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Paṭisambhidā Jāla-Abaddha Paripanti Tipiṭaka nīti Anvesanā ca Paricaya Nikhilavijjālaya ca ñātibhūta Pavatti Nissāya 
http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org anto 112 Seṭṭhaganthāyatta Bhāsā
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Diploma in Theravada Buddhist Studies (DBS) Model Question Paper 2018-19 Q 11 to Q 24
Filed under: General, Vinaya Pitaka, Sutta Pitaka, Abhidhamma Pitaka, Tipiṭaka, ಅಭಿಧಮ್ಮಪಿಟಕ, ವಿನಯಪಿಟಕ, ತಿಪಿಟಕ (ಮೂಲ)
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LESSON 3030 Fri 14 Jun 2019

Invitation to Bhikkhus, Bhikkunis, Upakakas, Upasikas of All Awakened Aboriginal Societies

with their gracious presence and blessings

for our

OPENING CEREMONY

of

TIPITAKA BUDDHA SASANA KUSHINARA PARINIBBANA BHOOMI


TBSKPB

White Home for TIPITAKA

 to DO GOOD BE MINDFUL which is the Essence of the Words of the Awakened One with Awareness


Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta —
Attendance on awareness — [ mahā+satipaṭṭhāna ]
MEDITATION PRACTICE in BUDDHA’S OWN WORDS for welfare, happiness and peace on the path of Eternal Bliss as Final Goal


Day and Date will be announced




from

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Paṭisambhidā Jāla-Abaddha Paripanti Tipiṭaka nīti Anvesanā ca Paricaya Nikhilavijjālaya ca ñātibhūta Pavatti Nissāya http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org anto 112 Seṭṭhaganthāyatta Bhās
“No entanto, muitas palavras sagradas que você lê, no entanto, muitos que você fala, que bem eles vão fazer você Se você não

668,
5A Main Road, 8th Cross HAL III Stage Bengaluru - 560075 Karnataka
India Ph: 91 (080) 25203792 Email: buddhasaid2us@gmail.com



up a levelhttp://sarvajan.ambedkar.orgup a level

Buddhasasana

“In the Buddha you see clearly a man, simple, devout, alone,
battling for light, a vivid human personality, not a myth. He too gave a
message to mankind universal in character.”

http://www.orgsites.com/oh/awakenedone/

Awakeness Practices

All 84,000 Khandas As Found in the Pali Suttas

Traditionally there  are 84,000 Dhamma Doors - 84,000 ways to get
Awakeness. Maybe so; certainly the Buddha taught a large number of
practices that lead to Awakeness. This web page attempts to catalogue
those found in the Pali Suttas (DN, MN, SN, AN, Ud & Sn 1).

There are 3 sections:

The discourses of Buddha are divided into 84,000, as to separate
addresses. The division includes all that was spoken by Buddha.”I
received from Buddha,” said Ananda, “82,000 Khandas, and  from the
priests 2000; these are 84,000 Khandas maintained by me.” They are
divided into 275,250, as to the stanzas of the original text, and into
361,550, as to the stanzas of the commentary. All the discourses
including both those of Buddha and those of the commentator, are
divided  into 2,547 banawaras, containing 737,000 stanzas, and29,368,000
separate letters.

in
Diploma in Theravada Buddhist Studies (DBS)
Model Question Paper
2018-19

Q 11 to 24

Q 11 How many types of Bodhisattas are there ? Elaborate on each of them.

Bodhisatta refers to anyone who has made a resolution to become a
Buddha and has also received a confirmation or prediction from a living
Buddha that this will be so.
A Crowned Bodhisattva Head and its type. | Tom Swope Gallery
A Crowned Bodhisatta Head and its type
Top 6 Popular Types of Buddhism Figures in Tibet - China ...23China Buddhism Bronze Gild Three Bodhisattva Sakyamuni ...
Three Bodhisatta Sakyamuni …Wisdom | An Excerpt from The Bodhisattva Guide | Shambhala
An Excerpt from The Bodhisatta Guide | Shambhala
File:Gandhara, bodhisattva assiso, II sec..JPG - Wikipedia
Gandhara, bodhisatta assiso, II sec.
File:Seated Bodhisattva, c. 775, Japan, wood core, dry ...
Seated Bodhisatta, c. 775, Japan
File:Bodhisattva statue at National Museum, New Delhi.jpg ...
Bodhisatta statue at National Museum, New Delhi81 best images about Tibetan Culture on Pinterest | Tibet ...
best images about Tibetan Culture
File:Five Wisdom Buddhas and four Bodhisattvas at the ...
Five Wisdom Buddhas and four Bodhisattas Bodhisattva Maitreya (article) | Khan Academy
Bodhisatta Maitreya (article) | Khan Academy
1000+ images about Bodhisattvas on Pinterest | Guanyin ...
images about BodhisattasBodhisattva - JungleKey.in Image
Bodhisatta File:A 16-bodhisattva-siebold.jpg - Chinese Buddhist ...
16-bodhisattva-siebold.jpg - Chinese Buddhist …Powers & Abilities - Different types of Asura ? | Oro Jackson
Powers & Abilities - Different types of Asura ?The Buddha Amitabha with the eight great bodhisattvas ...
The Buddha Amitabha with the eight great bodhisattas …File:Chinese mural of a bodhisattva, ink and color on ...
Chinese mural of a bodhisatta, ink and colorFile:Amitabha with Eight Great Bodhisattvas (Jokyoji Kyoto ...
Amitabha with Eight Great Bodhisattvas (Jokyoji Kyoto …Bodhisattva (Jp. = Bosatsu) - Japanese Buddhism ...
Bodhisatta (Jp. = Bosatsu) - Japanese Buddhism …File:Bodhisattva at Iimori-yama closeup.JPG - Wikimedia ...
Bodhisatta at Iimori-yama closeupFile:Amitabha Buddha and Bodhisattvas.jpeg - Wikimedia Commons
Amitabha Buddha and Bodhisattas.YOGA LIFE: Are you on your way to Bodhisattva?
Are you on your way to Bodhisatta?
Bodhisattva - Wikipedia
Bodhisatta
File:Buddha and Bodhisattvas Dunhuang Mogao Caves.png ...
Buddha and Bodhisattas Dunhuang Mogao Caves.png …
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sKhY2HxRojQ
Difference Between Buddha and Bodhisatta

Published on Mar 14, 2017

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Chinese: 虛空藏; pinyin: Xūkōngzàng; Japanese pronunciation: Kokūzō; Korean: 허공장, Tibetan: ནམ་མཁའི་སྙིང་པོ།, THL: Namkha’i Nyingpo) is a bodhisattva who is associated with the great element (mahābhūta) of space (ākāśa).

(Chinese: 觀音; pinyin: Guanyin; Japanese pronunciation: Kannon; Korean: 관음; Vietnamese: Quán Thế Âm, Tibetan: སྤྱན་རས་གཟིགས་, THL: Chenrézik)

The bodhisatta of compassion, the listener of the world’s cries
who uses skillful means to come to their aid; the most universally
acknowledged bodhisatta in Mahayana Buddhism and appears unofficially
in Theravada Buddhism in Cambodia under the name Lokeśvara. This
bodhisatta gradually became identified predominantly as female in East Asian Buddhism and its name may originally have been Avalokitāśvara.

(Chinese: 地藏; pinyin: Dìzáng; Japanese pronunciation: Jizō; Korean: 지장; Vietnamese: Địa Tạng, Tibetan: ས་ཡི་སྙིང་པོ, THL: Sayi Nyingpo).

Kṣitigarbha is a bodhisatta primarily revered in East Asian Buddhism and usually depicted as a Buddhist monk.
His name may be translated as “Earth Treasury”, “Earth Store”, “Earth
Matrix”, or “Earth Womb”. Kṣitigarbha is known for his vow to take
responsibility for the instruction of all beings in the six worlds between the death of Gautama Buddha and the rise of Maitreya, as well as his vow not to achieve Buddhahood until all hells
are emptied. He is therefore often regarded as the bodhisatta of
hell-beings, as well as the guardian of children and patron deity of
deceased children and aborted fetuses in Japanese culture.


(Chinese: 大勢至; pinyin: Dàshìzhì; Japanese pronunciation: Daiseishi; Korean: 대세지; Vietnamese: Đại Thế Chí)

Mahāsthāmaprāpta (Korean: Daeseji) is a mahāsattva representing the power of wisdom, often depicted in a trinity with Amitābha and Avalokiteśvara, especially in Pure Land Buddhism. His name literally means “arrival of the great strength”.

In some Buddhist texts such as the Amitabha Sutra and the Lotus Sutra, he is referred to as Ajita.
Chinese: 彌勒; pinyin: Mílè; Japanese pronunciation: Miroku; Korean: 미륵; Vietnamese: Di-lặc, Tibetan: བྱམས་པ་, THL: Jampa).

According to both Mahayana and Theravada Buddhism, Maitreya is
regarded as the future buddha. Buddhist tradition, Maitreya is a
bodhisattva who will appear on Earth in the future, achieve complete enlightenment, and teach the pure dhamma. According to scriptures, Maitreya will be a successor to the present Buddha, Gautama Buddha.
The prophecy of the arrival of Maitreya refers to a time in the future
when the dharma will have been forgotten by most on the terrestrial
world. This prophecy is found in the canonical literature of all major schools of Buddhism. Maitreya has also been adopted for his millenarian role by many non-Buddhist religions in the past such as the White Lotus as well as by modern new religious movements such as Yiguandao.


(Chinese: 文殊; pinyin: Wénshū; Japanese pronunciation: Monju; Korean: 문수; Vietnamese: Văn Thù, Tibetan: འཇམ་དཔལ་དབྱངས།, THL: Jampelyang)

Mañjuśrī is a bodhisattva associated with prajñā (transcendent wisdom) in Mahayana Buddhism. In Tibetan Buddhism, he is also a yidam. His name means “Gentle Glory” Mañjuśrī is also known by the fuller Sanskrit name of Mañjuśrīkumārabhūta,[4] literally “Mañjuśrī, Still a Youth” or, less literally, “Prince Mañjuśrī”.



Chinese: 普賢菩薩; pinyin: Pǔxián; Japanese pronunciation: Fugen; Korean: 보현; Vietnamese: Phổ Hiền, Tibetan: ཀུན་ཏུ་བཟང་པོ, THL: Küntu Zangpo, Mongolian: Хамгаар Сайн}

Samantabhadra Universal Worthy is associated with practice and meditation. Together with the Buddha and Mañjuśrī, he forms the Shakyamuni trinity in Buddhism. He is the patron of the Lotus Sutra and, according to the Avatamsaka Sutra, made the ten great vows which are the basis of a bodhisatta. In China,
Samantabhadra is associated with action, whereas Mañjuśrī is associated
with prajñā. In Japan, Samantabharda is often venerated by the Tendai and in Shingon Buddhism, and as the protector of the Lotus Sutra by Nichiren Buddhism. In the Nyingma school of Tibetan Buddhism, Samantabhadra is also the name of the Adi-Buddha - in indivisible Yab-Yum union with his consort, Samantabhadrī.

(Chinese: 金剛手; pinyin: Jīngāngshǒu; Japanese pronunciation: Kongōshu; Korean: 금강수; Vietnamese: Kim cương thủ, Tibetan: ཕྱག་ན་རྡོ་རྗེ་, THL: Chakna Dorjé)

Vajrapāṇi (Sanskrit, “Vajra
in [his] hand”) is one of the earliest-appearing bodhisattvas in
Mahayana Buddhism. He is the protector and guide of Gautama Buddha and
rose to symbolize the Buddha’s power.

Vajrapāṇi is extensively represented in Buddhist iconography as
one of the three protective deities surrounding the Buddha. Each of them
symbolizes one of the Buddha’s virtues: Mañjuśrī manifests all the Buddhas’ wisdom, Avalokiteśvara manifests all the Buddhas’ compassion and Vajrapāṇi manifests all the Buddhas’ power as well as the power of all five tathāgatas. Vajrapāṇi is one of the earliest dharmapalas and the only Buddhist deity to be mentioned in the Pāli Canon as well as be worshiped in the Shaolin Monastery,
in Tibetan Buddhism and in Pure Land Buddhism, where he is known as
Mahasthamaprapta and forms a triad with Amitābha and Avalokiteśvara.

Manifestations of Vajrapāṇi can also be found in many Buddhist temples in Japan as dharma protectors called the Niō (仁王) or “Two Kings”. The Niō are two wrathful and muscular guardians of the Buddha standing today at the entrance of many Buddhist temples in East Asian Buddhism.
They are said to be dharmapala manifestations of Vajrapāṇi. According
to Japanese tradition, they traveled with Gautama Buddha to protect him,
reminiscent of Vajrapāṇi’s role in the Ambaṭṭha Sutta of the Pali Canon. Within the generally pacifist tradition
of Buddhism, stories of dharmapalas justified the use of physical force
to protect cherished values and beliefs against evil. The Niō are also
seen as a manifestations of Mahasthamaprapta in Pure Land Buddhism and
as Vajrasattva in Tibetan Buddhism.[5]

Vajrapāṇi is also associated with Acala, who is venerated as Fudō-Myō in Japan, where he is serenaded as the holder of the vajra.

Classification

Four Great Bodhisattas

There are several lists of four Bodhisattas according to scripture and local tradition.

Popular Chinese Buddhism generally lists the following, as they are associated with the Four Sacred Mountains:


The Womb Realm Mandala of Esoteric Buddhism
provides another enumeration. These bodhisattvas are featured in the
Eight Petal Hall in the center of the mandala. They are as follows:



The Avataṃsaka Sūtra mentions four bodhisattvas, each of whom expounds a portion of the Fifty-two Stages of Bodhisattv Practice.



The Lotus Sutta provides a list of bodhisattvas that are the leaders of the Bodhisattas of the Earth.




Five Great Bodhisattas

Chapter 7 of the Humane King Sutra provides an enumeration of five bodhisattvas, known as the “Five Bodhisattvas of Great Power
(五大力菩薩).” There are two Chinese translations of this text, each
providing an entirely different name to these figures. Their association
with the cardinal directions also differs between versions.[7] They are as follows:



Old translation (Kumaravija) Direction New translation (Amoghavajra) Direction
無量力吼
West
Vajrapāramitā (剛波羅蜜多)
Central
雷電吼
North
Vajrayakṣa (金剛夜叉)
North
無畏方吼
East
Vajratīkṣṇa (金剛利)
West
龍王吼
South
Vajraratna (金剛宝)
South
金剛吼
Central
Vajrapāṇi (金剛手)
East


Sixteen Bodhisattas

The Niṣpannayogāvalī provides a list of bodhisattas known as the “Sixteen Honored Ones of the Auspicious Aeon.”
They also appear in a Sutra with the same title (賢劫十六尊). They are as
follows, along with their respective associated directions:



East South West North


Another set of sixteen are known as the “Sixteen Great Bodhisattas” and make up a portion of the Diamond Realm Mandala. They are associated with the Buddhas of the cardinal directions.



Akṣobhya
(East)
Ratnasaṃbhava
(South)
Amitābha
(West)
Amoghasiddhi
(North)


Twenty-five Bodhisattas

According to the Sūtta on Ten Methods of Rebirth in Amitābha Buddha’s Land (十往生阿彌陀佛國經), those people who are devoted to attaining rebirth in the Western Pure Land are protected by a great number of bodhisattvas. Twenty-five of them are given by name:


ood core, dry …

Chinese: 虛空藏; pinyin: Xūkōngzàng; Japanese pronunciation: Kokūzō; Korean: 허공장, Tibetan: ནམ་མཁའི་སྙིང་པོ།, THL: Namkha’i Nyingpo) is a bodhisattva who is associated with the great element (mahābhūta) of space (ākāśa).

(Chinese: 觀音; pinyin: Guanyin; Japanese pronunciation: Kannon; Korean: 관음; Vietnamese: Quán Thế Âm, Tibetan: སྤྱན་རས་གཟིགས་, THL: Chenrézik)

The bodhisatta of compassion, the listener of the world’s cries
who uses skillful means to come to their aid; the most universally
acknowledged bodhisatta in Mahayana Buddhism and appears unofficially
in Theravada Buddhism in Cambodia under the name Lokeśvara. This
bodhisatta gradually became identified predominantly as female in East Asian Buddhism and its name may originally have been Avalokitāśvara.

(Chinese: 地藏; pinyin: Dìzáng; Japanese pronunciation: Jizō; Korean: 지장; Vietnamese: Địa Tạng, Tibetan: ས་ཡི་སྙིང་པོ, THL: Sayi Nyingpo).

Kṣitigarbha is a bodhisatta primarily revered in East Asian Buddhism and usually depicted as a Buddhist monk.
His name may be translated as “Earth Treasury”, “Earth Store”, “Earth
Matrix”, or “Earth Womb”. Kṣitigarbha is known for his vow to take
responsibility for the instruction of all beings in the six worlds between the death of Gautama Buddha and the rise of Maitreya, as well as his vow not to achieve Buddhahood until all hells
are emptied. He is therefore often regarded as the bodhisatta of
hell-beings, as well as the guardian of children and patron deity of
deceased children and aborted fetuses in Japanese culture.


(Chinese: 大勢至; pinyin: Dàshìzhì; Japanese pronunciation: Daiseishi; Korean: 대세지; Vietnamese: Đại Thế Chí)

Mahāsthāmaprāpta (Korean: Daeseji) is a mahāsattva representing the power of wisdom, often depicted in a trinity with Amitābha and Avalokiteśvara, especially in Pure Land Buddhism. His name literally means “arrival of the great strength”.

In some Buddhist texts such as the Amitabha Sutra and the Lotus Sutra, he is referred to as Ajita.
Chinese: 彌勒; pinyin: Mílè; Japanese pronunciation: Miroku; Korean: 미륵; Vietnamese: Di-lặc, Tibetan: བྱམས་པ་, THL: Jampa).

According to both Mahayana and Theravada Buddhism, Maitreya is
regarded as the future buddha. Buddhist tradition, Maitreya is a
bodhisattva who will appear on Earth in the future, achieve complete enlightenment, and teach the pure dhamma. According to scriptures, Maitreya will be a successor to the present Buddha, Gautama Buddha.
The prophecy of the arrival of Maitreya refers to a time in the future
when the dharma will have been forgotten by most on the terrestrial
world. This prophecy is found in the canonical literature of all major schools of Buddhism. Maitreya has also been adopted for his millenarian role by many non-Buddhist religions in the past such as the White Lotus as well as by modern new religious movements such as Yiguandao.


(Chinese: 文殊; pinyin: Wénshū; Japanese pronunciation: Monju; Korean: 문수; Vietnamese: Văn Thù, Tibetan: འཇམ་དཔལ་དབྱངས།, THL: Jampelyang)

Mañjuśrī is a bodhisattva associated with prajñā (transcendent wisdom) in Mahayana Buddhism. In Tibetan Buddhism, he is also a yidam. His name means “Gentle Glory” Mañjuśrī is also known by the fuller Sanskrit name of Mañjuśrīkumārabhūta,[4] literally “Mañjuśrī, Still a Youth” or, less literally, “Prince Mañjuśrī”.



Chinese: 普賢菩薩; pinyin: Pǔxián; Japanese pronunciation: Fugen; Korean: 보현; Vietnamese: Phổ Hiền, Tibetan: ཀུན་ཏུ་བཟང་པོ, THL: Küntu Zangpo, Mongolian: Хамгаар Сайн}

Samantabhadra Universal Worthy is associated with practice and meditation. Together with the Buddha and Mañjuśrī, he forms the Shakyamuni trinity in Buddhism. He is the patron of the Lotus Sutra and, according to the Avatamsaka Sutra, made the ten great vows which are the basis of a bodhisatta. In China,
Samantabhadra is associated with action, whereas Mañjuśrī is associated
with prajñā. In Japan, Samantabharda is often venerated by the Tendai and in Shingon Buddhism, and as the protector of the Lotus Sutra by Nichiren Buddhism. In the Nyingma school of Tibetan Buddhism, Samantabhadra is also the name of the Adi-Buddha - in indivisible Yab-Yum union with his consort, Samantabhadrī.

(Chinese: 金剛手; pinyin: Jīngāngshǒu; Japanese pronunciation: Kongōshu; Korean: 금강수; Vietnamese: Kim cương thủ, Tibetan: ཕྱག་ན་རྡོ་རྗེ་, THL: Chakna Dorjé)

Vajrapāṇi (Sanskrit, “Vajra
in [his] hand”) is one of the earliest-appearing bodhisattvas in
Mahayana Buddhism. He is the protector and guide of Gautama Buddha and
rose to symbolize the Buddha’s power.

Vajrapāṇi is extensively represented in Buddhist iconography as
one of the three protective deities surrounding the Buddha. Each of them
symbolizes one of the Buddha’s virtues: Mañjuśrī manifests all the Buddhas’ wisdom, Avalokiteśvara manifests all the Buddhas’ compassion and Vajrapāṇi manifests all the Buddhas’ power as well as the power of all five tathāgatas. Vajrapāṇi is one of the earliest dharmapalas and the only Buddhist deity to be mentioned in the Pāli Canon as well as be worshiped in the Shaolin Monastery,
in Tibetan Buddhism and in Pure Land Buddhism, where he is known as
Mahasthamaprapta and forms a triad with Amitābha and Avalokiteśvara.

Manifestations of Vajrapāṇi can also be found in many Buddhist temples in Japan as dharma protectors called the Niō (仁王) or “Two Kings”. The Niō are two wrathful and muscular guardians of the Buddha standing today at the entrance of many Buddhist temples in East Asian Buddhism.
They are said to be dharmapala manifestations of Vajrapāṇi. According
to Japanese tradition, they traveled with Gautama Buddha to protect him,
reminiscent of Vajrapāṇi’s role in the Ambaṭṭha Sutta of the Pali Canon. Within the generally pacifist tradition
of Buddhism, stories of dharmapalas justified the use of physical force
to protect cherished values and beliefs against evil. The Niō are also
seen as a manifestations of Mahasthamaprapta in Pure Land Buddhism and
as Vajrasattva in Tibetan Buddhism.[5]

Vajrapāṇi is also associated with Acala, who is venerated as Fudō-Myō in Japan, where he is serenaded as the holder of the vajra.

Classification

Four Great Bodhisattas

There are several lists of four Bodhisattas according to scripture and local tradition.

Popular Chinese Buddhism generally lists the following, as they are associated with the Four Sacred Mountains:


The Womb Realm Mandala of Esoteric Buddhism
provides another enumeration. These bodhisattvas are featured in the
Eight Petal Hall in the center of the mandala. They are as follows:



The Avataṃsaka Sūtra mentions four bodhisattvas, each of whom expounds a portion of the Fifty-two Stages of Bodhisattv Practice.



The Lotus Sutta provides a list of bodhisattvas that are the leaders of the Bodhisattas of the Earth.




Five Great Bodhisattas

Chapter 7 of the Humane King Sutra provides an enumeration of five bodhisattvas, known as the “Five Bodhisattvas of Great Power
(五大力菩薩).” There are two Chinese translations of this text, each
providing an entirely different name to these figures. Their association
with the cardinal directions also differs between versions.[7] They are as follows:



Old translation (Kumaravija) Direction New translation (Amoghavajra) Direction
無量力吼
West
Vajrapāramitā (剛波羅蜜多)
Central
雷電吼
North
Vajrayakṣa (金剛夜叉)
North
無畏方吼
East
Vajratīkṣṇa (金剛利)
West
龍王吼
South
Vajraratna (金剛宝)
South
金剛吼
Central
Vajrapāṇi (金剛手)
East


Sixteen Bodhisattas

The Niṣpannayogāvalī provides a list of bodhisattas known as the “Sixteen Honored Ones of the Auspicious Aeon.”
They also appear in a Sutra with the same title (賢劫十六尊). They are as
follows, along with their respective associated directions:



East South West North


Another set of sixteen are known as the “Sixteen Great Bodhisattas” and make up a portion of the Diamond Realm Mandala. They are associated with the Buddhas of the cardinal directions.



Akṣobhya
(East)
Ratnasaṃbhava
(South)
Amitābha
(West)
Amoghasiddhi
(North)


Twenty-five Bodhisattas

According to the Sūtta on Ten Methods of Rebirth in Amitābha Buddha’s Land (十往生阿彌陀佛國經), those people who are devoted to attaining rebirth in the Western Pure Land are protected by a great number of bodhisattvas. Twenty-five of them are given by name:



Q 12 How many perfections a Bodhisatta must fulfil to become a Buddha ?

Q 13 Write an essay on theten Paramis.

Q 12 How many perfections a Bodhisatta must fulfil to become a Buddha ?


Q 13 Write an essay on the ten Paramis.

https://quizlet.com/7936317/the-ten-perfections-paramis-flash-cards/

Terms in this set (10)


This
can be characterized by unattached and unconditional generosity, giving
and letting go. Giving leads to being reborn in happy states and
material wealth. Alternatively, lack of giving leads to unhappy states
and poverty. The exquisite paradox in Buddhism is that the more we give -
and the more we give without seeking something in return - the
wealthier (in the broadest sense of the word) we will become. By giving
we destroy those acquisitive impulses that ultimately lead to further
suffering.


It
is an action that is an intentional effort. It refers to moral purity
of thought, word, and deed. The four conditions of sila are chastity,
calmness, quiet, and extinguishment, i.e. no longer being susceptible to
perturbation by the passions like greed and selfishness, which are
common in the world today. Sila refers to overall (principles of)
ethical behaviour.


Nekkhamma
is a Pali word generally translated as “renunciation” while also
conveying more specifically “giving up the world and leading a holy
life” or “freedom from lust, craving and desires.” In Buddhism’s Noble
Eightfold Path, nekkhamma is the first practice associated with “Right
Intention.” In the Theravada list of ten perfections, nekkhamma is the
third practice of “perfection.”


Prajña
(Sanskrit) or pañña (Pali) has been translated as “wisdom,”
“understanding,” “discernment,” “cognitive acuity,” or “know-how.” In
some sects of Buddhism, it especially refers to the wisdom that is based
on the direct realization of the Four Noble Truths, impermanence,
interdependent origination, non-self, emptiness, etc. Prajña is the
wisdom that is able to extinguish afflictions and bring about
enlightenment.


It
stands for strenuous and sustained effort to overcome unskillful ways,
such as indulging in sensuality, ill will and harmfulness. It stands for
the right endeavour to attain dhyana. Virya does not stand for physical
strength. It signifies strength of character and the persistent effort
for the well-being of others. In the absence of sustained efforts in
practicing meditation, craving creeps in and the meditator comes under
its influence. Right effort known as viryabala is, thus, required to
overcome unskillful mental factors and deviation from dhyana.


Khanti
(Pali) has been translated as patience, forbearance and forgiveness. It
is the practice of exercising patience toward behavior or situations
that might not necessarily deserve it. It is seen as a conscious choice
to actively give patience as if a gift, rather than being in a state of
oppression in which one feels obligated to act in such a way.




Metta
(Pali) or maitri (Sanskrit) has been translated as “loving-kindness,”
“friendliness,” “benevolence,” “amity,” “friendship,” “good will,”
“kindness,” “love,” “sympathy,” and “active interest in others.” It is
one of the ten paramitas of the Theravada school of Buddhism, and the
first of the four Brahmaviharas. The metta bhavana (”cultivation of
metta”) is a popular form of meditation in Buddhism.

The object
of metta meditation is loving kindness (love without attachment).
Traditionally, the practice begins with the meditator cultivating loving
kindness towards themselves,then their loved ones, friends, teachers,
strangers, enemies, and finally towards all sentient beings. Commonly,
it can be used as a greeting or closing to a letter or note.

Buddhists
believe that those who cultivate metta will be at ease because they see
no need to harbour ill will or hostility. Buddhist teachers may even
recommend meditation on metta as an antidote to insomnia and nightmares.
It is generally felt that those around a metta-ful person will feel
more comfortable and happy too. Radiating metta is thought to contribute
to a world of love, peace and happiness.

Metta meditation is
considered a good way to calm down a distraught mind by people who
consider it to be an antidote to anger. According to them, someone who
has cultivated metta will not be easily angered and can quickly subdue
anger that arises, being more caring, more loving, and more likely to
love unconditionally.



American Buddhist monk Bhikkhu Bodhi wrote:
“The
real meaning of upekkha is equanimity, not indifference in the sense of
unconcern for others. As a spiritual virtue, upekkha means equanimity
in the face of the fluctuations of worldly fortune. It is evenness of
mind, unshakeable freedom of mind, a state of inner equipoise that
cannot be upset by gain and loss, honor and dishonor, praise and blame,
pleasure and pain. Upekkha is freedom from all points of self-reference;
it is indifference only to the demands of the ego-self with its craving
for pleasure and position, not to the well-being of one’s fellow human
beings. True equanimity is the pinnacle of the four social attitudes
that the Buddhist texts call the ‘divine abodes’: boundless
loving-kindness, compassion, altruistic joy, and equanimity. The last
does not override and negate the preceding three, but perfects and
consummates them.”



Q 14 Explain the difference between an ordinary act of Dana (giving) and an act of dana parami (perfection of giving)

https://www.learnreligions.com/perfection-of-giving-449724

Buddhism’s Perfection of Giving

Monks holding alms bowl.


Giving is essential to Buddhism. Giving includes charity, or giving
material help to people in want. It also includes giving spiritual
guidance to those who seek it and loving kindness to all who need it.
However, one’s motivation for giving to others is at least as important
as what is given.





Motivation



What is the right or wrong motivation? In sutra 4:236 of the
Anguttara Nikaya, a collection of texts in the Sutta-Pitaka, lists a
number of motivations for giving. These include being shamed or
intimidated into giving; giving to receive a favor; giving to feel good
about yourself. These are impure motivations.





The Buddha taught that when we give to others, we give without
expectation of reward. We give without attaching to either the gift or
the recipient. We practice giving to release greed and self-clinging.





Some teachers propose that giving is good because it accrues merit and creates karma that will bring future happiness.
Others say that even this is self-clinging and an expectation of
reward. In many schools, people are encouraged to dedicate merit to the
liberation of others.





Paramitas



Giving with pure motivation is called dana paramita (Sanskrit), or dana parami (Pali), which means “perfection of giving.” There are lists of perfections that vary somewhat between Theravada and Mahayana Buddhism, but dana, giving, is the first perfection on every list. The perfections might be thought of as strengths or virtues that lead one to enlightenment.





Theravadin monk and scholar Bhikkhu Bodhi said,





“The practice of giving is universally recognized as one of
the most basic human virtues, a quality that testifies to the depth of
one’s humanity and one’s capacity for self-transcendence. In the
teaching of the Buddha, too, the practice of giving claims a place of
special eminence, one which singles it out as being in a sense the
foundation and seed of spiritual development.”





The Importance of Receiving



It’s important to remember that there is no giving without receiving,
and no givers without receivers. Therefore, giving and receiving arise
together; one is not possible without the other. Ultimately, giving and
receiving, giver and receiver, are one. Giving and receiving with this
understanding is ​the perfection of giving. As long as we are sorting
ourselves into givers and receivers, however, we are still falling short
of dana paramita.





Zen monk Shohaku Okumura wrote in Soto Zen Journal
that for a time he didn’t want to receive gifts from others, thinking
that he should be giving, not taking. “When we understand this teaching
in this way, we simply create another standard to measure gaining and
losing. We are still in the framework of gaining and losing,” he wrote.
When giving is perfect, there is no loss and no gain.





In Japan, when monks carry out traditional alms begging, they wear
huge straw hats that partly obscure their faces. The hats also prevent
them from seeing the faces of those giving them alms. No giver, no
receiver; this is pure giving.





Give Without Attachment



We are advised to give without attaching to either the gift or the recipient. What does that mean?





In Buddhism, to avoid attachment doesn’t mean we can’t have any friends. Quite the opposite, actually. Attachment
can only happen when there are at least two separate things — an
attacher, and something to attach to. But, sorting the world into
subjects and objects is a delusion.





Attachment, then, comes from a habit of mind that sorts the world
into “me” and “everything else.” Attachment leads to possessiveness and a
tendency to manipulate everything, including people, to your own
personal advantage. To be non-attached is to recognize that nothing is
really separate.





This brings us back to the realization that the giver and the
receiver are one. And the gift isn’t separate, either. So, we give
without expectation of reward from the recipient — including a “thank
you” — and we place no conditions on the gift.





A Habit of Generosity



Dana paramita is sometimes translated “perfection of generosity.” A
generous spirit is about more than just giving to charity. It is a
spirit of responding to the world and giving what is needed and
appropriate at the time.






This spirit of generosity is an important foundation of practice. It
helps tear down our ego-walls while it relieves some of the sufferings
of the world. And it also includes being grateful for the generosity
shown to you. This is the practice of dana paramita.


Q 15 Write clearly in Pali and English Dhamma Vandana Gatha. Explain the meaning, as you understand it.

Svaakkhato Bhagavataa Dhamma, sandditthiko, akaaliko,


ehipassiko, opanayiko, paccattam veditabbo vinnuhiti.


Namo tassa niyyaanikassa Dhammassa!


Ya ca Dhammaa atitaaca,


Ya ca Dhammaa anaagataa


Paccuppannaa ca ye Dhammaa,


Aham Vandaami sabbadaa


Natthi me saranam annam


Dhammo me saranam varam


Etena Saccavajjene,


Hoto me jayamangalam


Uttamangena Vandeham


Dhammanca tividham varam


Dhamme yo Khalito doso,


Dhammo khamatu tam mamam


Dhamam yaava nibbaanapariyantam


Saranam gacchaami


The Teaching is perfectly
enunciated by the Blessed One; it is verifiable here and now, and bears
immediate fruit; it invites all the test for themselves, leads one
onward to Nibbana and is to be experienced by the wise for himself.


Reverential salutation to the Noble Teaching, leading


onwards to deliverance.


The Noble Teachings of the past (Buddhas),


The Noble Teachings of the future (Buddhas),


The Noble Teachings of the Buddhas of present (aeon),


Humbly do I ever worship.


There is no other refuge for me.


The Noble Teaching is my Supreme Refuge,


By this avowal of Truth,


May joyous victory be mine!


With my brow do I worship the most exce;;ent threefold


Teaching


If the Teaching I have transgressed in any way,


May my error the mighty Dhamma deign forgive.


I go to sacred Teaching for refuge,


Till deliverance is attained.


Kindly visit:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TlQtxa0KHnA




Buddhism - Pali Chantings {Salutations to Doctrine}


 

http://www.buddhanet.net/audio-chant.htm


Mp3 06-chant-06.mp3
201 KB

Dhamma Vandana - Homage to the Doctrine.

http://www.geocities.com/ssdahampasala/


Dhamma: the characteristics of purity, radiance and peace which arise from morality, concentration and wisdom

Svakkhato bhagavata dhammo
Dhammam namassami.

The Dhamma well-expounded by the Exalted One
I bow low before the Dhamma.

To the Way to Awakenment I go for refuge

The Three Refuges

When people ask, “Who is really a Buddhist?” the answer will be,
“One who has accepted the Three Refuges” — Buddha, Dhamma and Sangha, as
his shelter and guiding ideal.”

So now that we have paid our respects to the Teacher, it is usual
for Buddhists to continue by affirming their Refuge in Awakenment
(bodhi) in three aspects: the Buddha, the rediscoverer of Awakenment;
the Dhamma, the way to that Awakenment; and the Sangha, those who are
practicing that way have discovered Awakenment for themselves. That
which has the nature of the Unsurpassed Perfect Awakenment, unconfused
and brilliant with the qualities of Great Compassion, Purity and Wisdom,
that is a secure refuge. So we recite this sure refuge as a reminder
every day:

To the Awakened One I go for refuge.
To the Way to Awakenment I go for refuge,
To the Awakened Community I go for refuge.

For the second time to the Awakened One I go for refuge.
For the second time to the Way Awakenment I go for refuge.
For the second time to the Awakened Community I go for refuge.

For the third time to the Awakened One I go for refuge.
For the third time to the Way to Awakenment I go for refuge.
For the third tome to the Awakened Community I go for refuge.

There is a reason for repeating each refuge three times. The mind is
often distracted and if words are spoken or chanted at that time then
it is as though they have not been spoken at all. There is no strong
intention behind them and one’s Going for Refuge will be like that of a
parrot. Repeating words three times is common in many Buddhist
ceremonies (such as ordination) and ensures that the mind is
concentrated during at least one repetition.

When one has gone for refuge and so affirmed that one is following
the way taught by the Buddha, then it is time to remind oneself of the
basic moral precepts for daily conduct.


Dhamma sadhu, kiyam cu dhamme ti?
Apasinave, bahu kayane, daya, dane, sace, socaye.

Dhamma is good, but what constitutes Dhamma?
(It includes) little evil, much good, kindness,
generosity, truthfulness and purity.



King Asoka



Q 16  Enumerate the qualities of the Dhamma and write the significance of each quality

Dhammam saranam gacchami:
I go to the Dhamma for refuge.


There are three levels to the Dhamma, the teachings of the Buddha —



A. Pariyatti: studying the words of the Buddha as recorded in the Canon — the Discipline, the Discourses, and the Abhidhamma.

B. Patipatti: following the practice of moral virtue, concentration, and discernment as derived from one’s study of the Canon.

C. Pativedha: Liberation.


A. The study of the Dhamma can be done in any of three ways —



1 Alagaddupama-pariyatti: studying like a water viper.

2 Nissaranattha-pariyatti: studying for the sake of emancipation.

3 Bhandagarika-pariyatti: studying to be a storehouse keeper.


Studying like a water viper
means to study the words of the Buddha without then putting them into
practice, having no sense of shame at doing evil, disobeying the
monastic code, making oneself like a poisonous snake-head, full of the
fires of greed, anger, and delusion.


Studying for the sake of
emancipation means to study the Buddha’s teachings out of a desire for
merit and wisdom, with a sense of conviction and high regard for their
worth — and then, once we have reached an understanding, bringing our
thoughts, words, and deeds into line with those teachings with a high
sense of reverence and respect. To try to bring the Buddha’s teachings
into line with ourselves is the wrong approach — because, for the most
part, we are full of defilements, cravings, views, and conceits. If we
act in this way we are bound to be more at fault than those who try to
bring themselves into line with the teachings: Such people are very hard
to find fault with.


Studying to be a storehouse
keeper refers to the education of people who no longer have to be
trained, i.e., of arahants, the highest level of the Noble Ones. Some
arahants, when they were still ordinary, run-of-the-mill people, heard
the Dhamma directly from the Buddha once or twice and were able
immediately to reach the highest attainment. This being the case, they
lacked a wide-ranging knowledge of worldly conventions and traditions;
and so, with an eye to the benefit of other Buddhists, they were willing
to undergo a certain amount of further education. This way of studying
the Dhamma is called ’sikkha-garavata’: respect for the training.


B. The practice of the Dhamma means to conduct oneself in line with the words of the Buddha as gathered under three headings:



— Virtue: proper behavior, free from vice and harm, in terms of one’s words and deeds.

— Concentration: intentness of mind, centered on one of the themes of meditation, such as the breath.

— Discernment: insight and
circumspection with regard to all fashioned things, i.e., physical
properties, aggregates, and sense media.


To conduct oneself in this
manner is termed practicing the Dhamma. By and large, though, Buddhists
tend to practice the Dhamma in a variety of ways that aren’t in line
with the true path of practice. If we were to classify their ways of
practice, there would be three:



1 Lokadhipateyya — putting the world first.
2 Attadhipateyya — putting the self first.
3 Dhammadhipateyya — putting the Dhamma first.


To put the world first means
to practice for the sake of such worldly rewards as prestige, material
gains, praise, and sensual pleasures. When we practice this way, we are
actually torturing ourselves, because undesirable things are bound to
occur: Having attained prestige, we can lose it. Having acquired
material gains, we can lose them. Having received praise, we can receive
censure. Having experienced pleasure, we can see it disintegrate. Far
from the paths, fruitions, and nibbana, we torture ourselves by clinging
to these things as our own.


To put the self first means to
practice in accordance with our own opinions, acting in line with
whatever those opinions may be. Most of us tend to side with ourselves,
getting stuck on our own views and conceits because our study of the
Dhamma hasn’t reached the truth of the Dhamma, and so we take as our
standard our own notions, composed of four forms of personal bias —



a Chandagati: doing whatever we feel like doing.

b Bhayagati: fearing
certain forms of power or authority, and thus not daring to practice the
Dhamma as we truly should. (We put certain individuals first.)

c Dosagati: acting under the power of anger, defilement, craving, conceits, and views.

d Mohagati: practicing
misguidedly, not studying or searching for what is truly good; assuming
that we’re already smart enough, or else that we’re too stupid to
learn; staying buried in our habits with no thought of extracting
ourselves from our sensual pleasures.


All of these ways of practice are called ‘putting the self first.’


To put the Dhamma first means to follow the Noble Eightfold Path —



a. Right View: seeing
that there really is good, there really is evil, there really is
stress, that stress has a cause, that it disbands, and that there is a
cause for its disbanding.

b. Right Resolve: thinking of
how to rid ourselves of whatever qualities we know to be wrong and
immoral, i.e., seeing the harm in sensual desires in that they bring on
suffering and stress.

c. Right Speech: speaking the
truth; not saying anything divisive or inciteful; not saying anything
coarse or vulgar in situations where such words would not be proper; not
saying anything useless. Even though what we say may be worthwhile, if
our listener isn’t interested then our words would still count as
useless.

d. Right Action: being true to our duties, not acting in ways that would be corrupt or bring harm to ourselves or others.

e. Right Livelihood: obtaining wealth in ways that are honest, searching for it in a moral way and using it in a moral way.

f. Right Effort: persisting
in ridding ourselves of all that is wrong and harmful in our thoughts,
words, and deeds; persisting in giving rise to what would be good and
useful to ourselves and others in our thoughts, words, and deeds,
without a thought for the difficulty or weariness involved; acting
persistently so as to be a mainstay to others (except in cases that are
beyond our control).

g. Right Mindfulness: being
mindful and deliberate, making sure not to act or speak through the
power of inattention or forgetfulness, making sure to be constantly
mindful in our thoughts (being mindful of the four frames of reference).

h. Right Concentration:
keeping the mind centered and resilient. No matter what we do or say, no
matter what moods may strike the heart, the heart keeps its poise, firm
and unflinching in the four levels of jhana.


These eight factors can be
reduced to three — virtue, concentration, and discernment — called the
middle way, the heart of the Buddha’s teachings. The ‘middleness’ of
virtue means to be pure in thought, word, and deed, acting out of
compassion, seeing that the life of others is like your own, that their
possessions are like your own, feeling benevolence, loving others as
much as yourself. When ‘you’ and ‘they’ are equal in this way, you are
bound to be upright in your behavior, like a well-balanced burden that,
when placed on your shoulders, doesn’t cause you to tip to one side or
the other. But even then you are still in a position of having to
shoulder a burden. So you are taught to focus the mind on a single
preoccupation: This can be called ‘holding in your hands’ — i.e.,
holding the mind in the middle — or concentration.


The middleness of
concentration means focusing on the present, not sending your thoughts
into the past or future, holding fast to a single preoccupation (anapanaka-jhana, absorption in the breath).


As for the middleness of
discernment: No matter what preoccupations may come passing by, you are
able to rid yourself of all feelings of liking or disliking, approval or
rejection. You don’t cling, even to the one preoccupation that has
arisen as a result of your own actions. You put down what you have been
holding in your hands; you don’t fasten onto the past, present or
future. This is release.


When our virtue,
concentration, and discernment are all in the middle this way, we’re
safe. Just as a boat going down the middle of a channel, or a car that
doesn’t run off the side of the road, can reach its destination without
beaching or running into a tree; so too, people who practice in this way
are bound to reach the qualities they aspire to, culminating in the
paths and fruitions leading to nibbana, which is the main point of the
Buddha’s teachings.


So in short, putting the Dhamma first means to search solely for purity of mind.


C.
The attainment of the Dhamma refers to the attainment of the highest
quality, nibbana. If we refer to the people who reach this attainment,
there are four sorts —



1 Sukha-vipassako:
those who develop just enough tranquillity and discernment to act as a
basis for advancing to liberating insight and who thus attain nibbana
having mastered only asavakkhaya-ñana, the knowledge that does away with the fermentation of defilement.

2 Tevijjo: those who attain the three skills.

3 Chalabhiñño: those who attain the six intuitive powers.

4 Catuppatisambhidappatto: those who attain the four forms of acumen.


To explain sukha-vipassako (those who develop insight more than tranquillity): Vipassana (liberating insight) and asavakkhaya-ñana
(the awareness that does away with the fermentation of defilement)
differ only in name. In actuality they refer to the same thing, the only
difference being that vipassana refers to the beginning stage of insight, and asavakkhaya-ñana to the final stage: clear and true comprehension of the four Noble Truths.


To explain tevijjo: The three skills are —



a Pubbenivasanussati-ñana:
the ability to remember past lives — one, two, three, four, five, ten,
one hundred, one thousand, depending on one’s powers of intuition. (This
is a basis for proving whether death is followed by rebirth or
annihilation.)

b Cutupapata-ñana: knowledge of where living beings are reborn — on refined levels or base — after they die.

c Asavakkhaya-ñana: the awareness that enables one to do away with the fermentations in one’s character (sensuality, states of being, ignorance).


To explain chalabhiñño: The six intuitive powers are —



a Iddhividhi:
the ability to display miracles — becoming invisible, walking on a dry
path through a body of water, levitating, going through rain without
getting wet, going through fire without getting hot, making a crowd of
people appear to be only a few, making a few to appear many, making
oneself appear young or old as one likes, being able to use the power of
the mind to influence events in various ways.

b Dibbasota: clairaudience; the ability to hear far distant sounds, beyond ordinary human powers.

c Cetopariya-ñana: the ability to know the thoughts of others.

d Pubbenivasanussati-ñana: the ability to remember previous lives.

e Dibba-cakkhu:
clairvoyance; the ability to see far distant objects, beyond ordinary
human powers. Some people can even see other levels of being with their
clairvoyant powers (one way of proving whether death is followed by
rebirth or annihilation, and whether or not there really are other
levels of being).

f Asavakkhaya-ñana: the awareness that does away with the fermentation of defilement.


To explain catuppatisambhidappatto: The four forms of acumen are —



a Attha-patisambhida:
acumen with regard to the sense of the Doctrine and of matters in
general, knowing how to explain various points in line with their proper
meaning.

b Dhamma-patisambhida: acumen with regard to all mental qualities.

c Nirutti-patisambhida: acumen with regard to linguistic conventions. (This can include the ability to know the languages of living beings in general.)

d Patibhana-patisambhida:
acumen in speaking on the spur of the moment, knowing how to answer any
question so as to clear up the doubts of the person asking (like the
Venerable Nagasena).


This ends the discussion of
the virtues of the four classes of people — called arahants — who have
reached the ultimate quality, nibbana. As for the essence of what it
means to be an arahant, though, there is only one point — freedom from
defilement: This is what it means to attain the Dhamma, the other
virtues being simply adornment.


The three levels of Dhamma we
have discussed are, like the Buddha, compared to jewels: There are many
kinds of jewels to choose from, depending on how much wealth —
discernment — we have.


All of the qualities we have
mentioned so far, to put them briefly so as to be of use, come down to
this: Practice so as to give rise to virtue, concentration, and
discernment within yourself. Otherwise, you won’t have a refuge or
shelter. A person without the qualities that provide refuge and shelter
is like a person without a home — a delinquent or a vagrant — who is
bound to wander shiftlessly about. Such people are hollow inside, like a
clock without any workings: Even though it has a face and hands, it
can’t tell anyone where it is, what time it is, or whether it’s morning,
noon, or night (i.e., such people forget that they are going to die).


People who aren’t acquainted
with the Dhamma within themselves are like people blind from birth: Even
though they are born in the world of human beings, they don’t know the
light of the sun and moon that enables human beings to see. They get no
benefit from the light of the sun and moon or the light of fire; and
being blind, they then go about proclaiming to those who can see, that
there is no sun, no moon, and no brightness to the world. As a result,
they mislead those whose eyes are already a little bleary. In other
words, some groups say that the Buddha, Dhamma, and Sangha don’t exist,
that they were invented to fool the gullible.


Now, the Dhamma is something subtle and fine, like the fire-potential (tejas)
that exists in the air or in various elements and that, if we have
enough common sense, can be drawn out and put to use. But if we’re
fools, we can sit staring at a bamboo tube [a device for starting fire
that works on the same principle as the diesel engine] from dawn to dusk
without ever seeing fire at all. Anyone who believes that there is no
Buddha, Dhamma, or Sangha, no series of paths or fruitions leading to
nibbana, no consciousness that experiences death and rebirth, is like
the fool sitting and staring at the bamboo tube.


Here I would like to tell a
story as an allegory of those who aren’t acquainted with the Dhamma.
There once was a man living in the woods who, with his five sons,
started growing crops in a clearing about a mile from their home
village. He built a small shack at the clearing and would often take his
sons to stay there. One morning he started a fire in the shack and told
his sons to look after the fire, for he was going out to hunt for food
in the forest. ‘If the fire goes out,’ he told them, ‘get some fire from
my bamboo tube and start it up again.’ Then he set out to search for
food for his sons.


After he had left, his sons
got so wrapped up in their play that when they finally took a look at
the fire, they found that it was completely out. So they had the first
son go get some fire to start it up again. The first son walked over and
tried knocking on the bamboo tube but didn’t see any fire. So they had
the second son get some fire from the tube: He opened it up but didn’t
see any fire inside. All he saw were two bamboo chips but he didn’t know
what to do with them. So the third son came over for a look and, since
he didn’t see any fire, he took a knife to cut the tube in half but
still didn’t see any fire. The fourth son went over and, seeing the two
halves lying there, shaved them down into thin strips to find the fire
in them but didn’t see any fire at all.


Finally the fifth son went
over to look for fire, but before he went he said to his brothers,
‘What’s the matter with you guys that you can’t get any fire from the
bamboo tube? What a bunch of fools you are! I’ll go get it myself.’ With
that, he went to look at the bamboo tube and found it split into strips
lying in pile. Realizing what his brothers had done, and thinking,
‘What a bunch of hare-brains,’ he reached for a mortar and pestle and
ground up the bamboo strips to find the fire in them. By the time he ran
out of strength, he had ground them into a powder, but he still hadn’t
found any fire. So he snuck off to play by himself.


Eventually, toward noon, the
father returned from the forest and found that the fire had gone out. So
he asked his sons about it, and they told him how they had looked for
fire in the bamboo tube without finding any. ‘Idiots,’ he thought,
‘they’ve taken my fire-starter and pounded it to bits. For that, I won’t
fix them any food. Let ‘em starve!’ As a result, the boys didn’t get
anything to eat the entire day.


Those of us who aren’t acquainted with the brightness of the Dhamma — ‘Dhammo padipo’
— lying within us, who don’t believe that the Dhamma has value for
ourselves and others, are lacking in discernment, like the boys looking
for fire in the bamboo tube. Thus we bring about our own ruin in various
ways, wasting our lives: born in darkness, living in darkness, dying in
darkness, and then reborn in more darkness all over again. Even though
the Dhamma lies within us, we can’t get any use from it and thus will
suffer for a long time to come, like the boys who ruined their father’s
fire-starter and so had to go without food.


The Dhamma lies within us, but
we don’t look for it. If we hope for goodness, whether on a low or a
high level, we’ll have to look here, inside, if we are to find what is
truly good. But before we can know ourselves in this way, we first have
to know — through study and practice — the principles taught by the
Buddha.


Recorded Dhamma (pariyatti dhamma)
is simply one of the symbols of the Buddha’s teachings. The important
point is to actualize the Dhamma through the complete practice of
virtue, concentration, and discernment. This is an essential part of the
religion, the part that forms the inner symbol of all those who
practice rightly and well. Whether the religion will be good or bad,
whether it will prosper or decline, depends on our practice, not on the
recorded doctrine, because the recorded doctrine is merely a symbol. So
if we aim at goodness, we should focus on developing our inner quality
through the Dhamma of practice (patipatti dhamma). As for the main point of Buddhism, that’s the Dhamma of attainment (pativedha dhamma), the transcendent quality: nibbana.


3. Can the Dhamma as
proclaimed by the Buddha be called a religious doctrine, or a
philosophy, or is it a spiritual path i.e., a way of life that each
seeker should adhere to at all times? If you think it is a way of life
to be lead every day, how have you tried doing it yourself? It would be
good to share your experience with others.


Is Buddhism a religion or a philosophy?

The Buddha referred to his teachings simply as Dhamma-vinaya
— “the doctrine and discipline” — but for centuries people have tried
to categorize the teachings in various ways, trying to fit them into the
prevailing molds of cultural, philosophical, and religious thought.
Buddhism is an ethical system — a way of life — that leads to a very
specific goal and that possesses some aspects of both religion and
philosophy:

It is a philosophy.
Like most philosophies,
Buddhism attempts to frame the complexities of human existence in a way
that reassures us that there is, in fact, some underlying order to the
Universe. In the
Four Noble Truths the Buddha crisply summarizes our predicament: there is suffering, it has a cause, it has an end, and there is a way to reach the end. The teachings on kamma provide a thorough and logically self-consistent description of the nature of cause-and-effect. And even the Buddhist view of cosmology,
which some may at first find farfetched, is a logical extension of the
law of kamma. According to the Dhamma, a deep and unshakable logic
pervades the world.
It is not a philosophy.
Unlike most philosophical
systems, which rely on speculation and the power of reason to arrive at
logical truths, Buddhism relies on the direct observation of one’s
personal experience and on honing certain skills in order to gain true
understanding and wisdom.
Idle speculation
has no place in Buddhist practice. Although studying in the classroom,
reading books, and engaging in spirited debate can play a vital part in
developing a cognitive understanding of basic Buddhist concepts, the
heart of Buddhism can never be realized this way. The Dhamma is not an
abstract system of thought designed to delight the intellect; it is a
roadmap to be used, one whose essential purpose is to lead the practitioner to the ultimate goal,
nibbana.
It is a religion.
At the heart of each of the
world’s great religions lies a transcendent ideal around which its
doctrinal principles orbit. In Buddhism this truth is
nibbana, the hallmark of the cessation of suffering and stress,
a truth of utter transcendence that stands in singular distinction from
anything we might encounter in our ordinary sensory experience. Nibbana
is the sine qua non of Buddhism, the guiding star and ultimate
goal towards which all the Buddha’s teachings point. Because it aims at
such a lofty transcendent ideal, we might fairly call Buddhism a
religion.
It is not a religion.
In stark contrast to the
world’s other major religions, however, Buddhism invokes no divinity, no
supreme Creator or supreme Self, no Holy Spirit or omniscient loving
God to whom we might appeal for salvation.1
Instead, Buddhism calls for us to hoist ourselves up by our own
bootstraps: to develop the discernment we need to distinguish between
those qualities within us that are unwholesome and those that are truly
noble and good, and to learn how to nourish the good ones and expunge
the bad. This is the
path
to Buddhism’s highest perfection, nibbana. Not even the Buddha can take
you to that goal; you alone must do the work necessary to complete the
journey:

“Therefore, Ananda, be
islands unto yourselves, refuges unto yourselves, seeking no external
refuge; with the Dhamma as your island, the Dhamma as your refuge,
seeking no other refuge.”















Daily training myself to practice of the Dhamma  to conduct myself in line with the words of the Buddha to be Virtuous with proper behavior, free from vice and harm, in terms of my words and deeds.



To train my mind for Concentration: intentness of mind, centered on one of the themes of meditation, such as the breath.

To train my mind for
Discernment: insight and circumspection with regard to all fashioned
things, i.e., physical properties, aggregates, and sense media.


To conduct myself in this manner I feel is termed practicing the Dhamma by putting the Dhamma first.


To put the Dhamma first means to follow the Noble Eightfold Path —



a. Right View: seeing
that there really is good, there really is evil, there really is
stress, that stress has a cause, that it disbands, and that there is a
cause for its disbanding.

b. Right Resolve: thinking of
how to rid ourselves of whatever qualities we know to be wrong and
immoral, i.e., seeing the harm in sensual desires in that they bring on
suffering and stress.

c. Right Speech: speaking the
truth; not saying anything divisive or inciteful; not saying anything
coarse or vulgar in situations where such words would not be proper; not
saying anything useless. Even though what we say may be worthwhile, if
our listener isn’t interested then our words would still count as
useless.

d. Right Action: being true to our duties, not acting in ways that would be corrupt or bring harm to ourselves or others.

e. Right Livelihood: obtaining wealth in ways that are honest, searching for it in a moral way and using it in a moral way.

f. Right Effort: persisting
in ridding ourselves of all that is wrong and harmful in our thoughts,
words, and deeds; persisting in giving rise to what would be good and
useful to ourselves and others in our thoughts, words, and deeds,
without a thought for the difficulty or weariness involved; acting
persistently so as to be a mainstay to others (except in cases that are
beyond our control).

g. Right Mindfulness: being
mindful and deliberate, making sure not to act or speak through the
power of inattention or forgetfulness, making sure to be constantly
mindful in our thoughts (being mindful of the four frames of reference).

h. Right Concentration:
keeping the mind centered and resilient. No matter what we do or say, no
matter what moods may strike the heart, the heart keeps its poise, firm
and unflinching in the four levels of jhana.


These eight factors can be
reduced to three — virtue, concentration, and discernment — called the
middle way, the heart of the Buddha’s teachings. The ‘middleness’ of
virtue means to be pure in thought, word, and deed, acting out of
compassion, seeing that the life of others is like your own, that their
possessions are like your own, feeling benevolence, loving others as
much as yourself. When ‘you’ and ‘they’ are equal in this way, you are
bound to be upright in your behavior, like a well-balanced burden that,
when placed on your shoulders, doesn’t cause you to tip to one side or
the other. But even then you are still in a position of having to
shoulder a burden. So you are taught to focus the mind on a single
preoccupation: This can be called ‘holding in your hands’ — i.e.,
holding the mind in the middle — or concentration.


The middleness of
concentration means focusing on the present, not sending your thoughts
into the past or future, holding fast to a single preoccupation (anapanaka-jhana, absorption in the breath).


As for the middleness of
discernment: No matter what preoccupations may come passing by, you are
able to rid yourself of all feelings of liking or disliking, approval or
rejection. You don’t cling, even to the one preoccupation that has
arisen as a result of your own actions. You put down what you have been
holding in your hands; you don’t fasten onto the past, present or
future. This is release.


When our virtue,
concentration, and discernment are all in the middle this way, we’re
safe. Just as a boat going down the middle of a channel, or a car that
doesn’t run off the side of the road, can reach its destination without
beaching or running into a tree; so too, people who practice in this way
are bound to reach the qualities they aspire to, culminating in the
paths and fruitions leading to nibbana, which is the main point of the
Buddha’s teachings.


So in short, putting the Dhamma first means to search solely for purity of mind.


Q 17 What do you think of the five Buddhist precepts (Panca Sila) ?If you are practicing, what are the benefits you derive? Please elaborate.




Panca Sila

Pãnãti-pãtã
veramani sikkhã padam samãdiyãmi
Adinnã-dãnã
veramani sikkhã padam samãdiyãmi
Kãmesu micchã-cãrã
veramani sikkhã padam samãdiyãmi
Musãvãdã
veramani sikkhã padam samãdiyãmi
Surã meraya-majja-pamã-datthãnã
veramani sikkhã padam samãdiyãmi


I take the precept to
abstain from destroying living beings.
I take the precept to
abstain from taking things not given.
I take the precept to
abstain from sexual misconduct.
I take the precept to
abstain from false speech.
I take the precept to
abstain from taking anything that causes
intoxication or heedlessness.

By my daily training of my mind to practice Panca Sila I have realised that they are

Five faultless gifts

“There are these five gifts, five great gifts — original,
long-standing, traditional, ancient, unadulterated, unadulterated from
the beginning — that are not open to suspicion, will never be open to
suspicion, and are unfaulted by knowledgeable contemplatives &
priests. Which five?

 

As a disciple of the noble ones, abandoning the taking of life,
abstains from taking life. In doing so, I have dervived freedom from
danger, freedom from animosity, freedom from oppression to limitless
numbers of beings. In giving freedom from danger, freedom from
animosity, freedom from oppression to limitless numbers of beings,I gain
a share in limitless freedom from danger, freedom from animosity, and
freedom from oppression. This is the first gift, the first great gift —
original, long-standing, traditional, ancient, unadulterated,
unadulterated from the beginning — that is not open to suspicion, will
never be open to suspicion, and is unfaulted by knowledgeable
contemplatives & priests…

“Furthermore, abandoning taking what is not given (stealing), as a
true disciple of the noble ones I train my mind to abstain from taking
what is not given. In doing so, it gives freedom from danger, freedom
from animosity, freedom from oppression to limitless numbers of beings.
In giving freedom from danger, freedom from animosity, freedom from
oppression to limitless numbers of beings, I gain a share in limitless
freedom from danger, freedom from animosity, and freedom from
oppression. This is the second gift…

“Furthermore, abandoning illicit sex, as a true disciple of the
noble ones I train my my mind to abstain from illicit sex. In doing so,
it gives freedom from danger, freedom from animosity, freedom from
oppression to limitless numbers of beings. In giving freedom from
danger, freedom from animosity, freedom from oppression to limitless
numbers of beings, I gain a share in limitless freedom from danger,
freedom from animosity, and freedom from oppression. This is the third
gift…

“Furthermore, abandoning lying, as a true disciple of the noble ones
I train my mind to abstain from lying. In doing so, it gives freedom
from danger, freedom from animosity, freedom from oppression to
limitless numbers of beings. In giving freedom from danger, freedom from
animosity, freedom from oppression to limitless numbers of beings,I
gain a share in limitless freedom from danger, freedom from animosity,
and freedom from oppression. This is the fourth gift…

“Furthermore, abandoning the use of intoxicants, as a true disciple
of the noble ones I train my mind to abstain from taking intoxicants. In
doing so, it gives freedom from danger, freedom from animosity, freedom
from oppression to limitless numbers of beings. In giving freedom from
danger, freedom from animosity, freedom from oppression to limitless
numbers of beings, he gains a share in limitless freedom from danger,
freedom from animosity, and freedom from oppression. This is the fifth
gift, the fifth great gift — original, long-standing, traditional,
ancient, unadulterated, unadulterated from the beginning — that is not
open to suspicion, will never be open to suspicion, and is unfaulted by
knowledgeable contemplatives & priests. And this is the eighth
reward of merit, reward of skillfulness, nourishment of happiness,
celestial, resulting in happiness, leading to heaven, leading to what is
desirable, pleasurable, & appealing; to welfare & to
happiness.”



Q 18  On the full moon day of Ashala (July), two months after awakenment, the Buddha walked all the way from

Bodhi
Mandapa (Bodhgaya) to Isipatana in Baranasi. Why did he chooser this
mode of travelling rather than using psychic abilities as in the case of
other Buddhas?

Q 19  Having in mind whose spiritual well-being did he decide to walk rather than levitate ?

Q 20  What did the Buddha say regarding the nature of a Supreme Awakened One as given in the five verses ?

Q 21  Write down the ideals enunciate by the Buddha in the five verses ?

Q 22  Who is the real conquer (Jino), and why so ? elaborate.

Q 23  On hearing the five gathas of the Buddha what did the other traveler say ?

Q
24  Is it possible to construe the Buddha either as a god or an
incarnation, prophet or messaiah of a god from what has been said about
Boddhahood in Buddha’s own words in the five gathas ?

I ) If your answer is no, write why do you think so.
II) If your answer is yes, please explain why do you think so.





in 01) Classical Magahi Magadhi,
02) Classical Chandaso language,
03)Magadhi Prakrit,
04) Classical Hela Basa (Hela Language),
05) Classical Pali,
06) Classical Devanagari,Classical Hindi-Devanagari- शास्त्रीय हिंदी,

07) Classical Cyrillic
08) Classical Afrikaans– Klassieke Afrikaans

09) Classical Albanian-Shqiptare klasike,
10) Classical Amharic-አንጋፋዊ አማርኛ,
11) Classical Arabic-اللغة العربية الفصحى
12) Classical Armenian-դասական հայերեն,
13) Classical Azerbaijani- Klassik Azərbaycan,
14) Classical Basque- Euskal klasikoa,
15) Classical Belarusian-Класічная беларуская,
16) Classical Bengali-ক্লাসিক্যাল বাংলা,
17) Classical  Bosnian-Klasični bosanski,
18) Classical Bulgaria- Класически българск,
19) Classical  Catalan-Català clàssic
20) Classical Cebuano-Klase sa Sugbo,

21) Classical Chichewa-Chikale cha Chichewa,

22) Classical Chinese (Simplified)-古典中文(简体),

23) Classical Chinese (Traditional)-古典中文(繁體),

24) Classical Corsican-Corsa Corsicana,

25) Classical  Croatian-Klasična hrvatska,

26) Classical  Czech-Klasická čeština,
27) Classical  Danish-Klassisk dansk,Klassisk dansk,

28) Classical  Dutch- Klassiek Nederlands,
29) Classical English,Roman
30) Classical Esperanto-Klasika Esperanto,

31) Classical Estonian- klassikaline eesti keel,

32) Classical Filipino,
33) Classical Finnish- Klassinen suomalainen,

34) Classical French- Français classique,

35) Classical Frisian- Klassike Frysk,

36) Classical Galician-Clásico galego,
37) Classical Georgian-კლასიკური ქართული,

38) Classical German- Klassisches Deutsch,
39) Classical Greek-Κλασσικά Ελληνικά,
40) Classical Gujarati-ક્લાસિકલ ગુજરાતી,
41) Classical Haitian Creole-Klasik kreyòl,

42) Classical Hausa-Hausa Hausa,
43) Classical Hawaiian-Hawaiian Hawaiian,

44) Classical Hebrew- עברית קלאסית
45) Classical Hmong- Lus Hmoob,

46) Classical Hungarian-Klasszikus magyar,

47) Classical Icelandic-Klassísk íslensku,
48) Classical Igbo,

49) Classical Indonesian-Bahasa Indonesia Klasik,

50) Classical Irish-Indinéisis Clasaiceach,
51) Classical Italian-Italiano classico,
52) Classical Japanese-古典的なイタリア語,
53) Classical Javanese-Klasik Jawa,
54) Classical Kannada- ಶಾಸ್ತ್ರೀಯ ಕನ್ನಡ,
55) Classical Kazakh-Классикалық қазақ,

56) Classical Khmer- ខ្មែរបុរាណ,
57) Classical Korean-고전 한국어,

58) Classical Kurdish (Kurmanji)-Kurdî (Kurmancî),

59) Classical Kyrgyz-Классикалык Кыргыз,
60) Classical Lao-ຄລາສສິກລາວ,
61) Classical Latin-LXII) Classical Latin,

62) Classical Latvian-Klasiskā latviešu valoda,

63) Classical Lithuanian-Klasikinė lietuvių kalba,

64) Classical Luxembourgish-Klassesch Lëtzebuergesch,

65) Classical Macedonian-Класичен македонски,
66) Classical Malagasy,
67) Classical Malay-Melayu Klasik,

68) Classical Malayalam-ക്ലാസിക്കൽ മലയാളം,

69) Classical Maltese-Klassiku Malti,
70) Classical Maori-Maori Maori,
71) Classical Marathi-क्लासिकल माओरी,

72) Classical Mongolian-Сонгодог Монгол,

73) Classical Myanmar (Burmese)-Classical မြန်မာ (ဗမာ),

74) Classical Nepali-शास्त्रीय म्यांमार (बर्मा),
75) Classical Norwegian-Klassisk norsk,

76) Classical Pashto- ټولګی پښتو

77) Classical Persian-کلاسیک فارسی
78) Classical Polish-Język klasyczny polski,

79) Classical Portuguese-Português Clássico,
80) Classical Punjabi-ਕਲਾਸੀਕਲ ਪੰਜਾਬੀ,
81) Classical Romanian-Clasic românesc,
82) Classical Russian-Классический русский,
83) Classical Samoan-Samoan Samoa,
84) Classical Scots Gaelic-Gàidhlig Albannach Clasaigeach,
85) Classical Serbian-Класични српски,
86) Classical Sesotho-Seserbia ea boholo-holo,
87) Classical Shona-Shona Shona,
88) Classical Sindhi,
89) Classical Sinhala-සම්භාව්ය සිංහල,

90) Classical Slovak-Klasický slovenský,
91) Classical Slovenian-Klasična slovenska,
92) Classical Somali-Soomaali qowmiyadeed,
93) Classical Spanish-Español clásico,
94) Classical Sundanese-Sunda Klasik,
95) Classical Swahili,
96) Classical Swedish-Klassisk svensk,
97) Classical Tajik-тоҷикӣ классикӣ,

98) Classical Tamil-பாரம்பரிய இசைத்தமிழ் செம்மொழி,
99) Classical Telugu- క్లాసికల్ తెలుగు,
100) Classical Thai-ภาษาไทยคลาสสิก,
101) Classical Turkish-Klasik Türk,
102) Classical Ukrainian-Класичний український,
103) Classical Urdu- کلاسیکی اردو
104) Classical Uzbek-Klassik o’zbek,
105) Classical Vietnamese-Tiếng Việt cổ điển,

106) Classical Welsh-Cymraeg Clasurol,
107) Classical Xhosa-IsiXhosa zesiXhosa,
108) Classical Yiddish- קלאסישע ייִדיש
109) Classical Yoruba-Yoruba Yoruba,
110) Classical Zulu-I-Classical Zulu






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http://www.orgsites.com/oh/awakenedone/


Awakeness Practices

All 84,000 Khandas As Found in the Pali Suttas

Traditionally there  are 84,000 Dhamma Doors - 84,000 ways to get
Awakeness. Maybe so; certainly the Buddha taught a large number of
practices that lead to Awakeness. This web page attempts to catalogue
those found in the Pali Suttas (DN, MN, SN, AN, Ud & Sn 1).

There are 3 sections:

The discourses of Buddha are divided into 84,000, as to separate
addresses. The division includes all that was spoken by Buddha.”I
received from Buddha,” said Ananda, “82,000 Khandas, and  from the
priests 2000; these are 84,000 Khandas maintained by me.” They are
divided into 275,250, as to the stanzas of the original text, and into
361,550, as to the stanzas of the commentary. All the discourses
including both those of Buddha and those of the commentator, are
divided  into 2,547 banawaras, containing 737,000 stanzas, and29,368,000
separate letters.


ESSENCE OF TIPITAKA

Positive Buddha Vacana — The words of the Buddha —
Interested in All Suttas  of Tipitaka as Episodes in visual format including 7D laser Hologram 360 degree Circarama presentation

from
Analytic Insight Net - FREE Online Tipiṭaka Law Research & Practice
University
in
112 CLASSICAL LANGUAGES Please Visit: http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org

LESSONS

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PPydLZ0cavc
for
 Maha-parinibbana Sutta — Last Days of the Buddha

The Great Discourse on the Total Unbinding

This wide-ranging sutta, the longest one in the Pali canon,
describes the events leading up to, during, and immediately following
the death and final release (parinibbana) of the Buddha. This colorful
narrative
contains a wealth of Dhamma teachings, including the Buddha’s final
instructions that defined how Buddhism would be lived and practiced long
after the Buddha’s death — even to this day. But this sutta also
depicts, in simple language, the poignant human drama that unfolds among
the Buddha’s many devoted followers around the time of the death of
their beloved teacher.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bDkKT54WbJ4
for
Mahāsatipaṭṭhānasuttaṃ (Pali) - 2 Kāyānupassanā ānāpānapabbaṃ

http://www.buddha-vacana.org/sutta/digha.html
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http://www.translate.google.com/

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is the most Positive Energy of informative and research oriented site propagating the teachings of the Awakened One with Awareness the Buddha and on Techno-Politico-Socio
Transformation and Economic Emancipation Movement followed by millions
of people all over the world in 112 Classical languages.

Rendering exact translation as a lesson of thisUniversity in one’s mother tongue to this Google Translation and
propagation entitles to become a Stream
Enterer (Sottapanna) and to attain Eternal Bliss as a Final Goal






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LESSON 3030 Fri 14 Jun 2019 Invitation to Bhikkhus, Bhikkunis, Upakakas, Upasikas of All Awakened Aboriginal Societies with their gracious presence and blessings for our OPENING CEREMONY of TIPITAKA BUDDHA SASANA KUSHINARA PARINIBBANA BHOOMI TBSKPB White Home for TIPITAKA to DO GOOD BE MINDFUL which is the Essence of the Words of the Awakened One with Awareness Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta — Attendance on awareness — [ mahā+satipaṭṭhāna ] MEDITATION PRACTICE in BUDDHA’S OWN WORDS for welfare, happiness and peace on the path of Eternal Bliss as Final Goal Day and Date will be announced from Analytic Insight Net -Hi Tech Radio Free Animation Clipart Online and Offline Tipiṭaka Law Research & Practice University
 in
 112 CLASSICAL LANGUAGES Paṭisambhidā Jāla-Abaddha Paripanti Tipiṭaka nīti Anvesanā ca Paricaya Nikhilavijjālaya ca ñātibhūta Pavatti Nissāya http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org anto 112 Seṭṭhaganthāyatta Bhās “No entanto, muitas palavras sagradas que você lê, no entanto, muitos que você fala, que bem eles vão fazer você Se você não 668, 5A Main Road, 8th Cross HAL III Stage Bengaluru - 560075 Karnataka India Ph: 91 (080) 25203792 Email: buddhasaid2us@gmail.com, up a levelhttp://sarvajan.ambedkar.orgup a level Buddhasasana “In the Buddha you see clearly a man, simple, devout, alone, battling for light, a vivid human personality, not a myth. He too gave a message to mankind universal in character.” http://www.orgsites.com/oh/awakenedone/ Awakeness Practices All 84,000 Khandas As Found in the Pali Suttas Traditionally there are 84,000 Dhamma Doors - 84,000 ways to get Awakeness. Maybe so; certainly the Buddha taught a large number of practices that lead to Awakeness. This web page attempts to catalogue those found in the Pali Suttas (DN, MN, SN, AN, Ud & Sn 1). There are 3 sections: The discourses of Buddha are divided into 84,000, as to separate addresses. The division includes all that was spoken by Buddha.”I received from Buddha,” said Ananda, “82,000 Khandas, and from the priests 2000; these are 84,000 Khandas maintained by me.” They are divided into 275,250, as to the stanzas of the original text, and into 361,550, as to the stanzas of the commentary. All the discourses including both those of Buddha and those of the commentator, are divided into 2,547 banawaras, containing 737,000 stanzas, and29,368,000 separate letters.
Filed under: General, Vinaya Pitaka, Sutta Pitaka, Abhidhamma Pitaka, Tipiṭaka, ಅಭಿಧಮ್ಮಪಿಟಕ, ವಿನಯಪಿಟಕ, ತಿಪಿಟಕ (ಮೂಲ)
Posted by: site admin @ 4:29 pm

LESSON 3030 Fri 14 Jun 2019

Invitation to Bhikkhus, Bhikkunis, Upakakas, Upasikas of All Awakened Aboriginal Societies

with their gracious presence and blessings

for our

OPENING CEREMONY

of

TIPITAKA BUDDHA SASANA KUSHINARA PARINIBBANA BHOOMI


TBSKPB

White Home for TIPITAKA

 to DO GOOD BE MINDFUL which is the Essence of the Words of the Awakened One with Awareness


Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta —
Attendance on awareness — [ mahā+satipaṭṭhāna ]
MEDITATION PRACTICE in BUDDHA’S OWN WORDS for welfare, happiness and peace on the path of Eternal Bliss as Final Goal


Day and Date will be announced




from

Analytic Insight Net -Hi Tech Radio Free Animation Clipart Online and Offline Tipiṭaka Law Research & Practice University
 in
 112 CLASSICAL LANGUAGES

Paṭisambhidā Jāla-Abaddha Paripanti Tipiṭaka nīti Anvesanā ca Paricaya Nikhilavijjālaya ca ñātibhūta Pavatti Nissāya http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org anto 112 Seṭṭhaganthāyatta Bhās
“No entanto, muitas palavras sagradas que você lê, no entanto, muitos que você fala, que bem eles vão fazer você Se você não

668,
5A Main Road, 8th Cross HAL III Stage Bengaluru - 560075 Karnataka
India Ph: 91 (080) 25203792 Email: buddhasaid2us@gmail.com



up a levelhttp://sarvajan.ambedkar.orgup a level

Buddhasasana

“In the Buddha you see clearly a man, simple, devout, alone,
battling for light, a vivid human personality, not a myth. He too gave a
message to mankind universal in character.”

http://www.orgsites.com/oh/awakenedone/

Awakeness Practices

All 84,000 Khandas As Found in the Pali Suttas

Traditionally there  are 84,000 Dhamma Doors - 84,000 ways to get
Awakeness. Maybe so; certainly the Buddha taught a large number of
practices that lead to Awakeness. This web page attempts to catalogue
those found in the Pali Suttas (DN, MN, SN, AN, Ud & Sn 1).

There are 3 sections:

The discourses of Buddha are divided into 84,000, as to separate
addresses. The division includes all that was spoken by Buddha.”I
received from Buddha,” said Ananda, “82,000 Khandas, and  from the
priests 2000; these are 84,000 Khandas maintained by me.” They are
divided into 275,250, as to the stanzas of the original text, and into
361,550, as to the stanzas of the commentary. All the discourses
including both those of Buddha and those of the commentator, are
divided  into 2,547 banawaras, containing 737,000 stanzas, and29,368,000
separate letters.

in



in 01) Classical Magahi Magadhi,
02) Classical Chandaso language,
03)Magadhi Prakrit,
04) Classical Hela Basa (Hela Language),
05) Classical Pali,
06) Classical Devanagari,Classical Hindi-Devanagari- शास्त्रीय हिंदी,

07) Classical Cyrillic
08) Classical Afrikaans– Klassieke Afrikaans

09) Classical Albanian-Shqiptare klasike,
10) Classical Amharic-አንጋፋዊ አማርኛ,
11) Classical Arabic-اللغة العربية الفصحى
12) Classical Armenian-դասական հայերեն,
13) Classical Azerbaijani- Klassik Azərbaycan,
14) Classical Basque- Euskal klasikoa,
15) Classical Belarusian-Класічная беларуская,
16) Classical Bengali-ক্লাসিক্যাল বাংলা,
17) Classical  Bosnian-Klasični bosanski,
18) Classical Bulgaria- Класически българск,
19) Classical  Catalan-Català clàssic
20) Classical Cebuano-Klase sa Sugbo,

21) Classical Chichewa-Chikale cha Chichewa,

22) Classical Chinese (Simplified)-古典中文(简体),

23) Classical Chinese (Traditional)-古典中文(繁體),

24) Classical Corsican-Corsa Corsicana,

25) Classical  Croatian-Klasična hrvatska,

26) Classical  Czech-Klasická čeština,
27) Classical  Danish-Klassisk dansk,Klassisk dansk,

28) Classical  Dutch- Klassiek Nederlands,
29) Classical English,Roman
30) Classical Esperanto-Klasika Esperanto,

31) Classical Estonian- klassikaline eesti keel,

32) Classical Filipino,
33) Classical Finnish- Klassinen suomalainen,

34) Classical French- Français classique,

35) Classical Frisian- Klassike Frysk,

36) Classical Galician-Clásico galego,
37) Classical Georgian-კლასიკური ქართული,

38) Classical German- Klassisches Deutsch,
39) Classical Greek-Κλασσικά Ελληνικά,
40) Classical Gujarati-ક્લાસિકલ ગુજરાતી,
41) Classical Haitian Creole-Klasik kreyòl,

42) Classical Hausa-Hausa Hausa,
43) Classical Hawaiian-Hawaiian Hawaiian,

44) Classical Hebrew- עברית קלאסית
45) Classical Hmong- Lus Hmoob,

46) Classical Hungarian-Klasszikus magyar,

47) Classical Icelandic-Klassísk íslensku,
48) Classical Igbo,

49) Classical Indonesian-Bahasa Indonesia Klasik,

50) Classical Irish-Indinéisis Clasaiceach,
51) Classical Italian-Italiano classico,
52) Classical Japanese-古典的なイタリア語,
53) Classical Javanese-Klasik Jawa,
54) Classical Kannada- ಶಾಸ್ತ್ರೀಯ ಕನ್ನಡ,
55) Classical Kazakh-Классикалық қазақ,

56) Classical Khmer- ខ្មែរបុរាណ,
57) Classical Korean-고전 한국어,

58) Classical Kurdish (Kurmanji)-Kurdî (Kurmancî),

59) Classical Kyrgyz-Классикалык Кыргыз,
60) Classical Lao-ຄລາສສິກລາວ,
61) Classical Latin-LXII) Classical Latin,

62) Classical Latvian-Klasiskā latviešu valoda,

63) Classical Lithuanian-Klasikinė lietuvių kalba,

64) Classical Luxembourgish-Klassesch Lëtzebuergesch,

65) Classical Macedonian-Класичен македонски,
66) Classical Malagasy,
67) Classical Malay-Melayu Klasik,

68) Classical Malayalam-ക്ലാസിക്കൽ മലയാളം,

69) Classical Maltese-Klassiku Malti,
70) Classical Maori-Maori Maori,
71) Classical Marathi-क्लासिकल माओरी,

72) Classical Mongolian-Сонгодог Монгол,

73) Classical Myanmar (Burmese)-Classical မြန်မာ (ဗမာ),

74) Classical Nepali-शास्त्रीय म्यांमार (बर्मा),
75) Classical Norwegian-Klassisk norsk,

76) Classical Pashto- ټولګی پښتو

77) Classical Persian-کلاسیک فارسی
78) Classical Polish-Język klasyczny polski,

79) Classical Portuguese-Português Clássico,
80) Classical Punjabi-ਕਲਾਸੀਕਲ ਪੰਜਾਬੀ,
81) Classical Romanian-Clasic românesc,
82) Classical Russian-Классический русский,
83) Classical Samoan-Samoan Samoa,
84) Classical Scots Gaelic-Gàidhlig Albannach Clasaigeach,
85) Classical Serbian-Класични српски,
86) Classical Sesotho-Seserbia ea boholo-holo,
87) Classical Shona-Shona Shona,
88) Classical Sindhi,
89) Classical Sinhala-සම්භාව්ය සිංහල,

90) Classical Slovak-Klasický slovenský,
91) Classical Slovenian-Klasična slovenska,
92) Classical Somali-Soomaali qowmiyadeed,
93) Classical Spanish-Español clásico,
94) Classical Sundanese-Sunda Klasik,
95) Classical Swahili,
96) Classical Swedish-Klassisk svensk,
97) Classical Tajik-тоҷикӣ классикӣ,

98) Classical Tamil-பாரம்பரிய இசைத்தமிழ் செம்மொழி,
99) Classical Telugu- క్లాసికల్ తెలుగు,
100) Classical Thai-ภาษาไทยคลาสสิก,
101) Classical Turkish-Klasik Türk,
102) Classical Ukrainian-Класичний український,
103) Classical Urdu- کلاسیکی اردو
104) Classical Uzbek-Klassik o’zbek,
105) Classical Vietnamese-Tiếng Việt cổ điển,

106) Classical Welsh-Cymraeg Clasurol,
107) Classical Xhosa-IsiXhosa zesiXhosa,
108) Classical Yiddish- קלאסישע ייִדיש
109) Classical Yoruba-Yoruba Yoruba,
110) Classical Zulu-I-Classical Zulu






Dove-02-june.gif (38556 bytes)


http://www.orgsites.com/oh/awakenedone/


Awakeness Practices

All 84,000 Khandas As Found in the Pali Suttas

Traditionally there  are 84,000 Dhamma Doors - 84,000 ways to get
Awakeness. Maybe so; certainly the Buddha taught a large number of
practices that lead to Awakeness. This web page attempts to catalogue
those found in the Pali Suttas (DN, MN, SN, AN, Ud & Sn 1).

There are 3 sections:

The discourses of Buddha are divided into 84,000, as to separate
addresses. The division includes all that was spoken by Buddha.”I
received from Buddha,” said Ananda, “82,000 Khandas, and  from the
priests 2000; these are 84,000 Khandas maintained by me.” They are
divided into 275,250, as to the stanzas of the original text, and into
361,550, as to the stanzas of the commentary. All the discourses
including both those of Buddha and those of the commentator, are
divided  into 2,547 banawaras, containing 737,000 stanzas, and29,368,000
separate letters.


ESSENCE OF TIPITAKA

Positive Buddha Vacana — The words of the Buddha —
Interested in All Suttas  of Tipitaka as Episodes in visual format including 7D laser Hologram 360 degree Circarama presentation

from
Analytic Insight Net - FREE Online Tipiṭaka Law Research & Practice
University
in
112 CLASSICAL LANGUAGES Please Visit: http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org

LESSONS

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PPydLZ0cavc
for
 Maha-parinibbana Sutta — Last Days of the Buddha

The Great Discourse on the Total Unbinding

This wide-ranging sutta, the longest one in the Pali canon,
describes the events leading up to, during, and immediately following
the death and final release (parinibbana) of the Buddha. This colorful
narrative
contains a wealth of Dhamma teachings, including the Buddha’s final
instructions that defined how Buddhism would be lived and practiced long
after the Buddha’s death — even to this day. But this sutta also
depicts, in simple language, the poignant human drama that unfolds among
the Buddha’s many devoted followers around the time of the death of
their beloved teacher.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bDkKT54WbJ4
for
Mahāsatipaṭṭhānasuttaṃ (Pali) - 2 Kāyānupassanā ānāpānapabbaṃ

http://www.buddha-vacana.org/sutta/digha.html
Use
http://www.translate.google.com/

from


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Awaken One With Awareness Mind

(A1wAM)+ ioT (insight-net of Things)  - the art of Giving, taking and Living   to attain Eternal Bliss

as Final Goal through Electronic Visual Communication Course on

Political Science -Techno-Politico-Socio Transformation and Economic

Emancipation Movement (TPSTEEM).

Struggle hard to see that all fraud EVMs are replaced by paper ballots by

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using Internet of things by creating Websites, blogs. Make the best use

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Practice

Insight Meditation in all postures of the body - Sitting, standing,

lying, walking, jogging, cycling, swimming, martial arts etc., for

health mind in a healthy body.

 






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buddhasaid2us@gmail.com
jchandra1942@icloud.com
sarvajanow@yahoo.co.in

jcs4ever@outlook.com

is the most Positive Energy of informative and research oriented site propagating the teachings of the Awakened One with Awareness the Buddha and on Techno-Politico-Socio
Transformation and Economic Emancipation Movement followed by millions
of people all over the world in 112 Classical languages.

Rendering exact translation as a lesson of thisUniversity in one’s mother tongue to this Google Translation and
propagation entitles to become a Stream
Enterer (Sottapanna) and to attain Eternal Bliss as a Final Goal






Media Prabandhak








Image may contain: 2 people




Maharaja Jagatheesan  & Upasaka Chandrasekharan



Peace and joy for all























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