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969 LESSON 03-07-2013 WEDNESDAY FREE ONLINE eNńĀlńĀndńĀ Research and Practice UNIVERSITY run through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org 30 Lakkha√Ķa Sutta AWS SUMMIT 2013, Bangalore Date: Friday, July 5, 2013 Time: 8:30am - 5:30pm Venue:The Lalit Ashok, Bangalore after registering online by visiting https://aws.amazon.com/aws-summit-2013/bangalore/?TRK=shobiz
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969 LESSON 03-07-2013 WEDNESDAY

FREE ONLINE  eNńĀlńĀndńĀ Research and Practice UNIVERSITY

run through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org


30

Lakkha√Ķa
Sutta


An exciting agenda for a large enterprise or a start-up that includes presentations from AWS experts and industry leaders.
Hands-on sessions at the AWS Labs, as
well as AWS Solutions Architecture corner and solutions showcase at
the Partner & Solutions Pavilion.



AWS experts and industry leaders, hands-on sessions at the AWS Labs, as
well as AWS Solutions Architecture corner and solutions showcase at
the Partner & Solutions Pavilion.

Dr. Werner Vogels, CTO, Amazon, will be joining as our keynote speaker and will host a customer panel discussion featuring:

Kind Attention: Jagatheesan Chandrasekharan,Thanks for registering at AWS Summit, Bangalore. (organized by Amazon Seller Services Pvt. Ltd.) We are delighted to confirm your participation.

Gentle reminder: Registration opens at 7:30 am and the event starts at 8:30 am. Kindly carry a copy of this confirmation email to the event to facilitate registration.

Date: Friday, July 5, 2013
Time: 8:30am - 5:30pm
Venue:The Lalit Ashok, Bangalore
after registering online by visiting
https://aws.amazon.com/aws-summit-2013/bangalore/?TRK=shobiz


Three breakout sessions designed for
enterprises, start-ups and developers will feature detailed
presentations and case studies on topics such as Big Data on the Cloud,
Optimizing your Costs and Infrastructure with Support and Running
Lean with Optimized Architecture.


Since its inception in 2006, Amazon Web Services (AWS) has been providing cost-effective, flexible, secure and scalable technology infrastructure in-the-cloud to hundreds of thousands of companies of all sizes across over 190 countries across the globe. As part of a global series of Summit events, the AWS Summit - Bangalore (hosted by Amazon Seller Services Pvt. Ltd) is a free, one-day event where you will learn about the latest technology trends in the cloud and some of the most interesting AWS Cloud use cases and workloads. You can choose from different sessions to help you get started or dive deeper into specific solutions and use cases. This event is designed to bring AWS customers together along with those interested in cloud computing so you can learn, discover, meet other AWS customers and share ideas. You will also have an opportunity to meet with AWS experts and get your technical and business questions answered.

10 Reasons to Attend the Summit:


EACH SENTENCE IS FORMED TO SEND AS SMSes

The Awakened One with Awareness (AOA)’s asserted that, “The way to change the world is to change the nature of man.”

It offers a critical insight into how to improve conditions for our planet and its inhabitants.

The
spirit to care not just for ourselves but for others, based on an
awareness of our interlinked fates, lies at the heart of Buddhism.

These teachings challenge families, communities and nations to act in concert for the advancement of our common well-being.

That
is the best way to secure individual and collective progress in an
interdependent world.And indeed, all of the world’s great religions are
for that.

We must also change longstanding assumptions and open
our minds to new ideas and possible solutions if we are to address major
global threats.

AOAs of all traditions are invited to use the
occasion of the Day of AWS Summit, 2013 to reflect on how we can change
our actions.

AOAs  must pave the way for a more sustainable future  from the proliferation of deadly weapons to intolerance and inequality.

The
AOA, bequeathed to humanity profound teachings that can guide our
efforts to resolve the severe problems facing today’s world.

His
injunction against the three poisons of greed, anger and ignorance is
especially relevant to multilateral efforts to overcome the hunger.

It needlessly affects nearly a billion people in a world of plenty, the brutal violence that takes millions of lives each year.

It affects the senseless environmental damage that humans cause to our only home, the planet Earth.

The
theme of socio-economic development may sound modern, but its core is
the very problem of human suffering that AOA sought to addresslong ago.

Numerous
AOA organizations are putting these teachings into practice and  their
support for United Nations activities to achieve the Development Goals.

That is the  blueprint for enabling all people to enjoy lives of dignity and opportunity.

Let
us draw on the universal values of AOA to  act in solidarity with those
who are suffering, thereby contributing to a more compassionate and
awakened world for all.

CODI
(CO-OPERATIVE DIRECT INVESTMENT)

CF SALE MART
 
(CYBERNETIC FAIR SALE MART)

With lots of Metta

Jagatheesan Chandrasekharan

CO-OPERATIVE
DIRECT INVESTMENT CODI CYBERNETIC FAIR SALE MART assert that, “The way
to change the world is to change the nature of man.”

It offers Insight to Improve Conditions for Planet, Inhabitants. The world needs waves of reforms.

Generate an opportunity to set the world on a more equitable and sustainable path of development.

C
F SALE MART has much to offer that process. CF SALE MART  assert that,
“The way to change the world is to change the nature of man.”

It offers a critical insight into how to improve conditions for our planet and its inhabitants.
The
spirit to care not just for ourselves but for others, based on an
awareness of our interlinked fates, lies at the heart of Buddhism.
These teachings challenge families, communities and nations to act in concert for the advancement of our common well-being.
That
is the best way to secure individual and collective progress in an
interdependent world.And indeed, all of the world’s great religions are
for that.
We must also change longstanding assumptions and open our
minds to new ideas and possible solutions if we are to address major
global threats.
C F SALE MARTs of all traditions are invited to use
the occasion of the Day of AWS Summit, 2013 to reflect on how we can
change our actions.

C F SALE MARTs  must pave the way for a more
sustainable future  from the proliferation of deadly weapons to
intolerance and inequality.

The C F SALE MART, bequeathed to
humanity profound teachings that can guide our efforts to resolve the
severe problems facing today’s world.
His injunction against the
three poisons of greed, anger and ignorance is especially relevant to
multilateral efforts to overcome the hunger.
It needlessly affects nearly a billion people in a world of plenty, the brutal violence that takes millions of lives each year.
It affects the senseless environmental damage that humans cause to our only home, the planet Earth.
The
theme of socio-economic development may sound modern, but its core is
the very problem of human suffering that CFSM sought to address long
ago.
Numerous CFSM organizations are putting these teachings into
practice and  their support for United Nations activities to achieve the
Development Goals.
That is the  blueprint for enabling all people to enjoy lives of dignity and opportunity.
Let
us draw on the universal values of CFSM to  act in solidarity with
those who are suffering, thereby contributing to a more compassionate
and awakened world for all.

ECONOMY OF THE AWAKEN ONE WITH AWARENESS (CYBERNETIC FAIR SALE MART ) is to provide all people with a minimum income.

Radiation theory sees the economy prospering through the virtuous actions of individuals following the moral law.

CFSM
 accept existing political and economic institutions, even while
providing a democratic social ethos revolutionary for its time.

Emperor
Asoka, pursued a highly activist fiscal policy even though he believed
only meditation could help people to advance in moral living.

CYBERNETIC FAIR SALE MART  places great stress on gift giving.

Income Redistribution in the Ideal State

Through
the laws of cause and condition there is a distributive cycle of one’s
current social and economic position is due to one’s good cause and
condition accumulated in the past.

This does not mean indifference to the poor, for one’s economic status is not only dependent on the laws of cause and condition.

It
is also complemented by the moral virtues of compassion and
generosity.’ Alms giving to the poor is regarded as increasing one’s
merit.

The importance of active intervention has some important implications for behavior of the “righteous ruler” as well.

CFSM
rulers are also known for the financial aid which they provided for the
poor; indeed, the rulers were advised to give their gifts to all who
are poor.

Gifts to the those who practice CFSM  do not prevent
them from providing a refuge for the destitute or from redistributing
such beneficence to the indigent.

Redistribution of income, either through the public or private, sectors, is certainly regarded in a favorable light.

In
order to favor the spiritual improvement of the population, the State
is justified in taking steps to provide all people with a minimum
income.

Radiation: Virtue as a Positive Externality

CYBERNETIC
FAIR SALE MART  theory of radiation sees the economy prospering through
the collective impact of the virtuous actions of individuals.

CFSM argue
that since the economy can ultimately prosper only through virtuous
action, ultimately the only hope for prosperity lies in a regeneration
of human kind.

Through the cultivation of the Four Sublime Abodes (loving kindness, compassion, sympathetic joy, and equanimity).

Any appropriate good action inevitably leads to an increase of the material wealth of the community.

Trade Through the Market

CYBERNETIC FAIR SALE MART  discussion on right livelihood prohibits trade in certain goods and services.

It 
means that all other types of trade are apparently allowed (but not
explicitly approved) in an interesting comparison between trading and
agriculture as means of livelihood.

The CFSM  also notes that both trading and agriculture can bring high or low returns, depending on the circumstances.

Trading
is an occupation with little to do, few duties, a small administration,
and small problems, while agriculture is the reverse.

The
capable merchant is approvingly said to know the value of goods and
prices and the profits he obtains; and to buy where the price is low and
to sell where the price is high.

A merchant who was generous to the cause was highly praised for his piety.

CYBERNETIC
FAIR SALE MART  accepts competition in general in the sense that it is
possible to compete without hurting others,excel in virtue.

It is still competition without rivalry, for victory to oneself does not mean the defeat of someone else.

Economic Policies

Description of the origins of property also discusses the origins of the State.

As
crime increased after the division of the land, the people elected a
ruler to maintain law and order, paying him for his troubles.

This suggests a type of social contract theory, which means that the ruler has important obligations toward the people.

Some of the discussion about economic policy are traditional Ten Royal Precepts of Rulership.

Governance
of  ruler: generosity, morality, liberality, uprightness, gentleness,
self-restraint, non-anger, non-hurtfulness, forbearance, &
non-opposition.

More practical advice can also be found, speaking of the GovernmentActs to increase prosperity.

Include giving of seed corn and food to farmers and of capital to merchants to start or increase their business.

Emphasizes that if prosperity increases, economic disorders and crime such as theft decrease.

Additional
insight into State economic activities can be gained by examining the
records of some of the “righteous rulers” who are revered by the CFSM.

Because
of the participation of the State in the operations of the irrigation
systems in many of these countries, the govt. had a fairly active role
in the economy.

The prototypical important righteous ruler was
the revered King Ashoka (ca. 274-232 B.C.E.), the grandson of the
founder of the Mauryan dynasty.

From Asoka’s edicts it appears that he generally accepted the economic and political institutions of his time.

However,
he also took as the goal of statecraft the welfare and happiness of the
people. He adopted a highly activist fiscal policy.

both with regard to current and capital expenditures.
 
He
gave gifts to the aged, other needy, and religious orders; he set up
public education courses to teach the doctrines of Rule of the Law;

He
cut back on large public festivals; he imported and planted medicinal
herbs; and he carried out various public works projects such as digging
of wells.

Planting of trees, construction of rest houses and animal watering stations along main roads in the empire.

Some of his edicts appeared to enforce traditional AOA  beliefs, e.g, bans on slaughtering various animals.

The
funds spent on the maintenance of the govt. and good works were high,
e.g., taxes were apparently about one fourth of the revenue of land.

Still
another righteous ruler was King Ruang  who lived in the 14th century
in Thailand, long after the canonical scriptures had been completed.

Ruang stated quite clearly that a righteous king brings prosperity to his subjects.

He apparently had a much less luxurious court or a less activist governmental expenditure policy than Asoka.

He
advised that taxes should be less than 10 percent of the crop (and less
in a drought) and that such taxes should never be higher than those of
the preceding king.

He also urged that the State provide
interest free loans to those wishing to engage in commerce and that no
profit taxes should be placed upon such commercial activities.

Awaken One with Awareness (CYBERNETIC FAIR SALE MART ) and Politics

The Awaken One with Awareness (CFSM ) had gone beyond all worldly affairs, but still gave advice on good government.

AN
AWAKENED ONE WITH AWARENESS  ruler came from a warrior caste and was
naturally brought into association with rulers and ministers.

Despite
His origin and association, He never resorted to the influence of
political power to introduce His thoughts nor allowed His Thoughts to be
misused.

But today, many politicians try to drag the AOA’s name
into politics by introducing Him as a communist, capitalist, or even an
imperialist.

They have forgotten that the new political philosophy as we know it really developed in the West long after the AOA’s time.

Those
who try to make use of the good name of the  AOA for their own personal
advantage must remember that the  AOA was the SupremelyAwaken One.
 
for gaining political power.  who had gone beyond all worldly concerns.

There
is an inherent problem of trying to intermingle religion with politics.
The basis of religion is morality, purity and faith, while that for
politics is power.

In the course of history, religion has often been used to give legitimacy to those in power and their exercise of that power.

Religion was used to justify wars and conquests, persecutions, atrocities, rebellions, destruction of works of art and culture.

When
religion is used to pander to political whims, it has to forego its
high moral ideals and become debased by worldly political demands.

The
thrust of the  AOA  Rule of Law is not directed to the creation of new
political institutions and establishing political arrangements.

Basically,
it seeks to approach the problems of society by reforming the
individuals constituting that society and by suggesting some general
principles.

Through which the society can be guided towards
greater humanism, improved welfare of its members, and more equitable
sharing of resources.

There is a limit to the extent to which a political system can safeguard the happiness and prosperity of its people.

No
political system, no matter how ideal it may appear to be, can bring
about peace and happiness as long as the people in the system are
dominated by greed, hatred and delusion.

In addition, no matter
what political system is adopted, there are certain universal factors
which the members of that society will have to experience,

The
effects of good and bad Cause and Condition, the lack of real
satisfaction or everlasting happiness in the world characterized by
unsatisfactoriness, impermanence), and egolessness.

To the  AOA , nowhere in attachment is there real freedom, not even in the heavens or the world of Creator.

A
good and just political system  guarantees basic human rights and
contains checks and balances to the use of power is an important
condition for a happy in society.

People should not fritter away
their time by endlessly searching for the ultimate political system
where men can be completely free.

Because complete freedom cannot be found in any system but only in minds which are free.

To
be free, people will have to look within their own minds and work
towards freeing themselves from the chains of ignorance and craving.

Freedom in the truest sense is only possible when a person uses Rule of Law to develop his character.

Through
good speech and action and to train his mind so as to expand his mental
potential and achieve his ultimate aim of awaken-ness.

Recognizing
the usefulness of separating religion from politics and the limitations
of political systems in bringing about peace and happiness.

There
are several aspects of the  AOA’s thoughts which have close
correspondence to the political arrangements of the present day.

Firstly,
the AOA spoke about the equality of all human beings long before
Abraham Lincoln, and that classes and castes are artificial barriers
erected by society.

The only classification of human beings, according to the  AOA, is based on the quality of their moral conduct.

Secondly, the  AOA encouraged the spirit of social -co-operation and active participation in society.

This spirit is actively promoted in the political process of modern societies.

Thirdly, since no one was appointed as the AOA’s successor, the members of the Order were to be guided by the Rule of Law.

Until today very member of the Order is to abide by the Rule of Law which governs and guides their conduct.

Fourthly, the  AOA  encouraged the spirit of consultation and the democratic process.

This is shown within the community of the Order in which all members have the right to decide on matters of general concern.

When
a serious question arose demanding attention, the issues were put
before the wise and discussed in a manner similar to the democratic
parliamentary system used today.

This self-governing procedure may come as a surprise to many.

Assemblies
of  AOA’s in JAMBUDVIPA 2,500 years and more ago are to be found the
rudiments of the parliamentary practice of the present day.

A
special officer similar to ‘Mr. Speaker’ was appointed to preserve the
dignity of the Parliamentary Chief Whip, was also appointed to see if
the quorum was secured.

Matters were put forward in the form of a motion which was open to discussion.

In
some cases it was done once, in others three times, thus anticipating
the practice of Parliament in requiring that a bill be read a third time
before it becomes law.

If the discussion showed a difference of opinion, it was to be settled by the vote of the majority through balloting.

The  AOA approach to political power is the moralization and the responsible use of public power.

The  AOA preached non-violence and peace as a universal message.

He did not approve of violence or the destruction of life, and declared that there is no such thing as a ‘just’ war.

He
taught: ‘The victor breeds hatred, the defeated lives in misery. He who
renounces both victory and defeat is happy and peaceful.

Not only did the AOA teach non-violence and peace.

He was perhaps the first and only religious teacher who went to the battlefield personally to prevent the outbreak of a war.

He diffused tension between the Sakyas and the Koliyas who were about to wage war over the waters of Rohini.

He also dissuaded King Ajatasattu from attacking the Kingdom of the Vajjis.

The AOA discussed the importance and the prerequisites of a good government.

He
showed how the country could become corrupt, degenerate and unhappy
when the head of the government becomes corrupt and unjust.

He spoke against corruption and how a government should act based on humanitarian principles.

The
AOA once said, ‘When the ruler of a country is just and good, the
ministers become just and good; when the ministers are just and good,
the higher officials become just and good; when the higher officials are
just and good, the rank and file become just and good; when the rank
and file become just and good, the people become just and good.’

The  AOA said that immorality and crime, such as theft, falsehood, violence, hatred, cruelty, could arise from poverty.

Governments may try to suppress crime through punishment, but it is futile to eradicate crimes through force.

The  AOA suggested economic development instead of force to reduce crime.

The government should use the country’s resources to improve the economic conditions of the country.

It could embark on agricultural and rural development, provide financial support to entrepreneurs and business.

Provide adequate wages for workers to maintain a decent life with human dignity.

The AOA had given to rules for Good Government. 

These
ten rules can be applied even today by any government which wishes to
rule the country peacefully. The rules are as follows:

1) be
liberal and avoid selfishness,
2) maintain a high moral character,
3) be
prepared to sacrifice one’s own pleasure for the well-being of the
subjects,
4) be honest and maintain absolute integrity,
5) be kind and
gentle,
6) lead a simple life for the subjects to emulate,
7) be free
from hatred of any kind,
8) exercise non-violence,
9) practice patience,
and
10) respect public opinion to promote peace and harmony.

Regarding the behavior of rulers, He further advised:

-
A good ruler should act impartially and should not be biased and
discriminate between one particular group of subjects against another.
- A good ruler should not harbor any form of hatred against any of his subjects.
- A good ruler should show no fear whatsoever in the enforcement of the law, if it is justifiable.
- A good ruler must possess a clear understanding of the law to be enforced.
It
should not be enforced just because the ruler has the authority to
enforce the law. It must be done in a reasonable manner and with common
sense.

‘If a man, who is unfit, incompetent, immoral, improper,
unable and unworthy of rulership, has enthroned himself a ruler with
great authority.

He is subject to be tortured‚Äö to be subject to a
variety of punishment by the people, because, being unfit and unworthy,
he has placed himself unrighteously in the seat of sovereignty.

The
ruler, like others who violate and transgress moral codes and basic
rules of all social laws of mankind, is equally subject to punishment.

To be censured is the ruler who conducts himself as a robber of the public.

It is mentioned that a ruler who punishes innocent people and does not punish the culprit is not suitable to rule a country.

The ruler always improves himself and carefully examines his own conduct in deeds, words and thoughts.

To
discover and listen to public opinion as to whether or not he had been
guilty of any faults and mistakes in ruling the kingdom.

If it
is found that he rules unrighteously, the public will complain that they
are ruined by the wicked ruler with unjust treatment, punishment,
taxation, or other oppressions including corruption of any kind, and
they will react against him in one way or another. On the contrary, if
he rules righteously they will bless him: ‘Long live His Majesty.’

The
AOA’s emphasis on the moral duty of a ruler to use public power to
improve the welfare of the people had inspired Emperor Asoka in the
Third Century B.C.

To do likewise. Emperor Asoka, a sparkling
example of this principle, resolved to live according to and preach the
Rule of Law and to serve his subjects and all humanity.

He
declared his non-aggressive intentions to his neighbors, assuring them
of his goodwill and sending envoys to distant kings bearing his message
of peace and non-aggression.

He promoted the energetic practice
of the socio-moral virtues of honesty, truthfulness, compassion,
benevolence, non-violence, considerate behavior towards all,
non-extravagance, non-acquisitiveness, and non-injury to animals.

He encouraged religious freedom and mutual respect for each other’s creed.

He went on periodic tours preaching the Rule of Law to the rural people.

He
undertook works of public utility, such as founding of hospitals for
men and animals, supplying of medicine, planting of roadside trees and
groves, digging of wells, and construction of watering sheds and rest
houses.

He expressly forbade cruelty to animals.

Sometimes the AOA is said to be a social reformer.

Among
other things, He condemned the caste system, recognized the equality of
people, spoke on the need to improve socio-economic condition.

Recognized the importance of a more equitable distribution of wealth among the rich and the poor, raised the status of women.

Recommended the incorporation of humanism in government and administration.

And taught that a society should not be run by greed but with consideration and compassion for the people.

Despite
all these, His contribution to mankind is much greater because he took
off at a point which no other social reformer before or ever since had
done.

That is, by going to the deepest roots of human ill which are found in the human mind.

It is only in the human mind that true reform can be effected.

Reforms imposed by force upon the external world have a very short life because they have no roots.

But those reforms which spring as a result of the transformation of man’s inner consciousness remain rooted.

While
their branches spread outwards, they draw their nourishment from an
unfailing source — the subconscious imperatives of the life-stream
itself.

So reforms come about when men’s minds have prepared the
way for them, and they live as long as men revitalize them out of their
own love of truth, justice and their fellow men.

The doctrine preached by the AOA is not one based on ‘Political Philosophy’.

Nor is it a doctrine that encourages men to worldly pleasures.

It sets out a way to attain Eternal Bliss.

In other words, its ultimate aim is to put an end to craving  that keeps them in bondage to this world.

‘The path that leads to worldly gain is one, and the path that leads to Eternal Bliss (by leading a religious life)is another.’

However, this does not mean that  AOA cannot or should not get involved in the political process, which is a social reality.

The
lives of the members of a society are shaped by laws and regulations,
economic arrangements allowed within a country, institutional
arrangements.

They are influenced by the political arrangements of that society.

Nevertheless, if an AOA wishes to be involved in politics, he should not misuse religion to gain political powers.

Nor
is it advisable for those who have renounced the worldly life to lead a
pure, religious life to be actively involved in politics.

Putting CYBERNETIC FAIR SALE MART of Awaken One with Awareness ( CFSM of AOA) to Work: ‚Ä®

A New Approach to Management and Business

CFSM of AOA Economics: The Emerging Middle Path between Capitalism and Socialism

A novel approach to economic management that goes beyond socialism and capitalism.

The proposed economics for the 21st century is ‘CFSM of AOA Economics’.

Based on the insight of the CFSM of AOAb that spiritual liberation is attained by avoiding extremes.

Whether by indulgence in worldly pleasures or severe asceticism, and treading namely ‘ the Middle Way ‘.

  ‘CFSM of AOA Economics ‘ is recommended as the ideal middle path between the competing models of capitalism and socialism.

Both these systems, have failed to contain the relentless destruction of the natural environment and the human community.

Forced leading executives and planners to search for new solutions for planetary problems.

Best aspects of both capitalist and socialist economic systems is drawn in  ‘ CFSM of AOA Economics ‘ model.

It supports the conventional forces of a free market and competition without destroying either nature or human society.

Alternate vision of sustainable economics is meant to be more just and more ecologically sound.

Inspired by the fundamental CFSM of AOA  insight of the inter-connectedness existing among all living things.

That CFSM of AOA, Economics and Ecology are all inter-related.

There
is a heavy emphasis on the concept of freedom as understood in CFSM of
AOA in contrast to the Western concept of ‘freedom’.

In the West ‘freedom’ revolves around the rights of the individual i.e. freedom to do what one wishes.

In CFSM of AOA , ‘freedom’ means freedom from personal desires or attachments.

An
CFSM of AOA approach to economics requires an understanding that
economics and a moral and spiritual life are neither separate nor
mutually exclusive.

The 20th Century has been ravaged by a materialistic, self-centered consumerism.

The next century needs to focus on the quality and spirituality of life itself. CFSM of AOA , which advocates the ‘Middle Path’.

Serves
as an important resource to pursue an alternative to the extremes of
capitalism and socialism, or pure self-interest and utter self-negation.

The Essence of CFSM of AOA Economics

Three key phrases are identified that underlie the model of Awaken One with Awareness (CYBERNETIC FAIR SALE MART ) Economics.

They are:

1) an economics that benefits oneself and others

2) an economics of tolerance and peace

3) an economics that can save the earth.

An Economics that benefits oneself and others

Theory of free enterprise based on the concept of self-benefit is developed.

This led to people being more concerned with enriching themselves and disregarding the interests of others.

At
the international level, major colonial powers such as England,
Netherlands, France, Portugal and Spain developed their economies from
the resources taken from other poorer regions, without an adequate
resulting benefit accruing to the colonies.

In contrast, the
earlier CFSM of AOA  societies such as JAMBUDVIPA during the time of the
CFSM of AOA or Japan during the time of Prince Shotuku ( 574 - 622 AD )
existed with a radically different social approach.

In Japanese
society where the density of population was high, human relations were
tightly interwoven, and Japanese people were encouraged to pay great
attention to how other people thought or reacted.

In the
Japanese world of business, earning the trust of others and entering
into mutually beneficial transactions have always been given priority.

Such conduct was the result of deep-seated CFSM of AOA  influence.

The
Western obsession with ’self-benefit ‘ and indifference to the rights
of non-European people has been well analysed by former  diplomat
K.M.Panikkar in his ground breaking book ‘Asia and Western Domination - A
Survey of the Vasco De Gama Epoch of Asian History 1498 - 1945,
published in 1953.

Panikkar says that western colonial powers
were reluctant to recognise that doctrines of international law applied
outside Europe or that European nations had any moral obligations when
dealing with Asian people.

For example, when Britain insisted on
the opium trade against the laws of China in the 19th Century, there
was a prohibition by law on opium smoking in England.

In
countries under direct British occupation eg. JAMBUDVIPA, Ceylon and
Burma, though there were equal rights established by law, there was
considerable reservation in enforcing the law against Europeans.

Maurice
Collis, a British magistrate in Burma, gives a rare candid account in
his book ‘Trials in Burma’ ( 1938 ) about the pressures brought upon him
by the members of the Colonial Government and the British expatriate
community, to be partial towards Europeans in his judgments.

Panikkar
avers that this doctrine of different rights (which made a mockery of
the concept of the Rule of Law) persisted to the very end of western
colonial domination and was a prime cause of Europe’s ultimate failure
in Asia.

An Economics of Tolerance and Peace

The  Emperor Asoka established the world’s first welfare state in the third century BC upon embracing  AOA  approach.

He
renounced the idea of conquest by the sword. In contrast to the western
concept of ‘ Rule of Law ‘, Asoka embarked upon a ‘policy of piety or
rule of righteousness’.

The basic assumption of this policy of
piety was that the ruler who serves as a moral model would be more
effective than one who rules purely by strict law enforcement.

The
right method of governing is not only by legislation and law
enforcement, but also by promoting the moral education of the people.

Asoka began by issuing edicts concerning the ideas and practice of Rule of Law, dealing with universal law and social order.

Realizing that poverty eroded the social fabric, one of his first acts was to fund social welfare and other public projects.

Asoka’s
ideals involved promoting policies for the benefit of everyone in
society, treating all his subjects as if they were his children and
protecting religion.

He built hospitals, animal welfare shelters and enforced a ban on owning slaves and killing.

He
gave recognition to animal rights in a number of his rock edicts and
accepted state responsibility for the protection of animals.

Animal sacrifice was forbidden by law.

An important aspect of Asoka’s economics of peace was tolerance.

In
one of his rock edicts, Asoka calls for religious freedom and
tolerance, and declares that by respecting someone else’s religion, one
brings credit to one’s own religion.

The idea of religious
tolerance only emerged in the West in 1689 with the publication of John
Locke’s book ‘ A Letter Concerning Toleration ‘.

From a CFSM of
AOA  perspective, politics can be summed up by the wheel turner, which
means a  political ruler who protects his people and the AOA teachings.

Asoka
was the prototype of this ruler whose political ideas were to inspire a
countless number of other Asian Emperors and rulers.

One enthusiastic follower of Asoka in Japan was Prince Shotuku. (574 - 622 AD ). An ardent believer in AOA  approach,

Shotukti drafted a 17 Article Constitution (the first AOA  approach Constitution of Japan).

It
was promulgated in 604 AD. Shotuku appeals neither to ’self-evident
truths ‘ (as in the American Constitution ) nor to some divine right of
rulers as the basis of law.

He begins pragmatically by stating
that if society is to work efficiently for the good of all, then people
must restrain factionalism and learn to work together.

A key
feature of this Constitution is the emphasis placed on resolving
differences by appeals to harmony and common good, using the procedure
of consensus.

This approach is in marked contrast to the western view that factions can be controlled only legally by a balance of powers.

Decision making by consensus is a significant characteristic of Japanese society.

Every effort is made to ensure that minority dissident factions are not allowed to lose face.

The
influence of AOA approach in Japan was such that in 792 AD Emperor
Kammu (781 - 806 AD) despite constant threats from Korea, abolished the
100 year old national army, except for one regiment to guard the region
near Korea.

National security was maintained by sons of local clan leaders somewhat similar to the present day police.

Japan
was effectively without an army until the emergence of the new warrior
class before the Kamakura, Shogunate (1192 - 1333 AD).

Tibet is another example of demilitarisation (in the 17th century).

What
is significant to note here is that long before the ideal of
demilitarisation was espoused in western countries, ancient AOA
countries had already implemented it.

In Japan, beginning from the 9th century, the death penalty was abolished for nearly three and a half centuries.

An Economics to save the Earth

The
practice of industrial societies indulging in a policy of take-and-take
from nature is criticized, despite economics being fundamentally about
exchange or give-and-take.

A possible root cause of the western attitude towards nature. This passage declares:

“So
God created man in his own image, in the image created he him, male and
female created he them. And God blessed them, and God said unto them,
“Be fruitful and multiply, and replenish the earth and subdue it, and
have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air,
and over every living thing that moveth upon the earth”.

Some
have interpreted this passage literally, as one giving divine sanction
to domination of the earth for the benefit of only human beings and
disregarding the interests of both plants and other living creatures of
this world.

In contrast, AOA approach sacred texts are much more
humble and always emphasise the need to live in harmony with nature and
peacefully co-exist with other living creatures, as the ideal and noble
way.

In the AOA  approach worldview, humans rather being masters of this earth, simply make up one tiny element in a vast cosmos.

In
the CFSM of AOA approach Economics that proposes, the earth rather than
human beings will be placed at the center of our worldview.

History of Economics

The
major ideas in the theories of prominent economists such as Adam Smith
(1723 - 1790), David Ricardo (1772 - 1823), Karl, Marx (1818 - 1883),
John Keynes (1883 - 1946) Joan Robinson (1903 - 1983) and the German
Economists Friedrich von Hayek (1899 - 1992), Wilhelm Lopke (1899 -
1966) and Ludwig Erhard (1897 - 1977) is examined.Lopke’s best-selling
book ‘ Civitas Humanas (Human Citizen) published in 1949 as laying the
foundation for the new humanistic school of economics is singled out.

The
concept of `social market economics’ advocated by Ludwig Erhard in his
1957 book ‘Woffistand fur Alles (Happiness for All ) as the precedent
for developing the new AOA approach Economics is used. Erhard called for
the need to overcome the inherent tensions between the haves and
have-nots in society, through such governmental policies as the banning
of cartels, using government ‘price valuation’ to ensure fair pricing,
rent control and supporting people with disabilities.

Dr. E.F Schumacher’s book ‘Small is Beautiful’, which has a chapter on AOA approach Economics is an inspiration.

Schumacher was heavily influenced by AOA approach meditation and wisdom during his time in Myanmar (formerly Burma).

Though
Schumacher recommended a new approach to economics based on
AOAapproach, that Schumacher’s ultimate solutions were sought in
Christian oriented ethics.

Nevertheless, that Schumacher’s book should serve as a wake up call for those living in AOA  approach countries.

He
further says that given the destruction of the natural environment that
has taken place in the industrial West, the time has come to use a 
AOA approach to economics.

Historical Background of CFSM of AOA Economics

The life story of the AOA offers a valuable lesson when focusing on CFSM of AOA approach economics.

The
Prince rejected the material comforts of a royal life, and also
realised the futility of asceticism and denial of natural physical
needs.

‘’AOA walked a fine line between materialism and denial
of the world, and this middle way or moderate standpoint is fundamental
to understanding CFSM of AOA  Economics’.

The ordinary public and the merchant class supported CFSM of AOA approach from the very outset.

As
AOA approach moved eastwards over the centuries, to China, Korea and
Japan it absorbed elements of the culture of these countries and became
transformed along the way.

It also managed to transform the
societies and economies of these countries by introducing ethical
concepts into the pursuit of profit.

In Japanese history there
has been substantial AOA approach support of commerce, which had come to
fruition during the Edo period (1603 - 1867).

This period witnessed an explosion of economic activity.

Some
sociologists have found interesting parallels in the connections
between the Protestant work ethic and capitalism, and between the rise
of Japanese Capitalism and the religious thought of the time.

Unrestrained Consumption

The world’s natural resources would be depleted if two factors are not immediately addressed:

1) the ever increasing population growth, and

2) the mismanagement of desire ( particularly of those people in the so-called advanced countries)

In
the Ryoan-ji, the AOATemple of Kyoto, famous for its stone and sand
garden, there is a poem carved on a stone, which says ‘ Know what one
really needs ‘.

This is no simple injunction.

To know what one really needs in life requires great wisdom.

But to have the strength to say ‘no’ to the unessential products in life would release a person from the coils of consumption.

This
view i.e. of wanting what is really essential reflects the AOA approach
view of consumption and it is the ideal attitude to be promoted in the
coming century.

Right Livelihood

Right livelihood is one of the components of the Noble Eightfold Path.

Its importance lies in the fact that the work one does for a living influences a person’s thinking.

The AOA has named five types of occupations as unwholesome ways of earning a living.

They are

1) Selling liquor or being connected with the production and sale of liquor

2) Sale of flesh or being connected with the raising and killing of animals

3) Poison (includes drugs)

4) Trading in living beings (includes slavery or for similar purposes)

5) Dangerous weapons.

The layman’s code of discipline or gihi vinaya  is the premise for developing the right work ethic for the next century.

In one passage AOA says “One should work like a bee to earn one’s livelihood.

Do not wait for others to help, nor depend on others foolishly.

AOA showed his concern for the material welfare and the spiritual development of his lay disciples.

In
the discourse to young Sigala, the AOA  explained the full range of
duties owed by a layman to all those with whom he interacts.

The
AOA also indicated how wealth has to be spent i.e. one portion for
one’s needs, which includes offerings to Order of AOA and charity, two
portions on investment and the fourth portion to be kept for an
emergency.

Japanese entrepreneurs who had incorporated
AOA  principles and meditation techniques in their day to day work in an
effort to develop a more humanistic and environmentalist business
ethic.

CFSM of AOA  Economic Vision

Provides food for thought to anyone wishing to adopt an innovative approach to Management and Business.

However
the greatest appeal of this highly readable book lies in the elaborate
development of Schumacher’s profound insight that there is another way
of approaching economics, based on the ideas taught in the East 2500
years ago, particularly of the fundamental interconnectedness of people
and nature.

It is upon this premise that the world can shift from a throw-away culture to a more sustainable* civilisation.

This
work also throws a challenge to governments in AOA  approach countries
to develop a AOA   economic vision as a part of national planning, as we
move towards a new millennium.

ECONOMY OF THE CFSM of AOA ) is to provide all people with a minimum income.

Radiation theory sees the economy prospering through the virtuous actions of individuals following the moral law.

CFSM
of AOA  accept existing political and economic institutions, even while
providing a democratic social ethos revolutionary for its time.

King
Asoka, greatest of all  emperors, pursued a highly activist fiscal
policy even though he believed only meditation could help people to
advance in moral living.

CFSM of AOA places great stress on gift giving.

Income Redistribution in the Ideal State

Through
the laws of cause and condition there is a distributive cycle of one’s
current social and economic position is due to one’s good cause and
condition accumulated in the past.

This does not mean
indifference to the poor, for one’s economic status is not only
dependent on the laws of cause and condition, but is also complemented
by the moral virtues of compassion and generosity.

‘ Alms giving
to the poor is regarded as increasing one’s merit The importance of our
active intervention has some important implications for behavior of the
“righteous ruler” as well.

CFSM of AOArulerss are also known for
the financial aid which they provided for the poor; indeed, the ”
Cakkavatti-Sihanada Suttanta” advises rulers to give their gifts to all
who are poor.

Moreover, gifts to the practioners of CFSM of
AOA  do not prevent them from providing a refuge for the destitute or
from redistributing such beneficence to the indigent.

Redistribution of income, either through the public or private, sectors, is certainly regarded in a favorable light.

In
order to favor the spiritual improvement of the population, the State
is justified in taking steps to provide all people with a minimum
income.

Radiation: Virtue as a Positive Externality

CFSM
of AOA  theory of radiation sees the economy prospering through the
collective impact of the virtuous actions of individuals.

AOA argue
that since the economy can ultimately prosper only through virtuous
action, ultimately the only hope for prosperity lies in a regeneration
of human kind.

Through the cultivation of the Four Sublime Abodes (loving kindness, compassion, sympathetic joy, and equanimity).

Any appropriate good action inevitably leads to an increase of the material wealth of the community.

The Cloud that refers to a centralized location on the Internet that
stores data, making it accessible anytime, anywhere, from any device.
Small businesses have embraced the Cloud because it has a number of
benefits, including:

  • Reduced Cost - Using the Cloud over physical file storage can save a significant amount of money.
  • Ease of Use - Saving and accessing files on the Cloud is easy,
    making it an attractive option, even for non-technical small business
    owners.
  • Flexibility - The Cloud, and the way you use it, can grow and change as your business needs grow and change.
  • Automation - Instead of having to invest in IT support to keep your
    file storage system updated and maintained, most applications that use
    the Cloud automatically update themselves.

Of course, there are also negatives to using the Cloud. Security of
data stored in the Cloud and loss of complete control over that data are
serious concerns, for example. However, there are ways to protect your
data to ensure it remains accessible and secure at all times. In most
cases, the benefits far outweigh the risks for small business owners.

Here are some of the ways small businesses can use the Cloud. Review
this list and how it applies to your business as you explore how the
Cloud can help you use technology to do more with less.

1. Data Backup

As a small business owner, you are probably already aware of the
importance of backing up your data so you don’t lose everything in the
case of a systems failure or other disaster. The Cloud not only
simplifies the process by allowing your data to automatically update as
you work, but it also creates copies of your data off-site where it will
be safe from any local natural disaster, theft or malfunction.

2. Mobile Working

One of the great benefits of technology is the ability for small business owners to create fully functional mobile offices.
The Cloud fits in perfectly with this because it allows you to access
and sync your data from wherever you are, essentially allowing you to
take your office with you on the road.

3. Information Sharing

Whether you have in-house staff or a team spread across a distance,
the Cloud makes sharing data effortless. Once you have your data backed
up, sharing files can be as easy as sending a link, eliminating the
cumbersome process of emailing large files or saving copies on drives
that are then mailed.

4. File Storage

Many small businesses are using images, audio and video to enhance their marketing activities.
These files often take up a significant part of your hard drive space,
which can be costly. The Cloud allows you to shift the storage of large
files off of your local system, saving local storage for the files you
need to access every day.

5. Growth Planning

The Cloud is scalable, so it allows small businesses to create a plan
for growth that utilizes the benefits of the Cloud without a
significant up-front investment. You can start small, and gradually
increase your usage over time, while only paying incrementally for the
services and access you need. The Cloud is also self-managed by the apps
that provide the services, so you can eliminate or at least reduce the
need for an in-house IT staff to manage your technology.

Small business owners who want to reduce costs
without sacrificing their ability to do business and compete with
larger companies are using the Cloud. If you are ready to put the Cloud
to work for your business, you can start small so you can see the
benefits without making major changes to your operations. Over time, you
will discover news ways to use and benefit from the Cloud.

Start a Business

Try a New Marketing Activity

Write a Short & Sweet Business Plan

Explore Online Business Training

As Guide to Small Business Information Guide,Online Business / Hosting,Desktop Video Guide,Web Design / HTML,Entrepreneurs,Portable Electronics,Internet / Network Security,Digital Cam



It has identified some of
the students of the University to become partners of AWS Summit,
Bangalore organised by Amazon Seller Service Pvt.Ltd. As per the tele
conference we had on 17th June 2013, we will be delighted
if you let us know the number of participants you may allow us to be part of the Summit.


1) Mr. Kodand Ram Software Engineer  now Practicing Advocate to be a Start-up in farming-kodandram76@yahoo.com- 9901144330

2) Mr. Shibu Final Year Law student planning to Start-up enterprise for Tribals-shibutsa@yahoo.co.in-9994646730

3) Mr. Jankiramulu Expert Airplane manufacturer wishes to start-up solar plane manufacture-pjanakiramulu@rediffmail.com-9901451070

4) Mr. H.Lingaiah Expert wt. & CG of Airplanes planning small civil Airplanes-hlingaiah@yahoo.com-9901452620

5) Dr.Gajendran Expert small aircraft Manufacturer planning to start-up the same.-ceegee49@gmail.com-9880595603

6) Dr. Balkrishna Expert Helicopter Designer planning to start-up new ventures.-bala_hdb@hotmail.com-9845180131

7) Dr. Balasundaram MD Aircraft planning to Start-up manufacture-pbsundaram@gmail.com-

8) Master Tushar Kumar wishes to start-up own enterprise.-tushark186@gmail.com-2221643729

9) Mrs Banurekha Pradee Kumar Expert play homes wishes to start-up the same.-banurekha.p@gmail.com-+911409931058

10) Miss Keethi Planning to start-up new enterprise.-keerthi161@gmail.com-

11) Mr. Hamsraj Expert Software Engineer willing to upgrade his expertise-hamsamrjc@yahoo.co.in-

12) Mr. R. Muniappa Expert Social Scientist willing to Start-up enterprises for the needy-rmuniyappabsp@rediffmail.com-998060657

13)  Dr. Raguraman willing to upgrade his Clinic to Nursing Home.-drraghuramanv@gmail.com-9243436464

14) Mr. Karthik Raja Expert Event Management wishes to develop the same.-Kartik.udaa@gmail.com-9845188332

15) Mr. Jitendra Kumar & Viji small enterprise to be developed to large enterprise.-viji.jeethindra@gmail.com,ragavendra.enterprises931@gmail.com-9845796891

16) Mr. Bharath Kumar willing to develop his event management.-bharathkumarl@hcl.in-9341035361

17) Mr. Sathish Kumar expert event Management -sadasathya@gmail.com-

18) Mr. Jose Expert Computer repair and maintanance - 9342570677

19) Mr. Kumar Dhammo Expert Educationist, kumaradhammo@gmail.com, 9845703702

Thanking you  with kind regards and awaiting for your kind response.

Jagatheesan Chandrasekharan (JC)

Rector

FREE ONLINE  eNńĀlńĀndńĀ Research and Practice UNIVERSITY

                 

https://aws.amazon.com/aws-summit-2013/bangalore/?TRK=2wo&mkt_tok=3RkMMJWWfF9wsRoiuajIZKXonjHpfsX56ewvXa62lMI%252F0ER3fOvrPUfGjI4ATMBrNK%252BTFAwTG5toziV8R7jML81rzNQQUhDr



                                                
Kind Attention: Jagatheesan Chandrasekharan,

Thanks for registering at AWS Summit, Bangalore.
(organized by Amazon Seller Services Pvt. Ltd.) We are delighted to
confirm your participation.                                            

Date: Friday, July 5, 2013

Time: 8:30am - 5:30pm

Venue:The Lalit Ashok, Bangalore

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact Ms. Vyshali P K at +91 7483104482

or email us: awssummit.bang@shobiziems.com

Gentle reminder:
Registration opens at 7:30 am and the event starts at 8:30 am. Kindly carry a copy of this confirmation email to the event to facilitate registration.

We will give you a reminder call prior to the event date.

We look forward to meeting you!

Regards,
Amazon Web Services Marketing Team

AWS Blog  ln brk  Facebook  Twitter  YouTube  Slideshare







Speakers

Dr. Werner Vogels

Dr. Werner Vogels
CTO, Amazon


Dr. Werner Vogels is Vice President and Chief Technology Officer at
Amazon where he is responsible for driving the company’s technology
vision, which is to continuously enhance the innovation on behalf of
Amazon’s customers at a global scale.



Krishna Mehra

Krishna Mehra
Co-Founder & CTO, Capillary


Krishna is the Cofounder & CTO of Capillary Technologies, where he
drives the product vision and strategy for the company. As a technology
evangelist, Krishna believes that true innovation happens at the
confluence of Technology and Business. At Capillary, he has created
powerful products that address the gaping void of customer engagement in
Retail. Capillary’s products have enabled hundreds of consumer facing
businesses worldwide to embrace emerging and cutting-edge paradigms -
including Real-time Analytics integrated Mobile and Social Media based
customer engagement technologies.



Srini Rajam

Srini Rajam
Chairman & CEO, Ittiam


Srini Rajam co-founded Ittiam Systems in 2001, along with a team of
senior leaders from the semiconductor industry. Prior to Ittiam, Srini
was the Managing Director of Texas Instruments (TI) India during
1995-2000 and led TI India to be among the most valuable R&D centers
for TI. He had also served as the first Technical Marketing Director
for TI Asia Region, member of the TI Asia Leadership Team and Chairman
of TI Asia Technical Council.



Renjit Paul

Renjit Paul
Senior Manager - IT, Malayala Manorama


Renjit Paul leads the technology team of Manorama Online which drives
the digital initiatives of various products from Malayala Manorama
group. Manorama Online has been in the digital business for more than 15
years and runs multiple websites across several verticals. My key roles
include choosing the right platform and infrastructure for building and
deploying scalable web applications and portals. Has vast experience in
working with various enterprise content management systems for media
portals. Has been working with Malayala Manorama group since 1997.



R Chandrashekar

R Chandra‚ÄĚshekar‚ÄĚ
Head - Engineering & Tech, MeriTrac


R Chandra‚ÄĚshekar‚ÄĚ heads the Engineering and Technology division at
MeritTrac. Heading a critical function in an evolving market, Shekar is
responsible for introducing transformational internet-based technology
products that will modernize the Indian testing and assessment
landscape. The products being developed include solutions for Online
Assessment, scheduling, online Application deployment over cloud, Tablet
based initiatives etc. He is leading the effort in development of an
end to end internet based Scalable Enterprise Assessment Platform
deployed over cloud as well as OnPrem, that will include question bank
platform, rule based Question Paper generation, massive deployment
across over 500 centers with differing internet bandwidth available,
conduct on online exams with 0% result/response loss, and automatic
report generation utilizing Open Source stack.



Vikram Nayak

Vikram Nayak
Co-Founder & CTO, Vizury


Vikram is the CTO and one of the co-founders of Vizury. He currently
oversees product architecture and technology development. He is also
responsible for driving innovation at Vizury. At Vizury, Vikram has also
been instrumental in building the engineering team from the ground-up.
Prior to this, he was a part of the Enterprise solutions group of
Trilogy (renamed Versata). At Trilogy, Vikram handled Pricing,
Configuration and project management in the Enterprise Solutions Group.
He has also worked with behavioural targeting leaders focused on the US
market.

Agenda

AWS Summit, July 5

8:30am - 9:30am Registration and Partners & Solutions Pavilion
8:30am - 5:00pm AWS Hands-On Labs
Visit the AWS Hands-On Labs and take
advantage of 16 self-paced lab sessions. These labs give you an
opportunity to get hands-on experience with AWS using common use cases
in a live AWS environment. The lab room is staffed with knowledgeable
AWS engineers and Solutions Architects to help answer your questions.
Each lab is approximately 1 hour and seating is limited to 40 attendees
at a time. All labs are available at no charge and dedicated computers
are provided.

‚Ėľ View Lab Topics

9:30am - 9:35am Welcome Remarks
9:35am - 11:05am Opening Keynote & Customer Panel
Speaker: Dr. Werner Vogels, CTO, Amazon


Customers:

  • Krishna Mehra, Co-Founder & CTO, Capillary
  • Srini Rajam, Chairman & CEO, Ittiam
  • Renjit Paul, Senior Manager - IT, Malayala Manorama
  • R Chandra‚ÄĚshekar‚ÄĚ, Head - Engineering & Tech, MeriTrac
  • Vikram Nayak, Co-Founder & CTO, Vizury

11:05am - 11:45am ‚Ėľ The Total Cost of (Non) Ownership in the Cloud
11:45am - 12:45pm Networking Lunch and Partners & Solutions Pavilion
12:45pm - 4:05pm Breakout Tracks:

Start-Up and Developer Track

‚Ėľ AWS Enabling the Development Lifecycle

‚Ėľ 0 to Production in 40 minutes

‚Ėľ How Start-Ups and VCs benefit from AWS

‚Ėľ Scaling Seamlessly and Going Global with the Cloud

‚Ėľ Running Lean with Optimized Architecture

Enterprise Track

‚Ėľ Extend your Datacenter in the Cloud and achieve High Availability with Reliable Security at Low Cost

‚Ėľ Running Enterprise Applications like SAP, Oracle and Microsoft on the AWS Cloud

‚Ėľ Petabyte Scale Data Warehousing at Low Cost

‚Ėľ AWS Support - Optimizing your Costs and Infrastructure with Support

Solutions and AWS Use Cases Track

‚Ėľ Web, Mobile and Social Apps on AWS

‚Ėľ Big Data Analytics, Co-Presented with Intel

‚Ėľ Media Industry Use Cases on AWS

‚Ėľ Disaster Recovery, Backup and Archive in the Cloud

‚Ėľ Running High Churn Development & Test Environments

4:05pm - 4:30pm Break
4:30pm - 5:10pm Fireside Chat with Dr. Werner Vogels, CTO, Amazon
5:10pm - 5:30pm Closing Remarks
5:30pm Event Concludes


Location

The Lalit Ashok | Kumara Krupa High Grounds, Bangalore


View Larger Map


Event Sponsors

Gold
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Bronze
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Werner_Vogels


Jump to: navigation, search
Werner Vogels
Wernervogels ddp.jpg
Werner Vogels VP and CTO of Amazon.com
Born 3 October 1958 (age 54)
Amsterdam
, Netherlands
Residence Seattle, Washington
Nationality Dutch
Fields Distributed computing
Institutions Cornell University
Amazon.com

INESC Porto

Vrije Universiteit
Alma mater Vrije Universiteit
Thesis Scalable Cluster Technologies for Mission Critical Enterprise Computing (2003)
Doctoral advisor Henri Bal
Andy Tanenbaum
[1]
Known for Amazon Web Services
Website
twitter.com/Werner
www.allthingsdistributed.com

Werner Hans Peter Vogels (born 3 October 1958 in Amsterdam, Netherlands) is the chief technology officer

Spreading Buddhism Conference 2013 will be held at Nagpur (India) on July 20-21, 2013.
The two days conference will be discussed on following topics.:



1.
Buddha Sangiti ( Discussion of Buddhist Monks).

2.
The Concept of Buddhist India.(Symposium)
3. Buddhists Code of Conduct.(Free Discussion)
4. Buddhism & Women Empowerment.(Symposium)

5. Buddhists Literature. (Discussion)


6.
Buddha’s Economics - Five precepts.(Symposium)
7. Co-ordination of Buddhist at Large.

8.
Implementation of prepared action plan of World Buddhist Conference 2006 of Nagpur(India).(Discussion)

9.
Buddhists Poet Gathering & Cultural Events.

You are cordially invited this conference. Lodging and boarding
facilities will be provided to the delegates & participants outside.


With bests Compliments from :


Dr. Milind Jiwane , Chairman & Chief Organizer,


Spreading Buddhism Conference 2013 at Nagpur (India)

Civil Rights Protection Cell

H.Q.: Jeewak Welfare Society Premises, Naya Nakasha, Opposite Swastik School, Nagpur 440017 (India)

Mob. No. +91 9370984138, 9225226922
email : civilrightsprotectioncell@yahoo.in
dr.milindjiwane@yahoo.com




LESSONS ON LATEST TECHNOLOGY:

https://mail.google.com/mail/?shva=1#inbox/13fa13b22b158eb5


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Yamaha Announces AVENTAGE Home Theater Separates for 2013/14




Building on their successful mid and high-end AVENTAGE Home Theater Receiver line,
Yamaha has decided to delve a little deeper into the high end home
theater market with the introduction of a separate 11.2 channel capable
Preamp/AV processor (CX-A5000) and Power Amp (MX-A5000). Used together,
these components are designed to deliver the best possible audio and
video performance for a high-end home theater experience.

Starting with the CX-A5000, this unit provides all the connectivity (including eight HDMI inputs and two outputs), decoding (Dolby and DTS up to TrueHD and Master Audio), and processing (Yamaha Presence for audio, 4K
upscaling for video) needed for all audio and video sources (Blu-ray,
DVD, CD players, Cable, Satellite, etc…), line outputs for up to two powered subwoofers and up to three additional Zones, as well a providing access to both internet (vTuner) and network-based (DLNA) streaming content sources.


However, the CX-A5000 does not provide its own internal amplification
(in order words, it does not have ability to power speakers). For that,
the CX-A5000 connects to its companion MX-A5000 11 channel power
amplifier (or any other similar power amplifier or combination of power
amplifiers you might choose to use) via either up to 11 channel RCA-type or XLR-type analog audio outputs.


The MX-A5000, in-turn, supports the CX-A5000 with the ability to pump
out 150 watts-per-channel, (rated using an 8 ohm load, with 2 channels
driven, from 20Hz to 20KHz, with 0.06% THD).
Even if you take into consideration that when all channels driven
simultaneously the power output won’t be quite as high, the MX-A5000
still provides plenty of power for an 11 channel speaker system in a
large room. Of course, you also have to take into consideration that
this powerhouse also sucks up the AC power - consuming an average of 650
watts when in use.


All this does come with a price: $2,999.95 for each unit. If you prefer
having a home theater setup utilizing a separate preamp/processor and
power amp, rather than having those functions housed in single receiver,
they should be available at select Authorized Yamaha dealers beginning
sometime in August 2013.


In the meantime, you can dig deeper into the features and specifications of both units by visiting the Official Yamaha CX-A5000 and MX-A5000 product pages. Image: Top Right - CX-A5000, Left Side - MX-A5000 © Yamaha Corporation of America

LESSON 2)

https://mail.google.com/mail/?shva=1#inbox/13fa01880f320284

What happens in Vegas: Upcoming events and cloud market fatigue

Latest Technology News and Expert Advice
A roundup of news and tips on the topics you’re interested in | July 02, 2013
TechTarget


ISSUE HIGHLIGHTS
What happens in Vegas: Upcoming events and cloud market fatigue
How will the use of InfiniBand affect the cloud computing market?
Cloud computing continues to drive IT growth, shapes industry
VMware vCloud Suite takes a centralized approach to cloud computing
Are your cloud applications performing as they should?


EXPERT ADVICE
What happens in Vegas: Upcoming events and cloud market fatigue
David
Linthicum and his guest discuss recent shakeups in the cloud market and
whether IT pros are sick of hearing about cloud computing.  (SearchCloudComputing.com)
How will the use of InfiniBand affect the cloud computing market?
Enterprises
are turning to InfiniBand for a high-speed, high-density networking
option in the cloud. How will that affect the cloud market?  (SearchCloudComputing.com)
Cloud computing continues to drive IT growth, shapes industry
IDC
claims third platform technologies will drive 90% of growth in IT. Are
enterprises choosing to ignore this shift sure to stagnate?  (SearchCloudComputing.com)
VMware vCloud Suite takes a centralized approach to cloud computing
The
OpenStack community cloud model isn’t for every enterprise. VMware
vCloud Suite’s centralized approach to cloud appeals to some IT pros.  (SearchCloudComputing.com)
Are your cloud applications performing as they should?
As
enterprises put mission-critical apps into cloud, performance takes a
front seat. Performance monitoring tools are useful but not the only
answer.  (SearchCloudComputing.com)

LESSON 3)

https://mail.google.com/mail/?shva=1#inbox/13fa00604a45d6ae

Is Windows really your path to the cloud? Expert analysis inside

DatacenterVirtualSeminar@theonlineexpo.com
9:04 PM (12 hours ago)

to me

This year at TechEd Microsoft reiterated their message that Windows
is the leading platform for enterprise customers, even as the space is
seeing a decided shift away from physical desktops and servers to
virtual, cloud-based ones.

But is Windows really the path to the cloud? Our experts at
SearchWindowsServer.com compiled a series of webcasts feauturing
industry gurus, inlcuding best-selling
author Mark Minasi, to tackle this question
in this online resource.

View these webcasts from the comfort and convenience of your own desk and gain insight into key topics, including:

- Public cloud, private clouds, apps, and data center futures:
Minasi not only details the 3 cloud models, but also the types of
applications best suited for each, including monolithic, n-tier, and
Exchange.

- The scoop on Server 2012: Windows 8 has gotten all the
attention, but Windows Server 2012 might be the bigger story,
essentially serving as the high availability, low cost version of
Server.

- Exchange ‚Äď Host and in the Cloud: Discover the most
important factors involved in the cloud vs. on-premises debate and
receive expert guidance to help you make the best choice based on your
own experience, company goals and long-term technical direction.

- Windows Server 2012 and Storage Capabilities:
Microsoft has modernized the latest version of Windows Server by
introducing new storage features such as Windows Storage Spaces and the
highly anticipated ReFS file system. Learn how to use these and other
features to achieve the best possible performance and fault tolerance
for your storage infrastructure.

Click here to view this resource today.

 

 

 

  

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LESSON 4)
https://mail.google.com/mail/?shva=1#inbox/13fa0017dc48dd21


Membership Confirmation: Welcome to SearchCloudComputing.com



SearchCloudComputing.com
9:00 PM (12 hours ago)

to me
Welcome to SearchCloudComputing.com. Thank you for registering and
for verifying your account.

Whether SearchCloudComputing.com is your first introduction to

TechTarget’s network of 80+ technology focused websites or you’ve
frequented one of our other search sites and just recently conducted
research around cloud computing technologies, as a newly registered
member of SearchCloudComputing.com, you now have exclusive access to
the best online resource for the latest news, tech tips, and expert
advice for anyone with responsibility of making decisions about cloud
investments and managing advance cloud infrastructures.

Free member benefits include:

* Focused email updates on newly-posted content, highlighting best

  practices for successful cloud deployment and management
* Instant access exclusive to members-only content from the
  SearchCloudComuting.com editorial team, including exclusive
research
  reports, virtual seminars and in-depth tutorials
* Invitations to exclusive, free seminars and conferences featuring
  the today’s top experts on the cloud

Discover all of the resources available to you with your free

membership, including the following tips and tutorials that made it
on your peers’ must-read list:

TIP: Prepping data center infrastructure for a cloud migration

Cloud migration projects affect existing infrastructure and your
teams. Prep work should start with one question: ‘Is it wise to move
to cloud?’
http://go.techtarget.com/r/22356101/16294249

TUTORIAL: Cloud computing development for beginners

This guide provides information on a variety of cloud computing
platforms available for application development and offers best
practices and helpful hints on working with cloud application
programming interfaces (APIs).
http://go.techtarget.com/r/22356102/16294249

FEATURE: Cloud computing adoption numbers don’t add up to vendor

noise
Enterprises projecting a move to cloud computing may be more hopeful
than ready. Data shows actual cloud penetration doesn’t live up to
expectations.
http://go.techtarget.com/r/22356103/16294249

TIP: Why are people so hung up on Apache Hadoop?

Despite being described as a ‘perfect’ cloud application framework,
many enterprises still don’t know how to deploy Hadoop or recognize
its pitfalls.
http://go.techtarget.com/r/22356104/16294249

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successful in all of your cloud endeavors.

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LESSON 5)

https://mail.google.com/mail/?shva=1#inbox/13f9fb2fceb6040d


IDG Tech Dossier:  Converged Storage: Utility Storage - and Other New Research



SearchCloudComputing.com
7:33 PM (14 hours ago)

to me


Today’s Top White Papers:


IDG Tech Dossier:  Converged Storage: Utility Storage
Configuration Management for Virtual and Cloud Infrastructures
Virtual Seminar: Is Windows Your Path to the Cloud?
Network Evolution University: Integrating Private and Public Cloud Resources
Microsoft Convergence 2012

IDG Tech Dossier:  Converged Storage: Utility Storage


White Paper sponsored by HP & Intel¬ģ

In this IDG Tech Dossier,
learn how utility storage makes for massive consolidation, flexibility
and scalability, so IT departments can reduce storage infrastructure and
lower costs while improving their ability to respond to fast-changing
needs of business units.

View Now


Configuration Management for Virtual and Cloud Infrastructures


White Paper sponsored by ComputerWeekly.com

The top seven things to consider when managing configuration for virtual and cloud infrastructures.

View Now


Virtual Seminar: Is Windows Your Path to the Cloud?


Virtual Seminar sponsored by SearchCloudComputing.com

In this VTS, leading IT
expert Mark Minasi discusses Microsoft’s new place in the cloud market
and the pros and cons to their cloud strategy. He also details the tools
and techniques we can steal from the cloud to improve our data centers
and reach this shared resources nirvana.

View Now


Network Evolution University: Integrating Private and Public Cloud Resources


Virtual Environment sponsored by SearchNetworking.com

This workshop will walk you
through how to unify your public and private cloud services to take
advantage of their flexibility, including interconnecting private and
public clouds, management tools, offloading and migrating workloads, and
locking cloud services down with the right security.

View Now


Microsoft Convergence 2012


Analyst Report sponsored by ComputerWeekly.com

Nucleus Research assesses Microsoft’s plans to extend and develop the Microsoft Dynamics CRM platform.

View Now


LESSON 6 )
https://mail.google.com/mail/?shva=1#inbox/13f9f636d2492433

Webcast: On Cloud, Premise or Hybrid? IBM’s B2B Architects Weigh In



SearchCloudComputing.com
6:07 PM (15 hours ago)

to me
Webcast: On Cloud, Premise or Hybrid? IBM’s B2B Architects Weigh In
Webcast sponsored by IBM

In
this exclusive webcast, hear from a panel of IBM experts as they
discuss the benefits and challenges of the different cloud-based models.
Discover the impact of today’s consumerization trends on IT and how
leveraging the cloud can enhance your organization’s ability to support
these business demands. Compare the pros and cons of each cloud strategy
to realize a best-fit solution for your business.


VIEW NOW
LESSON 7)
https://mail.google.com/mail/?shva=1#inbox/13f9f247aa7971df


IT Handbook: Prepping Data Center Infrastructure for the Cloud



Daily White Papers and Webcasts
July 02, 2013

A service of Bitpipe.com



Daily white papers, case studies, webcasts and product information on the topics you are interested in.


IT Handbook: Prepping Data Center Infrastructure for the Cloud
by SearchDataCenter.com




Check out this expert resource to discover how to successfully prep your data center infrastructure for the cloud.




LESSON 8 )
https://mail.google.com/mail/?shva=1#inbox/13f9e4a0c4a3ca0e



Caleb Gabriel
12:53 PM (20 hours ago)

to
Your Active E-mail Won!

Thank you. Please send the prize to Jagatheesan Chandrasekharan No. 668
5th A Main Road, 8th Cross HAL 3rd Stage, Bangalore-560075, Karnataka,
India to utilise it for spreading DHAMMA.

LESSON 9)

https://mail.google.com/mail/?shva=1#inbox/13f9d2ee894411ce


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http://www.metta.lk/tipitaka/
http://www.metta.lk/tipitaka/2Sutta-Pitaka/1Digha-Nikaya/index.html


30

Lakkha√Ķa
Sutta

Pali

English 

Sinhala


Pali



Suttantapi√Īake
Dãghanikàyo
Tatiya bhàgo
Pàthikavaggo1



Namo tassa bhagavato arahato sammà sambuddhassa


7. (30) Lakkha√Ķasutta√ľ

1. Eva√ľ me suta√ľ:

Eka√ľ samaya√ľ bhagav√† s√†vatthiya√ľ viharati jetavane an√†thapi√Ķ√≥ikassa
√†r√†me. Tatra kho bhagav√† bhikkh√• √†mantesi ‘bhikkhavo’ti. ‘Bhadante’ti1
te bhikkh√• bhagavato paccassosu√ľ. Bhagav√† etadavoca:

Dvatti√ľsim√†ni bhikkhave mah√†purisassa mah√†purisalakkha√Ķ√†ni yehi
samann√†gatassa mah√†purisassa dve gatiyo bhavanti ana¬§¬§√†: sace ag√†ra√ľ
ajjhàvasati ràjà hoti cakkavatti dhammiko dhammaràjà càturanto vijitàvã
janapadatthàvariyappatto sattaratanasamannàgato. Tassimàni satta
ratan√†ni bhavanti seyyath√£da√ľ: cakkaratana√ľ hatthiratana√ľ assaratana√ľ
ma√Ķiratana√ľ itthiratana√ľ gahapatiratana√ľ parin√†yakaratanameva sattama√ľ.
Parosahassa√ľ kho panassa putt√† bhavanti s√•r√† v√£ra√Įgar√•p√†
parasenappamaddan√†. So ima√ľ pa√Īhavi√ľ s√†garapariyanta√ľ ada√Ķ√≥ena asatthena
dhammena samena abhivijãya ajjhàvasati. Sace kho pana agàrasmà
anag√†riya√ľ pabbajati araha√ľ hoti samm√†sambuddho loke vivattacchado2
katam√†ni t√†ni bhikkhave dvatti√ľsa mah√†purisassa mah√†purisalakkha√Ķ√†ni
yehi samannàgatassa mahàpurisassa [PTS Page 143] [\q 143/] dveva gatiyo
bhavanti ana¬§¬§√†? Sace ag√†ra√ľ ajjh√†vasati, r√†j√† hoti cakkavatti dhammiko
dhammaràjà càturanto vijitàvã janapadatthàvariyappatto
sattaratanasamann√†gato. Tassim√†ni satta ratan√†ni bhavanti seyyath√£da√ľ:
cakkaratana√ľ hatthiratana√ľ assaratana√ľ ma√Ķiratana√ľ itthiratana√ľ
gahapatiratana√ľ parin√†yakaratanameva sattama√ľ. Parosahassa√ľ kho panassa
putt√† bhavanti s√•r√† v√£ra√Įgar√•p√† parasenappamaddan√†. So ima√ľ pa√Īhavi√ľ
s√†garapariyanta√ľ ada√Ķ√≥ena asatthena dhammena samena abhivij√£ya
ajjh√†vasati. Sace kho pana ag√†rasm√† anag√†riya√ľ pabbajati araha√ľ hoti
sammàsambuddho loke vivattacchado2

2. Idha bhikkhave mah√†puriso suppati√Ī√Īhitap√†do hoti. Yampi bhikkhave
mah√†puriso suppati√Ī√Īhitap√†do hoti. Idampi bhikkhave mah√†purisassa
mah√†purisalakkha√Ķa√ľ bhavati.

- - - - - - - - - - - - -

1. Bhaddante ti - machasa√ľ. 2. Viva√Īacchado - sy√†, kam. Viva√Ī√Īacchado - machasa√ľ

[BJT Page 238] [\x 238/]

Puna ca para√ľ bhikkhave mah√†purisassa he√Ī√Īh√†p√†datalesu cakk√†ni j√†t√†ni
honti sahassàràni sanemikàni sanàbhikàni sabbàkàraparipåràni. 1 Yampi
bhikkhave mah√†purisassa he√Ī√Īh√†p√†datalesu cakk√†ni j√†t√†ni honti
sahassàràni sanemikàni sanàbhikàni sabbàkàraparipåràni, idampi bhikkhave
mah√†purisassa mah√†purisalakkha√Ķa√ľ bhavati.

Puna ca para√ľ bhikkhave mah√†puriso √†yatapa√Ķh√£ hoti yampi bhikkhave
mah√†puriso √†yatapa√Ķh√£ hoti, idampi bhikkhave mah√†purissa
mah√†purisalakkha√Ķa√ľ bhavati. Puna ca para√ľ bhikkhave mah√†puriso
d√£gha√ľgul√£ hoti. Yampi bhikkhave mah√†puriso d√£gha√Įgul√£ hoti, idampi
bhikkhave mah√†purisassa mah√†purisalakkha√Ķa√ľ bhavati. Puna ca para√ľ
bhikkhave mahàpuriso mudutalunahatthapàdo hoti. Yampi bhikkhave
mah√†puriso muduta√ęunahatthap√†do hoti, idampi bhikkhave mah√†purisassa
mah√†purisalakkha√Ķa√ľ bhavati. Puna ca para√ľ bhikkhave mah√†puriso
jàlahatthapàdo hoti. Yampi bhikkhave mahàpuriso jàlahatthapàdo hoti,
idampi bhikkhave mah√†purisassa mah√†purisalakkha√Ķa√ľ bhavati. Puna ca
para√ľ bhikkhave mah√†puriso ussa√Įkhap√†do hoti. Yampi bhikkhave mah√†puriso
ussa√Įghap√†do hoti, idampi bhikkhave mah√†purisassa mah√†purisalakkha√Ķa√ľ
bhavati. Puna ca para√ľ bhikkhave mah√†puriso e√Ķija√Įgho hoti. Yampi
bhikkhave mah√†puriso e√Ķija√Įgho hoti, idampi bhikkhave mah√†purisassa
mah√†purisalakkha√Ķa√ľ bhavati. Puna ca para√ľ bhikkhave mah√†puriso
√Īhitako’va anonamanto ubhohi p√†√Ķitalehi ja√Ķ√Ķuk√†ni parimasati
parimajjati. Yampi bhikkhave mah√†puriso √Īhitako’va anonamanto ubhohi
p√†√Ķitalehi ja√Ķ√Ķuk√†ni parimasati parimaccati, idampi bhikkhave
mah√†purisassa mah√†purisalakkha√Ķa√ľ bhavati. Puna ca para√ľ bhikkhave
mahàpuriso kosohitavatthaguyho hoti. Yampi bhikkhave mahàpuriso
kosohitavatthaguyho hoti, idampi bhikkhave mahàpurisassa
mah√†purisalakkha√Ķa√ľ bhavati. Puna ca para√ľ bhikkhave mah√†puriso
suva√Ķ√Ķava√Ķ√Ķo hoti. Yampi bhikkhave mah√†puriso suva√Ķ√Ķava√Ķ√Ķo hoti, idampi
bhikkhave mah√†purisassa mah√†purisalakkha√Ķa√ľ bhavati. Puna ca para√ľ
bhikkhave mahàpuriso ka¤canasannibhattaco hoti. Yampi bhikkhave
mahàpuriso ka¤canasannibhattaco hoti, idampi bhikkhave mahàpurisassa
mah√†purisalakkha√Ķa√ľ bhavati. Puna ca para√ľ bhikkhave mah√†puriso
sukhumacchavi hoti. Yampi bhikkhave mahàpuriso sukhumacchavi hoti,
idampi bhikkhave mah√†purisassa mah√†purisalakkha√Ķa√ľ bhavati. Puna ca
para√ľ bhikkhave mah√†puriso sukhumatt√† chaviy√† rajojalla√ľ k√†ye na
upalippati. Yampi bhikkhave mah√†puriso sukhumatt√† chaviy√† rajojalla√ľ
k√†ye na upalippati, idampi bhikkhave mah√†purisassa mah√†purisalakkha√Ķa√ľ
bhavati. Puna ca para√ľ bhikkhave mah√†puriso ekekalomo hoti, ekek√†ni
lomàni lomakåpesu jàtàni honti. Yampi bhikkhave mahàpuriso [PTS Page
144] [\q 144/] ekekalomo hoti, ekekàni lomàni lomakåpesu jàtàni hoti,
idampi bhikkhave mah√†purisassa mah√†purisalakkha√Ķa√ľ bhavati. Puna ca
para√ľ bhikkhave mah√†puriso uddhaggalomo hoti, uddhagg√†ni lom√†ni j√†t√†ni
n√£l√†ni a¬§janava√Ķ√Ķ√†ni ku√Ķ√≥al√†vatt√†ni padakkhi√Ķ√†vattakaj√†t√†ni honti. Yampi
bhikkhave mahàpuriso uddhaggalomo hoti, uddhaggàni lomàni jàtàni nãlàni
a¬§janava√Ķ√Ķ√†ni ku√Ķ√≥a√≥al√†vatt√†ni2 padakkhi√Ķ√†vattakaj√†t√†ni honti, idampi
bhikkhave mah√†purisassa mah√†purisalakkha√Ķa√ľ bhavati. Puna ca para√ľ
bhikkhave mahàpuriso brahmujjugatto hoti. Yampi bhikkhave mahàpuriso
brahmujjugatto hoti, idampi bhikkhave mah√†purisassa mah√†purisalakkha√Ķa√ľ
bhavati. Puna ca para√ľ bhikkhave mah√†puriso sattussado hoti. Yampi
bhikkhave mahàpuriso sattussado hoti, idampi bhikkhave mahàpurisassa
mah√†purisalakkha√Ķa√ľ bhavati puna ca para√ľ bhikkhave mah√†puriso
sãhapubbaddhakàyo hoti. Yampi bhikkhave mahàpuriso sãhapubbaddhakàyo
hoti, idampi bhikkhave mah√†purisassa mah√†purisalakkha√Ķa√ľ bhavati. Puna
ca para√ľ bhikkhave mah√†puriso citantara√ľso hoti. Yampi bhikkhave
mah√†puriso citantara√ľso hoti, idampi bhikkhave mah√†purisassa
mah√†purisalakkha√Ķa√ľ bhavati. Puna ca para√ľ bhikkhave mah√†puriso
nigrodhaparima√Ķ√≥alo hoti, y√†vatakvassa k√†yo t√†vatakvassa by√†mo,
yàvatakvassa byàmo tàvatakvassa kàyo, yampi bhikkhave mahàpuriso
nigrodhaparima√Ķ√≥alo hoti, y√†vatakavassa k√†yo, t√†vatakvassa by√†mo,
yàvatakvassa byàmo tàvatakvassa kàyo, idampi bhikkhave mahàpurisassa
mah√†purisalakkha√Ķa√ľ bhavati. Puna ca para√ľ bhikkhave mah√†puriso
samavattakkhandho hoti. Yampi bhikkhave mahàpuriso samavattakkhandho
hoti, idampi bhikkhave mah√†purisassa mah√†purisalakkha√Ķa√ľ bhavati. Puna
ca para√ľ bhikkhave mah√†puriso rasaggasagg√£ hoti. Yampi bhikkhave
mahàpuriso rasaggasaggã hoti, idampi bhikkhave mahàpurisassa
mah√†purisalakkha√Ķa√ľ bhavati. Puna ca para√ľ bhikkhave mah√†puriso s√£hahanu
hoti. Yampi bhikkhave mahàpuriso sãhahanu hoti, idampi bhikkhave
mah√†purisassa mah√†purisalakkha√Ķa√ľ bhavati. Puna ca para√ľ bhikkhave
mah√†puriso catt√†√ę√£sadanto hoti. Yampi bhikkhave mah√†puriso
catt√†√ę√£sadanto hoti, idampi bhikkhave mah√†purisassa mah√†purisalakkha√Ķa√ľ
bhavati. Puna ca para√ľ bhikkhave mah√†puriso samadanto hoti. Yampi
bhikkhave mahàpuriso samadanto hoti, idampi bhikkhave mahàpurisassa
mah√†purisalakkha√Ķa√ľ bhavati. Puna ca para√ľ bhikkhave mah√†puriso
avira√ęadanto hoti. Yampi bhikkhave mah√†puriso avira√ęadanto hoti, idampi
bhikkhave mah√†purisassa mah√†purisalakkha√Ķa√ľ bhavati. Puna ca para√ľ
bhikkhave mah√†puriso susukkad√†√Īho hoti. Yampi bhikkhave mah√†puriso
susukkad√†√Īho hoti, idampi bhikkhave mah√†purisassa mah√†purisalakkha√Ķa√ľ
bhavati. Puna ca para√ľ bhikkhave mah√†puriso pah√•tajivho hoti. Yampi
bhikkhave mahàpuriso pahåtajivho hoti, idampi bhikkhave mahàpurisassa
mah√†purisalakkha√Ķa√ľ bhavati. Puna ca para√ľ bhikkhave mah√†puriso
buhmassaro hoti, karav√£kabhi√Ķ√£. Yampi bhikkhave mah√†puriso brahmassaro
hoti, karav√£kabh√†√Ķ√£. Idampi bhikkhave mah√†purisassa mah√†purisalakkha√Ķa√ľ
bhavati. Puna ca para√ľ bhikkhave mah√†puriso abhin√£lanetto hoti. Yampi
bhikkhave mahàpuriso ahãnãlanetto hoti, idampi bhikkhave mahàpurisassa
mah√†purisalakkha√Ķa√ľ bhavati. Puna ca para√ľ bhikkhave mah√†puriso
gopamukho hoti. Yampi bhikkhave mahàpuriso gopakhumo hoti, idampi
bhikkhave mah√†purisassa mah√†purisalakkha√Ķa√ľ bhavati. Puna ca para√ľ
bhikkhave mah√†puriso u√Ķ√Ķ√† bhamukantare j√†t√† hoti od√†t√† mudut√•lasannibh√†.
Yampi bhikkhave mah√†puriso u√Ķ√Ķ√† bhamukantare j√†t√† hoti od√†t√†
mudutulasannibh√†, idampi bhikkhave mah√†purisassa mah√†purisalakkha√Ķa√ľ
bhavati. [PTS Page 145] [\q 145/] puna ca para√ľ bhikkhave mah√†puriso
u√Ķh√£sas√£so hoti. Yampi bhikkhave mah√†puriso unh√£sas√£so hoti, idampi
bhikkhave mah√†purisassa mah√†purisalakkha√Ķa√ľ bhavati.

- - - - - - - - - - - -

1. Sabb√†k√†ra parip√•r√†√Ķi suvibhattantar√†√Ķi - [PTS] 2. Ku√Ķ√≥al√†va√Ī√Ī√†ni - machasa√ľ.

[BJT Page 240] [\x 240/]

Im√†ni kho t√†ni bhikkhave dvatti√ľsa mah√†purisassa mah√†purisalakkha√Ķ√†ni
yehi samannàgatassa mahàpurisassa dveva gatiyo bhavanti ana¤¤à. Sace
ag√†ra√ľ ajjh√†vasati, r√†j√† hoti cakkavatti dhammiko dhammar√†j√† c√†turanto
vijitàvã janapadatthàvariyappatto sattaratanasamannàgato. Tassimàni
satta ratan√†ni bhavanti. Seyyath√£da√ľ: cakkaratana√ľ hatthiratana√ľ
assaratana√ľ ma√Ķiratana√ľ itthiratana√ľ gahapatiratana√ľ
parin√†yakaratanameva sattama√ľ. Parosahassa√ľ kho panassa putt√† bhavanti
s√•r√† v√£ra√Įgar√•p√† parasenappamaddan√†. So ima√ľ pa√Īhavi√ľ s√†garapariyanta√ľ
ada√Ķ√≥ena asatthena dhammena samena abhivijiya ajjh√†vasati. Sace kho pana
ag√†rasm√† anag√†riya√ľ pabbajati, araha√ľ hoti samm√†sambuddho loke
vivattacchado.

3. Im√†ni kho bhikkhave dvatti√ľsa mah√†purisassa mah√†purisalakkha√Ķ√†ni
b√†hirak√† pi isayo dh√†renti. No ca kho te j√†nanti ‘imassa kammassa
katatt√† ima√ľ lakkha√Ķa√ľ pa√Īilabhant√£’ti.

Suppati√Ī√Īhitap√†dalakkha√Ķa√ľ (1)

Yampi bhikkhave tath√†gato purima√ľ j√†ti√ľ purima√ľ bhava√ľ purama√ľ
niketa√ľ pubbe manussabh√•to sam√†no da√ęhasam√†d√†no ahosi, kusalesu dhammesu
avatthitasamàdàno, kàyasucarite vacãsucarite manosucarite,
d√†nasa√ľvibh√†ge s√£lasam√†d√†ne uposathupav√†se matteyyat√†ya petteyyat√†ya
s√†ma¬§¬§at√†ya brahma¬§¬§at√†ya kuleje√Ī√Īh√†pac√†yit√†ya a¬§¬§atara¬§¬§ataresu ca
adhikusalesu [PTS Page 146] [\q 146/] dhammesu, so tassa kammassa
katatt√† upacitatt√† ussannatt√† vipulant√† k√†yassa bhed√† parammara√Ķ√†
sugati√ľ sagga√ľ loka√ľ upapajjati. So tattha a¬§¬§e deve dasahi √Īh√†nehi
adhiga√Ķh√†ti, dibbena √†yun√† dibbena va√Ķ√Ķena dibbena sukhena dibbena
yasena dibbena àdhipateyyena dibbehi råpehi dibbehi saddehi dibbehi
gandhehi dibbehi rasehi dibbehi pho√Ī√Īhabbehi. So tato cuto itthatta√ľ
√†gato sam√†no ima√ľ mah√†purisalakkha√Ķa√ľ pa√Īilabhati, suppati√Ī√Īhitap√†do
hoti, sama√ľ p√†da√ľ bh√•miya√ľ nikkhipati, sama√ľ uddharati, sama√ľ
sabb√†vantehi p√†datalehi bh√•mi√ľ phusati. So tena lakkha√Ķena samann√†gato
sace ag√†ra√ľ ajjh√†vasati, r√†j√† hoti cakkavatt√£ dhammiko dhammar√†j√†
càturanto vijitàvã janapadatthàvariyappatto sattaratanasamannàgato.
Tassim√†ni sattaratan√†ni bhavanti, seyyath√£da√ľ: cakkaratana√ľ
hatthiratana√ľ assaratana√ľ ma√Ķiratana√ľ itthiratana√ľ gahapatiratana√ľ
parin√†yakaratanameva sattama√ľ.

[BJT Page 242] [\x 242/]

Parosahassa√ľ kho panassa putt√† bhavanti sur√† v√£ra√Įgar√•p√†
parasenappamaddan√†, so ima√ľ pa√Īhavi√ľ s√†garapariyanta√ľ
akh√£lamanimittamaka√Ķ√Īaka√ľ iddha√ľ ph√£ta√ľ khema√ľ siva√ľ nirabbuda√ľ ada√Ķ√≥ena
asatthena dhammena samena ahivijiya ajjh√†vasati. R√†j√† sam√†no ki√ľ
labhati? Avikkhamhiyo hoti kenaci manussabhåtena paccattikena
pacc√†mittena. R√†j√† sam√†no ida√ľ labhati. Sace kho pana ag√†rasm√†
anag√†riya√ľ pabbajati, araha√ľ hoti samm√†sambuddho loke vivattacchado,
buddho sam√†no ki√ľ labhati? Avikkhamabhiyo1 hoti. Abbhantarehi v√†
bàhirehi và paccatthikehi paccàmittehi ràgena và dosena và mohena và
sama√Ķena [PTS Page 147] [\q 147/] v√† br√†hma√Ķena v√† devena v√† m√†rena v√†
brahmun√† v√† kenaci v√† lokasmi√ľ. Buddho sam√†no ida√ľ labhati. Etamattha√ľ
bhagavà avoca.

Tattheta√ľ vuccati:


Sacce ca dhamme ca dame ca sa√ľyame
Soceyya sãlàlayuposathesu ca,
D√†ne ahi√ľs√†ya as√†hase rato
Da√ęha√ľ sam√†d√†ya samattam√†cari2
So tena kammena diva√ľ apakkami3
Sukha√ľ ca khi√≥√≥√†ratiyo ca anvahi
Tato cavitvà punaràgato idha
Samehi p√†dehi phus√£ vasundhara√ľ.
By√†ka√ľsu veyya¬§janik√† sam√†gat√†
Samappati√Ī√Īhassa na hoti khambhan√†,
Gihissa và pabbajitassa và puna4
Ta√ľ lakkha√Ķa√ľ bhavati tadatthajotaka√ľ.
Akkhambhiyo hoti ag√†ram√†vasa√ľ
Paràbhibhu sattubhã sattumaddano,
Manussabhåtenidha hoti kenaci
Akkhambhiyo tassa phalena kammuno

- - - - - - - - - - - - -

1. Akakhamabhiyo - machasa√ľ 2. Samanatam√†cari - sy√†. Kam 3. Samakakami. Machasa√ľ 4. Bana - sy√†.

[BJT Page 244] [\x 244/]


Sace ca pabbajjamupeti tàdiso
Nekkhammachand√†bhirato vicakkha√Ķo,
Aggo na so gacchati j√†tu khambhata√ľ
Naruttamo esahi tassa dhammat√†’ti.

P√†datalesu cakkalakkha√Ķa√ľ (2)

4. Yampi bhikkhave tath√†gato purima√ľ j√†ti√ľ purima√ľ bhava√ľ purima√ľ
niketa√ľ pubbe manussabh√•to sam√†no [PTS Page 148] [\q 148/] bahujanassa
sukh√†vaho ahosi, ubbega√ľ utt√†sa√ľ bhaya√ľ apanudit√† dhammika√ľ ca
rakk√†vara√Ķagutti√ľ sa√ľvidh√†t√† sapariv√†ra√ľ ca d√†na√ľ ad√†si. So
tassakammassa katattà upacitattà ussannattà vipulattà kàyassa bhedà
parammara√Ķ√† sugati√ľ sagga√ľ loka√ľ upapajjati. So tattha a¬§¬§e deve dasahi
√Īh√†nehi adhiga√Ķh√†ti, dibbena √†yun√† dibbena va√Ķ√Ķena dibbena sukhena
dibbena yasena dibbena àdhipateyyena dibbehi råpehi dibbehi saddehi
dibbehi gandhehi dibbehi rasehi dibbehi pho√Ī√Īhabbehi. So tato cuto
itthatta√ľ √†gato sam√†no ima√ľ mah√†purisalakkha√Ķa√ľ pa√Īilabhati. He√Ī√Īh√†
pàdatalesu cakkàni jàtàni honti sahassàràni sanemikàni sanàbhikàni
sabb√†k√†raparip√•r√†ni suvihattantar√†ni. So tena lakkha√Ķena samann√†gato
sace ag√†ra√ľ ajjh√†vasati, r√†j√† hoti cakkavatat√£ dhammiko dhammar√†j√†
càturanto vijitàvã janapadatthàvariyappatto sattaratanasamannàgato.
Tassim√†ni satta ratan√†ni bhavanti. Seyyath√£da√ľ: cakkaratana√ľ
hatthiratana√ľ assaratana√ľ ma√Ķiratana√ľ itthiratana√ľ gahapatiratana√ľ
parin√†yakaratanameva sattama√ľ.

Parosahassa√ľ kho panassa putt√† bhavanti s√•r√† v√£ra√Įgar√•p√†
parasenappamaddan√†. So ima√ľ pa√Īhavi√ľ s√†garapariyanta√ľ
akh√£lamanimittamaka√Ķ√Īaka√ľ iddha√ľ ph√£ta√ľ khema√ľ siva√ľ nirabbuda√ľ ada√Ķ√≥ena
asatthena dhammena samena abhivijiya ajjh√†vasati. R√†j√† sam√†no ki√ľ
labhati? Mah√†pariv√†ro hoti, mah√†’ssa honti pariv√†r√† br√†hma√Ķagahapatik√†
negamaj√†napad√† ga√Ķak√† mah√†matt√† an√£ka√Ī√Īh√† dov√†rik√† amacc√† p√†risajj√†
r√†j√†no bhogiy√† kum√†r√†. R√†j√† sam√†no ida√ľ labhati.

Sace kho pana ag√†rasm√† anag√†riya√ľ pabbajati, araha√ľ hoti
samm√†sambuddho loke vivattacchado. Buddho sam√†no ki√ľ labhati?
Mah√†pariv√†ro hoti, mah√†’ssa honti pariv√†r√† bhikkh√• bhikkhuniyo up√†sak√†
up√†sik√†yo dev√† manuss√† asur√† n√†g√† gandhabb√†. Buddho sam√†no ida√ľ labhati.
Etamattha√ľ bhagav√† √†voca tattheta√ľ vuccati:


Pure puratthà purimàsu jàtisu
Manussabh√•to bahuna√ľ sukh√†vaho,
Ubbegauttàsabhayàpanådano
Gutt√£su rakkh√†vara√Ķesu ussuko.
[PTS Page 149] [\q 149/] so tena kammena diva√ľ samakkami
Sukha¤ca khióóà ratiyo ca anvabhã,
Tato civitvà punaràgato idha
Cakkàni pàdesu duvesu vindati
Samantanemãni sahassaràni ca.
[BJT Page 246] [\x 246/]
By√†ka√ľsu veyya¬§janik√† sam√†gat√†,
Disv√† kum√†ra√ľ satapu¬§¬§alakkha√Ķa√ľ
Parivàravà hessati sattumaddano
Tathà hi cakkàni samantanemini.
Sace na pabbajjamupeti tàdiso,
Vatteti cakka√ľ pa√Īhavi√ľ pas√†sati
Tass√†nuyutt√†’dha1 bhavanti khattiy√†
Mah√†yasa√ľ sampariv√†rayanti na√ľ.
Sace ca pabbajjamupeti tàdiso,
Nekkhammachand√†bhirato vicakkha√Ķo
Devàmanussà surasakka2 rakkhasà
Gandhabbanàgà vihagà catuppadà
Anuttara√ľ devamanussap√•jita√ľ
Mah√†yasa√ľ sampariv√†rayanti nanti.

√Ęyatapa√Ķahit√†dini t√£ni lakkha√Ķ√†ni (3 - 5)

5. Yampi bhikkhave tath√†gato purima√ľ j√†ti√ľ purima√ľ bhava√ľ purima√ľ
niketa√ľ pubbe manussabh√•to sam√†no p√†√Ķ√†tip√†ta√ľ pah√†ya p√†√Ķ√†tip√†t√†
pa√Īivirato ahosi, nihitada√Ķe√≥√† nihitasattho lajj√£ day√†panto
sabbap√†√Ķabh√•tahit√†nukampi vih√†si, so tassa kammassa katatt√† upacitatt√†
ussantatt√† vipulatt√† k√†yassa bhed√† parammara√Ķ√† sugati√ľ sagga√ľ loka√ľ
upapajjati. So tattha a¬§¬§e deve dasahi √Īh√†nehi adhiga√Ķh√†ti, dibbena
√†yun√† dibbena va√Ķ√Ķena dibbena sukhena dibbena yasena dibbena
àdhipateyyena dibbehi råpehi dibbehi saddehi dibbehi gandhehi dibbehi
rasehi dibbehi pho√Ī√Īhabbehi. So tato cuto itthatta√ľ √†gato sam√†no im√†ni
t√£√Ķi m√†h√†purisalakkha√Ķ√†ni [PTS Page 150] [\q 150/] pa√Īilabhati,
√†yatapa√Ķh√£ ca hoti d√£gha√Įgul√£ ca brahmujugatto ca. So tehi lakkha√Ķehi
samann√†gato, sace ag√†ra√ľ ajjh√†vasati, r√†j√† hoti cakkavatti dhammiko
dhammaràjà càturanto vijitàvã janapadatthàvariyappatto
sattaratanasamann√†gato. Tassim√†ni satta ratan√†ni bhavanti. Seyyath√£da√ľ:
cakkaratana√ľ hatthiratana√ľ assaratana√ľ ma√Ķiratana√ľ itthiratana√ľ
gahapatiratana√ľ parin√†yakaratanameva sattama√ľ.

Parosahassa√ľ kho panassa putt√† bhavanti s√•r√† v√£ra√Įgar√•p√†
parasenappamaddan√†. So ima√ľ pa√Īhavi√ľ s√†garapariyanta√ľ ada√Ķ√≥ena asatthena
dhammena samena abhivijiya ajjh√†vasati. R√†j√† sam√†no ki√ľ labhati?
D√£gh√†yuko hoti vira√Ī√Īhitiko, d√£gham√†yump√†leti. Na sakk√† hoti antar√†
j√£vit√† vorepetu√ľ kenaci manussabh√•tena paccatthikena pacc√†mittena. R√†j√†
sam√†no ida√ľ labhati. Sace kho pana ag√†rasm√† anag√†riya√ľ pabbajati araha√ľ
hoti samm√†sambuddho loke vivattacchado. Buddho sam√†no ki√ľ labhati?
D√£gh√†yuko hoti cira√Ī√Īhitiko, d√£gham√†yump√†leti, na sakk√† hoti antar√†
j√£vit√† voropetu√ľ paccatthikehi pacc√†mittehi sama√Ķena v√† br√†hma√Ķena v√†
devena v√† m√†rena v√† brahmun√† v√† kenaci v√† lokasmi√ľ. Buddho sam√†no ida√ľ
labhati. Etamattha√ľ bhagav√† avoca. Tattheta√ľ vuccati:

- - - - - - - - - -

1. Tass√†nu yatt√† ca - machasa√ľ 2. Satta (kam)

[BJT Page 248] [\x 248/]


Mara√Ķavadha1 bhayattano viditv√†
Pa√Īivirato param√†ra√Ķ√†yahosi2
Tena sucaritena saggamagamà3
Sukataphalavipàkamanuhosi.
Caviya punaridhàgato samàno
Pa√Īilabhati idha t√£√Ķi lakkha√Ķ√†ni,
Bhavati vipulad√£ghap√†sa√Ķabhiko
Brahm√†’va s√•ju subho suj√†tagatto.
Subhujo susu susa√Ķ√Īhito suj√†to
Muduta√ęu√Ķa√Įguliyassa honti d√£gh√†,
[PTS Page 151] [\q 151/] t√£hi purisavaraggalakkha√Ķehi
Cirayapanàya4 kumàramàdiyanti.
Bhavati yadi gih√£ cira√ľ yapeti
Ciratara√ľ pabbajati yadi tato hi
Yàpayati vasiddhi bhàvanàya
Iti dãghàyukatàya tannimittanti.

Satatussadat√†lakkha√Ķa√ľ (6)

6. Yampi bhikkhave tath√†gato purima√ľ j√†ti√ľ purima√ľ bhava√ľ purima√ľ
niketa√ľ pubbe manussabh√•to sam√†no d√†t√† ahosi pa√Ķ√£t√†na√ľ rasit√†na√ľ
kh√†dan√£y√†na√ľ bhojan√£y√†na√ľ s√†yan√£y√†na√ľ lehan√£y√†na√ľ p√†n√†na√ľ, so tassa
kammassa katattà upacitattà ussannattà vipulattà kàyassa bhedà
parammara√Ķ√† sugati√ľ sagga√ľ loka√ľ upapajjati. So tattha a¬§¬§e deve dasahi
√Īh√†nehi adhiga√Ķh√†ti, dibbena √†yun√† dibbena va√Ķ√Ķena dibbena sukhena
dibbena yasena dibbena àdhipateyyena dibbehi råpehi dibbehi saddehi
dibbehi gandhehi dibbehi rasehi dibbehi pho√Ī√Īhabbehi. So tato cuto
itthatta√ľ √†gato sam√†no ima√ľ mah√†purisalakkha√Ķa√ľ pa√Īilabhati, sattussado
hoti. Sattassa ussadà honti: uhosu hatthesu ussadà honti, uhosu pàdosu
ussad√† honti, uhosu a√ľsak√•√Īesu ussad√† honti, khandhe ussad√† hoti. So
tena lakkha√Ķena samann√†gato sace ag√†ra√ľ ajjh√†vasati r√†j√† hoti cakkavatt√£
dhammiko dhammaràjà càturanto vijitàvã janapadatthàvariyappatto
sattaratanasamann√†gato. Tassim√†ni sattaratan√†ni bhavanti, seyyath√£da√ľ:
cakkaratana√ľ hatthiratana√ľ assaratana√ľ ma√Ķiratana√ľ itthiratana√ľ
gahapatiratana√ľ parin√†yakaratanameva sattama√ľ. Parosahassa√ľ kho panassa
putt√† bhavanti s√•r√† v√£ra√Įgar√•p√† parasenappamaddan√†. So ima√ľ pa√Īhavi√ľ
s√†garapariyanta√ľ akh√£lamanimittamaka√Ķ√Īaka√ľ iddha√ľ ph√£ta√ľ khema√ľ siva√ľ
nirabbuda√ľ ada√Ķ√≥ena asatthena dhammena samena abhivijiya ajjh√†vasati.
R√†j√† sam√†no ki√ľ labhati? L√†bh√£ hoti pa√Ķ√£t√†na√ľ rasit√†na√ľ kh√†dan√£y√†na√ľ
bhojan√£y√†na√ľ s√†yan√£y√†na√ľ lehan√£y√†na√ľ p√†n√†na√ľ. R√†j√† sam√†no ida√ľ labhati.
Buddho sam√†no ki√ľ labhati? L√†bh√£ hoti pa√Ķ√£t√†na√ľ rasit√†na√ľ kh√†dan√£y√†na√ľ
bhojan√£y√†na√ľ s√†yan√£y√†na√ľ lehan√£y√†na√ľ p√†n√†na√ľ. Buddho sam√†no ida√ľ
labhati. [PTS Page 152] [\q 152/] etamattha√ľ bhagav√† avoca. Tattheta√ľ
vuccati:

- - - - - - - - - - -

1. Mara√Ķa (machasa√ľ) 2. M√†ra√Ķ√†ya hoti (machasa√ľ) 3. Tena so sucaritena saggamagam√†si (sy√†) 4. Ciray√†pat√†ya (sy√†)

[BJT Page 250] [\x 250/]


Khajjabhojana√ľ atha leyyas√†yiya√ľ
Uttamaggarasadàyako ahu.
Tena so sucaritena kammunà
Nandane ciramahippamodati.
Sattavussado idhàdhigacchati
Hatthapàdamudutala¤ca vindati,
√Ęhu bya¬§jananimittakovid√†
Khajja bhojja rasal√†bhit√†ya na√ľ.
Ta√ľ gihissapi tadatthajotaka√ľ
Pabbajampi ca tadàdhigacchati,
Khajjabhojanassa l√†bhiruttama√ľ
√Ęhu sabbagihibandhanacchidanti.

Karacara√Ķamudut√†j√†lat√†lakkha√Ķ√†ni (7 - 8)

7. Yampi bhikkhave tath√†gato purima√ľ j√†ti√ľ purima√ľ bhava√ľ purima√ľ
niketa√ľ pubbe manussabh√•to sam√†no cat√•hi sa√Įgahavatth√•hi jana√ľ sa√Įg√†hako
ahosi dànena peyyavajjena1 atthacariyàya samànattatàya, so tassa
kammassa katattà upacitattà ussannattà vipulattà kàyassa bhedà
parammara√Ķ√† sugati√ľ sagga√ľ loka√ľ upapajjati. So tattha a¬§¬§e deve dasahi
√Īh√†nehi adhiga√Ķh√†ti, dibbena √†yun√† dibbena va√Ķ√Ķena dibbena sukhena
dibbena yasena dibbena àdhipateyyena dibbehi råpehi dibbehi saddehi
dibbehi gandhehi dibbehi rasehi dibbehi pho√Ī√Īhabbehi. So tato cuto
itthatta√ľ √†gato sam√†no im√†ni dve [PTS Page 153] [\q 153/]
mah√†purisalakkha√Ķ√†ni pa√Īilabhati, muduta√ęu√Ķahatthap√†do ca hoti
j√†lahatthap√†do ca. So tehi lakkha√Ķehi samann√†gato, sace ag√†ra√ľ
ajjhàvasati, ràjà hoti cakkavattã dhammiko dhammaràjà càturanto vijitàvã
janapadatthàvariyappatto sattaratanasamannàgato. Tassimàni
sattaratan√†ni bhavanti, seyyath√£da√ľ: cakkaratana√ľ hatthiratana√ľ
assaratana√ľ ma√Ķiratana√ľ itthiratana√ľ gahapatiratana√ľ
parin√†yakaratanameva sattama√ľ. Parosahassa√ľ kho panassa putt√† bhavanti
s√•r√† v√£ra√Įgar√•p√† parasenappamaddan√†, so ima√ľ pa√Īhavi√ľ s√†garapariyanta√ľ
akh√£lamanimittamaka√Ķ√Īaka√ľ iddha√ľ ph√£ta√ľ khema√ľ siva√ľ nirabbuda√ľ ada√Ķ√≥ena
asatthena dhammena samena abhivijiya ajjh√†vasati. R√†j√† sam√†no ki√ľ
labhati? Susa√Įgahitaparijano hoti, susa√Įgahit√†ssa honti
br√†hma√Ķagahapatik√† negamaj√†napad√† ga√Ķak√† mah√†matt√† an√£ka√Ī√Īh√† dov√†rik√†
amacc√† p√†risajj√† r√†j√†no bhogiy√† kum√†r√†. R√†j√† sam√†no ida√ľ labhati. Buddho
sam√†no ki√ľ labhati? Susa√Įgahitaparijano hoti, susa√Įgahit√†’ssa honti
bhikkh√• bhikkh√•√Ķiyo up√†sak√† up√†sik√†yo dev√† manuss√† asur√† n√†g√† gandhabb√†.
Buddho sam√†no ida√ľ labhati. Etamattha√ľ bhagav√† avoca. Tattheta√ľ
vuccati:


Dànampi catthacariyata¤ca2
Piyavadana√ľ ca sam√†nachandata√ľ ca3
Kariya cariya susa√Įgaha√ľ bahunna√ľ4
Anavamatena gu√Ķena y√†ti sagga√ľ.

- - - - - - - - - - - -

1. Piyavàvena (syà kam) 2. Dànampi ca atthacariyatamapi ca [PTS] 3.
Piyav√†dita√ľ ca sam√†n√†ttata√ľ ca (machasa√ľ) 4. Bah√•na√ľ (machasa√ľ)

[BJT Page 252] [\x 252/]


Vacãya punaridhàgato samàno
Karacara√Ķamudutala¬§ca j√†lino ca,
Atirucirasuvaggudassaneyya√ľ
Pa√Īilabhati daharo susu kum√†ro.
[PTS Page 154] [\q 154/] bhavati parijanassavo vidheyyo
Mahimiva m√†vasate1 susa√Įgah√£to,
Piyavadu hitasukhata√ľ jigi√ľsam√†no2
Abhirucit√†ni gu√Ķ√†ni √†caranto. 3
Yadi ca jahati sabbak√†mabhoga√ľ
Kathayati dhammakatha√ľ jino janassa,
Vacanapa√Īikarassabhippasann√†
Sutvà dhammanudhammamàcarantã4ti

Ussa√Įkhap√†da uddhaggalomat√†lakkha√Ķ√†ni (9 - 10)

8. Yampi bhikkhave tath√†gato purima√ľ j√†ti√ľ purima√ľ bhava√ľ purima√ľ
niketa√ľ pubbe manussabh√•to sam√†no bahuno janassa atth√•pasa√ľhita√ľ
dhamm√•pasa√ľhita√ľ v√†cambh√†sit√† ahosi, bahujana√ľ nida√ľsesi, p√†√Ķ√£na√ľ
hitasukhàvaho dhammayàgã, so tassa kammassa katattà upacitattà
ussannatt√† vipulatt√† k√†yassa bhed√† parammara√Ķ√† sugati√ľ sagga√ľ loka√ľ
upapajjati. So tattha a¬§¬§e deve dasahi √Īh√†nehi adhiga√Ķh√†ti, dibbena
√†yun√† dibbena va√Ķ√Ķena dibbena sukhena dibbena yasena dibbena
àdhipateyyena dibbehi råpehi dibbehi saddehi dibbehi gandhehi dibbehi
rasehi dibbehi pho√Ī√Īhabbehi. So tato cuto itthatta√ľ √†gato sam√†no im√†ni
dve mah√†purisalakkha√Ķ√†ni pa√Īilabhati, ussa√Įkhap√†do ca hoti uddhaggalomo
ca. So tehi lakkha√Ķehi samann√†gato sace ag√†ra√ľ ajjh√†vasati, r√†j√† hoti
cakkavattã dhammiko dhammaràjà càturanto vijitàvã
janapadatthàvariyappatto sattaratanasamannàgato. Tassimàni satta
ratan√†ni bhavanti. Seyyath√£da√ľ: cakkaratana√ľ hatthiratana√ľ assaratana√ľ
ma√Ķiratana√ľ itthiratana√ľ gahapatiratana√ľ parin√†yakaratanameva sattama√ľ.

Parosahassa√ľ kho panassa putt√† bhavanti s√•r√† v√£ra√Įgar√•p√†
parasenappamaddan√†. So ima√ľ pa√Īhavi√ľ s√†garapariyanta√ľ
akh√£lamanimittamaka√Ķ√Īaka√ľ iddha√ľ ph√£ta√ľ khema√ľ siva√ľ nirabbuda√ľ ada√Ķ√≥ena
asatthena dhammena samena abhivijiya ajjh√†vasati. R√†j√† sam√†no ki√ľ
labhati? Aggo ca hoti se√Ī√Īho ca p√†mokkho ca uttamo ca pavaroca
k√†mabhog√£na√ľ. R√†j√† sam√†no ida√ľ labhati. Sace kho pana ag√†rasm√†
anag√†riya√ľ pabbajati, araha√ľ hoti samm√†sambuddho loke vivattacchado.
Buddho sam√†no ki√ľ labhati? Aggo ca hoti se√Ī√Īho ca p√†mokkho ca uttamo ca
pavaro ca sabbasatt√†na√ľ. Buddho sam√†no ida√ľ labhati. Etamattha√ľ bhagav√†
√†voca. Tattheta√ľ vuccati:

[PTS Page 155] [\q 155/] atthadhammasa√ľhita√ľ5 pure gira√ľ


Eraya√ľ bahujana√ľ nida√ľsay√£,
P√†√Ķ√£na√ľ hitasukh√†vaho ah√•
Dhammayàgamayajã6 amaccharã.

- - - - - - - - - - - - -

1. Mahima√ľ √†vayate (s√£mu. Machasa√ľ) 2. J√£g√£sam√†no(machasa√ľ) 3.
√Ęcarati (s√£mu. Machasa√ľ) 4. Sutv√†na dhamm√†nudhamma m√†caranati (machasa√ľ)
5. Atthadhammasa√ľhita√ľ (kam. [PTS] 6. Dhammay√†ga√ľ asasaji (kam)

[BJT Page 254] [\x 254/]


Tena so sucaritena kammunà
Sugati√ľ vajati tattha modati
Lakkha√Ķ√†ni ca duve idh√†gato
Uttamappamukhatàya1 vindati.
Ubbhamuppatitalomavàsaso
P√†daga√Ķ√Īhirah√• s√†du sa√Ķ√Īhit√†,
Ma√ľsalohit√† cit√† tacottha√Ī√†
Uparivara√Ķ√† ca sohan√†2ahu.
Gehamàvasati ce tathàvidho
Aggata√ľ vajati k√†mabhogina√ľ,
Tena uttar√£taro na vijjati
Jambud√£pamahibhuyya ir√£yati.
[PTS Page 156] [\q 156/] pabbajampi ca anomanikkamo
Aggata√ľ vajati sabbap√†√Ķina√ľ,
Tena uttar√£taro na vijjati
Sabbalokamahibhuyya viharat√£’ti.

E√Ķ√£ja√Įghalakkha√Ķa√ľ (11)

9. Yampi bhikkhave tath√†gato purima√ľ j√†ti√ľ purima√ľ bhava√ľ purima√ľ
niketa√ľ pubbe manussabh√•to sam√†no sakkacca√ľ v√†cet√† ahosi sippa√ľ v√†
vijja√ľ v√† cara√Ķa√ľ v√† kamma√ľ v√†, ‘kinti me khippa√ľ vij√†neyyu√ľ, kinti’me
khippa√ľ pa√Īipajjeyyu√ľ na cira√ľ kilisseyyunti.

So tassa kammassa katattà upacitattà ussannattà vipulattà kàyassa
bhed√† parammara√Ķ√† sugati√ľ sagga√ľ loka√ľ upapajjati. So tattha a¬§¬§e deve
dasahi √Īh√†nehi adhiga√Ķh√†ti, dibbena √†yun√† dibbena va√Ķ√Ķena dibbena
sukhena dibbena yasena dibbena àdhipateyyena dibbehi råpehi dibbehi
saddehi dibbehi gandhehi dibbehi rasehi dibbehi pho√Ī√Īhabbehi. So tato
cuto itthatta√ľ √†gato sam√†no ida√ľ mah√†purisalakkha√Ķa√ľ pa√Īilabhati,
e√Ķija√Įgho hoti. So tena lakkha√Ķe samann√†gato sace ag√†ra√ľ ajjh√†vasati,
ràjà hoti cakkavattã dhammiko dhammaràjà càturanto vijitàvã
janapadatthàvariyappatto sattaratanasamannàgato. Tassimàni satta
ratan√†ni bhavanti. Seyyath√£da√ľ: cakkaratana√ľ hatthiratana√ľ assaratana√ľ
ma√Ķiratana√ľ itthiratana√ľ gahapatiratana√ľ parin√†yakaratanameva sattama√ľ.

Parosahassa√ľ kho panassa putt√† bhavanti s√•r√† v√£ra√Įgar√•p√†
parasenappamaddan√†. So ima√ľ pa√Īhavi√ľ s√†garapariyanta√ľ
akh√£lamanimittamaka√Ķ√Īaka√ľ iddha√ľ ph√£ta√ľ khema√ľ siva√ľ nirabbuda√ľ ada√Ķ√≥ena
asatthena dhammena samena abhivijiya ajjh√†vasati. R√†j√† sam√†no ki√ľ
labhati? Y√†ni t√†ni r√†j√†rah√†ni r√†ja√Įg√†ni r√†j√•pabhog√†ni r√†janucchavik√†ni,
t√†ni khippa√ľ pa√Īilabhati. R√†j√† sam√†no ida√ľ labhati. Sace kho pana
ag√†rasm√† anag√†riya√ľ pabbajati, araha√ľ hoti samm√†sambuddho loke
vivattacchado. Buddho sam√†no ki√ľ labhati? Y√†ni t√†ni sama√Ķ√†rah√†ni
sama√Ķa√Įg√†ni saman√•pabhog√†ni sama√Ķ√†nucchavik√†ni, t√†ni khippa√ľ
pa√Īilabhati. Buddho sam√†no ida√ľ labhati. Etamattha√ľ bhagav√† √†voca.
Tattheta√ľ vuccati:


Sippesu vijj√†cara√Ķesu kammasu3
Katha√ľ vij√†neyyu3 lahunti icchati.
[PTS Page 157] [\q 157/] yadåpaghàtàya na hoti kassaci
V√†ceti khippa√ľ na cira√ľ kilissati.

- - - - - - - - - - - -

1. Utatama sukhatàya (sayyà. Utatama pamukakhatàya (kam)
utatamapamukhatàya sukhàni (sãmu) 2. Uparijànu sobanà (syà). Papari ca
pana sobhat√† [PTS] 3. Kammesu - (machasa√ľ) 3. Vij√†neyyu√ľ - (machasa√ľ)

[BJT Page 256] [\x 256/]


Ta√ľ kamma√ľ katv√† kusala√ľ sukhudraya√ľ1
Cha√Įgh√† manu¬§¬§√† labhate susa√Ķ√Īhit√†,
Va√Ī√Ī√† suj√†t√† anupubbamuggat√†
Uddhaggalom√† sukhumattacottha√Ī√†.
E√Ķeyyaja√Įgho’ti tam√†hu puggala√ľ
Sampattiy√† khippamid√†hu lakkha√Ķa√ľ,
Geh√†nulom√†ni yad√†bhika√Įkhati
Apabbaja√ľ khippamidh√†dhigacchati.
Sace va pabbajjamupeti tàdiso
Nekkhammachand√†bhirato vicakkha√Ķo,
Anucchavikassa yad√†nulomika√ľ
Ta√ľ vindati khippamanomavikkamo’ti. 2

Subumacchavilakkha√Ķa√ľ (12)

10. Yampi bhikkhave tath√†gato purima√ľ j√†ti√ľ purima√ľ bhava√ľ purima√ľ
niketa√ľ pubbe manussabh√•to sam√†no sama√Ķa√ľ v√† br√†hma√Ķa√ľ v√† upasa√Įkamitv√†
paripucchit√† ahosi: ki√ľ bhante kusala√ľ, ki√ľ akusala√ľ, ki√ľ s√†vajja√ľ, ki√ľ
anavajja√ľ, ki√ľ sevitabba√ľ, ki√ľ nasevitabba√ľ, kimme kar√£yam√†na√ľ
d√£gharatta√ľ ahit√†ya dukkh√†ya assa, ki√ľ v√† pana me kar√£yam√†na√ľ
d√£gharatta√ľ hit√†ya sukh√†ya ass√†?Ti. So tassa kammassa katatt√† upacitatt√†
ussannatt√† vipulatt√† k√†yassa bhed√† parammara√Ķ√† sugati√ľ sagga√ľ loka√ľ
upapajjati. So tattha a¬§¬§e deve dasahi √Īh√†nehi adhiga√Ķh√†ti, dibbena
√†yun√† dibbena va√Ķ√Ķena dibbena sukhena dibbena yasena dibbena
àdhipateyyena dibbehi råpehi dibbehi saddehi dibbehi gandhehi dibbehi
rasehi dibbehi pho√Ī√Īhabbehi. So tato cuto itthatta√ľ √†gato sam√†no ida√ľ
mah√†purisalakkha√Ķa√ľ pa√Īilabhati, sukhumacchav√£ hoti, sukhumatt√† chaviy√†
rajojalla√ľ k√†ye na upalippati. [PTS Page 158] [\q 158/] so tena
lakkha√Ķena samann√†gato, sace ag√†ra√ľ ajjh√†vasati, r√†j√† hoti cakkavatt√£
dhammiko dhammaràjà càturanto vijitàvã janapadatthàvariyappatto
sattaratanasamann√†gato. Tassim√†ni satta ratan√†ni bhavanti. Seyyath√£da√ľ:
cakkaratana√ľ hatthiratana√ľ assaratana√ľ ma√Ķiratana√ľ itthiratana√ľ
gahapatiratana√ľ parin√†yakaratanameva sattama√ľ.

Parosahassa√ľ kho panassa putt√† bhavanti s√•r√† v√£ra√Įgar√•p√†
parasenappamaddan√†. So ima√ľ pa√Īhavi√ľ s√†garapariyanta√ľ
akh√£lamanimittamaka√Ķ√Īaka√ľ iddha√ľ ph√£ta√ľ khema√ľ siva√ľ nirabbuda√ľ ada√Ķ√≥ena
asatthena dhammena samena abhivijiya ajjh√†vasati. R√†j√† sam√†no ki√ľ
labhati? Mah√†pa¬§¬§o hoti, n√†ssa hoti koci pa¬§¬§√†ya sadiso v√†, se√Ī√Īho v√†
k√†mabhogina√ľ. R√†j√† sam√†no ida√ľ labhati. Sace kho pana ag√†rasm√†
anag√†riya√ľ pabbajati, araha√ľ hoti samm√†sambuddho loke vivattacchado.
Buddho sam√†no ki√ľ labhati? Mah√†pa¬§¬§o hoti, puthupa¬§¬§o h√†sapa¬§¬§o
javanapa¤¤o tikkhapa¤¤o nibbedhikapa¤¤o. Nàssa hoti koci pa¤¤àya sadiso
v√†, se√Ī√Īho v√† sabbasatt√†na√ľ. Buddho sam√†no ida√ľ labhati. Etamattha√ľ
bhagav√† √†voca. Tattheta√ľ vuccati:


Pure puratthà purimàsu jàtisu
A¤¤àtukàmo paripucchità ahu,
Suss√•sit√† pabbajita√ľ up√†sit√†
Atthantaro atthakatha√ľ nis√†mayi.

- - - - - - - - - - -

1. Sukhinadriya√ľ - (kam) 2. Khippamanomanikkamo - (sy√†. [PTS]

[BJT Page 258] [\x 258/]


Pa¬§¬§√†pa√Īil√†bhagatena1 kammun√†
Manussabhåto sukhumacchavã ahu,
By√†ka√ľsu upp√†danimittakovid√†
Sukhumàni atthàni avecca dakkhati.
Sace na pabbajjamupeti tàdiso
Vatteti cakka√ľ pa√Īhavi√ľ pass√†ti.
Atthànusatthãsu pariggahesu ca
Na tena seyyo sadiso va vijjati.
[PTS Page 159] [\q 159/] sace ca pabbajjamupeti tàdiso
Nekkhammachand√†bhirato vicakkha√Ķe,
Pa¬§¬§√†visi√Ī√Īha√ľ labhate anuttara√ľ
Pappoti bodhi√ľ varabhurimedhaso’ti.

Suva√Ķ√Ķava√Ķ√Ķat√†lakkha√Ķa√ľ (13)

11. Yampi bhikkhave tath√†gato purima√ľ j√†ti√ľ purima√ľ bhava√ľ purima√ľ
niketa√ľ pubbe manussabh√•to sam√†no akkodhano ahosi anup√†y√†sabahulo,
bahumpi vutto samàno nàbhisajji, na kuppi, na byàpajji, nappatitthayi,
na kopa¬§ca dosa¬§ca appaccaya¬§ca p√†tv√†k√†si. D√†t√† ca ahosi sukhum√†na√ľ
muduk√†na√ľ atthara√Ķ√†na√ľ p√†pura√Ķ√†na√ľ2 khomasukhum√†na√ľ kapp√†sikasukhum√†na√ľ
koseyyasukhum√†na√ľ kambalasukhum√†na√ľ. So tassa kammassa katatt√†
upacitatt√† ussannatt√† vipulatt√† k√†yassa bhed√† parammara√Ķ√† sugati√ľ sagga√ľ
loka√ľ upapajjati. So tattha a¬§¬§e deve dasahi √Īh√†nehi adhiga√Ķh√†ti,
dibbena √†yun√† dibbena va√Ķ√Ķena dibbena sukhena dibbena yasena dibbena
àdhipateyyena dibbehi råpehi dibbehi saddehi dibbehi gandhehi dibbehi
rasehi dibbehi pho√Ī√Īhabbehi. So tato cuto itthatta√ľ √†gato sam√†no ida√ľ
mah√†purisalakkha√Ķa√ľ pa√Īilabhati, suva√Ķ√Ķava√Ķ√Ķo hoti ka¬§canasannibhattaco.
So tena lakkha√Ķe samann√†gato sace ag√†ra√ľ ajjh√†vasati, r√†j√† hoti
cakkavattã dhammiko dhammaràjà càturanto vijitàvã
janapadatthàvariyappatto sattaratanasamannàgato. Tassimàni satta
ratan√†ni bhavanti. Seyyath√£da√ľ: cakkaratana√ľ hatthiratana√ľ assaratana√ľ
ma√Ķiratana√ľ itthiratana√ľ gahapatiratana√ľ parin√†yakaratanameva sattama√ľ.
Parosahassa√ľ kho panassa putt√† bhavanti s√•r√† v√£ra√Įgar√•p√†
parasenappamaddan√†. So ima√ľ pa√Īhavi√ľ s√†garapariyanta√ľ
akh√£lamanimittamaka√Ķ√Īaka√ľ iddha√ľ ph√£ta√ľ khema√ľ siva√ľ nirabbuda√ľ ada√Ķ√≥ena
asatthena dhammena samena abhivijiya ajjh√†vasati. R√†j√† sam√†no ki√ľ
labhati? L√†bh√£ hoti sukhum√†na√ľ muduk√†na√ľ atthara√Ķ√†na√ľ p√†pura√Ķ√†na√ľ
khomasukhum√†na√ľ kapp√†sikasukhum√†na√ľ koseyyasukhum√†na√ľ kambalasukhum√†na√ľ.
R√†j√† sam√†no ida√ľ labhati. Sace kho pana ag√†rasm√† anag√†riya√ľ pabbajati,
araha√ľ hoti samm√†sambuddho loke vivattacchado. Buddho sam√†no ki√ľ
labhati? L√†bh√£ hoti sukhum√†na√ľ muduk√†na√ľ atthara√Ķ√†na√ľ p√†pura√Ķ√†na√ľ
khomasukhum√†na√ľ kapp√†sikasukhum√†na√ľ koseyyasukhum√†na√ľ kambalasukhum√†na√ľ.
Buddho sam√†no ida√ľ labhati. Etamattha√ľ bhagav√† √†voca. Tattheta√ľ
vuccati:


1. Akkodha¬§ca adhi√Ī√Īhah√£ ad√†si3
Dàna¤ca vatthàni sukhumàni succhavini.
[PTS Page 160] [\q 160/] purimatarabhave √Īhito’bhivissaji4 mahimiva suro abhivassa√ľ,

- - - - - - - - -

1. Pa¬§¬§apa√Īil√†bhakatena - [PTS] 2. P√†ravu√Ķ√†na√ľ - (machasa√ľ) 3. Ad√†s√£ ca - [PTS] 4. Abhivisasaji (machasa√ľ)

[BJT Page 260] [\x 260/]


2. Ta√ľ katv√†na ito cuto diva√ľ
Uppajja1 sukataphalavipàkamanubhutvà,
Ka√Ķakatanusannibho idh√†bhibhavati
Suravarataroriva indo.

3. Gehamàvasati naro apabbajja
Micch√†mahatimahi√ľ anus√†sat√£
Pasayha sa h√£ ca sattaratana√ľ
Pa√Īilabhati vimala2 sukhumacchavi√ľ suci¬§ca.

4. L√†bh√£ acch√†danavatthamokkhap√†pura√Ķ√†na√ľ3
Bhavati sadi anag√†riyata√ľ upeti.
Sa hi4 purimakataphala√ľ anubhavati
Na bhavati katassa pan√†so’ti.

Kosohitavatthaguyhat√†lakkha√Ķa√ľ (14)

12. Yampi bhikkhave tath√†gato purima√ľ j√†ti√ľ purima√ľ bhava√ľ purima√ľ
niketa√ľ pubbemanussabh√•to sam√†no cirappana√Ī√Īhe sucirappav√†sino ¬§√†t√£
mitte suhajje sakhino samànetà ahosi, màtarampi puttena samànetà ahosi,
puttampi màtarà samànetà ahosi, pitarampã [PTS Page 161] [\q 161/]
puttena samànetà ahosi, puttampi pitarà samànetà ahosi, bhàtarampi
bhàtarà samànetà ahosi, bhàtarampi bhaginiyà samànetà ahosi, bhaginimpi
bh√†tar√† sam√†net√† ahosi, sama√Įg√£katv√† ca abbhanumodit√† ahosi, so tassa
kammassa katattà upacitattà ussannattà vipulattà kàyassa bhedà
parammara√Ķ√† sugati√ľ sagga√ľ loka√ľ upapajjati. So tattha a¬§¬§e deve dasahi
√Īh√†nehi adhiga√Ķh√†ti, dibbena √†yun√† dibbena va√Ķ√Ķena dibbena sukhena
dibbena yasena dibbena àdhipateyyena dibbehi råpehi dibbehi saddehi
dibbehi gandhehi dibbehi rasehi dibbehi pho√Ī√Īhabbehi. So tato cuto
itthatta√ľ √†gato sam√†no ida√ľ mah√†purisalakkha√Ķa√ľ pa√Īilabhati,
kosohitavatthaguyho hoti. So tena lakkha√Ķena samann√†gato sace ag√†ra√ľ
ajjhàvasati, ràjà hoti cakkavattã dhammiko dhammaràjà càturanto vijitàvã
janapadatthàvariyappatto sattaratanasamannàgato. Tassimàni satta
ratan√†ni bhavanti. Seyyath√£da√ľ: cakkaratana√ľ hatthiratana√ľ assaratana√ľ
ma√Ķiratana√ľ itthiratana√ľ gahapatiratana√ľ parin√†yakaratanameva sattama√ľ.
Parosahassa√ľ kho panassa putt√† bhavanti s√•r√† v√£ra√Įgar√•p√†
parasenappamaddan√†. So ima√ľ pa√Īhavi√ľ s√†garapariyanta√ľ
akh√£lamanimittamaka√Ķ√Īaka√ľ iddha√ľ ph√£ta√ľ khema√ľ siva√ľ nirabbuda√ľ ada√Ķ√≥ena
asatthena dhammena samena abhivijiya ajjh√†vasati. R√†j√† sam√†no ki√ľ
labhati? Pah√•taputto hoti, parosahassa√ľ kho panassa putt√† bhavanti s√•r√†
v√£ra√Įgar√•p√† parasenappamaddan√†. R√†j√† sam√†no ida√ľ labhati. Sace kho pana
ag√†rasm√† anag√†riya√ľ pabbajati, araha√ľ hoti samm√†sambuddho loke
vivattacchado. Buddho sam√†no ki√ľ labhati? Pah√•taputto hoti anekasahassa√ľ
kho panassa putt√† bhavanti s√•r√† v√£ra√Įgar√•p√† parasenappamaddan√†. Buddho
sam√†no ida√ľ labhati. Etamattha√ľ bhagav√† √†voca. Tattheta√ľ vuccati:


Pure puratthà purimàsu jàtisu
Cirappana√Ī√Īhe sucirappav√†sino,
¥àtã suhajje sakhino samànayã
Sama√Įgikatv√†5 anumodit√† ahu

- - - - - - - - - - -

1. Uppajji - (machasa√ľ) 2. Vipula - (sy√†ma) vipula√ľ - [PTS] 3.
P√†vura√Ķ√†na√ľ - (machasa√ľ) 4. S√†hito - (machasa√ľ) 5. Samaggi√ľ katv√† - (sy√†
[PTS]

[BJT Page 262] [\x 262/]


So tena1 kammena diva√ľ apakkami2
Sukha¬§ca khi√≥√≥√† ratiyo ca a√Ķvabh√£.
Tato cavitvà punaràgato idha
Kosohita√ľ vindati vatthach√†diya√ľ.
[PTS Page 162] [\q 162/] pahåtaputto bhavatã tathàvidho
Parosahassa√ľ ca bhavanti atraj√†.
Sårà ca vãrà ca3 amittatàpanà
Gihissa p√£ti√ľ janan√† piya√ľvad√†.
Bahutarà pabbajitassa irãyato
Bhavanti puttà vacanànusàrino.
Gihissa và pabbajitassa và puna
Ta√ľ lakkha√Ķa√ľ bhavati5 tadatthajotakanti.

Pa√Īhamabh√†√Ķav√†ro ni√Ī√Īhito.

Parima√Ķ√≥ala - anonama - ja’√Ķ√Ķuparimasanalakkha√Ķ√†ni (15, 16)

13. Yamp√£ bhikkhave tath√†gato purima√ľ j√†ti√ľ purima√ľ bhava√ľ purima√ľ
niketa√ľ pubbe manussabh√•to sam√†no mah√†janasa√Įgaha√ľ samekkham√†no sama√ľ
j√†n√†ti, s√†ma√ľ j√†n√†ti, purisa√ľ j√†n√†ti, purisavisesa√ľ j√†n√†ti
ayamidamarahati ayamidamarahat√£’ti. Tattha tattha purisavisesakaro pure
ahosi, so tassa kammassa katattà upacitattà ussannattà vipulattà kàyassa
bhed√† parammara√Ķ√† sugati√ľ sagga√ľ loka√ľ upapajjati. So tattha a¬§¬§e deve
dasahi √Īh√†nehi adhiga√Ķh√†ti, dibbena √†yun√† dibbena va√Ķ√Ķena dibbena
sukhena dibbena yasena dibbena àdhipateyyena dibbehi råpehi dibbehi
saddehi dibbehi gandhehi dibbehi rasehi dibbehi pho√Ī√Īhabbehi. So tato
cuto itthatta√ľ √†gato sam√†no im√†ni dve mah√†purisalakkha√Ķ√†ni pa√Īilabhati,
nigrodhaparima√Ķ√≥alo ca hoti √Īhitako’va anonamanto ubhoh√£ p√†√Ķ√£talehi
ja√Ķ√Ķuk√†ni parimasati parimajjati, so tehi lakkha√Ķehi samann√†gato sace
ag√†ra√ľ ajjh√†vasati, r√†j√† hoti cakkavatt√£ dhammiko dhammar√†j√† c√†turanto
vijitàvã janapadatthàvariyappatto sattaratanasamannàgato. Tassimàni
satta ratan√†ni bhavanti. Seyyath√£da√ľ: cakkaratana√ľ hatthiratana√ľ
assaratana√ľ ma√Ķiratana√ľ itthiratana√ľ gahapatiratana√ľ
parin√†yakaratanameva sattama√ľ. Parosahassa√ľ kho panassa putt√† bhavanti
s√•r√† v√£ra√Įgar√•p√† parasenappamaddan√†. So ima√ľ pa√Īhavi√ľ s√†garapariyanta√ľ
akh√£lamanimittamaka√Ķ√Īaka√ľ iddha√ľ ph√£ta√ľ khema√ľ siva√ľ nirabbuda√ľ ada√Ķ√≥ena
asatthena dhammena samena abhivijiya ajjh√†vasati. R√†j√† sam√†no ki√ľ [PTS
Page 163] [\q 163/] labhati? Aóóho hoti mahaddhano mahàbhogo
pah√•taj√†tar√•parajato pah√•tavittupakara√Ķo pah√•tadhanadha¬§¬§o
paripu√Ķ√Ķakosako√Ī√Īh√†g√†ro. R√†j√† sam√†no ida√ľ labhati. Sace kho pana
ag√†rasm√† anag√†riya√ľ pabbajati, araha√ľ hoti samm√†sambuddho loke
vivattacchado. Buddho sam√†no ki√ľ labhati? A√≥√≥ho hoti mahaddhano
mah√†bhogo. Tassim√†ni dhan√†ni honti, seyyath√£da√ľ saddh√†dhana√ľ s√£ladhana√ľ
hir√£dhana√ľ ottappadhana√ľ sutadhana√ľ c√†gadhana√ľ pa¬§¬§√†dhana√ľ, buddho
sam√†no ida√ľ labhati. Etamattha√ľ bhagav√† √†voca. Tattheta√ľ vuccati:

- - - - - - - - - -

1. Sa tena - (kam) 2. Samakkami - (machasa√ľ) 3. Vira√Įgar√•p√† - (kam)
4. J√†yati - (machasa√ľ) 5. Mah√†√Ķasa√Įg√†hata√ľ samapekkham√†no (kam)

[BJT Page 264] [\x 264/]


Tuliya pa√Īiviciya1 cinnayitv√†
Mahajanasa√Įgahana√ľ2 samekkham√†no,
Ayamidamarahat√£ti tattha tattha
Purisavisesakaro pure ahosi.
3Sa hi ca pana √Īhito anonamanto
Phusati karehi ubhohi ja√Ķ√Ķuk√†ni,
Mahiruhaparima√Ķ√≥alo ahosi
Sucaritakammavipàkasesakena.
Bahuvividha nimitta lakkha√Ķa¬§¬§√•
Abhinipu√Ķ√† manuj√† viy√†kari√ľsu,
Bahuvividhàni gihãnamarahàni
Pa√Īilabhati daharo sus√• kum√†ro,
[PTS Page 164] [\q 164/] idha mah√£pati’ssa k√†mabhog√£
Gihipa√Īir√•pak√† bah√• bhavanti,
Yadi ca jahati sabbak√†mabhoga√ľ
Labhati anuttaramuttama√ľ dhanagganti.

S√£hapubbaddhak√†y√†d√£ni t√£√Ķi lakkha√Ķ√†ni (17 - 19)

14. Yamp√£ bhikkhave tath√†gato purima√ľ j√†ti√ľ purima√ľ bhava√ľ purima√ľ
niketa√ľ pubbe manussabh√•to sam√†no bahuno janassa atthak√†mo ahosi
hitak√†mo ph√†suk√†mo yogakkhemak√†mo ‘kinti me saddh√†ya va√≥√≥heyyu√ľ, s√£lena
va√≥√≥heyyu√ľ, sutena va√≥√≥heyyu√ľ, 4 c√†gena ca√≥√≥heyyu√ľ, dhammena va√≥√≥heyyu√ľ,
pa¬§¬§√†ya va√≥√≥heyyu√ľ dhanadha¬§¬§ena ca√≥√≥heyyu√ľ, khettavatthun√† va√≥√≥heyyu√ľ,
dvipadacatuppadehi va√≥√≥heyyu√ľ, puttad√†rehi va√≥√≥heyyu√ľ,
d√†sakammakaraporisehi va√≥√≥heyyu√ľ, ¬§√†t√£hi va√≥√≥heyyu√ľ, mittehi va√≥√≥heyyu√ľ,
bandhavehi vaóóheyyunti.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - -

1. Pa√Īivicaya - (machasa√ľ) 2. Mah√†jana√ľ sa√Įg√†hata√ľ - (kam) 3. Mahi√ľca - (machasa√ľ) gham√† ca pana (sy√†) 4. Sutena va√≥√≥heyyu√ľ(sy√†)

[BJT Page 266] [\x 266/]

So tassa kammassa katattà upacitattà ussannattà vipulattà kàyassa
bhed√† parammara√Ķ√† sugati√ľ sagga√ľ loka√ľ upapajjati. So tattha a¬§¬§e deve
dasahi √Īh√†nehi adhiga√Ķh√†ti, dibbena √†yun√† dibbena va√Ķ√Ķena dibbena
sukhena dibbena yasena dibbena àdhipateyyena dibbehi råpehi dibbehi
saddehi dibbehi gandhehi dibbehi rasehi dibbehi pho√Ī√Īhabbehi. So tato
cuto itthatta√ľ √†gato sam√†no im√†ni t√£√Ķi mah√†purisalakkha√Ķ√†ni pa√Īilabhati,
s√£hapubbaddhak√†yo ca hoti citantara√ľso ca samavattakkhandho ca. So tehi
lakkha√Ķehi samann√†gato sace ag√†ra√ľ ajjh√†vasati, r√†j√† hoti cakkavatt√£
dhammiko dhammaràjà càturanto vijitàvã janapadatthàvariyappatto
sattaratanasamann√†gato. Tassim√†ni satta ratan√†ni bhavanti seyyath√£da√ľ:
cakkaratana√ľ hatthiratana√ľ assaratana√ľ ma√Ķiratana√ľ itthiratana√ľ
gahapatiratana√ľ parin√†yakaratanameva sattama√ľ. Parosahassa√ľ kho panassa
putt√† bhavanti s√•r√† v√£ra√Įgar√•p√† parasenappamaddan√†. So ima√ľ pa√Īhavi√ľ
s√†garapariyanta√ľ akh√£lamanimittamaka√Ķ√Īaka√ľ iddha√ľ ph√£ta√ľ khema√ľ siva√ľ
nirabbuda√ľ ada√Ķ√≥ena asatthena dhammena samena abhivijiya ajjh√†vasati.
R√†j√† sam√†no ki√ľ labhati? [PTS Page 165] [\q 165/] aparih√†nadhammo hoti,
na parihàyati dhanadha¤¤ena khettavatthunà dãpadacatuppadehi puttadàrehi
dàsakammakaraporisehi ¤àtãhi mittehi bandhavehi. Na parihàyati
sabbasampattiy√†. R√†j√† sam√†no ida√ľ labhati. Sace kho pana ag√†rasm√†
anag√†riya√ľ pabbajati, araha√ľ hoti samm√†sambuddho loke vivattacchado.
Buddho sam√†no ki√ľ labhati? Aparih√†nadhammo hoti, na parih√†yati saddh√†ya
sãlena sutena càgena pa¤¤àye na parihàyati sabbasampattiyà. Buddho
sam√†no ida√ľ labhati.

Etamattha√ľ bhagav√† avoca. Tattheta√ľ vuccati:


Saddhàya sãlena sutena buddhiyà
Càgena dhammena bahåhi sàdhuhi
Dhanena dha¤¤ena ca khettavatthunà
Puttehi dàrehi catuppadehi ca.
¥àtãhi mittemi ca bandhavehi ca
Balena va√Ķ√Ķena sukhena c√•bhaya√ľ,
Katha√ľ na h√†yye√ľ pare’ti icchati
Ida√ľ samiddha√ľ ca2 pan√†bhika√Įkhati.
Sa s√£hapubbaddhasusa√Ķ√Īhito ahu
Samavattakkhandho ca citantara√ľso
Pubbe suci√Ķ√Ķena katena kammun√†
Aha niya√ľ pubbanimittamassata√ľ.
Gihã pi dha¤¤ena dhanena vaóóhati
Puttehi dàrehi catuppadehi ca,
Aki¬§cano pabbajito anuttara√ľ
Pappoti sambodhimahànadhammatanti. 1

- - - - - - - - - - - -

1. Atthassa midadhi ca - (machasa√ľ) addha√ľ samidha√ľ ca (sy√†) 2. Pappe√ľti boyi√ľ asah√†na dhammatanti (machasa√ľ)

[BJT Page 268] [\x 268/]

Rasaggasaggit√†lakkha√Ķa√ľ (20)

15. [PTS Page 166] [\q 166/] yampi bhikkhave tath√†gato purima√ľ j√†ti√ľ
purima√ľ bhava√ľ purima√ľ niketa√ľ pubbe manussabh√•to sam√†no satt√†na√ľ
avihe√Īhakaj√†tiko ahosi p√†√Ķin√† v√† le√≥√≥un√† v√† da√Ķ√≥ena v√† satthena v√†, so
tassa kammassa katattà upacitattà ussannattà vipulattà kàyassa bhedà
parammara√Ķ√† sugati√ľ sagga√ľ loka√ľ upapajjati. So tattha a¬§¬§e deve dasahi
√Īh√†nehi adhiga√Ķh√†ti, dibbena √†yun√† dibbena va√Ķ√Ķena dibbena sukhena
dibbena yasena dibbena àdhipateyyena dibbehi råpehi dibbehi saddehi
dibbehi gandhehi dibbehi rasehi dibbehi pho√Ī√Īhabbehi. So tato cuto
itthatta√ľ √†gato sam√†no ima√ľ mah√†purisalakkha√Ķa√ľ pa√Īilabhati,
rasaggasagg√£ hoti, uddhagg√†ssa rasahara√Ķ√£yo g√£v√†ya j√†t√† honti
sam√†v√†hiniyo. 1 So tena lakkha√Ķena samann√†gato sace ag√†ra√ľ ajjh√†vasati,
ràjà hoti cakkavattã dhammiko dhammaràjà càturanto vijitàvã
janapadatthàvariyappatto sattaratanasamannàgato. Tassimàni satta
ratan√†ni bhavanti. Seyyath√£da√ľ: cakkaratana√ľ hatthiratana√ľ assaratana√ľ
ma√Ķiratana√ľ itthiratana√ľ gahapatiratana√ľ parin√†yakaratanameva sattama√ľ.
Parosahassa√ľ kho panassa putt√† bhavanti s√•r√† v√£ra√Įgar√•p√†
parasenappamaddan√†. So ima√ľ pa√Īhavi√ľ s√†garapariyanta√ľ
akh√£lamanimittamaka√Ķ√Īaka√ľ iddha√ľ ph√£ta√ľ khema√ľ siva√ľ nirabbuda√ľ ada√Ķ√≥ena
asatthena dhammena samena abhivijiya ajjh√†vasati. R√†j√† sam√†no ki√ľ
labhati? App√†b√†dho hoti app√†ta√Įko samavep√†kiniy√† gahaniy√† samann√†gato
n√†tis√£t√†ya n√†ccu√Ķh√†ya. R√†j√† sam√†no ida√ľ labhati. Sace kho pana ag√†rasm√†
anag√†riya√ľ pabbajati, araha√ľ hoti samm√†sambuddho loke vivattacchado.
Buddho sam√†no ki√ľ labhati? App√†b√†dho hoti app√†ta√Įko samavep√†kiniy√†
gaha√Ķiy√† samann√†gato n√†tis√£t√†ya n√†ccu√Ķh√†ya majjhim√†ya padh√†nakkham√†ya.
Buddho sam√†no ida√ľ labhati.


Etamattha√ľ bhagav√† √†voca. Tattheta√ľ vuccati:
Na p√†√Ķida√Ķ√≥ehi pan√†tha le√≥√≥un√†
Satthena v√† mara√Ķavadhena v√† puna,
Ubbàdhanàya paritajjanàya và
Na he√Īhay√£ janatamahe√Īhako ahu.
Teneva so sugatisu pecca modati
Sukhapphala√ľ kariya sukh√†ni vindati,
[PTS Page 167] [\q 167/] samojas√†2 rasahara√Ķ√£ susa√Ķa√Īhit√†
Idh√†gato labhati rasaggasaggita√ľ.
Ten√†hu na√ľ atinipu√Ķ√† vicakkha√Ķ√†
Aya√ľ naro sukhabahulo bhavissati
Gihissa và pabbajitassa và puna3
Ta√ľ lakkha√Ķa√ľ bhavati tadatthajotakanti.

- - - - - - - - - - -

1. Sam√†bhiv√†hitva yo (machasa√ľ) 2. Sampajjas√† [PTS] p√† mu¬§jas√† (sy√†) s√†ma¬§cas√† (kam) 3. Pana (sya√ľ)

[BJT Page 270] [\x 270/]

Abhin√£lanetta - gopakhumalakkha√Ķ√†ni (21, 22)

16. Yamp√£ bhikkhave tath√†gato purima√ľ j√†ti√ľ purima√ľ bhava√ľ purima√ľ
niketa√ľ pubbe manussabh√•to sam√†no na ca visa√Īa√ľ na ca vis√†c√£1 na ca pana
viceyya pekkhit√†, uj√•. Tath√† pasa√Īamujumano piyacakkhun√† bahujana√ľ
udikkhità ahosi. So tassa kammassa katattà upacitattà ussannattà
vipulatt√† k√†yassa bhed√† parammara√Ķ√† sugati√ľ sagga√ľ loka√ľ upapajjati. So
tattha a¬§¬§e deve dasahi √Īh√†nehi adhiga√Ķh√†ti, dibbena √†yun√† dibbena
va√Ķ√Ķena dibbena sukhena dibbena yasena dibbena √†dhipateyyena dibbehi
råpehi dibbehi saddehi dibbehi gandhehi dibbehi rasehi dibbehi
pho√Ī√Īhabbehi. So tato cuto itthatta√ľ √†gato sam√†no im√†ni dve
mah√†purisalakkha√Ķ√†ni pa√Īilabhati, abhin√£lanetto ca hoti gopakhumo ca. So
tehi lakkha√Ķehi samann√†gato sace ag√†ra√ľ ajjh√†vasati, r√†j√† hoti
cakkavattã dhammiko dhammaràjà càturanto vijitàvã
janapadatthàvariyappatto sattaratanasamannàgato. Tassimàni satta
ratan√†ni bhavanti. Seyyath√£da√ľ: cakkaratana√ľ hatthiratana√ľ assaratana√ľ
ma√Ķiratana√ľ itthiratana√ľ gahapatiratana√ľ parin√†yakaratanameva sattama√ľ.
Parosahassa√ľ kho panassa putt√† bhavanti s√•r√† v√£ra√Įgar√•p√†
parasenappamaddan√†. So ima√ľ pa√Īhavi√ľ s√†garapariyanta√ľ
akh√£lamanimittamaka√Ķ√Īaka√ľ iddha√ľ ph√£ta√ľ khema√ľ siva√ľ nirabbuda√ľ ada√Ķ√≥ena
asatthena dhammena samena abhivijiya ajjh√†vasati. R√†j√† sam√†no ki√ľ
labhati? Piyadassano hoti, bahuno janassa piyo hoti manàpo
br√†hma√Ķagahapatik√†na√ľ negamaj√†napad√†na√ľ [PTS Page 168] [\q 168/]
ga√Ķak√†na√ľ mah√†matt√†na√ľ an√£ka√Ī√Īh√†na√ľ dov√†rik√†na√ľ amacc√†na√ľ p√†risajj√†na√ľ
r√†j√•na√ľ bhogiy√†na√ľ kum√†r√†na√ľ, r√†j√† sam√†no ida√ľ labhati. Sace kho pana
ag√†rasm√† anag√†riya√ľ pabbajati, araha√ľ hoti samm√†sambuddho loke
vivattacchado. Buddho sam√†no ki√ľ labhati? Piyadassano hoti, bahuno
janassa piyo hoti man√†po bhikkhuna√ľ bhikkhun√£na√ľ up√†sak√†na√ľ up√†sik√†na√ľ
dev√†na√ľ manuss√†na√ľ asur√†na√ľ n√†g√†na√ľ gandhabb√†na√ľ. Buddho sam√†no ida√ľ
labhati.

Etamattha√ľ bhagav√† √†voca. Tattheta√ľ vuccati:


Na ca visa√Īa√ľ na ca vis√†c√£2
Na ca pana viceyya pekkhità
Uju√ľ tath√† pasa√Īamujumano
Piyacakkhun√† bahujana√ľ udikkhit√†.
Sugat√£su so phalavip√†ka√ľ
Anubhavati tattha modati.
Idha ca pana bhavati gopakhumo
Abhin√£lanettanayano sudassano.
Abhiyogino ca nipu√Ķ√†
Bahå pana nimittakovidà
Sukhumanayanakusala manujà
Piyadassano’ti abhiniddisanti na√ľ.

- - - - - - - - - - - - -

1. Na ca vis√†cita√ľ [PTS], na ca vis√†v√£ (sy√†) 2. Na ca vis√†vita√ľ [PTS], na ca vis√†vi (sy√†)

[BJT Page 272] [\x 272/]


Piyadassano gih√£ pi santo ca
Bhavati bahujanapiy√†√Īhito,
[PTS Page 169] [\q 169/] yadi ca na bhavati gih√£ samano hoti
Piyo bah√•na√ľ sokan√†sano’ti.

U√Ķh√£sas√£salakkha√Ķa√ľ (23)

17. Yampi bhikkhave tath√†gato purima√ľ j√†ti√ľ purima√ľ bhava√ľ purima√ľ
niketa√ľ pubbe manussabh√•to sam√†no bahujanapubba√Įgame ahosi kusalesu
dhammesu bahujan√†na√ľ p√†mokkho k√†yasucarite vac√£sucarite manosucarite
d√†nasa√ľvibh√†ge s√£lasam√†d√†ne uposath√•pav√†se matteyyat√†ya petteyyat√†ya
s√†ma¬§¬§at√†ya brahma¬§¬§at√†ya kule je√Ī√Īh√†pac√†yit√†ya a¬§¬§atara¬§¬§ataresu ca
adhikusalesu dhammesu. So tassa kammassa katattà upacitattà ussannattà
vipulatt√† k√†yassa bhed√† parammara√Ķ√† sugati√ľ sagga√ľ loka√ľ upapajjati. So
tattha a¬§¬§e deve dasahi √Īh√†nehi adhiga√Ķh√†ti, dibbena √†yun√† dibbena
va√Ķ√Ķena dibbena sukhena dibbena yasena dibbena √†dhipateyyena dibbehi
råpehi dibbehi saddehi dibbehi gandhehi dibbehi rasehi dibbehi
pho√Ī√Īhabbehi. So tato cuto itthatta√ľ √†gato sam√†no ima√ľ
mah√†purisalakkha√Ķa√ľ pa√Īilabhati, u√Ķh√£sas√£so hoti. So tena lakkha√Ķena
samann√†gato sace ag√†ra√ľ ajjh√†vasati, r√†j√† hoti cakkavatt√£ dhammiko
dhammaràjà càturanto vijitàvã janapadatthàvariyappatto
sattaratanasamann√†gato. Tassim√†ni satta ratan√†ni bhavanti. Seyyath√£da√ľ:
cakkaratana√ľ hatthiratana√ľ assaratana√ľ ma√Ķiratana√ľ itthiratana√ľ
gahapatiratana√ľ parin√†yakaratanameva sattama√ľ. Parosahassa√ľ kho panassa
putt√† bhavanti s√•r√† v√£ra√Įgar√•p√† parasenappamaddan√†. So ima√ľ pa√Īhavi√ľ
s√†garapariyanta√ľ akh√£lamanimittamaka√Ķ√Īaka√ľ iddha√ľ ph√£ta√ľ khema√ľ siva√ľ
nirabbuda√ľ ada√Ķ√≥ena asatthena dhammena samena abhivijiya ajjh√†vasati.
R√†j√† sam√†no ki√ľ labhati? Mah√†’ssa jano anv√†yiko hoti, br√†hma√Ķagahapatik√†
negamaj√†napad√† ga√Ķak√† mah√†matt√† an√£ka√Ī√Īh√† dov√†rik√† amacc√† p√†risajj√†
r√†j√†no bhogiy√† kum√†r√†. R√†j√† sam√†no ida√ľ labhati. Sace kho pana ag√†rasm√†
anag√†riya√ľ pabbajati, araha√ľ hoti samm√†sambuddho loke vivattacchado.
Buddho sam√†no ki√ľ labhati? Mah√†ssa jano anv√†yiko hoti, bhikkh√•
bhikkhuniyo upàsakà upàsikàyo devà manussà asurà nàgà gandhabbà. Buddho
sam√†no ida√ľ labhati.

Etamattha√ľ bhagav√† √†voca. Tattheta√ľ vuccati:


Pubba√Įgamo sucaritesu ah√•
Dhammesu dhammacariyàya1 abhirato,
Anavàyiko bahujanassa ahå
Saggesu vedayittha pu¬§¬§aphala√ľ.
[PTS Page 170] [\q 170/] vediyitv√† so sucaritassa phala√ľ
U√Ķh√£sa s√£sattamidhajjhagam√†
By√†ka√ľsu bya¬§jana nimittadhar√†
Pubba√Įgamo bahujanassa2 hessati.
Pa√Īibhogiy√† manujesu idha
Pubbeva tassa abhiharanati tadà
Yadikhattiyo bhavati bhåmipati
Pa√Īih√†rakabahujane3 labhati.

- - - - - - - - - - - -

1. Dhammacariy√†bhirato (machasa√ľ) 2. Pubba√Įgamo bahujana√ľ (machasa√ľ) 3. Pa√Īih√†raka√ľ bahujano (machasa√ľ)

[BJT Page 274] [\x 274/]


Atha ce pi pabbajati so manujo
Dhammesu hoti paguno visàvã.
Tass√†nus√†sanigu√Ķ√†bhirato
Anvàyiko bahujano bhavatã ti.

Ekekalomat√†u√Ķ√Ķ√†lakkha√Ķ√†d√£ni. (24, 25)

18. Yamp√£ bhikkhave tath√†gato purima√ľ j√†ti√ľ purima√ľ bhava√ľ purima√ľ
niketa√ľ pubbe manussabh√•to sam√†no mus√†v√†da√ľ pah√†ya mus√†v√†d√† pa√Īivirato
ahosi saccav√†d√£ saccasandho theto paccayiko avisa√ľv√†dako lokassa, so
tassa kammassa katattà upacitattà ussannattà vipulattà kàyassa bhedà
parammara√Ķ√† sugati√ľ sagga√ľ loka√ľ upapajjati. So tattha a¬§¬§e deve dasahi
√Īh√†nehi adhiga√Ķh√†ti, dibbena √†yun√† dibbena va√Ķ√Ķena dibbena sukhena
dibbena yasena dibbena àdhipateyyena dibbehi råpehi dibbehi saddehi
dibbehi gandhehi dibbehi rasehi dibbehi pho√Ī√Īhabbehi. So tato cuto
itthatta√ľ √†gato sam√†no im√†ni dve mah√†purisalakkha√Ķ√†ni pa√Īilabhati,
ekekalomo ca hoti, u√Ķ√Ķ√† ca bhamukantare j√†t√† hoti od√†t√† mudut√•lasannih√†.
So tehi lakkha√Ķehi samann√†gato sace ag√†ra√ľ ajjh√†vasati, r√†j√† hoti
cakkavattã dhammiko dhammaràjà càturanto vijitàvã
janapadatthàvariyappatto sattaratanasamannàgato. Tassimàni satta
ratan√†ni bhavanti. Seyyath√£da√ľ: cakkaratana√ľ hatthiratana√ľ assaratana√ľ
ma√Ķiratana√ľ itthiratana√ľ gahapatiratana√ľ parin√†yakaratanameva sattama√ľ.
Parosahassa√ľ kho panassa putt√† bhavanti s√•r√† v√£ra√Įgar√•p√†
parasenappamaddan√†. So ima√ľ pa√Īhavi√ľ s√†garapariyanta√ľ
akh√£lamanimittamaka√Ķ√Īaka√ľ iddha√ľ ph√£ta√ľ khema√ľ siva√ľ nirabbuda√ľ ada√Ķ√≥ena
asatthena dhammena samena abhivijiya ajjh√†vasati. R√†j√† sam√†no ki√ľ
labhati? Mah√†’ssa jano upavattati br√†hma√Ķagahapatik√† negamaj√†napad√† [PTS
Page 171] [\q 171/] ga√Ķak√† mah√†matt√† an√£ka√Ī√Īh√† dov√†rik√† amacc√†
p√†risajj√† r√†j√†no bhogiy√† kum√†r√†. R√†j√† sam√†no ida√ľ labhati. Sace kho pana
ag√†rasm√† anag√†riya√ľ pabbajati, araha√ľ hoti samm√†sambuddho loke
vivattacchado. Buddho sam√†no ki√ľ labhati? Mah√†’ssa jano upavattati
bhikkhå bhikkhuniyo upàsakà upàsikàyo devà manussà asurà nàgà gandhabbà.
Buddho sam√†no ida√ľ labhati,

Etamattha√ľ bhagav√† √†voca. Tattheta√ľ vuccati:


Saccappa√Īi¬§¬§o purim√†su j√†tisu
Advejjhav√†co alika√ľ avajjay√£
Na so visa√ľv√†dayit√† pi kassaci
Bhåtena tacchena tathena bhàsayi. 1
Setà susukkà mudutålasannibhà
U√Ķ√Ķ√†suj√†t√†2 bhamukantare ah√•
Na lomak√•pesu duve aj√†yisu√ľ
Ekekalom√•pacita√Įgav√† ah√•.

- - - - - - - - - - - - -

1. Tosayi [PTS] 2. U√Ķ√Ķasuj√†t√† (machasa√ľ)

[BJT Page 276] [\x 276/]


Ta√ľ lakkha√Ķa¬§¬§√• bahavo sam√†gat√†
By√†ka√ľsu upp√†danimittakovid√†.
U√Ķ√Ķ√† ca lom√† ca yath√† susa√Ķ√Īhit√†
Upavattat√£ √£disaka√ľ bahujjano.
Gihimpi santa√ľ upavattat√£ jano
Bahå puratthà pakatena kammunà
Aki¬§cana√ľ pabbajita√ľ anuttara√ľ
Buddhamp√£ santa√ľ upavattat√£ jano’ti.

Catt√†√ę√£sadanta - aviraladanta - lakkha√Ķ√†d√£ni (26, 27)

19. Yampi bhikkhave tath√†gato purima√ľ j√†ti√ľ purima√ľ bhava√ľ purima√ľ
niketa√ľ pubbe manussabh√•to sam√†no pisu√Ķa√ľ v√†ca√ľ pah√†ya pisu√Ķ√†ya v√†c√†ya
pa√Īivirato ahosi. Ito sutv√† na amutra akkh√†t√† imesambhed√†ya, amutra v√†
sutv√† na imesa√ľ akkh√†t√† am√•sambhed√†ya. Iti bhinn√†na√ľ v√† sandh√†t√† [PTS
Page 172] [\q 172/] sa√ľhit√†na√ľ v√† anuppad√†t√† samagg√†r√†mo samaggarato
samagganandi samaggakara√Ķi√ľ v√†ca√ľ bh√†sit√† ahosi, so tassa kammassa
katatt√† upacitatt√† ussannatt√† vipulatt√† k√†yassa bhed√† parammara√Ķ√†
sugati√ľ sagga√ľ loka√ľ upapajjati. So tattha a¬§¬§e deve dasahi √Īh√†nehi
adhiga√Ķh√†ti, dibbena √†yun√† dibbena va√Ķ√Ķena dibbena sukhena dibbena
yasena dibbena àdhipateyyena dibbehi råpehi dibbehi saddehi dibbehi
gandhehi dibbehi rasehi dibbehi pho√Ī√Īhabbehi. So tato cuto itthatta√ľ
√†gato sam√†no im√†ni dve mah√†purisalakkha√Ķ√†ni pa√Īilabhati, catt√†√ę√£sadanto
ca hoti avira√ęadanto ca. So tehi lakkha√Ķehi samann√†gato sace ag√†ra√ľ
ajjhàvasati, ràjà hoti cakkavattã dhammiko dhammaràjà càturanto vijitàvã
janapadatthàvariyappatto sattaratanasamannàgato. Tassimàni satta
ratan√†ni bhavanti. Seyyath√£da√ľ: cakkaratana√ľ hatthiratana√ľ assaratana√ľ
ma√Ķiratana√ľ itthiratana√ľ gahapatiratana√ľ parin√†yakaratanameva sattama√ľ.
Parosahassa√ľ kho panassa putt√† bhavanti s√•r√† v√£ra√Įgar√•p√†
parasenappamaddan√†. So ima√ľ pa√Īhavi√ľ s√†garapariyanta√ľ
akh√£lamanimittamaka√Ķ√Īaka√ľ iddha√ľ ph√£ta√ľ khema√ľ siva√ľ nirabbuda√ľ ada√Ķ√≥ena
asatthena dhammena samena abhivijiya ajjh√†vasati. R√†j√† sam√†no ki√ľ
labhati? Abhejjapariso hoti abhejj√†’ssa honti paris√† br√†hma√Ķagahapatik√†
negamaj√†napad√† ga√Ķak√† mah√†matt√† a√Ķ√£ka√Ī√Īh√† dov√†rik√† amacc√† p√†risajj√†
r√†j√†no bhogiy√† kum√†r√†. R√†j√† sam√†no ida√ľ labhati. Sace kho pana ag√†rasm√†
anag√†riya√ľ pabbajati, araha√ľ hoti samm√†sambuddho loke vivattacchado.
Buddho sam√†no ki√ľ labhati? Abhejjapariso hoti abejj√†’ssa honti paris√†
bhikkhå bhikkhuniyo upàsakà upàsikàyo devà manussà asurà nàgà gandhabbà.
Buddho sam√†no ida√ľ labhati.

Etamattha√ľ bhagav√† √†voca. Tattheta√ľ vuccati:


Vebh√•tiya√ľ sa√ľhitabhedak√†ri√ľ1
Bhedappava√≥√≥hana viv√†dak√†ri√ľ
Kalahappava√≥√≥hana akiccak√†ri√ľ
Sa√ľhit√†na√ľ bhedajanan√£√ľ na bha√Ķi.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - -

1. Sahitabhedak√†ri√ľ (machasa√ľ)

[BJT Page 278] [\x 278/]


Aviv√†dava√≥√≥hanak√†ri√ľ sugira√ľ
Bhinn√†na√ľ sandhijanni√ľ aha√Ķi.
[PTS Page 173] [\q 173/] kalaha√ľ janassa panudi sama√Įgi
Sa√ľhitehi nandati pamodati ca.
Sugat√£su so phalavip√†ka√ľ
Anubhavati tattha modati.
Dant√† idha honti acira√ę√† sahit√†
Caturo dasassa mukhaj√† susa√Ķ√Īhit√†.
Yadi khattiyo bhavati bhåmipati
Avibhediy√†’ssa paris√† bhavanti
Samano ca hoti virajo v√£tamalo
Paris√†’ssa hoti anugat√† acal√†’ti.

Pah√•tajivh√† - brahmassara lakkha√Ķ√†ni (28, 29)

20. Yampi bhikkhave purima√ľ j√†ti√ľ purima√ľ bhava√ľ purima√ľ niketa√ľ
pubbe manussabh√•to sam√†no pharusa√ľ v√†ca√ľ pah√†ya pharus√†ya v√†c√†ya
pa√Īivirato ahosi, y√† s√† v√†c√† nel√† ka√Ķ√Ķasukh√† peman√£y√† hadaya√Įgam√† por√£
bahujanakant√† bahujanaman√†p√†, tath√†rupi√ľ v√†ca√ľ bh√†sit√† ahosi, so tassa
kammassa katattà upacitattà ussannattà vipulattà kàyassa bhedà
parammara√Ķ√† sugati√ľ sagga√ľ loka√ľ upapajjati. So tattha a¬§¬§e deve dasahi
√Īh√†nehi adhiga√Ķh√†ti, dibbena √†yun√† dibbena va√Ķ√Ķena dibbena sukhena
dibbena yasena dibbena àdhipateyyena dibbehi råpehi dibbehi saddehi
dibbehi gandhehi dibbehi rasehi dibbehi pho√Ī√Īhabbehi. So tato cuto
itthatta√ľ √†gato sam√†no im√†ni dve mah√†purisalakkha√Ķ√†ni pa√Īilabhati,
pah√•ta jivho ca hoti brahmassaro ca karav√£kabh√†√Ķ√£. So tehi lakkha√Ķehi
samann√†gato sace ag√†ra√ľ ajjh√†vasati, r√†j√† hoti cakkavatt√£ dhammiko
dhammaràjà càturanto vijitàvã janapadatthàvariyappatto
sattaratanasamann√†gato. Tassim√†ni satta ratan√†ni bhavanti. Seyyath√£da√ľ:
cakkaratana√ľ hatthiratana√ľ assaratana√ľ ma√Ķiratana√ľ itthiratana√ľ
gahapatiratana√ľ parin√†yakaratanameva sattama√ľ. Parosahassa√ľ kho panassa
putt√† bhavanti s√•r√† v√£ra√Įgar√•p√† parasenappamaddan√†. So ima√ľ pa√Īhavi√ľ
s√†garapariyanta√ľ akh√£lamanimittamaka√Ķ√Īaka√ľ iddha√ľ ph√£ta√ľ khema√ľ siva√ľ
nirabbuda√ľ ada√Ķ√≥ena asatthena dhammena samena abhivijiya ajjh√†vasati.
T√†ni dvatti√ľsa sace ratan√†ni r√†j√† sam√†no ki√ľ labhati? √Ędeyyav√†co hoti,
√†d√£yanti’ssa vacana√ľ br√†hma√Ķagahapatik√† negamaj√†napad√† ga√Ķak√† mah√†matt√†
a√Ķ√£ka√Ī√Īh√† dov√†rik√† amacc√† p√†risajj√† r√†j√†no bhogiy√† kum√†r√†. R√†j√† sam√†no
ida√ľ labhati. Sace kho pana ag√†rasm√† anag√†riya√ľ pabbajati, araha√ľ hoti
samm√†sambuddho loke vivattacchado. Buddho sam√†no ki√ľ labhati? [PTS Page
174] [\q 174/] √†deyyav√†co hoti, √†diyanti’ssa vacana√ľ bhikkh√• bhakkhuniyo
up√†sak√† up√†sik√†yo dev√† manuss√† asur√† n√†g√† gandhabb√†. Buddho sam√†no ida√ľ
labhati.

Etamattha√ľ bhagav√† √†voca. Tattheta√ľ vuccati:


Akkosabha√Ķ√≥anavihesak√†ri√ľ
Ubb√†dhaka√ľ1 bahujanamaddana√ľ
B√†√ęha√ľ2 gira√ľ so na bha√Ķi pharusa√ľ
Madhura√ľ bha√Ķ√£ s√•sa¬§hita√ľ sakhila√ľ.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

1. Ubb√†dhakara√ľ (machasa√ľ) 2. Ab√†√ęha√ľ (machasa√ľ)

[BJT Page 280] [\x 280/]


Manaso piyà hadayagàminiyo
V√†c√† so erayati ka√Ķ√Ķasub√†
V√†c√† suci√Ķ√Ķaphalamanubhavi.
Saggesu vedaya pu¬§¬§aphala√ľ.
Veditv√† so sucaritassa phala√ľ
Brahmassarattamidhajjhagamà.
Jivh√†’ssa hoti vipul√† puthul√†
√Ędeyyav√†kyavacano bhavati.
Gihino’pi ijjhati yath√† bha√Ķato
Atha ce pabbajati so manujo
[PTS Page 175] [\q 175/] √†diyant√£’ssa vacana√ľ janat√†
Bahuno bahu√ľ subha√Ķita√ľ2 bha√Ķato’ti.

S√£hahanulakkha√Ķa√ľ (30)

21. Yampi bikkhave tath√†gato purima√ľ j√†ti√ľ purima√ľ bhava√ľ purima√ľ
niketa√ľ pubbe manussabh√•to sam√†no samphappal√†pa√ľ pah√†ya samphappal√†p√†
pa√Īivirato ahosi, k√†lav√†d√£ bh√•tav√†d√£ atthav√†d√£ dhammav√†d√£ vinayav√†d√£
nidh√†navati√ľ v√†ca√ľ bh√†sit√† k√†lena s√†padesa√ľ pariyannavati√ľ
atthasa√ľhita√ľ, so tassa kammassa katatt√† upacitatt√† ussannatt√† vipulatt√†
k√†yassa bhed√† parammara√Ķ√† sugati√ľ sagga√ľ loka√ľ upapajjati. So tattha
a¬§¬§e deve dasahi √Īh√†nehi adhiga√Ķh√†ti, dibbena √†yun√† dibbena va√Ķ√Ķena
dibbena sukhena dibbena yasena dibbena àdhipateyyena dibbehi råpehi
dibbehi saddehi dibbehi gandhehi dibbehi rasehi dibbehi pho√Ī√Īhabbehi. So
tato cuto itthatta√ľ √†gato sam√†no ima√ľ mah√†purisalakkha√Ķa√ľ pa√Īilabhati,
s√£hahanu hoti. So tena lakkha√Ķena samann√†gato sace ag√†ra√ľ ajjh√†vasati,
ràjà hoti cakkavattã dhammiko dhammaràjà càturanto vijitàvã
janapadatthàvariyappatto sattaratanasamannàgato. Tassimàni satta
ratan√†ni bhavanti. Seyyath√£da√ľ: cakkaratana√ľ hatthiratana√ľ assaratana√ľ
ma√Ķiratana√ľ itthiratana√ľ gahapatiratana√ľ parin√†yakaratanameva sattama√ľ.
Parosahassa√ľ kho panassa putt√† bhavanti s√•r√† v√£ra√Įgar√•p√†
parasenappamaddan√†. So ima√ľ pa√Īhavi√ľ s√†garapariyanta√ľ
akh√£lama√Ķimittamaka√Ķ√Īaka√ľ iddha√ľ ph√£ta√ľ khema√ľ siva√ľ nirabbuda√ľ ada√Ķ√≥ena
asatthena dhammena samena abhivijiya ajjhàvasati. Tassimàni ràjà samàno
ki√ľ labhati? Appadha√ľsiyo hoti kenaci manussabh√•tena paccatthikena
pacc√†mittena. R√†j√† sam√†no ida√ľ labhati. Sace kho pana ag√†rasm√†
anag√†riya√ľ pabbajati, araha√ľ hoti sammasambuddho loke vivattacchado.
Buddho sam√†no ki√ľ labhati? Appadha√ľsiyo hoti abbhantarehi v√† b√†hirehi v√†
paccattikehi pacc√†mittehi r√†gena v√† dosena v√† mohena v√† sama√Ķena v√†
br√†hma√Ķena v√† devena v√† m√†rena v√† brahmun√† v√† kenaci v√† lokasmi√ľ. Buddho
sam√†no ida√ľ labhati.

Etamattha√ľ bhagav√† avoca. Tattheta√ľ vuccati:


Samphappal√†pa√ľ na abuddhatanti√ľ3
Aviki√Ķ√Ķavacanabyappato ahosi.
Ahitampi ca apanudi
Hitampi ca bahujanasukha¬§ca abha√Ķi.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

2. Susahita√ľ (sy√†) 3. Na samphappal√†pa√ľ na muddhata√ľ (machasa√ľ)

[BJT Page 282] [\x 282/]


[PTS Page 176] [\q 176/] ta√ľ katv√† ito cuto divamupapajji
Sukataphalavipàkamanubhosi
Caviya punaridhàgato samàno
Dviduggamavaratarahanuttamalattha.
R√†j√† hoti suduppadha√ľsiyo
Manujindo manujàdhipatã mahànubhàvo,
Tidivapuravarasamo bhavati
Suravarataroriva indo.
Gandhabbàsurayakkharakkhasehi
Surehi na hi bhavati suppadha√ľsiyo,
Tathatto yadi bhavati tathàvidho
Idha dis√† ca pa√Īidis√† ca vidis√†c√†ti.

Samadanta - susukkad√†√Īh√† - lakkha√Ķ√†ti ( 31, 32)

22. Yampi bhikkhave tath√†gato purima√ľ j√†ti√ľ purima√ľ bhava√ľ purima√ľ
niketa√ľ pubbe munassabh√•to sam√†no micch√†√†j√£va√ľ pah√†ya samm√†√†j√£vena
jivika√ľ kappesi. Tul√†k√•√Īa - ka√ľsak√•√Īa - m√†nak√•√Īa - ukko√Īana - va¬§cana -
nikati - - sàciyoga - chedana - vadhabandhana viparàmosa - àlopa -
sahas√†k√†r√† pa√Īivirato ahosi, so tassa kammassa [PTS Page 177] [\q 177/]
katatt√† upacitatt√† ussannatt√† vipulatt√† k√†yassa bhed√† parammara√Ķ√†
sugati√ľ sagga√ľ loka√ľ upapajjati. So tattha a¬§¬§e deve dasahi √Īh√†nehi
adhiga√Ķh√†ti, dibbena √†yun√† dibbena va√Ķ√Ķena dibbena sukhena dibbena
yasena dibbena àdhipateyyena dibbehi råpehi dibbehi saddehi dibbehi
gandhehi dibbehi rasehi dibbehi pho√Ī√Īhabbehi. So tato cuto itthatta√ľ
√†gato sam√†no im√†ni dve mah√†purisalakkha√Ķ√†ni pa√Īilabhati, samadanto ca
hoti susukkad√†√Īho ca.

[BJT Page 284] [\x 284/]

So tehi lakkha√Ķehi samann√†gato sace ag√†ra√ľ ajjh√†vasati, r√†j√† hoti
cakkavattã dhammiko dhammaràjà càturanto vijitàvã
janapadatthàvariyappatto sattaratanasamannàgato. Tassimàni satta
ratan√†ni bhavanti. Seyyath√£da√ľ: cakkaratana√ľ hatthiratana√ľ assaratana√ľ
ma√Ķiratana√ľ itthiratana√ľ gahapatiratana√ľ parin√†yakaratanameva sattama√ľ.
Parosahassa√ľ kho panassa putt√† bhavanti, s√•r√† v√£ra√Įgar√•p√†
parasenappamaddan√†. So ima√ľ pa√Īhavi√ľ s√†garapariyanta√ľ
akh√£lamanimittamaka√Ķ√Īaka√ľ iddha√ľ ph√£ta√ľ khema√ľ siva√ľ nirabbuda√ľ ada√Ķ√≥ena
asatthena dhammena samena ahivijiya ajjh√†vasati. R√†j√† sam√†no ki√ľ
labhati? Suvipariv√†ro hoti, suc√£’ssa honti pariv√†r√† br√†hma√Ķagahapatik√†
negama j√†napad√† ga√Ķak√† mah√†matt√† an√£ka√Ī√Īh√† dov√†rik√† amacc√† p√†risajj√†
r√†j√†no bhogiy√† kum√†r√†. R√†j√† sam√†no ida√ľ labhati. Sace kho pana ag√†rasm√†
anag√†riya√ľ pabbajati araha√ľ hoti samm√†sambuddho loke vivattacchado.
Buddho sam√†no ki√ľ labhati? Sucipariv√†ro hoti, suci’ssa honti pariv√†r√†
bhikkhå bhikkhuniyo upàsakà upàsikàyo devà manussà asurà nàgà gandhabbà.
Buddho sam√†no ida√ľ labhati.

Etamattha√ľ bhagav√† avoca. Tattheta√ľ vuccati:


Micch√†j√£va¬§ca avassaji samena vutti√ľ
Suvinà so janayittha dhammikena
[PTS Page 178] [\q 178/] ahitampi ca apànudi1
Hitampi ca bahujanasukha¤ca àcari.2
Sagge vedayati naro sukhaphalàni
Karitv√† nipu√Ķehi vud√•hi
Sabbh√£ va√Ķ√Ķit√†ni tidivapuravarasamo
Abhiramati ratikhi√≥√≥√†sama√Įg√£.
Laddh√†3 m√†nusaka√ľ bhava√ľ tato
Cavitv√†4 sukataphalavip√†ka√ľ
Sesakena pa√Īilabhati lapanaja√ľ
Samamapi suci susukka√ľ.5

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

1. Apanud√£ (machasa√ľ) 2. Acari (machasa√ľ) 3. Laddh√†na (machasa√ľ) 4.
Cavitv√†na (machasa√ľ) 5. Laddh√†na manussaka√ľ bhava√ľ tato caviya puna
sukata, phalavip√†ka, ye sakena pa√Īilabhati lapanaja√ľ samamapi suci ca
suvisuddha susukka√ľ (sy√†)

[BJT Page 286] [\x 286/]


Ta√ľ veyya¬§janik√† sam√†gat√†
Bahavo by√†ka√ľsu nipu√Ķasammat√† manuj√†
Sucijanapariv√†raga√Ķo bhavati
Dijasamasukkasucisobhanadanto.
Ra¤¤o hoti bahujano
Sucipariv√†ro mahati√ľ mahi√ľ anus√†sako,
[PTS Page 179] [\q 179/] pasayha na ca janapadatudana√ľ
Hitampi ca bahujanasukha¤ca caranti.
Atha ce pabbajati bhavati vipàpo
Sama√Ķo samitarajo vivattachaddo,
Vigatadarathakilamatho
Imampi ca parampi ca1 passati loka√ľ.
Tassovàdakarà bahå gihã ca pabbajità ca
Asucigarahita√ľ2 dhunanti p√†pa√ľ,
Sa hi sucihi parivuto bhavati
Malakh√£lakalikilese panudet√£ ti. 3

Lakkha√Ķasutta√ľni√Ī√Īhita√ľ sattama√ľ.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

1. Imamaji ca paramaphi ca [PTS], paramapi paramapi ca (syà) 2.
Apuci√ľ garahita√ľ (machasa√ľ) 3. Tassov√†dak√† bahugih√£ ca. Pabbajito ca
asucãvigarahita - panudi pàsasasa hi sucihi parivuto, bhavati
malakhilaka kilase panudeti (syà)


 oS ksldh


kfud ;ii N.jf;d wryf;d iuud iunqoaOii


[\q 432/]


5=’ ,laLK iQ;1h’

 3′ ud jsiska
fufia wik ,os’ tla ld,hl Nd.Hj;2ka jykafia ieje;akqjr fojqruz fjfyr jdih
lrkakdy’ tl,ays Nd.Hj;2ka jykafia ))uyfKkshs)) NsCIQkag l:d l

4′
))uyfKks” fuz ,CIK fo;si uydmqreIhdf.a uydmqreI ,CIKfhdah’ fuz ,CIK
j,ska hqla; jQ uydmqreIhdf.a fuz .;s follau fj;a’ *Tyq( .sysf.h jdih
flfrAo” i;r osYdjg wOsm;s jQfha OrAu rdchkajQ ilajs;s rfcla fjhs’
uydmqreIhd .sysf.ka kslau uyKfjzo” flf,ia keue;s jeiau is√čsk ,o wrAy;ajQ
iuHla iuznq√ą fjhs’ uyfKks” uydmqreIhdf.a fuz fo;sia uyd mqreI ,CIKfhda
ljryqo$))

 

5′
))uyfKks” fuys uydmqreI f;fuz ukdfldg msysgs mdo we;af;a fjhs’
uydmqreIhdf.a hgsm;2,a j, oyila wr we;s” ksuzj,,q iys;jQ” ken iys;jQ”
pl1fhda my< fjhs’ uyd mqreI f;fuz osla jsZMuz we;af;a fjhs” os.
weZ.s,s we;af;a fjhs” uD√ąjQ ;reKjQ w;2,am;2,a we;af;a fjhs” oe,aljq,qjl
n√Ć iujQ weZ.,s we;s w;a md we;af;a fjhs” msreKq f.dmaui we;s md we;af;a
fjhs” Tz,q uqjkaf.a n√Ć flKAvd we;af;a fjhs” isgf.ku fkdkeuS fow;a,j,ska
okysia w;.dhs” msrsuoS’ fldaIh ;2< ieZ.jqkq mqreI ,CIK we;af;a fjhs”
ishquz yu we;af;a fjhs” tl tl f,duz we;af;a fjhs” frdaul@mhkays tla tla
frdau yg.;a;dyqh” Wvql2re wla we;s frdau we;af;a fjhs’ Wvql2rejQ f,duz
ks,ajkah’” w√Ćkajkah’))

 

))fl,ska
msysgs YrSrh we;af;a fjhs” *fomsg m;2,a foWrysia” lr hk( i;a ;ek Wia
jQfha fjhs’ isxyfhl2f.a YrSrh bosrsmi fuka iuzmQrAK YrSrhla we;af;a
fjhs’ msg fome;a; ueo msrefKA fjhs’ kq. rellafia jgjQ nj we;af;a fjhs’
Wkajykafiaf.a YrSrh huz muK fjzo nUh;a tmuKh’ nUh huz muKo 


[\q 433/]

YrSrh;a
tmuKh’ iu jg fn,a, we;af;a fjhs’ i;aishhla ri kyr we;af;a fjhs’
isxyfhl2f.a hg ylal fuka iuzmQrAKjQ Wvq hgs yl2 fol we;af;a fjhs’
iui;,sia o;a we;af;a fjhs’ iu o;a is√ąre ke;sjQ o;a os,sfik b;d iq√ą o;a
we;af;a fjhs’ uD√ą osla m<,a osj we;af;a fjhs’ n1yauhdf.a fuka lgyX
we;af;a fjhs’ l2rjSl yX n√Ć lgyX we;af;a fjhs’ msrsis√ą ks,ajka mdg weia
we;af;a fjhs’ Wmka flfKys jiafil2f.a n√Ć meye√ąkq weia .2,s we;af;a fjhs’
foneu w;r iq√ąjQ uD√ąjQ mq,qka fm√čla jeks ol2Kg lrlejS k<, ueo msysgs
frdauhla jQfha fjhs’

6′
))uyfKks” huz fya;2jlska uyd mqreIhdf.a foneu w;r iq√ąjQ uD√ąjQ mqZMka
fm√čla jeks W#rAK frdauhla jQfhao fuho” uyfKks” uydmqreIhdf.a uydmqreI
,CIKhla fjhs’ uyfKks” kej;o uydmqreI f;fuz msreKq k<, iys; iuzmQrAK
ysi we;af;a fjhs’

))uyfKks” uymqrsia f;fuz huz n√ĆjQ iuzmQrAK ysi we;af;a fjzo” fuho uyfKks” uydmqreIhdf.a uydmqreI ,CIKhla fjhs’

7′
))uyfKks” huz fya;2jlska ;:d.;hka jykafia fmr cd;sfhys ukqIHfhla jQfha
oY l2Y, OrAuhkayS oevsj iudoka jQfha ksYap,jQ iudodkh we;af;a jsh’ lhska
jpkfhka is;ska lrk iqprs;fhyso” oka fnod yod oSfuyso” YS,iudodkfhyso”
fmfyjia jsiSfuyso” ujg Wmia:dk lsrSfuyso” mshdg Wmia:dk lsrSfuyso”
uyKqkag i;aldr lsrSfuyso” mjz √ąrel< nuqKkag i;aldr lsrSfuyso”
jevsysgshka msoSfuyso tla tla Wiia l2Y, OrAuhkayS oevs iudodk we;af;a
ksYap, iudodk we;af;a jSh’ fyf;u urKska u;2 hym;a .;s we;s iajrA.
f,dalfhys WmoshS’ fyf;u tys wkH fojsjrekag jvd lreKq oyhlska jevsfjhs’
osjHuhjQ wdhqIfhkao” mdfgkao” iemfhkao” msrsjrskao” wOsm;s nfjkao”
rEmfhkao” Ynzofhkao” .kaOfhkao” rifhkao” iamrAIfhkao hk lreKq oyfhka
jevsfjhs’

8′ ))fyf;u ta fojz f,djska pq;j usksi;a njg meusKsfha fuz uydmqrsia ,l2Kq ,nhs’

[\q 434/]


9′
uyfKks” huz fya;2jlska ;:d.; f;fuz fmr cd;sfhys fmr Njfhys fmr jdifhys
fmr ukqIHfhla jQfha iuzMm1,dm*ysia jpk( √ąrefldg iuzMm1,dm lSfuka
√ąrejQfha jsh’ iq√ąiql,a oek lshkafkla” we;sfohla lshkafkla” m1fhdackjQjla
lshkafkla ” OdrAusl fohla lshkafkla” yslaujsh hq;2 jpk lshkafkla is;
;nd.; hq;2jQo lreKq iys;jQo Wmfoia iys;jQo wrA: iys;jQo jpk iq√ąiq
ld,fhys lshkafkla jQfhah’ fyf;u ta lrAuh l, nejska YrSrhdf.a ns√čSfuka
urKska u;2 hym;a .;s we;s iajrA.f,dalfhys Wmoshs’ fyf;u tys wkH
fojsjrekag jvd lreKq oyhlska jevsfjhs’ osjHuhjQ wdhqIfhkao” osjHuhjQ
mdfgkao” osjHuhjQ iemfhkao” osjHuhjQ msrsjrskao” osjHuhjQ
wOsm;sNdjfhkao” osjHuhjQ rEmfhkao” osjHuhjQ Ynzofhkao” osjHuhjQ
.kaOfhkao” osjHuhjQ rifhkao” osjHuhjQ iamrAIfhkao hk lreKq oyfhka jevs
fjhs’ fyf;u t;ekska pq;j usksia njg meusKsfha fuz uyd mqreI ,CIKh ,nhs’

fuys Nd.Hj;2ka jykafia fo;sia uyd mqreI ,CIK ,enSug fya;2jQ fmr l< mqkH lrAu jsia;r l

* ;sia jeksjQ ,laLK iQ;1h ksusfhah (


MAY BADA BHANTE BE WELL AND SECURE

Please visit:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RK5EHFWUMrA

for


Pali Chanting Bojjhanga sutta

MAY BADA BHANTE BE WELL AND SECURE
MAY HE LIVE LONG


AS HE IS FOR THE WELFARE OF ALL SENTIENT AND NON-SENTIENT BEINGS TO BE EVER HAPPY
HE ALWAYS HAS CALM, QUIET, ALERT, ATTENTIVE AND


EQUANIMITY MIND WITH A CLEAR UNDERSTANDING THAT


EVERYTHING IS CHANGING.


All of us  seriously practice meditation, puja, and dedicate merits and metta to Bada Bhanteji for his good health.


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