha: yaitali] Dīgha Nikāya amasonkhanitsa zolankhula zoposa 34
woperekedwa ndi Buddha. Pali ziphuphu zambiri zomwe ambiri a iwo amabwera mochedwa
zowonjezera ku chiyambi choyambirira ndi chodziwika chokayikitsa.

https://www.youtube.com/watch …

“Majjhima Nikaya, kulankhula kwa nthawi yaitali”

Buddha amaphunzitsa bhikkhus njira zisanu ndi ziwiri zoletsedwa
kuchoka kwa dyes, zofooka zazikulu zomwe zimakhala ukapolo
mpaka kuzungulira kubadwa ndi imfa.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mfcteN91nnk
Saṃyutta Nikāya
[samyutta: gulu] Saṃyutta Nikāya amasonkhanitsa suttas molingana ndi
Nkhani yake mu 56 magulu ang’onoang’ono otchedwa saṃyuttas. Lili ndi zambiri kuposa
Maulendo zikwi zitatu za kutalika, koma ambiri
zochepa

https://www.youtube.com/watch …
Aṅguttara Nikāya
[alembag: factor | uttara: zoonjezera] Aṅguttara Nikāya yagawidwa
Mu magulu khumi ndi limodzi omwe amatchedwa nipātas, aliyense wa iwo akukamba nkhani
zomwe zili ndi ndondomeko za chinthu china chogwirizana ndi cha
Nipta yapitayi Ili ndi zikwi za suttas zomwe kawirikawiri zimakhala
zochepa

Khuddaka Nikāya
[khuddha: ochepa, ochepa] The Khuddhaka
Malembo ochepa a Nikāya amaonedwa ngati mankhwala ophatikiza awiri:
Dhammapada, Udāna, Itivuttaka, Sutta Nipata,
Theragāthā-Therīgāthā
ndipo Jātaka amapanga chingwe chakale, pamene mabuku ena ali owonjezera mwamsanga
ndipo zoona zake ndizokayikitsa.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vv_mtv94_WU

https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/ …
Nyimbo ya Tripitaka 


Classical Chinese (Simplified)古典奇切瓦

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UdAT9C87cuI&t=904s
Chinese Buddhism Music: 7 songs
Dharmachakra Wheel of the Dharma
Published on Feb 9, 2017
Buddhism Meditation Music: Welcome to Chinese Buddhism, please scroll down
The Buddhist Tripitaka original music series
顯密經藏 原創音樂
1. Mind Bridge 心橋: 00:00
2. Neutral Mind 平常心: 10:39
3. Tears of Avalokiteśvara 觀音淚: 20:52
4. Follow Your Heart 隨緣: 30:47
5. Nirvana 涅槃: 40:34
6. Ultimate Bliss 極樂: 49:46
7. Praise of Badeng Rinpoche 巴登上師祈請文: 1:00:14

No copyright infringement is intended
Please visit the music source 請參觀音樂來源處
http://www.xianmijingzang.com/index/i

Useful links to access Buddhist Tipitaka/Tripitaka
大藏經網址

Theravada Tipitaka (English)
巴利大藏經 (英語)
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/

Theravada Tipitaka (Multilingual)
巴利大藏經 (多國語言)
https://suttacentral.net/

Theravada Suttas Reading (English)
巴利大藏經 經藏錄音 (英語)
http://www.suttareadings.net/audio/in

Theravada Tipitaka Reading (English)
巴利大藏經 三藏錄音 (英語)
http://www.audtip.org/

Audio recordings of selected texts from the Theravada tradition (English, Pāli, Sanskrit)
上座部佛法書籍錄音 (英語 巴利語 梵語)
http://www.ancient-buddhist-texts.net...

Theravada/Mahayana Selected Suttas/Sutras (English)
巴利大藏/北傳大藏經典選讀 (英語)
http://buddhasutra.com/

Mahayana Tripitaka (Multilingual)
大正新脩大藏經 (多國語言)
http://www.fodian.net/world/

Mahayana Tripitaka (English)
大正新脩大藏經 (英語)
http://www.bdk.or.jp/english/english_

Mahayana Tripitaka (English)
大正新脩大藏經 (英語)
http://www.sutrasmantras.info/

Other Mahayana Sutras and Buddhist books
其他大乘佛經與佛法書籍
Buddhist Text Translation Society (Multilingual)
http://www.buddhisttexts.org/ebooks-l
http://www.bttsonline.org/english-books/
Richard Hunn Association for Ch’an Study (English)
http://wenshuchan-online.weebly.com/c

Mahayana (QianLong or Dragon Buddhist Canon)/Vajrayana (Kangyur) Tripitaka Reading (Chinese, Tibetan)
顯密經藏 龍藏經(乾隆大藏經)/甘珠爾 三藏錄音 (中文,藏文)
*火力推薦 華人之福*
http://www.xianmijingzang.com/

Vajrayana Tripitaka: Kangyur/Tengyur (English)
甘珠爾/丹珠爾 (英語)
http://84000.co/

Digital Sanskrit Buddhist Canon (Sanskrit)
電子版梵文佛教文典 (梵文)
http://www.dsbcproject.org/

CBETA 漢文大藏經 (中文)
http://www.cbeta.org/

顯密文庫 佛教文集 附白話佛經 (中文)
(網址有時失效 請前往其他白話佛經網址)
http://read.goodweb.cn/

其他白話佛經網址 (中文)
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1W

Diamond Sutra: New translation by Alex Johnson (English)
金剛經匯集本: Alex Johnson匯集 (英語)
http://diamond-sutra.com/

Bibliography of translations from the Taishō Buddhist Canon (Mahayana Tripitaka) into Western Languages (Multilingual)
西語佛經 大正新脩大藏經 翻譯情況一覽 (多國語言)
http://mbingenheimer.net/tools/bibls/

Mahayana Buddhism Sutras (English Audiobook or Videobook) 英語佛經 (漢傳佛經)
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list

Theravada Buddhism Suttas (English Audiobook) 英語佛經 (南傳佛經)
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list

Other Chinese sutras 其他華語佛經
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list

Click this link to watch other Buddhism animations 按此連結有其它的佛教動畫
https://youtu.be/16XtO7T2d6g?list=PLF

“Dharmachakra Wheel of the Dharma” channel and other websites
本頻道的其他網站
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzVf
http://i.youku.com/i/UMzc2ODU0MzY2NA==

Email us about the video
電子郵箱
wheelofthedharma@gmail.com
Category
Education
古典奇切瓦

项目2773 Div 10月12日2018
实践BUDDHA VACANA FOR PEACE(PBVP)
不一样(DGBM)

TYPES树的结构化流程

https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/
大藏经歌

TYPES树的结构化流程

VinayaPiμaka
https://www.youtube.com/watch
VinayaPiṭaka:Mahāvagga(~1至2世纪)[摘录:
排序] Sutta Vibhaaga [两本书包含比丘的规则

bhikkhunis,概述八种罪行]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eWteUSs-8m4
Importante papel de las mujeres en el budismo y las reglas de los monjes - desde el MN-44

(五个nics或收藏)
SuttaPiṭaka包含了佛陀教学的精髓
关于佛法。它包含超过一万个suttas。是
分为五个系列,称为Nikāyas(人群,集会; a
收集;上课,订购,分组;协会,兄弟会,
众;房子,房屋)。

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9exdLBS6Y7A&t=607s
问一个和尚:Tipitaka

https://www.youtube.com/watch

在Piμaka下

https://www.youtube.com/watch
DN 01 I II的全部视图

DīghaNikāya
[dgha:long]DīghaNikāya收集了34篇最长的演讲
由佛陀给出。有几个提示,其中许多人迟到了
添加到原始语料库和可疑的真实性。

https://www.youtube.com/watch

“Majjhima Nikaya,平均长度的演讲”

佛陀教授比丘的七种限制方法
放弃染料,维持奴隶制的根本缺陷
到了出生和死亡的轮次。

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mfcteN91nnk
SaṃyuttaNikāya
[samyutta:group]SaṃyuttaNikāya根据收集suttas
它的主题在56个小组中称为saṃyuttas。它包含多个
三千种不同长度的演讲,但一般相对而言

https://www.youtube.com/watch
AṅguttaraNikāya
[aṅg:factor | uttara:additionalnal]AṅguttaraNikāya被细分
在称为nipātas的11个小组中,每个小组都收集了演讲
其中包括一个附加因子的枚举与
以前的nipta它通常包含成千上万的suttas

KhuddakaNikāya
[khuddha:短,小] Khuddhaka
Nikāya的短文被认为是两个阶层的复合体:
Dhammapada,Udāna,Itivuttaka,SuttaNipāta,
Theragāthā-Therīgāthā
和Jātaka形成了旧的阶层,而其他书籍则是后期的补充
它的真实性更值得怀疑。

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vv_mtv94_WU

https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/
大藏经歌


youtube.com
Buddhism
Meditation Music: Welcome to Chinese Buddhism, please scroll down The
Buddhist Tripitaka original music series 顯密經藏 原創音樂 1. Mind…

LikeShow More Reactions
Comment

Classical Chinese (Traditional)  - 古典中文(繁體)
1 min ·

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UH3X1H6pYjY
Chinese Buddhist Cave Shrines
Asian Art Museum
Published on May 20, 2009
Explore ancient Buddhist cave shrines in China and discover why the sites were created.

Category
Education
古典中文(繁體)

項目2773 Div 10月12日2018
實踐BUDDHA VACANA FOR PEACE(PBVP)
不一樣(DG​​BM)

TYPES樹的結構化流程

https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/
大藏經歌

TYPES樹的結構化流程

VinayaPiμaka
https://www.youtube.com/watch
VinayaPiṭaka:Mahāvagga(~1至2世紀)[摘錄:
排序] Sutta Vibhaaga [兩本書包含比丘的規則

bhikkhunis,概述八種罪行]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eWteUSs-8m4
Importante papel de las mujeres en el budismo y las reglas de los monjes - desde el MN-44

(五個nics或收藏)
SuttaPiṭaka包含了佛陀教學的精髓
關於佛法。它包含超過一萬個suttas。是
分為五個系列,稱為Nikāyas(人群,集會; a
收集;上課,訂購,分組;協會,兄弟會,
眾;房子,房屋)。

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9exdLBS6Y7A&t=607s
問一個和尚:Tipitaka

https://www.youtube.com/watch

在Piμaka下

https://www.youtube.com/watch
DN 01 I II的全部視圖

DīghaNikāya
[dgha:long]DīghaNikāya收集了34篇最長的演講
由佛陀給出。有幾個提示,其中許多人遲到了
添加到原始語料庫和可疑的真實性。

https://www.youtube.com/watch

“Majjhima Nikaya,平均長度的演講”

佛陀教授比丘的七種限制方法
放棄染料,維持奴隸制的根本缺陷
到了出生和死亡的輪次。

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mfcteN91nnk
SaṃyuttaNikāya
[samyutta:group]SaṃyuttaNikāya根據收集suttas
它的主題在56個小組中稱為saṃyuttas。它包含多個
三千種不同長度的演講,但一般相對​​而言

https://www.youtube.com/watch
AṅguttaraNikāya
[aṅg:factor | uttara:additionalnal]AṅguttaraNikāya被細分
在稱為nipātas的11個小組中,每個小組都收集了演講
其中包括一個附加因子的枚舉與
以前的nipta它包含通常的數千個suttas

KhuddakaNikāya
[khuddha:短,小] Khuddhaka
Nikāya的短文被認為是兩個階層的複合體:
Dhammapada,Udāna,Itivuttaka,SuttaNipāta,
Theragāthā-Therīgāthā
和Jātaka形成了舊的階層,而其他書籍則是後期的補充
它的真實性更值得懷疑。

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vv_mtv94_WU

https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/
大藏經歌


youtube.com
Explore ancient Buddhist cave shrines in China and discover why the sites were created.
Classical  Corsican-Corsa Corsicana

ITEM 2773 Div 12 Oct. 2018
PRACTICE BUDDHA VACANA FOR PEACE (PBVP)
NO SAME (DGBM)

U flussu strutturatu di l’arbre di TYPES

https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/ …
Tripitaka song

U flussu strutturatu di l’arbre di TYPES

Vinaya Piμaka
https://www.youtube.com/watch …
Vinaya Piṭaka: Mahāvagga (~ 1 ° à 2 ° seculu) [Estrattate: L’evoluzione di
Sorting] Sutta Vibhaaga [dui libri chì cuntenenu e reguli per bhikkhus
i
bhikkhunis, scrivenu ottu tipi di crimini]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eWteUSs-8m4
Impurtante rollu di e femini in u buddimu è e reguli di i monchi - da u MN-44

(Cinqui nichi o cullezzione)
U Sutta Piṭaka cuntene l’essenza di l’insignamentu di u Buddu
versu u Dhamma. Contene più di deci milla suttas. Is
divisu in cinque culleculi chjamati Nikāyas (Un ghjente, assemblea; a
cullezzione; à a classa, ordine, gruppu; una associazione, fraternità,
congregation; una casa, abitudine).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9exdLBS6Y7A&t=607s
Ask a monk: u Tipitaka

https://www.youtube.com/watch …

Sottu Piμaka

https://www.youtube.com/watch …
DN 01 U Net Net of Views di l’I II

Dīgha Nikāya
[dgha: long] Dīgha Nikāya recuuta 34 di i discorsi più longu
datu da u Buddhist. Ci sò parechji cunsiglii chì parechji di elli arribanu tardi
aghjunte per u corpus uriginale è l’autenticità dubbiare.

https://www.youtube.com/watch …

“Majjhima Nikaya, i discorsi di a longa media”

U Buddhà enseò i bhikkhus set mètudi per a restrizzioni è
l’abbandunamentu di i tinte, e mancanza fundamentale chì sustene l’esclavità
à a ronda di nascita è morte.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mfcteN91nnk
Saṃyutta Nikāya
[samyutta: gruppu] Saṃyutta Nikāya recuata i suttas secondu
Su subjecte in 56 subgruppi chjamati saṃyuttas. Ùn cuntene più di più
Trè mila discorsi di variendu tulu, ma in generale in relazione
curtu

https://www.youtube.com/watch …
Aṅguttara Nikāya
[aṅg: factor | uttara: additionalale] Aṅguttara Nikāya hè divisu
In ònde i sottugruppi chjamati nipātas, ogni unu di elli cugghiate speeches
chì compone di l’enumerazione di un factor addizzjonali versus u di u
nipta chì hè stata cumposta di miglii di suttas chì sò abituati
curtu

Khuddaka Nikāya
[Kudya: curta, chjuca] U Kuddhaka
I testi brevi di Nikāya sò cunsiderate cumminati di dui strati:
Dhammapada, Udāna, Itivuttaka, Sutta Nipāta,
Theragāthā-Therīgāthā
è Jātaka formanu a strata antica, mentre chì altri libri sò aghjunte tardi
è a so l’autenticità hè più dubbiute.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vv_mtv94_WU

https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/ …
Tripitaka song

Classical Czech

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dyM2AnA96yE
Edvard Grieg: Peer Gynt Suite No.1
Juancitoamericano
Published on Nov 24, 2011
Edvard Grieg (1843-1907) is the greatest composer Norway has fostered.
In retrospect one may wonder how a country with neither national freedom
nor a long tradition of art music could have produced a man of such
genius.

Up to 1814 Norway had been totally subject to Denmark,
with Copenhagen as its cultural center. From 1814 to 1905 it was forced
into a union with Sweden. The first half of the eighteenth century was a
time of poverty in Norway and it was some time before it could assert
itself among its Scandinavian brothers. But for the highly gifted these
are perhaps the ideal conditions for providing impetus and nurturing
growth.

In the autumn of 1858, Edvard Grieg, then only 15 years
old, went to the Leipzig Conservatory to study music. His teachers were
among the most eminent in Europe, and four years later he left the
Conservatory as a full-fledged musician and composer. In the years up to
1866, Grieg lived in Copenhagen, leaving it only to make brief study
trips.

Grieg’s style was based on the German romantic tradition
of music but bit by bit national awareness developed within him, coupled
with a growing need to create a typical Norwegian style of music. His
friendships and discussions with other young Norwegians also furthered
this development. In Copenhagen Grieg had met Rikard Nordraak, whose
patriotism reached its fullest expression in the choral setting of
Norway’s national anthem.

In 1869 Grieg, on a state stipend,
left for Italy. His encounter with Franz Liszt and the artistic circles
in Rome gave him fresh inspiration and self-confidence. Fired with new
energy and enthusiasm he returned to Christiania in 1870. There he
initiated a fruitful cooperation with Bjornstjerne Bjornson, who for
many years had been waiting for a composer who could write Norwegian
music that would expand and bring to life his poems and dramas. Grieg’s
dramatic talents were put to a test when Henrik Ibsen asked him to
write the incidental music to “Peer Gynt.” This was no easy task for
Grieg, but the music he wrote became one of the major works of the
1870s. In Grieg’s own lifetime the “Peer Gynt” music scored a resounding
international success thanks, not least, to the two orchestral suites
which made the music accessible in the concert hall.

A number of
music researchers have pointed to the significance of Grieg’s later
works on the French impressionists’ search for a new world of sound.
After Grieg’s death Maurice Ravel visited Oslo, where he was asked,
whether Norwegian music had influenced him. His answer was: “I am fairly
certain, that Edvard Grieg’s influence was much more significant in
non-nordic countries than here in the north. The generation of French
composers, which I am part of, was strongly attracted by Grieg’s music.
Next to Debussy there’s no other composer, whom I feel more related to,
than Grieg.”

Bela Bartok, who attempted to renew musical style
in the twentieth century on the basis of folk music, also received
important impulses from Grieg’s piano adaptations of such melodies.


Edvard Grieg’s goal was to create a national form of music which could
give the Norwegian people an identity, and in this respect he was an
inspiration to other composers.

But the greatness of his works
lies not just in this, but in the fact that he also succeeded in
expressing thoughts and emotions which could be recognized everywhere;
music which people could identify with. Grieg’s music transcended
national boundaries. Viewed in this perspective, it is evident that he
was far more than just a national composer.

Peer Gynt Suite No.1
Performed by the Berliner Philharmoniker Orchestra
Herbert von Karajan, Conductor
Category
Music


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