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 112 CLASSICAL LANGUAGES
Paṭisambhidā Jāla-Abaddha Paripanti Tipiṭaka Anvesanā ca Paricaya Nikhilavijjālaya ca ñātibhūta Pavatti Nissāya 
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(92) LESSON 2749 Wed 19 Sep 2018 LESSON (92) Wes 19 Sep 2007 Do Good Be Mindful - Awakened One with Awareness (AOA)Sarvajan Hitay Sarvajan Sukhay-For The Gain of The Many and For The Welfare of The Many-‘Monolith India’ and the vote bank
Filed under: General
Posted by: site admin @ 11:57 am

(92)  LESSON



2749 Wed 19 Sep 2018

LESSON (92) Wes 19 Sep 2007 Do Good Be Mindful - Awakened One with Awareness (AOA)

https://www.wellhappypeaceful.com/pali-glossary/


Pali

Pali Glossary

Pali
Pali
is a Middle Indo-Aryan language of the Indian subcontinent. It is best
known as the language of many of the earliest existing Buddhist
scriptures, as collected in the Tipitaka, and as the liturgical language
of Theravada Buddhism. The Tipitaka (Pali ti, “three,” + pitaka,
“baskets”), or Pali canon, is the collection of primary Pali language
texts which form the doctrinal foundation of Theravada Buddhism.

A
adhimokkha (Skt. adhimokṣa): determination, decision, resolve: is one of the mental concomitants (cetasika) and belongs to the group of mental formations (saṅkhārakkhandha).
adhiṭṭhāna (from adhi meaning “higher” or “best” plus sthā meaning
“standing”) has been translated as “decision,” “resolution,”
“self-determination,” “will” and “resolute determination.”In the late
canonical literature of Theravada Buddhism, adhiṭṭhāna is one of the ten
“perfections” (dasa pāramiyo), exemplified by the bodhisatta’s resolve
to become fully awakened.
akusala: unwholesome, unskillfulness
anapanasati: mindfulness of breathing
anatta: not-self
anicca: impermanence; inconstancy
anumodanā: Literally, it means “rejoicing together,” but it can also mean approval and encouragement.
aparimāṇa: limitless; immeasurable, unconditional
Arahant: Liberated one
arambhadhatu: “element of beginning” or “element of effort”
ariya (Skt. arya): noble; as in ariya-sacca, meaning “noble truth” or
“truth of the noble ones.” More specifically, the term ariya-sacca
refers to the Buddha’s “Four Noble Truths”.
asaññasatto: without thoughts or perceptions
āsava: mental effluent, pollutant, or fermentation. Four qualities —
sensuality, views, becoming, and ignorance — that “flow out” of the mind
and create the flood of the round of death and rebirth.
atanka: illness; disease
atta: (Skt. atman) refers to a self
avihinsa: non-violence, non-cruelty; kindness to the weak
avijja: ignorance or delusion
ayatana: sphere of perception or sense in general, object of thought, sense-organ


B
bhavana: meditation, cultivation of wisdom and virtue, insight
bhavanga: (Pali, “ground of becoming”) is the most fundamental aspect of
mind in Theravada Buddhism. (The term does not occur in the Nikayas,
though the Theravada tradition identifies it with one that does; the
phenomenon described as “luminous mind.”)
bhikku: monk
bhikkuni: nun
bodhi: to awake, become aware, notice, know or understand
bodhicitta: awakened heart-mind
Bodhisatta: (Skt. Bodhisattva) A future Buddha
Buddha: an Enlightened being “Awakened”
Buddho: one who is awakened to the truth
Budu saranai: (Sinhalese) May the peace and blessings of the Buddha be with you


C
cārita: temperament, nature, character or habitual conduct
Cārita is of six types:
* Raga carita (the greedy or passionate nature)
* Dosa carita (the angry nature)
* Moha carita (the deluded nature)
* Saddha carita (the faithful nature)
* Buddhi carita (the intelligent nature)
* Vitakka carita (the ruminating or pondering nature)
chanda: (known in full as kusalachanda or dhammachanda). Chanda, or
zeal, is the real incentive for any truly constructive actions. However,
zeal may be impeded by desire and its attachments to laziness,
lethargy, or personal comfort. In this case, desire will stain any
attempts to perform good actions with suffering, by resisting the
practice through these negative states. If there is clear understanding
of the advantage of those actions and sufficient appreciation (chanda)
of them, enabling the burdening effect of desire to be overcome, chanda
becomes, in addition to an impetus for action, a cause for happiness.
cetanā: commonly translated as “volition”, “intention”,
“directionality”, or “attraction”. It can be defined as a mental factor
that moves or urges the mind in a particular direction, toward a
specific object or goal.
cetovimutti: liberation of mind: liberation of mind from defilements
citta: mind, consciousness (Bhikkhu Bodhi: Citta signifies mind as the
centre of personal experience, as the subject of thought, volition and
emotion)


D
dana: ‘foodgiving’, generosity, offering
Dhamma: (Skt. dharma) liberating law discovered by the Buddha, summed up
in the Four Noble Truths, the Truth, Reality, natural law, all physical
and mental phenomena
dosa: aversion
dukkha: unsatisfactoriness, suffering, pain, distress, discontent, stress, the impermanence of all phenomena


E
ehipassiko: The dhamma welcomes all beings to put it to the test and to
experience it for themselves. Literally “Come and see for yourself.”
ekaggatā (Skt. ekāgratā) means “one-pointedness” or “unification”. This mental factor is one of the components in the jhānas.


J
jara: old; decayed; decrepit
Jāti: (Pali word for “birth”) refers to the arising of a new living entity in saṃsāra.
jhana: (Skt. dhyana) meditative absorption, a state of strong concentration.


K
kalyana mitta: lovely friend (Sometimes interpreted as spiritual friend)
kamma: (Skt. karma): (lit.-action) The law of cause and effect; intentional acts
karuṇā: compassion
kasina: Spherical or disc shaped mental visual object of meditation
kataññu (katannu-katavedi): knowing what has been done; recollecting what has been done; gratitude
khanda: (Skt. skandha): Five aggregates which form the raw material for
one’s sense of self: form/body, feeling, perception, mental formations,
consciousness
khanti: patience, tolerance, endurance, forebearance
kilesa: (defilements) greed, aversion, delusion
kusala: wholesome, skillful, of good merit


L
lobha: greed


M
magga: path
metta: Lovingkindness, good will
moha: (lit.-to be stupified) delusion
muditā: sympathetic joy or joy with others. The ability of being happy
in the happiness of others and is therefore the opposite of jealousy,
spite and envy.


N
nandi: joy, enjoyment, pleasure, delight, hedonic gratification
nibbana: (Skt. nirvana): the cessation of suffering, enlightenment, liberation
nibbida: Disenchantment; aversion; disgust; weariness. The skillful
turning-away of the mind from the conditioned samsaric world towards the
unconditioned, the transcendent; Nibbana.
nikati (Skt. nikṛti) fraud, deceit, cheating
nikāya: a word of meaning “collection” of discourses (used to describe
groupings of discourses according to theme, length, or other categories.
For example, the Sutta Piṭaka is broken up into five nikāyas)
nikkamadhatu: “proceeding” with your effort”, the element of exertion
nirodha: cessation, extinction, as in third noble truth concerned with the cessation of suffering (dukkha)
nissarana: way out or exit; release, escape, abandon, freedom, liberation


O
opanayiko: referring inwardly; to be brought inward. An epithet for the Dhamma


P
pahāna: ‘overcoming’, abandoning. There are 5 kinds of overcoming: 1
overcoming by repression vikkhambhana-pahāna i.e. the temporary
suspension of the 5 hindrances nīvarana during the absorptions, 2
overcoming by the opposite tadanga-pahāna 3 overcoming by destruction
samuccheda-pahāna 4 overcoming by tranquillization patipassaddhi-pahāna 5
overcoming by escape nissarana-pahāna
pañña: wisdom
papañca: Complication, proliferation; tendency of the mind to proliferate issues from the sense of “self.”
parakkkamadhatu: valor; strength of mind or spirit that enables a person to proceed with firmness; strong determination
paramattha: absolute or ultimate reality
parami: perfections, virtues necessary for the realization of Awakening
pariyatti: Theoretical understanding of Dhamma obtained through reading, study, and learning.
passaddhi: calmness,tranquility, repose and serenity.
paticcasamuppāda: commonly translated as dependent origination or dependent arising.
paṭipatti: The practice of dhamma, as opposed to mere theoretical knowledge (pariyatti).
paṭivedha: ‘penetration’, signifies the realization of the truth of the
Dhamma, as distinguished from the mere acquisition of its wording
pariyatti or the practice patipatti of it, in other words, realization
as distinguished from theory and practice.
pranayama: a Sanskrit word meaning “extension of the breath” or more accurately, “extension of the life force”.
piti: Rapture or happiness, bliss
puñña: merit, meritorious, is a popular term for karmically wholesome (kusala) action.


S
sacca: truth
saddha: faith, confidence (Lit.-to place one’s heart on)
samadhi: concentration; meditative absorption; a deep state of meditation
samānattatā: impartiality, feeling towards others as towards oneself without bias or partiality
Samatha: A term referring to the group of meditation practices that aim at samadhi
sampajañña: Alertness; self-awareness; presence of mind; clear comprehension.
samsára: (lit.-perpetual wandering) ocean of worldly suffering; round of rebirth; pursuit of renewed existence
samvega: spiritual urgency
sangha: the community of Buddhist monks & nuns; recently: “the community of followers on the Buddhist path.”
sankara (Skt. samskara): concoctions; fabrications
sati: mindfulness, awareness
sati sampajañña: mindfully clearly know
sila: moral conduct; precept; virtue; moral restraint
sukha: happiness; pleasure; ease; bliss
suñña: void (ness), empty (emptiness)
sutta: (lit. thread; Skt. sutra) discourse of the Buddha or one of his leading disciples


T
tanha: (lit. thirst) craving
Tathagata: (Lit. thus gone) an Enlightened person
Theravada: (Doctrine of the elders)- school of Buddhism that draws its
inspiration from the Pali Canon, or Tipitaka, the oldest surviving
record of the Buddha’s teachings. Has been the predominant religion of
southeast Asia (Thailand, Sri Lanka, Burma)
Tipitaka: (Literally Three baskets)- The Pali Canon- has Three divisions:
1. Sutta Pitaka- discourses of the Buddha, (Five collections-nikayas- 10,000 suttas)
2. Abhidhamma Pitaka- treatises offering systematic treatment of topics in the suttas
3. Vinaya Pitaka- rules for ordained monks and nuns


U
upāsaka/upāsikā: Buddhist lay men are called upāsaka and lay women
upāsikā. Both Pali words are derived from ‘to sit close’ (upāsati) and
‘to attend to’ (upāsana) Monks.
upekkha: equanimity
Upādāna: the Pāli word for “clinging,” “attachment” or “grasping”, although the literal meaning is “fuel.”


V
Vipallāsa: perversions or distortions
Vipassana: literally, “to see clearly”; insight; insight into the truth
of anicca (impermanence), anatta (not-self), & dukkha
(unstatisfactoriness), to see things as they really are
viriya: effort; persistence; energy

http://greatwesternvehicle.org/pali/tipitakaindex.html

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The
GWV master directory of translations of the

TIPITAKA

The Earliest Buddhist Canon of Literature

The Three Baskets
1
2
3
Discourses of the Buddha
Monastic Discipline
Higher Doctrine
Sutta Pitaka
Abhidhamma Pitaka

    Digha Nikaya
    Majjhima Nikaya
    Samyutta Nikaya
    Anguttara Nikaya
    Khuddaka Nikaya

    Parajika
    Sanghadisesa
    Pacittiya
    Bhikkhuni
Vinaya

    Mahavagga
    Cullavagga
    Parivara
    Patimokkha

    Dhammasanganippakarana 
     Vibhangappakarana 
     Kathavatthuppakarana 
     Dhatukathappakarana 
     Puggalapannatti 
     Yamakappakarana 
     Patthanappakarana

For further study

the GWV Pali Language Resource Guide for
the Study of the, Tipitaka, Pali Language and Literature

The GWV
Contemplative’s
Pali-English, English-Pali Dictionary (a work in
progress), Edited by Jhanananda

Other Pali Dictionaries Resources and
Utilities

A Glossary of Key Buddhist
Terms
and Concepts

A Buddhist Timeline

Understanding the original language of
the Buddha and his teachings (suttas/sutras)

A Guide
to Learning the Pali Language
and access to Pali
Fonts
by John Bullitt




One of the goals of the
Great Western Vehicle is to bring the Buddha’s
teachings to the broadest audience. In an effort to meet that goal
we have provided as much of the
original Discourses of the Buddha in English translation as we could find
in the public domain.

The
GWV
master directory of translations of the Tipitaka in English, Romanized
Pali and Sinhala is a compilation of the work of 24 different translators.
It includes the work of monastics, such as:
Bhikkhuni
Upalavanna; Bhikkhus: Amaravati, ânandajoti, Bodhi,
Jhanananda, Ñanamoli, Ñanananda, Narada, Nyanaponika,
Nyanasatta, Piyadassi, Soma and Thanissaro; scholars such as: V.
Fausböll, Ireland,
A.D. Jayasundere, F. Max Müller,
Horner, Olendzki, T. W. Rhys Davids, Story, Strong, Vajira and Woodward.
Thanissaro Bhikkhu’s English translations are thanks
to Access
to Insight
, which included the work of other excellent translators.
The translations of F. Max Muller, T.W. Rhys Davids et al are thanks
to
the PALI
TEXT SOCIETY
.

Every culture that has embraced Buddhism has
spent the first few centuries of that endeavor in acquiring and translating
the Three
Baskets, which includes the Discourses of the Buddha (sutta/sutra pitaka).
It is a matter of history that the Buddha spoke in the common language
of
the
people
of
his region. The Pali language
is a liturgical language that is based upon that language.
Once the Buddha’s teachings were written down they were almost immediately
translated into Sinhala and Sanskrit. When Buddhism arrived in China, then
Korea, then Japan then Tibet, the Three Baskets were acquired in Sanskrit
then translated into the languages of those above regions.

As the English speaking peoples embrace Buddhism we have the
choice to acquire the teachings of the Buddha in the above mentioned languages,
however, why go through three layers of translation, which are only going
to increase the likelihood of translator bias and religious
dogma, when we can go back to
the original
language
of the Buddha, which was closest related
to
the Pali
language?

For scholarly purposes we believe serious students of Buddhism
are going to want to penetrate through the fog of translator bias and
religious dogma to get as close to the original teachings of the Buddha
as one can. For that purpose we have included the Romanized form of the
Pali. We have also included the Sinhala version as a gift to the Sri Lankan
people,
who have preserved the earliest sources of Buddhist literature.

The Romanized Pali is based upon the Sri
Lanka Buddha Jayanti Tipitaka Series
.
The Sinhala is A.P. de Soyza’s translations. The English
is by 24 translators often downloaded from the Internet thanks to Metta
Net
, Access to Insight, and
the
PALI
TEXT SOCIETY
“Sacred Books of the Buddhists” and “Sacred
Books of the East
, thanks to Sacred Texts.

If only one person is relieved of suffering by our efforts,
then our work was well spent.

Sotapanna Jhanananda
Inyo National Forest, September 17 2005

Pali

the English Translators

Sinhala

Pali (1)

BJT Text

Pali (2)

New Text,
Study + Metrical Commentary

(1) Sister Upalavanna

(2) A.D. Jayasundere

(3) misc. & anon

(4) T. W. Rhys Davids

(5) Jhanananda

(6) Thanissaro

(7) Vajira/Story

(8) Piyadassi

(9) Narada

(10) Nyanaponika

(11) Ñanamoli

(12) Bodhi, Soma

(13) Horner

(14) Ñanananda

(15) Olendzki

(16)
Woodward

(17) F. Max Müller

(18) Strong

(19) Buddharakkhita

(20) ânandajoti

(21) Amaravati

(22) Nyanasatta

(23) Ireland

(24)
V. Fausböll

Main Translation 
from the
A. P Soyza series

You may wish to download and install the fonts from here before
you proceed so that the Romanized Pali displays correctly. Fonts  were
uploaded on June, 30, 2000. Or Pali
Fonts
.

The latest update of the MettaNet Tipitaka in
a single Zip file of 24.8 MB, uploaded
on June, 11, 2005


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105 CLASSICAL LANGUAGES

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http://mujtabas-musings.blogspot.com/2007/11/monolith-india-and-vote-bank.html

mujtabas-musings

Friday, November 9, 2007

‘Monolith India’ and the vote bank

‘Monolith India’ and the vote bank
Syed Ali Mujtaba

Vote bank politics has come to become an Indian reality and democracy in India has come to be the fine art of balancing different vote banks with very little excep-tion. Some political parties may openly denounce the politics of cultivating vote banks but overtly or covertly they practice it in their own constituencies, for political survival and advancement.

It has been said that democratic pro-cesses would put an end to India’s unique divisions, which were wilfully exploited by the colonial masters to perpetuate their rule. It was reasoned that periodic elections would gradually diminish the divisions based on caste, creed and religion. However, in the process of empowering the masses, democracy has sharpened the diversity by transforming them into vote banks and important ‘variables’ in the political process.

The trend is most prominent in caste categories within the majority Hindu community. Political parties exploit the aspirations of caste groups which differ from one another, or are at least made to think that they differ in significant ways. In fact, many political parties have become syno-nymous with certain caste categories. The Bahujan Samaj party and the Samajwadi party in Uttar Pradesh represent ‘lower’ and intermediary castes as do the Dalit Panthers of India (DPI) and the Pattali Makkal Katchi (PMK) in Tamil Nadu.

Religion is the other broad category on which hinges the survival of several political parties. The leading party of the ruling National Democratic Alliance, the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP), is primarily a Hindu party trying to market Hinduism in the cloak of nationalism. Even its secular face is Hindutva. The Akali Dal in Punjab and the Muslim League in Kerala espouse the cause of the Sikhs and Muslims interests at the provincial level.

Language is another category in the diversity among the peoples of India. Various political parties have cultivated linguistic constituencies. The Telugu Desam Party (TDP) in Andhra Pradesh, the Dravida Munnetra Kazhagam (DMK) and the All India Anna Dravida Munnetra Kazhagam (AIADMK) in Tamil Nadu, as well as the Assam Gon Parishad in Assam, all flaunt their linguistic constituencies.

The other category for political mobi-lisation is ethnicity. The Jharkhand Mukti Morcha (JMM) in the tribal-dominated Jharkhand and some other political parties in the Northeast and the hills and tribal regions elsewhere have ethnic groups as their vote banks. Provincialism also forms the basis of political divisions with political parties like the Shiv Sena, DMK, AIADMK, Biju Janta Dal, Assam Gon Prashid, Haryana Vikas Party being province-based political parties. Then there are parties which have farmers as their constituency. Ajit Singh’s Rashtriya Lok Dal in Uttar Pradesh and Om Prakash Chautala’s Harayana Vikas Party fall in this category.

The left parties, CPI and CPI (M), are ideology-based political entities and have a committed ideological cadre as their constituency. West Bengal, Kerala and Tripura are the few states where these parties are strong.

Centrifugal forces

Even during the British days there existed the religious, the left, the pro-Raj, the pro-worker, the pro-farmer, and the pro-landed class political parties, among many others, which espoused the cause of these myriad groups thus creating their separate vote banks. The general elections in 1936 and 1946 brought to fore the choices of vote banks for different political parties in India.

The Congress, which had a pivotal role in the freedom struggle, was the natural choice of many Indians for at least the first three general elections after Independence. The Congress vote bank comprised upper caste Hindus, Dalits and Muslims. The party had a smooth run till 1967, when for the first time it lost its majority not in one but in nine states of the country. That year is considered to be a watershed in Indian politics. Since then two sets of political forces emerged in India – one that challen-ged the all-India supremacy of the Congress and the other that tried to break free from the centralised structure of the state.

Drill it in!

In fact, from 1967 onwards there has been a tug-of-war going on in Indian politics. Would political parties with overarching all-India characteristics govern the country or would regional satraps forge linkages to run the affairs of the country? The trajectory that has been emerging of late reveals that all the parties ruling at the centre have had to accommodate parties and groups representing different regional constituencies through coalition arrangements.

The first non-Congress gov-ernment was formed in 1977 - a coalition of several parties led by the Janata Party, an offshoot of popular socialist leader Ram Manohar Lohia’s Socialist Party. The hotchpotch coalition had sprung to challenge the supremacy of Indira Gandhi’s Congress. It even included the BJP that emerged out of the Jan Sangh (formed in 1967 to re-present Hindu aspirations). Since 1967, parties have emerged left and right of the centre at the national level, and a flurry of political parties have come up at the regional and provincial level. The Shiv Sena in Maharastra, the Asam Gon Parishad in Assam, the Telugu Desam party in Andhra Pradesh mentioned earlier are some of them.

The other phase of political develop-ment began at the national level with the rise of the BJP since 1984 in the country. The party began cultivating the majority Hindu vote bank by espousing the cause of the Hindus of the country. It attacked the Congress for pampering minorities and cultivated its own constituency on the anti-Muslim platform.

The National Front government led by VP Singh, which drew inspiration from the Janata Party of 1977 and the Socialist Party of 1967, came up in a big way in 1989 by widening the net of the vote bank to other caste categories. Thus the Mandal Commi-ssion report which allowed 27 percent reservation for OBCs in government jobs in that year was another watershed event in Indian politics. As a result of the implementation of the Mandal report, intermediate castes like Yadavs and Kurmis came into the forefront in the Ganga plain. Parties like the Samajwadi Party, the Bahujan Samaj Party, the Rashtriya Lok Dal in Uttar Pradesh, the Rashtriya Janta Dal and the Samata Party in Bihar and the Biju Janata Dal in Orissa are all post-Mandal offspring.

The United Front government led by Deve Gowda in 1996 was yet another attempt by left of centre forces to govern the country. The United Front government had regional and provincial coalition partners such as the TDP and DMK which played the major role in holding power at the centre in New Delhi. The formation of the National Democratic Alliance (NDA) in 1998 led by the BJP reinforces the evolution in Indian politics where regional and local political parties are increasing their influence at the national level by forging alliances with national parties to form governments at the centre.

While it is difficult to predict whether national parties will be overtaken by combinations, of provincial parties, all political parties will continue to draw sustenance from diverse categories within the Indian electorate. There is no end in sight to the phenomena of vote bank politics in India. As new groups come forward to demand space in politics, the creation of new vote banks is an accelerating process. There is emerging consciousness among various marginalised groups to get united in the course of political mobilisation.

The result is the emergence of newer political parties to espouse the cause of the differentiated, and often marginalised, of India. The fate of democracy is thus entwined with vote banks. However, in the process of new vote banks being created, it is also true that narrow and parochial agendas are gaining an upper hand even as the broad all-India vote banks lose ground. In the mushrooming of local-regional political parties some would see Indians discovering their political identity, with local and regional considerations gaining ground and it being harder to tie down voters as ‘monolith Indians’? The answers open up a big debate — is India is a nation or a nation of nations. Political developments point to the latter.

http://www.himalmag.com/2004/may/commentary_4.htm

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2748 Tue 18 Sep 2018 LESSON (91) Tue 18 Sep 2007 Do Good Be Mindful - Awakened One with Awareness (AOA)

🌺🙏🌺🙏🌺🙏
NAMO BUDDHAYA

SMARANANJALI – Homage to our respected teacher Most Venerable Acharya Buddharakkhita on the 5th death anniversary.

22, 23 September 2018


Abhisambidhana Sutta

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Dhammapada | 3. Citta Vagga


Most Ven.Acharya Buddharakkhita was a visionary monk in modern India
who has worked hard for nearly six decades to bring the timeless message
of compassion and wisdom of the Supreme Buddha to all of us. His life
is marked by great struggles and sacrifices to revive the Buddha Sasana.
He was Dhamma and meditation teacher, writer, orator, kind hearted ever
helpful friendly guide, hard working compassionate guardian for poor
patients and destitute. He passed away five years back on 23rd
September, leaving a great message behind that only sincere practice of
the Dhamma will change the hearts of individuals and society.


You are requested to participate with family and friends in the programs
to pay respects to Late Venerable Acharya Buddharakkhita, Bade
Bhanteji, the founder of Mahabodhi organizations on 22nd and 23rd
September 2018.

Program
22-09-2018 Saturday
At 9 AM
onwards at Mahabodhi Dhammaduta Buddha Vihara, Narasipura Village,
Bengaluru North. Buses will be arranged from Gandhinagar monastery at
7:30 AM.

23-09-2018 Sunday at MahabodhiSociety,
Gandhinagar Bangalore
10 AM – Sanghadana – offering lunch to monks
10:30 AM onwards – Puja, talks and expressions on Bada Bhanteji. Release of publications in Kannada, Tamil and English
1 PM – Lunch for devotees
2 – 4 PM – documentary on Bada Bhanteji
6 PM – Evening special puja under the Bodhi Tree and merit sharing.
(on 20th dana service in Mahabodhi Burns hospital and Cancer Hospital)
Sadhu Sadhu Sadhu
🌸🙏🌸🙏🌸🙏

182Dhamma Datta, Sumeet Dahate and 180 others


http://www.tipitaka.org/knda/
Please watch:

Talking Book in Kannada - Buddha11:06 mins

The story of Gautham Buddha, the founder of one of the major religions
in the world - Buddhism, it depicts his journey from a prince to an awakened being.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0s00yLd4nNc
The quotes of Lord Buddha in kannada language.- 2:03 min
s


೮. ಮಹಾಸೀಹನಾದಸುತ್ತವಣ್ಣನಾ
೯. ಪೋಟ್ಠಪಾದಸುತ್ತವಣ್ಣನಾ

೧೦. ಸುಭಸುತ್ತವಣ್ಣನಾ
೧೧. ಕೇವಟ್ಟಸುತ್ತವಣ್ಣನಾ
೧೨. ಲೋಹಿಚ್ಚಸುತ್ತವಣ್ಣನಾ

೧೨. ಲೋಹಿಚ್ಚಸುತ್ತವಣ್ಣನಾ

ಲೋಹಿಚ್ಚಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣವತ್ಥುವಣ್ಣನಾ

೫೦೧. ಏವಂ ಮೇ ಸುತಂ…ಪೇ॰… ಕೋಸಲೇಸೂತಿ ಲೋಹಿಚ್ಚಸುತ್ತಂ। ತತ್ರಾಯಂ ಅನುತ್ತಾನಪದವಣ್ಣನಾ। ಸಾಲವತಿಕಾತಿ ತಸ್ಸ ಗಾಮಸ್ಸ ನಾಮಂ, ಸೋ ಕಿರ ವತಿಯಾ ವಿಯ ಸಮನ್ತತೋ ಸಾಲಪನ್ತಿಯಾ ಪರಿಕ್ಖಿತ್ತೋ। ತಸ್ಮಾ ಸಾಲವತಿಕಾತಿ ವುಚ್ಚತಿ। ಲೋಹಿಚ್ಚೋತಿ ತಸ್ಸ ಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣಸ್ಸ ನಾಮಂ।

೫೦೨-೫೦೩. ಪಾಪಕನ್ತಿ ಪರಾನುಕಮ್ಪಾ ವಿರಹಿತತ್ತಾ ಲಾಮಕಂ, ನ ಪನ ಉಚ್ಛೇದಸಸ್ಸತಾನಂ ಅಞ್ಞತರಂ। ಉಪ್ಪನ್ನಂ ಹೋತೀತಿ ಜಾತಂ ಹೋತಿ, ನ ಕೇವಲಞ್ಚ ಚಿತ್ತೇ ಜಾತಮತ್ತಮೇವ। ಸೋ ಕಿರ ತಸ್ಸ ವಸೇನ ಪರಿಸಮಜ್ಝೇಪಿ ಏವಂ ಭಾಸತಿಯೇವ। ಕಿಞ್ಹಿ ಪರೋ ಪರಸ್ಸಾತಿ
ಪರೋ ಯೋ ಅನುಸಾಸೀಯತಿ, ಸೋ ತಸ್ಸ ಅನುಸಾಸಕಸ್ಸ ಕಿಂ ಕರಿಸ್ಸತಿ। ಅತ್ತನಾ ಪಟಿಲದ್ಧಂ
ಕುಸಲಂ ಧಮ್ಮಂ ಅತ್ತನಾವ ಸಕ್ಕತ್ವಾ ಗರುಂ ಕತ್ವಾ ವಿಹಾತಬ್ಬನ್ತಿ ವದತಿ।

೫೦೪-೪೦೭. ರೋಸಿಕಂ ನ್ಹಾಪಿತಂ ಆಮನ್ತೇಸೀತಿ
ರೋಸಿಕಾತಿ ಏವಂ ಇತ್ಥಿಲಿಙ್ಗವಸೇನ ಲದ್ಧನಾಮಂ ನ್ಹಾಪಿತಂ ಆಮನ್ತೇಸಿ। ಸೋ ಕಿರ ಭಗವತೋ
ಆಗಮನಂ ಸುತ್ವಾ ಚಿನ್ತೇಸಿ – ‘‘ವಿಹಾರಂ ಗನ್ತ್ವಾ ದಿಟ್ಠಂ ನಾಮಂ ಭಾರೋ, ಗೇಹಂ ಪನ
ಆಣಾಪೇತ್ವಾ ಪಸ್ಸಿಸ್ಸಾಮಿ ಚೇವ ಯಥಾಸತ್ತಿ ಚ ಆಗನ್ತುಕಭಿಕ್ಖಂ ದಸ್ಸಾಮೀ’’ತಿ, ತಸ್ಮಾ
ಏವಂ ನ್ಹಾಪಿತಂ ಆಮನ್ತೇಸಿ।

೫೦೮. ಪಿಟ್ಠಿತೋ ಪಿಟ್ಠಿತೋತಿ ಕಥಾಫಾಸುಕತ್ಥಂ ಪಚ್ಛತೋ ಪಚ್ಛತೋ ಅನುಬನ್ಧೋ ಹೋತಿ। ವಿವೇಚೇತೂತಿ ವಿಮೋಚೇತು, ತಂ ದಿಟ್ಠಿಗತಂ ವಿನೋದೇತೂತಿ ವದತಿ। ಅಯಂ ಕಿರ ಉಪಾಸಕೋ ಲೋಹಿಚ್ಚಸ್ಸ ಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣಸ್ಸ ಪಿಯಸಹಾಯಕೋ। ತಸ್ಮಾ ತಸ್ಸ ಅತ್ಥಕಾಮತಾಯ ಏವಮಾಹ। ಅಪ್ಪೇವ ನಾಮ ಸಿಯಾತಿ ಏತ್ಥ ಪಠಮವಚನೇನ ಭಗವಾ ಗಜ್ಜತಿ, ದುತಿಯವಚನೇನ ಅನುಗಜ್ಜತಿ। ಅಯಂ ಕಿರೇತ್ಥ ಅಧಿಪ್ಪಾಯೋ – ರೋಸಿಕೇ ಏತದತ್ಥಮೇವ ಮಯಾ ಚತ್ತಾರಿ ಅಸಙ್ಖ್ಯೇಯ್ಯಾನಿ। ಕಪ್ಪಸತಸಹಸ್ಸಞ್ಚ ವಿವಿಧಾನಿ ದುಕ್ಕರಾನಿ ಕರೋನ್ತೇನ ಪಾರಮಿಯೋ ಪೂರಿತಾ ,
ಏತದತ್ಥಮೇವ ಸಬ್ಬಞ್ಞುತಞ್ಞಾಣಂ ಪಟಿವಿದ್ಧಂ, ನ ಮೇ ಲೋಹಿಚ್ಚಸ್ಸ ದಿಟ್ಠಿಗತಂ
ಭಿನ್ದಿತುಂ ಭಾರೋತಿ, ಇಮಮತ್ಥಂ ದಸ್ಸೇನ್ತೋ ಪಠಮವಚನೇನ ಭಗವಾ ಗಜ್ಜತಿ। ಕೇವಲಂ ರೋಸಿಕೇ
ಲೋಹಿಚ್ಚಸ್ಸ ಮಮ ಸನ್ತಿಕೇ ಆಗಮನಂ ವಾ ನಿಸಜ್ಜಾ ವಾ ಅಲ್ಲಾಪಸಲ್ಲಾಪೋ ವಾ ಹೋತು, ಸಚೇಪಿ
ಲೋಹಿಚ್ಚಸದಿಸಾನಂ ಸತಸಹಸ್ಸಸ್ಸ ಕಙ್ಖಾ ಹೋತಿ, ಪಟಿಬಲೋ ಅಹಂ ವಿನೋದೇತುಂ ಲೋಹಿಚ್ಚಸ್ಸ ಪನ
ಏಕಸ್ಸ ದಿಟ್ಠಿವಿನೋದನೇ ಮಯ್ಹಂ ಕೋ ಭಾರೋತಿ ಇಮಮತ್ಥಂ ದಸ್ಸೇನ್ತೋ ದುತಿಯವಚನೇನ ಭಗವಾ
ಅನುಗಜ್ಜತೀತಿ ವೇದಿತಬ್ಬೋ।

ಲೋಹಿಚ್ಚಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣಾನುಯೋಗವಣ್ಣನಾ

೫೦೯. ಸಮುದಯಸಞ್ಜಾತೀತಿ ಸಮುದಯಸ್ಸ ಸಞ್ಜಾತಿ ಭೋಗುಪ್ಪಾದೋ, ತತೋ ಉಟ್ಠಿತಂ ಧನಧಞ್ಞನ್ತಿ ಅತ್ಥೋ। ಯೇ ತಂ ಉಪಜೀವನ್ತೀತಿ ಯೇ ಞಾತಿಪರಿಜನದಾಸಕಮ್ಮಕರಾದಯೋ ಜನಾ ತಂ ನಿಸ್ಸಾಯ ಜೀವನ್ತಿ। ಅನ್ತರಾಯಕರೋತಿ ಲಾಭನ್ತರಾಯಕರೋ। ಹಿತಾನುಕಮ್ಪೀತಿ ಏತ್ಥ ಹಿತನ್ತಿ ವುಡ್ಢಿ। ಅನುಕಮ್ಪತೀತಿ ಅನುಕಮ್ಪೀ, ಇಚ್ಛತೀತಿ ಅತ್ಥೋ, ವುಡ್ಢಿಂ ಇಚ್ಛತಿ ವಾ ನೋ ವಾತಿ ವುತ್ತಂ ಹೋತಿ। ನಿರಯಂ ವಾ ತಿರಚ್ಛಾನಯೋನಿಂ ವಾತಿ ಸಚೇ ಸಾ ಮಿಚ್ಛಾದಿಟ್ಠಿ ಸಮ್ಪಜ್ಜತಿ, ನಿಯತಾ ಹೋತಿ, ಏಕಂಸೇನ ನಿರಯೇ ನಿಬ್ಬತ್ತತಿ, ನೋ ಚೇ, ತಿರಚ್ಛಾನಯೋನಿಯಂ ನಿಬ್ಬತ್ತತೀತಿ ಅತ್ಥೋ।

೫೧೦-೫೧೨.
ಇದಾನಿ ಯಸ್ಮಾ ಯಥಾ ಅತ್ತನೋ ಲಾಭನ್ತರಾಯೇನ ಸತ್ತಾ ಸಂವಿಜ್ಜನ್ತಿ ನ ತಥಾ ಪರೇಸಂ, ತಸ್ಮಾ
ಸುಟ್ಠುತರಂ ಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣಂ ಪವೇಚೇತುಕಾಮೋ ‘‘ತಂ ಕಿಂ ಮಞ್ಞಸೀ’’ತಿ ದುತಿಯಂ ಉಪಪತ್ತಿಮಾಹ। ಯೇ ಚಿಮೇತಿ ಯೇ ಚ ಇಮೇ ತಥಾಗತಸ್ಸ ಧಮ್ಮದೇಸನಂ ಸುತ್ವಾ ಅರಿಯಭೂಮಿಂ ಓಕ್ಕಮಿತುಂ ಅಸಕ್ಕೋನ್ತಾ ಕುಲಪುತ್ತಾ ದಿಬ್ಬಾ ಗಬ್ಭಾತಿ ಉಪಯೋಗತ್ಥೇ ಪಚ್ಚತ್ತವಚನಂ, ದಿಬ್ಬೇ ಗಬ್ಭೇತಿ ಅತ್ಥೋ। ದಿಬ್ಬಾ, ಗಬ್ಭಾತಿ ಚ ಛನ್ನಂ ದೇವಲೋಕಾನಮೇತಂ ಅಧಿವಚನಂ। ಪರಿಪಾಚೇನ್ತೀತಿ
ದೇವಲೋಕಗಾಮಿನಿಂ ಪಟಿಪದಂ ಪೂರಯಮಾನಾ ದಾನಂ, ದದಮಾನಾ, ಸೀಲಂ ರಕ್ಖಮಾನಾ,
ಗನ್ಧಮಾಲಾದೀಹಿ, ಪೂಜಂ ಕುರುಮಾನಾ ಭಾವನಂ ಭಾವಯಮಾನಾ ಪಾಚೇನ್ತಿ ವಿಪಾಚೇನ್ತಿ
ಪರಿಪಾಚೇನ್ತಿ ಪರಿಣಾಮಂ ಗಮೇನ್ತಿ। ದಿಬ್ಬಾನಂ ಭವಾನಂ ಅಭಿನಿಬ್ಬತ್ತಿಯಾತಿ ದಿಬ್ಬಭವಾ ನಾಮ ದೇವಾನಂ ವಿಮಾನಾನಿ , ತೇಸಂ ನಿಬ್ಬತ್ತನತ್ಥಾಯಾತಿ ಅತ್ಥೋ। ಅಥ ವಾ ದಿಬ್ಬಾ ಗಬ್ಭಾತಿ ದಾನಾದಯೋ ಪುಞ್ಞವಿಸೇಸಾ। ದಿಬ್ಬಾ ಭವಾತಿ ದೇವಲೋಕೇ ವಿಪಾಕಕ್ಖನ್ಧಾ, ತೇಸಂ ನಿಬ್ಬತ್ತನತ್ಥಾಯ ತಾನಿ ಪುಞ್ಞಾನಿ ಕರೋನ್ತೀತಿ ಅತ್ಥೋ। ತೇಸಂ ಅನ್ತರಾಯಕರೋತಿ ತೇಸಂ ಮಗ್ಗಸಮ್ಪತ್ತಿಫಲಸಮ್ಪತ್ತಿದಿಬ್ಬಭವವಿಸೇಸಾನಂ ಅನ್ತರಾಯಕರೋ। ಇತಿ ಭಗವಾ ಏತ್ತಾವತಾ ಅನಿಯಮಿತೇನೇವ ಓಪಮ್ಮವಿಧಿನಾ ಯಾವ ಭವಗ್ಗಾ ಉಗ್ಗತಂ ಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣಸ್ಸ ಮಾನಂ ಭಿನ್ದಿತ್ವಾ ಇದಾನಿ ಚೋದನಾರಹೇ ತಯೋ ಸತ್ಥಾರೇ ದಸ್ಸೇತುಂ ‘‘ತಯೋ ಖೋ ಮೇ, ಲೋಹಿಚ್ಚಾ’’ತಿಆದಿಮಾಹ।

ತಯೋ ಚೋದನಾರಹವಣ್ಣನಾ

೫೧೩. ತತ್ಥ ಸಾ ಚೋದನಾತಿ ತಯೋ ಸತ್ಥಾರೇ ಚೋದೇನ್ತಸ್ಸ ಚೋದನಾ। ನ ಅಞ್ಞಾ ಚಿತ್ತಂ ಉಪಟ್ಠಪೇನ್ತೀತಿ ಅಞ್ಞಾಯ ಆಜಾನನತ್ಥಾಯ ಚಿತ್ತಂ ನ ಉಪಟ್ಠಪೇನ್ತಿ। ವೋಕ್ಕಮ್ಮಾತಿ ನಿರನ್ತರಂ ತಸ್ಸ ಸಾಸನಂ ಅಕತ್ವಾ ತತೋ ಉಕ್ಕಮಿತ್ವಾ ವತ್ತನ್ತೀತಿ ಅತ್ಥೋ। ಓಸಕ್ಕನ್ತಿಯಾ ವಾ ಉಸ್ಸಕ್ಕೇಯ್ಯಾತಿ ಪಟಿಕ್ಕಮನ್ತಿಯಾ ಉಪಗಚ್ಛೇಯ್ಯ, ಅನಿಚ್ಛನ್ತಿಯಾ ಇಚ್ಛೇಯ್ಯ, ಏಕಾಯ ಸಮ್ಪಯೋಗಂ ಅನಿಚ್ಛನ್ತಿಯಾ ಏಕೋ ಇಚ್ಛೇಯ್ಯಾತಿ ವುತ್ತಂ ಹೋತಿ। ಪರಮ್ಮುಖಿಂ ವಾ ಆಲಿಙ್ಗೇಯ್ಯಾತಿ ದಟ್ಠುಮ್ಪಿ ಅನಿಚ್ಛಮಾನಂ ಪರಮ್ಮುಖಿಂ ಠಿತಂ ಪಚ್ಛತೋ ಗನ್ತ್ವಾ ಆಲಿಙ್ಗೇಯ್ಯ। ಏವಂಸಮ್ಪದಮಿದನ್ತಿ
ಇಮಸ್ಸಾಪಿ ಸತ್ಥುನೋ ‘‘ಮಮ ಇಮೇ ಸಾವಕಾ’’ತಿ ಸಾಸನಾ ವೋಕ್ಕಮ್ಮ ವತ್ತಮಾನೇಪಿ ತೇ ಲೋಭೇನ
ಅನುಸಾಸತೋ ಇಮಂ ಲೋಭಧಮ್ಮಂ ಏವಂಸಮ್ಪದಮೇವ ಈದಿಸಮೇವ ವದಾಮಿ। ಇತಿ ಸೋ ಏವರೂಪೋ ತವ
ಲೋಭಧಮ್ಮೋ ಯೇನ ತ್ವಂ ಓಸಕ್ಕನ್ತಿಯಾ ಉಸ್ಸಕ್ಕನ್ತೋ ವಿಯ ಪರಮ್ಮುಖಿಂ ಆಲಿಙ್ಗನ್ತೋ ವಿಯ
ಅಹೋಸೀತಿಪಿ ತಂ ಚೋದನಂ ಅರಹತಿ। ಕಿಞ್ಹಿ ಪರೋ ಪರಸ್ಸ ಕರಿಸ್ಸತೀತಿ ಯೇನ ಧಮ್ಮೇನ ಪರೇ ಅನುಸಾಸಿ, ಅತ್ತಾನಮೇವ ತಾವ ತತ್ಥ ಸಮ್ಪಾದೇಹಿ, ಉಜುಂ ಕರೋಹಿ। ಕಿಞ್ಹಿ ಪರೋ ಪರಸ್ಸ ಕರಿಸ್ಸತೀತಿ ಚೋದನಂ ಅರಹತಿ।

೫೧೪. ನಿದ್ದಾಯಿತಬ್ಬನ್ತಿ ಸಸ್ಸರೂಪಕಾನಿ ತಿಣಾನಿ ಉಪ್ಪಾಟೇತ್ವಾ ಪರಿಸುದ್ಧಂ ಕಾತಬ್ಬಂ।

೫೧೫. ತತಿಯಚೋದನಾಯ ಕಿಞ್ಹಿ ಪರೋ ಪರಸ್ಸಾತಿ ಅನುಸಾಸನಂ ಅಸಮ್ಪಟಿಚ್ಛನಕಾಲತೋ ಪಟ್ಠಾಯ ಪರೋ ಅನುಸಾಸಿತಬ್ಬೋ, ಪರಸ್ಸ
ಅನುಸಾಸಕಸ್ಸ ಕಿಂ ಕರಿಸ್ಸತೀತಿ ನನು ತತ್ಥ ಅಪ್ಪೋಸ್ಸುಕ್ಕತಂ ಆಪಜ್ಜಿತ್ವಾ ಅತ್ತನಾ
ಪಟಿವಿದ್ಧಧಮ್ಮಂ ಅತ್ತನಾವ ಮಾನೇತ್ವಾ ಪೂಜೇತ್ವಾ ವಿಹಾತಬ್ಬನ್ತಿ ಏವಂ ಚೋದನಂ ಅರಹತೀತಿ
ಅತ್ಥೋ।

ನ ಚೋದನಾರಹಸತ್ಥುವಣ್ಣನಾ

೫೧೬. ಚೋದನಾರಹೋತಿ
ಅಯಞ್ಹಿ ಯಸ್ಮಾ ಪಠಮಮೇವ ಅತ್ತಾನಂ ಪತಿರೂಪೇ ಪತಿಟ್ಠಾಪೇತ್ವಾ ಸಾವಕಾನಂ ಧಮ್ಮಂ ದೇಸೇತಿ।
ಸಾವಕಾ ಚಸ್ಸ ಅಸ್ಸವಾ ಹುತ್ವಾ ಯಥಾನುಸಿಟ್ಠಂ ಪಟಿಪಜ್ಜನ್ತಿ, ತಾಯ ಚ ಪಟಿಪತ್ತಿಯಾ
ಮಹನ್ತಂ ವಿಸೇಸಮಧಿಗಚ್ಛನ್ತಿ। ತಸ್ಮಾ ನ ಚೋದನಾರಹೋತಿ।

೫೧೭. ನರಕಪಪಾತಂ ಪಪತನ್ತೋತಿ ಮಯಾ ಗಹಿತಾಯ ದಿಟ್ಠಿಯಾ ಅಹಂ ನರಕಪಪಾತಂ ಪಪತನ್ತೋ। ಉದ್ಧರಿತ್ವಾ ಥಲೇ ಪತಿಟ್ಠಾಪಿತೋತಿ ತಂ ದಿಟ್ಠಿಂ ಭಿನ್ದಿತ್ವಾ ಧಮ್ಮದೇಸನಾಹತ್ಥೇನ ಅಪಾಯಪತನತೋ ಉದ್ಧರಿತ್ವಾ ಸಗ್ಗಮಗ್ಗಥಲೇ ಠಪಿತೋಮ್ಹೀತಿ ವದತಿ। ಸೇಸಮೇತ್ಥ ಉತ್ತಾನಮೇವಾತಿ।

ಇತಿ ಸುಮಙ್ಗಲವಿಲಾಸಿನಿಯಾ ದೀಘನಿಕಾಯಟ್ಠಕಥಾಯಂ

ಲೋಹಿಚ್ಚಸುತ್ತವಣ್ಣನಾ ನಿಟ್ಠಿತಾ।


೮. ಮಹಾಸೀಹನಾದಸುತ್ತವಣ್ಣನಾ
೯. ಪೋಟ್ಠಪಾದಸುತ್ತವಣ್ಣನಾ

೧೦. ಸುಭಸುತ್ತವಣ್ಣನಾ
೧೧. ಕೇವಟ್ಟಸುತ್ತವಣ್ಣನಾ
೧೨. ಲೋಹಿಚ್ಚಸುತ್ತವಣ್ಣನಾ
೧೩. ತೇವಿಜ್ಜಸುತ್ತವಣ್ಣನಾ

೧೩. ತೇವಿಜ್ಜಸುತ್ತವಣ್ಣನಾ

೫೧೮. ಏವಂ ಮೇ ಸುತಂ…ಪೇ॰… ಕೋಸಲೇಸೂತಿ ತೇವಿಜ್ಜಸುತ್ತಂ। ತತ್ರಾಯಂ ಅನುತ್ತಾನಪದವಣ್ಣನಾ। ಮನಸಾಕಟನ್ತಿ ತಸ್ಸ ಗಾಮಸ್ಸ ನಾಮಂ। ಉತ್ತರೇನ ಮನಸಾಕಟಸ್ಸಾತಿ ಮನಸಾಕಟತೋ ಅವಿದೂರೇ ಉತ್ತರಪಸ್ಸೇ। ಅಮ್ಬವನೇತಿ
ತರುಣಅಮ್ಬರುಕ್ಖಸಣ್ಡೇ, ರಮಣೀಯೋ ಕಿರ ಸೋ ಭೂಮಿಭಾಗೋ, ಹೇಟ್ಠಾ ರಜತಪಟ್ಟಸದಿಸಾ ವಾಲಿಕಾ
ವಿಪ್ಪಕಿಣ್ಣಾ, ಉಪರಿ ಮಣಿವಿತಾನಂ ವಿಯ ಘನಸಾಖಾಪತ್ತಂ ಅಮ್ಬವನಂ। ತಸ್ಮಿಂ ಬುದ್ಧಾನಂ
ಅನುಚ್ಛವಿಕೇ ಪವಿವೇಕಸುಖೇ ಅಮ್ಬವನೇ ವಿಹರತೀತಿ ಅತ್ಥೋ।

೫೧೯. ಅಭಿಞ್ಞಾತಾ ಅಭಿಞ್ಞಾತಾತಿ ಕುಲಚಾರಿತ್ತಾದಿಸಮ್ಪತ್ತಿಯಾ ತತ್ಥ ತತ್ಥ ಪಞ್ಞಾತಾ। ಚಙ್ಕೀತಿಆದೀನಿ ತೇಸಂ ನಾಮಾನಿ। ತತ್ಥ ಚಙ್ಕೀ ಓಪಾಸಾದವಾಸಿಕೋ। ತಾರುಕ್ಖೋ ಇಚ್ಛಾನಙ್ಗಲವಾಸಿಕೋ। ಪೋಕ್ಖರಸಾತೀ ಉಕ್ಕಟ್ಠವಾಸಿಕೋ। ಜಾಣುಸೋಣೀ ಸಾವತ್ಥಿವಾಸಿಕೋ। ತೋದೇಯ್ಯೋ ತುದಿಗಾಮವಾಸಿಕೋ। ಅಞ್ಞೇ ಚಾತಿ
ಅಞ್ಞೇ ಚ ಬಹುಜನಾ। ಅತ್ತನೋ ಅತ್ತನೋ ನಿವಾಸಟ್ಠಾನೇಹಿ ಆಗನ್ತ್ವಾ ಮನ್ತಸಜ್ಝಾಯಕರಣತ್ಥಂ
ತತ್ಥ ಪಟಿವಸನ್ತಿ। ಮನಸಾಕಟಸ್ಸ ಕಿರ ರಮಣೀಯತಾಯ ತೇ ಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣಾ ತತ್ಥ ನದೀತೀರೇ ಗೇಹಾನಿ
ಕಾರೇತ್ವಾ ಪರಿಕ್ಖಿಪಾಪೇತ್ವಾ ಅಞ್ಞೇಸಂ ಬಹೂನಂ ಪವೇಸನಂ ನಿವಾರೇತ್ವಾ ಅನ್ತರನ್ತರಾ ತತ್ಥ
ಗನ್ತ್ವಾ ವಸನ್ತಿ।

೫೨೦-೫೨೧. ವಾಸೇಟ್ಠಭಾರದ್ವಾಜಾನನ್ತಿ ವಾಸೇಟ್ಠಸ್ಸ ಚ ಪೋಕ್ಖರಸಾತಿನೋ ಅನ್ತೇವಾಸಿಕಸ್ಸ, ಭಾರದ್ವಾಜಸ್ಸ ಚ ತಾರುಕ್ಖನ್ತೇವಾಸಿಕಸ್ಸ। ಏತೇ ಕಿರ ದ್ವೇ ಜಾತಿಸಮ್ಪನ್ನಾ ತಿಣ್ಣಂ ವೇದಾನಂ ಪಾರಗೂ ಅಹೇಸುಂ। ಜಙ್ಘವಿಹಾರನ್ತಿ
ಅತಿಚಿರನಿಸಜ್ಜಪಚ್ಚಯಾ ಕಿಲಮಥವಿನೋದನತ್ಥಾಯ ಜಙ್ಘಚಾರಂ। ತೇ ಕಿರ ದಿವಸಂ ಸಜ್ಝಾಯಂ
ಕತ್ವಾ ಸಾಯನ್ಹೇ ವುಟ್ಠಾಯ ನ್ಹಾನೀಯಸಮ್ಭಾರಗನ್ಧಮಾಲತೇಲಧೋತವತ್ಥಾನಿ ಗಾಹಾಪೇತ್ವಾ
ಅತ್ತನೋ ಪರಿಜನಪರಿವುತಾ ನ್ಹಾಯಿತುಕಾಮಾ ನದೀತೀರಂ ಗನ್ತ್ವಾ
ರಜತಪಟ್ಟವಣ್ಣೇ ವಾಲಿಕಾಸಣ್ಡೇ ಅಪರಾಪರಂ ಚಙ್ಕಮಿಂಸು। ಏಕಂ ಚಙ್ಕಮನ್ತಂ ಇತರೋ
ಅನುಚಙ್ಕಮಿ, ಪುನ ಇತರಂ ಇತರೋತಿ। ತೇನ ವುತ್ತಂ ‘‘ಅನುಚಙ್ಕಮನ್ತಾನಂ
ಅನುವಿಚರನ್ತಾನ’’ನ್ತಿ। ಮಗ್ಗಾಮಗ್ಗೇತಿ ಮಗ್ಗೇ ಚ ಅಮಗ್ಗೇ
ಚ। ಕತಮಂ ನು ಖೋ ಪಟಿಪದಂ ಪೂರೇತ್ವಾ ಕತಮೇನ ಮಗ್ಗೇನ ಸಕ್ಕಾ ಸುಖಂ ಬ್ರಹ್ಮಲೋಕಂ
ಗನ್ತುನ್ತಿ ಏವಂ ಮಗ್ಗಾಮಗ್ಗಂ ಆರಬ್ಭ ಕಥಂ ಸಮುಟ್ಠಾಪೇಸುನ್ತಿ ಅತ್ಥೋ। ಅಞ್ಜಸಾಯನೋತಿ ಉಜುಮಗ್ಗಸ್ಸೇತಂ ವೇವಚನಂ, ಅಞ್ಜಸಾ ವಾ ಉಜುಕಮೇವ ಏತೇನ ಆಯನ್ತಿ ಆಗಚ್ಛನ್ತೀತಿ ಅಞ್ಜಸಾಯನೋ ನಿಯ್ಯಾನಿಕೋ ನಿಯ್ಯಾತೀತಿ ನಿಯ್ಯಾಯನ್ತೋ ನಿಯ್ಯಾತಿ, ಗಚ್ಛನ್ತೋ ಗಚ್ಛತೀತಿ ಅತ್ಥೋ।

ತಕ್ಕರಸ್ಸ ಬ್ರಹ್ಮಸಹಬ್ಯತಾಯಾತಿ ಯೋ ತಂ ಮಗ್ಗಂ ಕರೋತಿ ಪಟಿಪಜ್ಜತಿ, ತಸ್ಸ ಬ್ರಹ್ಮುನಾ ಸದ್ಧಿಂ ಸಹಭಾವಾಯ, ಏಕಟ್ಠಾನೇ ಪಾತುಭಾವಾಯ ಗಚ್ಛತೀತಿ ಅತ್ಥೋ। ಯ್ವಾಯನ್ತಿ ಯೋ ಅಯಂ। ಅಕ್ಖಾತೋತಿ ಕಥಿತೋ ದೀಪಿತೋ। ಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣೇನ ಪೋಕ್ಖರಸಾತಿನಾತಿ ಅತ್ತನೋ ಆಚರಿಯಂ ಅಪದಿಸತಿ। ಇತಿ ವಾಸೇಟ್ಠೋ ಸಕಮೇವ ಆಚರಿಯವಾದಂ ಥೋಮೇತ್ವಾ ಪಗ್ಗಣ್ಹಿತ್ವಾ ವಿಚರತಿ। ಭಾರದ್ವಾಜೋಪಿ ಸಕಮೇವಾತಿ। ತೇನ ವುತ್ತಂ ‘‘ನೇವ ಖೋ ಅಸಕ್ಖಿ ವಾಸೇಟ್ಠೋ’’ತಿಆದಿ।

ತತೋ ವಾಸೇಟ್ಠೋ ‘‘ಉಭಿನ್ನಮ್ಪಿ ಅಮ್ಹಾಕಂ ಕಥಾ ಅನಿಯ್ಯಾನಿಕಾವ,
ಇಮಸ್ಮಿಞ್ಚ ಲೋಕೇ ಮಗ್ಗಕುಸಲೋ ನಾಮ ಭೋತಾ ಗೋತಮೇನ ಸದಿಸೋ ನತ್ಥಿ, ಭವಞ್ಚ ಗೋತಮೋ
ಅವಿದೂರೇ ವಸತಿ, ಸೋ ನೋ ತುಲಂ ಗಹೇತ್ವಾ ನಿಸಿನ್ನವಾಣಿಜೋ ವಿಯ ಕಙ್ಖಂ ಛಿನ್ದಿಸ್ಸತೀ’’ತಿ
ಚಿನ್ತೇತ್ವಾ ತಮತ್ಥಂ ಭಾರದ್ವಾಜಸ್ಸ ಆರೋಚೇತ್ವಾ ಉಭೋಪಿ ಗನ್ತ್ವಾ ಅತ್ತನೋ ಕಥಂ ಭಗವತೋ
ಆರೋಚೇಸುಂ। ತೇನ ವುತ್ತಂ ‘‘ಅಥ ಖೋ ವಾಸೇಟ್ಠೋ…ಪೇ॰… ಯ್ವಾಯಂ ಅಕ್ಖಾತೋ ಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣೇನ
ತಾರುಕ್ಖೇನಾ’’ತಿ।

೫೨೨. ಏತ್ಥ ಭೋ ಗೋತಮಾತಿ ಏತಸ್ಮಿಂ ಮಗ್ಗಾಮಗ್ಗೇ। ವಿಗ್ಗಹೋ ವಿವಾದೋತಿಆದೀಸು ಪುಬ್ಬುಪ್ಪತ್ತಿಕೋ ವಿಗ್ಗಹೋ। ಅಪರಭಾಗೇ ವಿವಾದೋ। ದುವಿಧೋಪಿ ಏಸೋ ನಾನಾಆಚರಿಯಾನಂ ವಾದತೋ ನಾನಾವಾದೋ।

೫೨೩. ಅಥ ಕಿಸ್ಮಿಂ ಪನ ವೋತಿ
ತ್ವಮ್ಪಿ ಅಯಮೇವ ಮಗ್ಗೋತಿ ಅತ್ತನೋ ಆಚರಿಯವಾದಮೇವ ಪಗ್ಗಯ್ಹ ತಿಟ್ಠಸಿ, ಭಾರದ್ವಾಜೋಪಿ
ಅತ್ತನೋ ಆಚರಿಯವಾದಮೇವ, ಏಕಸ್ಸಾಪಿ ಏಕಸ್ಮಿಂ ಸಂಸಯೋ ನತ್ಥಿ। ಏವಂ ಸತಿ ಕಿಸ್ಮಿಂ ವೋ
ವಿಗ್ಗಹೋತಿ ಪುಚ್ಛತಿ।

೫೨೪. ಮಗ್ಗಾಮಗ್ಗೇ , ಭೋ ಗೋತಮಾತಿ
ಮಗ್ಗೇ ಭೋ ಗೋತಮ ಅಮಗ್ಗೇ ಚ, ಉಜುಮಗ್ಗೇ ಚ ಅನುಜುಮಗ್ಗೇ ಚಾತಿ ಅತ್ಥೋ। ಏಸ ಕಿರ
ಏಕಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣಸ್ಸಾಪಿ ಮಗ್ಗಂ ‘‘ನ ಮಗ್ಗೋ’’ತಿ ನ ವದತಿ। ಯಥಾ ಪನ ಅತ್ತನೋ ಆಚರಿಯಸ್ಸ
ಮಗ್ಗೋ ಉಜುಮಗ್ಗೋ, ನ ಏವಂ ಅಞ್ಞೇಸಂ ಅನುಜಾನಾತಿ, ತಸ್ಮಾ ತಮೇವತ್ಥಂ ದೀಪೇನ್ತೋ ‘‘ಕಿಞ್ಚಾಪಿ ಭೋ ಗೋತಮಾ’’ತಿಆದಿಮಾಹ।

ಸಬ್ಬಾನಿ ತಾನೀತಿ ಲಿಙ್ಗವಿಪಲ್ಲಾಸೇನ ವದತಿ, ಸಬ್ಬೇ ತೇತಿ ವುತ್ತಂ ಹೋತಿ। ಬಹೂನೀತಿ ಅಟ್ಠ ವಾ ದಸ ವಾ। ನಾನಾಮಗ್ಗಾನೀತಿ ಮಹನ್ತಾಮಹನ್ತಜಙ್ಘಮಗ್ಗಸಕಟಮಗ್ಗಾದಿವಸೇನ ನಾನಾವಿಧಾನಿ ಸಾಮನ್ತಾ ಗಾಮನದೀತಳಾಕಖೇತ್ತಾದೀಹಿ ಆಗನ್ತ್ವಾ ಗಾಮಂ ಪವಿಸನಮಗ್ಗಾನಿ।

೫೨೫-೫೨೬. ‘‘ನಿಯ್ಯನ್ತೀತಿ
ವಾಸೇಟ್ಠ ವದೇಸೀ’’ತಿ ಭಗವಾ ತಿಕ್ಖತ್ತುಂ ವಚೀಭೇದಂ ಕತ್ವಾ ಪಟಿಞ್ಞಂ ಕಾರಾಪೇಸಿ।
ಕಸ್ಮಾ? ತಿತ್ಥಿಯಾ ಹಿ ಪಟಿಜಾನಿತ್ವಾ ಪಚ್ಛಾ ನಿಗ್ಗಯ್ಹಮಾನಾ ಅವಜಾನನ್ತಿ। ಸೋ ತಥಾ
ಕಾತುಂ ನ ಸಕ್ಖಿಸ್ಸತೀತಿ।

೫೨೭-೫೨೯. ತೇವ ತೇವಿಜ್ಜಾತಿ ತೇ ತೇವಿಜ್ಜಾ। ವಕಾರೋ ಆಗಮಸನ್ಧಿಮತ್ತಂ। ಅನ್ಧವೇಣೀತಿ
ಅನ್ಧಪವೇಣೀ, ಏಕೇನ ಚಕ್ಖುಮತಾ ಗಹಿತಯಟ್ಠಿಯಾ ಕೋಟಿಂ ಏಕೋ ಅನ್ಧೋ ಗಣ್ಹತಿ, ತಂ ಅನ್ಧಂ
ಅಞ್ಞೋ ತಂ ಅಞ್ಞೋತಿ ಏವಂ ಪಣ್ಣಾಸಸಟ್ಠಿ ಅನ್ಧಾ ಪಟಿಪಾಟಿಯಾ ಘಟಿತಾ ಅನ್ಧವೇಣೀತಿ
ವುಚ್ಚತಿ। ಪರಮ್ಪರಸಂಸತ್ತಾತಿ ಅಞ್ಞಮಞ್ಞಂ ಲಗ್ಗಾ,
ಯಟ್ಠಿಗಾಹಕೇನಪಿ ಚಕ್ಖುಮತಾ ವಿರಹಿತಾತಿ ಅತ್ಥೋ। ಏಕೋ ಕಿರ ಧುತ್ತೋ ಅನ್ಧಗಣಂ ದಿಸ್ವಾ
‘‘ಅಸುಕಸ್ಮಿಂ ನಾಮ ಗಾಮೇ ಖಜ್ಜಭೋಜ್ಜಂ ಸುಲಭ’’ನ್ತಿ ಉಸ್ಸಾಹೇತ್ವಾ ‘‘ತೇನ ಹಿ ತತ್ಥ ನೋ
ಸಾಮಿ ನೇಹಿ, ಇದಂ ನಾಮ ತೇ ದೇಮಾ’’ತಿ ವುತ್ತೇ, ಲಞ್ಜಂ ಗಹೇತ್ವಾ ಅನ್ತರಾಮಗ್ಗೇ ಮಗ್ಗಾ
ಓಕ್ಕಮ್ಮ ಮಹನ್ತಂ ಗಚ್ಛಂ ಅನುಪರಿಗನ್ತ್ವಾ ಪುರಿಮಸ್ಸ ಹತ್ಥೇನ ಪಚ್ಛಿಮಸ್ಸ ಕಚ್ಛಂ
ಗಣ್ಹಾಪೇತ್ವಾ ‘‘ಕಿಞ್ಚಿ ಕಮ್ಮಂ ಅತ್ಥಿ, ಗಚ್ಛಥ ತಾವ ತುಮ್ಹೇ’’ತಿ ವತ್ವಾ ಪಲಾಯಿ, ತೇ
ದಿವಸಮ್ಪಿ ಗನ್ತ್ವಾ ಮಗ್ಗಂ ಅವಿನ್ದಮಾನಾ ‘‘ಕುಹಿಂ ನೋ ಚಕ್ಖುಮಾ, ಕುಹಿಂ ಮಗ್ಗೋ’’ತಿ
ಪರಿದೇವಿತ್ವಾ ಮಗ್ಗಂ ಅವಿನ್ದಮಾನಾ ತತ್ಥೇವ ಮರಿಂಸು। ತೇ ಸನ್ಧಾಯ ವುತ್ತಂ
‘‘ಪರಮ್ಪರಸಂಸತ್ತಾ’’ತಿ। ಪುರಿಮೋಪೀತಿ ಪುರಿಮೇಸು ದಸಸು ಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣೇಸು ಏಕೋಪಿ। ಮಜ್ಝಿಮೋಪೀತಿ ಮಜ್ಝಿಮೇಸು ಆಚರಿಯಪಾಚರಿಯೇಸು ಏಕೋಪಿ। ಪಚ್ಛಿಮೋಪೀತಿ ಇದಾನಿ ತೇವಿಜ್ಜೇಸು ಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣೇಸು ಏಕೋಪಿ। ಹಸ್ಸಕಞ್ಞೇವಾತಿ ಹಸಿತಬ್ಬಮೇವ। ನಾಮಕಞ್ಞೇವಾತಿ ಲಾಮಕಂಯೇವ। ತದೇತಂ ಅತ್ಥಾಭಾವೇನ ರಿತ್ತಕಂ, ರಿತ್ತಕತ್ತಾಯೇವ ತುಚ್ಛಕಂ।
ಇದಾನಿ ಬ್ರಹ್ಮಲೋಕೋ ತಾವ ತಿಟ್ಠತು, ಯೋ ತೇವಿಜ್ಜೇಹಿ ನ ದಿಟ್ಠಪುಬ್ಬೋವ। ಯೇಪಿ
ಚನ್ದಿಮಸೂರಿಯೇ ತೇವಿಜ್ಜಾ ಪಸ್ಸನ್ತಿ, ತೇಸಮ್ಪಿ ಸಹಬ್ಯತಾಯ ಮಗ್ಗಂ ದೇಸೇತುಂ
ನಪ್ಪಹೋನ್ತೀತಿ ದಸ್ಸನತ್ಥಂ ‘‘ತಂ ಕಿಂ ಮಞ್ಞಸೀ’’ತಿಆದಿಮಾಹ।

೫೩೦. ತತ್ಥ ಯತೋ ಚನ್ದಿಮಸೂರಿಯಾ ಉಗ್ಗಚ್ಛನ್ತೀತಿ ಯಸ್ಮಿಂ ಕಾಲೇ ಉಗ್ಗಚ್ಛನ್ತಿ। ಯತ್ಥ ಚ ಓಗ್ಗಚ್ಛನ್ತೀತಿ ಯಸ್ಮಿಂ ಕಾಲೇ ಅತ್ಥಮೇನ್ತಿ, ಉಗ್ಗಮನಕಾಲೇ ಚ ಅತ್ಥಙ್ಗಮನಕಾಲೇ ಚ ಪಸ್ಸನ್ತೀತಿ ಅತ್ಥೋ। ಆಯಾಚನ್ತೀತಿ ‘‘ಉದೇಹಿ ಭವಂ ಚನ್ದ, ಉದೇಹಿ ಭವಂ ಸೂರಿಯಾ’’ತಿ ಏವಂ ಆಯಾಚನ್ತಿ। ಥೋಮಯನ್ತೀತಿ ‘‘ಸೋಮ್ಮೋ ಚನ್ದೋ, ಪರಿಮಣ್ಡಲೋ ಚನ್ದೋ, ಸಪ್ಪಭೋ ಚನ್ದೋ’’ತಿಆದೀನಿ ವದನ್ತಾ ಪಸಂಸನ್ತಿ। ಪಞ್ಜಲಿಕಾತಿ ಪಗ್ಗಹಿತಅಞ್ಜಲಿಕಾ। ನಮಸ್ಸಮಾನಾತಿ ‘‘ನಮೋ ನಮೋ’’ತಿ ವದಮಾನಾ।

೫೩೧-೫೩೨. ಯಂ ಪಸ್ಸನ್ತೀತಿ ಏತ್ಥ ನ್ತಿ ನಿಪಾತಮತ್ತಂ। ಕಿಂ ಪನ ನ ಕಿರಾತಿ ಏತ್ಥ ಇಧ ಪನ ಕಿಂ ವತ್ತಬ್ಬಂ। ಯತ್ಥ ಕಿರ ತೇವಿಜ್ಜೇಹಿ ಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣೇಹಿ ನ ಬ್ರಹ್ಮಾ ಸಕ್ಖಿದಿಟ್ಠೋತಿ ಏವಮತ್ಥೋ ದಟ್ಠಬ್ಬೋ।

ಅಚಿರವತೀನದೀಉಪಮಾಕಥಾ

೫೪೨. ಸಮತಿತ್ತಿಕಾತಿ ಸಮಭರಿತಾ। ಕಾಕಪೇಯ್ಯಾತಿ ಯತ್ಥ ಕತ್ಥಚಿ ತೀರೇ ಠಿತೇನ ಕಾಕೇನ ಸಕ್ಕಾ ಪಾತುನ್ತಿ ಕಾಕಪೇಯ್ಯಾ। ಪಾರಂ ತರಿತುಕಾಮೋತಿ ನದಿಂ ಅತಿಕ್ಕಮಿತ್ವಾ ಪರತೀರಂ ಗನ್ತುಕಾಮೋ। ಅವ್ಹೇಯ್ಯಾತಿ ಪಕ್ಕೋಸೇಯ್ಯ। ಏಹಿ ಪಾರಾಪಾರನ್ತಿ ಅಮ್ಭೋ ಪಾರ ಅಪಾರಂ ಏಹಿ, ಅಥ ಮಂ ಸಹಸಾವ ಗಹೇತ್ವಾ ಗಮಿಸ್ಸಸಿ, ಅತ್ಥಿ ಮೇ ಅಚ್ಚಾಯಿಕಕಮ್ಮನ್ತಿ ಅತ್ಥೋ।

೫೪೪. ಯೇ ಧಮ್ಮಾ ಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣಕಾರಕಾತಿ ಏತ್ಥ ಪಞ್ಚಸೀಲದಸಕುಸಲಕಮ್ಮಪಥಭೇದಾ ಧಮ್ಮಾ ಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣಕಾರಕಾತಿ ವೇದಿತಬ್ಬಾ , ತಬ್ಬಿಪರೀತಾ ಅಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣಕಾರಕಾ। ಇನ್ದಮವ್ಹಾಯಾಮಾತಿ
ಇನ್ದಂ ಅವ್ಹಾಯಾಮ ಪಕ್ಕೋಸಾಮ। ಏವಂ ಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣಾನಂ ಅವ್ಹಾಯನಸ್ಸ ನಿರತ್ಥಕತಂ ದಸ್ಸೇತ್ವಾ
ಪುನಪಿ ಭಗವಾ ಅಣ್ಣವಕುಚ್ಛಿಯಂ ಸೂರಿಯೋ ವಿಯ ಜಲಮಾನೋ ಪಞ್ಚಸತಭಿಕ್ಖುಪರಿವುತೋ
ಅಚಿರವತಿಯಾ ತೀರೇ ನಿಸಿನ್ನೋ ಅಪರಮ್ಪಿ ನದೀಉಪಮಂಯೇವ ಆಹರನ್ತೋ
‘‘ಸೇಯ್ಯಥಾಪೀ’’ತಿಆದಿಮಾಹ।

೫೪೬. ಕಾಮಗುಣಾತಿ
ಕಾಮಯಿತಬ್ಬಟ್ಠೇನ ಕಾಮಾ, ಬನ್ಧನಟ್ಠೇನ ಗುಣಾ। ‘‘ಅನುಜಾನಾಮಿ ಭಿಕ್ಖವೇ, ಅಹತಾನಂ
ವತ್ಥಾನಂ ದಿಗುಣಂ ಸಙ್ಘಾಟಿ’’ನ್ತಿ (ಮಹಾವ॰ ೩೪೮) ಏತ್ಥ ಹಿ ಪಟಲಟ್ಠೋ ಗುಣಟ್ಠೋ।
‘‘ಅಚ್ಚೇನ್ತಿ ಕಾಲಾ ತರಯನ್ತಿ ರತ್ತಿಯೋ, ವಯೋಗುಣಾ ಅನುಪುಬ್ಬಂ ಜಹನ್ತೀ’’ತಿ ಏತ್ಥ
ರಾಸಟ್ಠೋ ಗುಣಟ್ಠೋ। ‘‘ಸತಗುಣಾ ದಕ್ಖಿಣಾ ಪಾಟಿಕಙ್ಖಿತಬ್ಬಾ’’ತಿ
(ಮ॰ ನಿ॰ ೩.೩೭೯) ಏತ್ಥ ಆನಿಸಂಸಟ್ಠೋ ಗುಣಟ್ಠೋ। ‘‘ಅನ್ತಂ ಅನ್ತಗುಣಂ (ಖು॰ ಪಾ॰ ೩.೧)
ಕಯಿರಾ ಮಾಲಾಗುಣೇ ಬಹೂ’’ತಿ (ಧ॰ ಪ॰ ೫೩) ಚ ಏತ್ಥ ಬನ್ಧನಟ್ಠೋ ಗುಣಟ್ಠೋ। ಇಧಾಪಿ ಏಸೇವ
ಅಧಿಪ್ಪೇತೋ। ತೇನ ವುತ್ತಂ ‘‘ಬನ್ಧನಟ್ಠೇನ ಗುಣಾ’’ತಿ। ಚಕ್ಖುವಿಞ್ಞೇಯ್ಯಾತಿ ಚಕ್ಖುವಿಞ್ಞಾಣೇನ ಪಸ್ಸಿತಬ್ಬಾ। ಏತೇನುಪಾಯೇನ ಸೋತವಿಞ್ಞೇಯ್ಯಾದೀಸುಪಿ ಅತ್ಥೋ ವೇದಿತಬ್ಬೋ। ಇಟ್ಠಾತಿ ಪರಿಯಿಟ್ಠಾ ವಾ ಹೋನ್ತು, ಮಾ ವಾ, ಇಟ್ಠಾರಮ್ಮಣಭೂತಾತಿ ಅತ್ಥೋ। ಕನ್ತಾತಿ ಕಾಮನೀಯಾ। ಮನಾಪಾತಿ ಮನವಡ್ಢನಕಾ। ಪಿಯರೂಪಾತಿ ಪಿಯಜಾತಿಕಾ। ಕಾಮೂಪಸಞ್ಹಿತಾತಿ ಆರಮ್ಮಣಂ ಕತ್ವಾ ಉಪ್ಪಜ್ಜಮಾನೇನ ಕಾಮೇನ ಉಪಸಞ್ಹಿತಾ। ರಜನೀಯಾತಿ ರಞ್ಜನೀಯಾ, ರಾಗುಪ್ಪತ್ತಿಕಾರಣಭೂತಾತಿ ಅತ್ಥೋ।

ಗಧಿತಾತಿ ಗೇಧೇನ ಅಭಿಭೂತಾ ಹುತ್ವಾ। ಮುಚ್ಛಿತಾತಿ ಮುಚ್ಛಾಕಾರಪ್ಪತ್ತಾಯ ಅಧಿಮತ್ತಕಾಯ ತಣ್ಹಾಯ ಅಭಿಭೂತಾ। ಅಜ್ಝೋಪನ್ನಾತಿ ಅಧಿಓಪನ್ನಾ ಓಗಾಳ್ಹಾ ‘‘ಇದಂ ಸಾರ’’ನ್ತಿ ಪರಿನಿಟ್ಠಾನಪ್ಪತ್ತಾ ಹುತ್ವಾ। ಅನಾದೀನವದಸ್ಸಾವಿನೋತಿ ಆದೀನವಂ ಅಪಸ್ಸನ್ತಾ। ಅನಿಸ್ಸರಣಪಞ್ಞಾತಿ ಇದಮೇತ್ಥ ನಿಸ್ಸರಣನ್ತಿ, ಏವಂ ಪರಿಜಾನನಪಞ್ಞಾವಿರಹಿತಾ, ಪಚ್ಚವೇಕ್ಖಣಪರಿಭೋಗವಿರಹಿತಾತಿ ಅತ್ಥೋ।

೫೪೮. ಆವರಣಾತಿಆದೀಸು ಆವರನ್ತೀತಿ ಆವರಣಾ। ನಿವಾರೇನ್ತೀತಿ ನೀವರಣಾ। ಓನನ್ಧನ್ತೀತಿ ಓನಾಹನಾ। ಪರಿಯೋನನ್ಧನ್ತೀತಿ ಪರಿಯೋನಾಹನಾ। ಕಾಮಚ್ಛನ್ದಾದೀನಂ ವಿತ್ಥಾರಕಥಾ ವಿಸುದ್ಧಿಮಗ್ಗತೋ ಗಹೇತಬ್ಬಾ।

೫೪೯-೫೫೦. ಆವುತಾ ನಿವುತಾ ಓನದ್ಧಾ ಪರಿಯೋನದ್ಧಾತಿ ಪದಾನಿ ಆವರಣಾದೀನಂ ವಸೇನ ವುತ್ತಾನಿ। ಸಪರಿಗ್ಗಹೋತಿ ಇತ್ಥಿಪರಿಗ್ಗಹೇನ ಸಪರಿಗ್ಗಹೋತಿ ಪುಚ್ಛತಿ। ಅಪರಿಗ್ಗಹೋ ಭೋ ಗೋತಮಾತಿಆದೀಸುಪಿ
ಕಾಮಚ್ಛನ್ದಸ್ಸ ಅಭಾವತೋ ಇತ್ಥಿಪರಿಗ್ಗಹೇನ ಅಪರಿಗ್ಗಹೋ। ಬ್ಯಾಪಾದಸ್ಸ ಅಭಾವತೋ ಕೇನಚಿ
ಸದ್ಧಿಂ ವೇರಚಿತ್ತೇನ ಅವೇರೋ। ಥಿನಮಿದ್ಧಸ್ಸ ಅಭಾವತೋ ಚಿತ್ತಗೇಲಞ್ಞಸಙ್ಖಾತೇನ
ಬ್ಯಾಪಜ್ಜೇನ ಅಬ್ಯಾಪಜ್ಜೋ। ಉದ್ಧಚ್ಚಕುಕ್ಕುಚ್ಚಾಭಾವತೋ ಉದ್ಧಚ್ಚಕುಕ್ಕುಚ್ಚಾದೀಹಿ
ಸಂಕಿಲೇಸೇಹಿ ಅಸಂಕಿಲಿಟ್ಠಚಿತ್ತೋ ಸುಪರಿಸುದ್ಧಮಾನಸೋ। ವಿಚಿಕಿಚ್ಛಾಯ ಅಭಾವತೋ ಚಿತ್ತಂ
ವಸೇ ವತ್ತೇತಿ। ಯಥಾ ಚ ಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣಾ ಚಿತ್ತಗತಿಕಾ ಹೋನ್ತೀತಿ, ಚಿತ್ತಸ್ಸ ವಸೇನ
ವತ್ತನ್ತಿ, ನ ತಾದಿಸೋತಿ ವಸವತ್ತೀ।

೫೫೨. ಇಧ ಖೋ ಪನಾತಿ ಇಧ ಬ್ರಹ್ಮಲೋಕಮಗ್ಗೇ। ಆಸೀದಿತ್ವಾತಿ ಅಮಗ್ಗಮೇವ ‘‘ಮಗ್ಗೋ’’ತಿ ಉಪಗನ್ತ್ವಾ। ಸಂಸೀದನ್ತೀತಿ ‘‘ಸಮತಲ’’ನ್ತಿ ಸಞ್ಞಾಯ ಪಙ್ಕಂ ಓತಿಣ್ಣಾ ವಿಯ ಅನುಪ್ಪವಿಸನ್ತಿ। ಸಂಸೀದಿತ್ವಾ ವಿಸಾರಂ ಪಾಪುಣನ್ತೀತಿ ಏವಂ ಪಙ್ಕೇ ವಿಯ ಸಂಸೀದಿತ್ವಾ ವಿಸಾರಂ ಅಙ್ಗಮಙ್ಗಸಂಭಞ್ಜನಂ ಪಾಪುಣನ್ತಿ। ಸುಕ್ಖತರಂ ಮಞ್ಞೇ ತರನ್ತೀತಿ
ಮರೀಚಿಕಾಯ ವಞ್ಚೇತ್ವಾ ‘‘ಕಾಕಪೇಯ್ಯಾ ನದೀ’’ತಿ ಸಞ್ಞಾಯ ‘‘ತರಿಸ್ಸಾಮಾ’’ತಿ ಹತ್ಥೇಹಿ ಚ
ಪಾದೇಹಿ ಚ ವಾಯಮಮಾನಾ ಸುಕ್ಖತರಣಂ ಮಞ್ಞೇ ತರನ್ತಿ। ತಸ್ಮಾ ಯಥಾ ಹತ್ಥಪಾದಾದೀನಂ
ಸಂಭಞ್ಜನಂ ಪರಿಭಞ್ಜನಂ, ಏವಂ ಅಪಾಯೇಸು ಸಂಭಞ್ಜನಂ ಪರಿಭಞ್ಜನಂ ಪಾಪುಣನ್ತಿ। ಇಧೇವ ಚ
ಸುಖಂ ವಾ ಸಾತಂ ವಾ ನ ಲಭನ್ತಿ। ತಸ್ಮಾ ಇದಂ ತೇವಿಜ್ಜಾನಂ ಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣಾನನ್ತಿ ತಸ್ಮಾ ಇದಂ ಬ್ರಹ್ಮಸಹಬ್ಯತಾಯ ಮಗ್ಗದೀಪಕಂ ತೇವಿಜ್ಜಕಂ ಪಾವಚನಂ ತೇವಿಜ್ಜಾನಂ ಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣಾನಂ। ತೇವಿಜ್ಜಾಇರಿಣನ್ತಿ ತೇವಿಜ್ಜಾಅರಞ್ಞಂ ಇರಿಣನ್ತಿ ಹಿ ಅಗಾಮಕಂ ಮಹಾಅರಞ್ಞಂ ವುಚ್ಚತಿ। ತೇವಿಜ್ಜಾವಿವನನ್ತಿ ಪುಪ್ಫಫಲೇಹಿ ಅಪರಿಭೋಗರುಕ್ಖೇಹಿ ಸಞ್ಛನ್ನಂ ನಿರುದಕಂ ಅರಞ್ಞಂ । ಯತ್ಥ ಮಗ್ಗತೋ ಉಕ್ಕಮಿತ್ವಾ ಪರಿವತ್ತಿತುಮ್ಪಿ ನ ಸಕ್ಕಾ ಹೋನ್ತಿ, ತಂ ಸನ್ಧಾಯಾಹ ‘‘ತೇವಿಜ್ಜಾವಿವನನ್ತಿಪಿ ವುಚ್ಚತೀ’’ತಿ। ತೇವಿಜ್ಜಾಬ್ಯಸನನ್ತಿ
ತೇವಿಜ್ಜಾನಂ ಪಞ್ಚವಿಧಬ್ಯಸನಸದಿಸಮೇತಂ। ಯಥಾ ಹಿ ಞಾತಿರೋಗಭೋಗ ದಿಟ್ಠಿ
ಸೀಲಬ್ಯಸನಪ್ಪತ್ತಸ್ಸ ಸುಖಂ ನಾಮ ನತ್ಥಿ, ಏವಂ ತೇವಿಜ್ಜಾನಂ ತೇವಿಜ್ಜಕಂ ಪಾವಚನಂ ಆಗಮ್ಮ
ಸುಖಂ ನಾಮ ನತ್ಥೀತಿ ದಸ್ಸೇತಿ।

೫೫೪. ಜಾತಸಂವಡ್ಢೋತಿ ಜಾತೋ ಚ ವಡ್ಢಿತೋ ಚ, ಯೋ ಹಿ ಕೇವಲಂ ತತ್ಥ ಜಾತೋವ ಹೋತಿ, ಅಞ್ಞತ್ಥ
ವಡ್ಢಿತೋ, ತಸ್ಸ ಸಮನ್ತಾ ಗಾಮಮಗ್ಗಾ ನ ಸಬ್ಬಸೋ ಪಚ್ಚಕ್ಖಾ ಹೋನ್ತಿ, ತಸ್ಮಾ
ಜಾತಸಂವಡ್ಢೋತಿ ಆಹ। ಜಾತಸಂವಡ್ಢೋಪಿ ಯೋ ಚಿರನಿಕ್ಖನ್ತೋ, ತಸ್ಸ ನ ಸಬ್ಬಸೋ ಪಚ್ಚಕ್ಖಾ
ಹೋನ್ತಿ। ತಸ್ಮಾ ‘‘ತಾವದೇವ ಅವಸಟ’’ನ್ತಿ ಆಹ, ತಙ್ಖಣಮೇವ ನಿಕ್ಖನ್ತನ್ತಿ ಅತ್ಥೋ। ದನ್ಧಾಯಿತತ್ತನ್ತಿ ಅಯಂ ನು ಖೋ ಮಗ್ಗೋ, ಅಯಂ ನ ನುಖೋತಿ ಕಙ್ಖಾವಸೇನ ಚಿರಾಯಿತತ್ತಂ। ವಿತ್ಥಾಯಿತತ್ತನ್ತಿ ಯಥಾ ಸುಖುಮಂ ಅತ್ಥಜಾತಂ ಸಹಸಾ ಪುಚ್ಛಿತಸ್ಸ ಕಸ್ಸಚಿ ಸರೀರಂ ಥದ್ಧಭಾವಂ ಗಣ್ಹಾತಿ, ಏವಂ ಥದ್ಧಭಾವಗ್ಗಹಣಂ। ನ ತ್ವೇವಾತಿ ಇಮಿನಾ ಸಬ್ಬಞ್ಞುತಞ್ಞಾಣಸ್ಸ ಅಪ್ಪಟಿಹತಭಾವಂ ದಸ್ಸೇತಿ। ತಸ್ಸ ಹಿ ಪುರಿಸಸ್ಸ ಮಾರಾವಟ್ಟನಾದಿವಸೇನ ಸಿಯಾ ಞಾಣಸ್ಸ ಪಟಿಘಾತೋ। ತೇನ ಸೋ ದನ್ಧಾಯೇಯ್ಯ ವಾ ವಿತ್ಥಾಯೇಯ್ಯ ವಾ। ಸಬ್ಬಞ್ಞುತಞ್ಞಾಣಂ ಪನ ಅಪ್ಪಟಿಹತಂ, ನ ಸಕ್ಕಾ ತಸ್ಸ ಕೇನಚಿ ಅನ್ತರಾಯೋ ಕಾತುನ್ತಿ ದೀಪೇತಿ।

೫೫೫. ಉಲ್ಲುಮ್ಪತು ಭವಂ ಗೋತಮೋತಿ ಉದ್ಧರತು ಭವಂ ಗೋತಮೋ। ಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣಿಂ ಪಜನ್ತಿ
ಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣದಾರಕಂ, ಭವಂ ಗೋತಮೋ ಮಮ ಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣಪುತ್ತಂ ಅಪಾಯಮಗ್ಗತೋ ಉದ್ಧರಿತ್ವಾ
ಬ್ರಹ್ಮಲೋಕಮಗ್ಗೇ ಪತಿಟ್ಠಪೇತೂತಿ ಅತ್ಥೋ। ಅಥಸ್ಸ ಭಗವಾ ಬುದ್ಧುಪ್ಪಾದಂ ದಸ್ಸೇತ್ವಾ
ಸದ್ಧಿಂ ಪುಬ್ಬಭಾಗಪಟಿಪದಾಯ ಮೇತ್ತಾವಿಹಾರಾದಿಬ್ರಹ್ಮಲೋಕಗಾಮಿಮಗ್ಗಂ ದೇಸೇತುಕಾಮೋ ‘‘ತೇನ
ಹಿ ವಾಸೇಟ್ಠಾ’’ತಿಆದಿಮಾಹ। ತತ್ಥ ‘‘ಇಧ ತಥಾಗತೋ’’ತಿಆದಿ ಸಾಮಞ್ಞಫಲೇ ವಿತ್ಥಾರಿತಂ।
ಮೇತ್ತಾಸಹಗತೇನಾತಿಆದೀಸು ಯಂ ವತ್ತಬ್ಬಂ, ತಂ ಸಬ್ಬಂ ವಿಸುದ್ಧಿಮಗ್ಗೇ
ಬ್ರಹ್ಮವಿಹಾರಕಮ್ಮಟ್ಠಾನಕಥಾಯಂ ವುತ್ತಂ। ಸೇಯ್ಯಥಾಪಿ ವಾಸೇಟ್ಠ ಬಲವಾ ಸಙ್ಖಧಮೋತಿಆದಿ ಪನ ಇಧ ಅಪುಬ್ಬಂ। ತತ್ಥ ಬಲವಾತಿ ಬಲಸಮ್ಪನ್ನೋ। ಸಙ್ಖಧಮೋತಿ ಸಙ್ಖಧಮಕೋ। ಅಪ್ಪಕಸಿರೇನಾತಿ
ಅಕಿಚ್ಛೇನ ಅದುಕ್ಖೇನ। ದುಬ್ಬಲೋ ಹಿ ಸಙ್ಖಧಮೋ ಸಙ್ಖಂ ಧಮನ್ತೋಪಿ ನ ಸಕ್ಕೋತಿ ಚತಸ್ಸೋ
ದಿಸಾ ಸರೇನ ವಿಞ್ಞಾಪೇತುಂ, ನಾಸ್ಸ ಸಙ್ಖಸದ್ದೋ ಸಬ್ಬತೋ ಫರತಿ। ಬಲವತೋ ಪನ ವಿಪ್ಫಾರಿಕೋ
ಹೋತಿ, ತಸ್ಮಾ ‘‘ಬಲವಾ’’ತಿಆದಿಮಾಹ। ಮೇತ್ತಾಯ ಚೇತೋವಿಮುತ್ತಿಯಾತಿ ಏತ್ಥ ಮೇತ್ತಾತಿ ವುತ್ತೇ ಉಪಚಾರೋಪಿ ಅಪ್ಪನಾಪಿ ವಟ್ಟತಿ, ‘‘ಚೇತ್ತೋವಿಮುತ್ತೀ’’ತಿ ವುತ್ತೇ ಪನ ಅಪ್ಪನಾವ ವಟ್ಟತಿ। ಯಂ ಪಮಾಣಕತಂ ಕಮ್ಮನ್ತಿ
ಪಮಾಣಕತಂ ಕಮ್ಮಂ ನಾಮ ಕಾಮಾವಚರಂ ವುಚ್ಚತಿ। ಅಪ್ಪಮಾಣಕತಂ ಕಮ್ಮಂ ನಾಮ ರೂಪಾರೂಪಾವಚರಂ।
ತಞ್ಹಿ ಪಮಾಣಂ ಅತಿಕ್ಕಮಿತ್ವಾ ಓದಿಸ್ಸಕಅನೋದಿಸ್ಸಕದಿಸಾಫರಣವಸೇನ ವಡ್ಢೇತ್ವಾ ಕತತ್ತಾ
ಅಪ್ಪಮಾಣಕತನ್ತಿ ವುಚ್ಚತಿ। ನ ತಂ ತತ್ರಾವಸಿಸ್ಸತಿ ನ ತಂ ತತ್ರಾವತಿಟ್ಠತೀತಿ
ತಂ ಕಾಮಾವಚರಕಮ್ಮಂ ತಸ್ಮಿಂ ರೂಪಾವಚರಾರೂಪಾವಚರಕಮ್ಮೇ ನ ಓಹೀಯತಿ, ನ ತಿಟ್ಠತಿ। ಕಿಂ
ವುತ್ತಂ ಹೋತಿ – ತಂ ಕಾಮಾವಚರಕಮ್ಮಂ ತಸ್ಸ ರೂಪಾರೂಪಾವಚರಕಮ್ಮಸ್ಸ ಅನ್ತರಾ ಲಗ್ಗಿತುಂ ವಾ
ಠಾತುಂ ವಾ ರೂಪಾರೂಪಾವಚರಕಮ್ಮಂ ಫರಿತ್ವಾ ಪರಿಯಾದಿಯಿತ್ವಾ ಅತ್ತನೋ ಓಕಾಸಂ ಗಹೇತ್ವಾ
ಪತಿಟ್ಠಾತುಂ ನ ಸಕ್ಕೋತಿ। ಅಥ ಖೋ ರೂಪಾವಚರಾರೂಪಾವಚರಕಮ್ಮಮೇವ ಕಾಮಾವಚರಂ ಮಹೋಘೋ ವಿಯ
ಪರಿತ್ತಂ ಉದಕಂ ಫರಿತ್ವಾ ಪರಿಯಾದಿಯಿತ್ವಾ ಅತ್ತನೋ ಓಕಾಸಂ ಗಹೇತ್ವಾ ತಿಟ್ಠತಿ। ತಸ್ಸ
ವಿಪಾಕಂ ಪಟಿಬಾಹಿತ್ವಾ ಸಯಮೇವ ಬ್ರಹ್ಮಸಹಬ್ಯತಂ ಉಪನೇತೀತಿ। ಏವಂವಿಹಾರೀತಿ ಏವಂ ಮೇತ್ತಾದಿವಿಹಾರೀ।

೫೫೯. ಏತೇ ಮಯಂ ಭವನ್ತಂ ಗೋತಮನ್ತಿ
ಇದಂ ತೇಸಂ ದುತಿಯಂ ಸರಣಗಮನಂ। ಪಠಮಮೇವ ಹೇತೇ ಮಜ್ಝಿಮಪಣ್ಣಾಸಕೇ ವಾಸೇಟ್ಠಸುತ್ತಂ
ಸುತ್ವಾ ಸರಣಂ ಗತಾ, ಇಮಂ ಪನ ತೇವಿಜ್ಜಸುತ್ತಂ ಸುತ್ವಾ ದುತಿಯಮ್ಪಿ ಸರಣಂ ಗತಾ।
ಕತಿಪಾಹಚ್ಚಯೇನ ಪಬ್ಬಜಿತ್ವಾ ಅಗ್ಗಞ್ಞಸುತ್ತೇ ಉಪಸಮ್ಪದಞ್ಚೇವ ಅರಹತ್ತಞ್ಚ ಅಲತ್ಥುಂ।
ಸೇಸಂ ಸಬ್ಬತ್ಥ ಉತ್ತಾನಮೇವಾತಿ।

ಇತಿ ಸುಮಙ್ಗಲವಿಲಾಸಿನಿಯಾ ದೀಘನಿಕಾಯಟ್ಠಕಥಾಯಂ

ತೇವಿಜ್ಜಸುತ್ತವಣ್ಣನಾ ನಿಟ್ಠಿತಾ।

ನಿಟ್ಠಿತಾ ಚ ತೇರಸಸುತ್ತಪಟಿಮಣ್ಡಿತಸ್ಸ ಸೀಲಕ್ಖನ್ಧವಗ್ಗಸ್ಸ

ಅತ್ಥವಣ್ಣನಾತಿ।

ಸೀಲಕ್ಖನ್ಧವಗ್ಗಟ್ಠಕಥಾ ನಿಟ್ಠಿತಾ।

image.png

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gVt34_vDFJA
Abhisambidhana Sutta
Harshana Hiripitiya
Published on Oct 20, 2017
නමෝ අභිසම්භිදානේ
යුත්තේ යුත්තේ පජ්ජලති පජ්ජලති
තීහුම් තීහුම් ලුහු ලුහු පරමේස්වාහා

නමෝ සම්මා සම්බුද්ධේ
යුත්තේ යුත්තේ පජ්ජලති පජ්ජලති
තීහුම් තීහුම් ලුහු ලුහු පරමේස්වාහා

නමෝ පච්චේක සම්බුද්ධේ
යුත්තේ යුත්තේ පජ්ජලති පජ්ජලති
තීහුම් තීහුම් ලුහු ලුහු පරමේස්වාහා

නමෝ සාරිපුත්ත මොග්ගල්ලානේ
යුත්තේ යුත්තේ පජ්ජලති පජ්ජලති
තීහුම් තීහුම් ලුහු ලුහු පරමේස්වාහා

නමෝ අංගුලිමාල මහා ථෙරෝ මහා වීරෝ මහා බලෝ
යුත්තේ යුත්තේ පජ්ජලති පජ්ජලති
තීහුම් තීහුම් ලුහු ලුහු පරමේස්වාහා

නමෝ සීවලීච මහා ථෙරෝ මහා කායෝ මහා ලාභී
යුත්තේ යුත්තේ පජ්ජලති පජ්ජලති
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AN 8.39 (A iv 245)

Abhisanda Sutta

— Results —

Here are eight ways in which all serious disciples of the Buddha create much merit for themselves.



Note: info·bubbles on all “underdotted” words


Pāḷi



English


“aṭṭhime, bhikkhave, puññābhisandā kusalābhisandā sukhassāhārā sovaggikā
sukhavipākā saggasaṃvattanikā, iṭṭhāya kantāya manāpāya hitāya sukhāya
saṃvattanti. katame aṭṭha?

“Monks, there are these eight rewards of merit, rewards of skillfulness, nourishments of happiness, celestial, resulting in happiness, leading to heaven, leading to what is desirable, pleasurable, & appealing, to welfare & happiness. Which eight?

idha, bhikkhave, ariyasāvako buddhaṃ saraṇaṃ gato hoti. ayaṃ, bhikkhave,
paṭhamo puññābhisando kusalābhisando sukhassāhāro sovaggiko sukhavipāko
saggasaṃvattaniko, iṭṭhāya kantāya manāpāya hitāya sukhāya saṃvattati.

“There is the case where a disciple of the noble ones has gone to the Buddha for refuge. This is the first reward of merit, reward of skillfulness, nourishment of happiness, celestial, resulting in happiness, leading to heaven, leading to what is desirable, pleasurable, & appealing; to welfare & to happiness.

“puna caparaṃ, bhikkhave, ariyasāvako dhammaṃ saraṇaṃ gato hoti. ayaṃ,
bhikkhave, dutiyo puññābhisando kusalābhisando sukhassāhāro sovaggiko
sukhavipāko saggasaṃvattaniko, iṭṭhāya kantāya manāpāya hitāya sukhāya
saṃvattati.

“Furthermore, the disciple of the noble ones has gone to the Dhamma for refuge. This is the second reward of merit, reward of skillfulness, nourishment of happiness, celestial, resulting in happiness, leading to heaven, leading to what is desirable, pleasurable, & appealing; to welfare & to happiness.

“puna caparaṃ, bhikkhave, ariyasāvako saṅghaṃ saraṇaṃ gato hoti. ayaṃ,
bhikkhave, tatiyo puññābhisando kusalābhisando sukhassāhāro sovaggiko
sukhavipāko saggasaṃvattaniko, iṭṭhāya kantāya manāpāya hitāya sukhāya
saṃvattati.

“Furthermore, the disciple of the noble ones has gone to the Sangha for refuge. This is the third reward of merit, reward of skillfulness, nourishment of happiness, celestial, resulting in happiness, leading to heaven, leading to what is desirable, pleasurable, & appealing; to welfare & to happiness.

“pañcimāni, bhikkhave, dānāni mahādānāni aggaññāni rattaññāni vaṃsaññāni
porāṇāni asaṃkiṇṇāni asaṃkiṇṇapubbāni, na saṃkiyanti na saṃkiyissanti,
appaṭikuṭṭhāni samaṇehi brāhmaṇehi viññūhi. katamāni pañca?

“Now, there are these five gifts, five great gifts
— original, long-standing, traditional, ancient, unadulterated,
unadulterated from the beginning — that are not open to suspicion, will
never be open to suspicion, and are unfaulted by knowledgeable contemplatives & brahmans. Which five?

idha, bhikkhave, ariyasāvako pāṇātipātaṃ pahāya pāṇātipātā paṭivirato
hoti. pāṇātipātā paṭivirato, bhikkhave, ariyasāvako aparimāṇānaṃ
sattānaṃ abhayaṃ deti, averaṃ deti, abyābajjhaṃ deti. aparimāṇānaṃ
sattānaṃ abhayaṃ datvā averaṃ datvā abyābajjhaṃ datvā aparimāṇassa
abhayassa averassa abyābajjhassa bhāgī hoti. idaṃ, bhikkhave, paṭhamaṃ
dānaṃ mahādānaṃ aggaññaṃ rattaññaṃ vaṃsaññaṃ porāṇaṃ asaṃkiṇṇaṃ
asaṃkiṇṇapubbaṃ, na saṃkiyati na saṃkiyissati, appaṭikuṭṭhaṃ samaṇehi
brāhmaṇehi viññūhi. ayaṃ, bhikkhave, catuttho puññābhisando
kusalābhisando sukhassāhāro sovaggiko sukhavipāko saggasaṃvattaniko,
iṭṭhāya kantāya manāpāya hitāya sukhāya saṃvattati.

“There is the case where a disciple of the noble ones, abandoning the taking of life, abstains from taking life.
In doing so, he gives freedom from danger, freedom from animosity,
freedom from oppression to limitless numbers of beings. In giving
freedom from danger, freedom from animosity, freedom from oppression to
limitless numbers of beings, he gains a share in limitless freedom from
danger, freedom from animosity, and freedom from oppression. This is the
first gift, the first great gift
— original, long-standing, traditional, ancient, unadulterated,
unadulterated from the beginning — that is not open to suspicion, will
never be open to suspicion, and is unfaulted by knowledgeable contemplatives & brahmans. And this is the fourth reward of merit, reward of skillfulness, nourishment of happiness, celestial, resulting in happiness, leading to heaven, leading to what is desirable, pleasurable, & appealing; to welfare & to happiness.

“puna caparaṃ, bhikkhave, ariyasāvako adinnādānaṃ pahāya adinnādānā
paṭivirato hoti. adinnādānā paṭivirato, bhikkhave, ariyasāvako
aparimāṇānaṃ sattānaṃ abhayaṃ deti averaṃ deti abyābajjhaṃ deti.
aparimāṇānaṃ sattānaṃ abhayaṃ datvā averaṃ datvā abyābajjhaṃ datvā,
aparimāṇassa abhayassa averassa abyābajjhassa bhāgī hoti. idaṃ,
bhikkhave, pañcamaṃ dānaṃ mahādānaṃ aggaññaṃ rattaññaṃ vaṃsaññaṃ porāṇaṃ
asaṃkiṇṇaṃ asaṃkiṇṇapubbaṃ, na saṃkiyati na saṃkiyissati, appaṭikuṭṭhaṃ
samaṇehi brāhmaṇehi viññūhi. ayaṃ kho, bhikkhave, aṭṭhamo puññābhisando
kusalābhisando sukhassāhāro sovaggiko sukhavipāko saggasaṃvattaniko,
iṭṭhāya kantāya manāpāya hitāya sukhāya saṃvattati.

“Furthermore, abandoning taking what is not given (stealing), the disciple of the noble ones abstains from taking what is not given.
In doing so, he gives freedom from danger, freedom from animosity,
freedom from oppression to limitless numbers of beings. In giving
freedom from danger, freedom from animosity, freedom from oppression to
limitless numbers of beings, he gains a share in limitless freedom from
danger, freedom from animosity, and freedom from oppression. This is the
second gift, the second great gift
— original, long-standing, traditional, ancient, unadulterated,
unadulterated from the beginning — that is not open to suspicion, will
never be open to suspicion, and is unfaulted by knowledgeable contemplatives & brahmans. And this is the fifth reward of merit, reward of skillfulness, nourishment of happiness, celestial, resulting in happiness, leading to heaven, leading to what is desirable, pleasurable, & appealing; to welfare & to happiness.

“puna caparaṃ, bhikkhave, ariyasāvako kāmesumicchācāraṃ pahāya
kāmesumicchācārā paṭivirato hoti. kāmesumicchācārā paṭivirato,
bhikkhave, ariyasāvako aparimāṇānaṃ sattānaṃ abhayaṃ deti averaṃ deti
abyābajjhaṃ deti. aparimāṇānaṃ sattānaṃ abhayaṃ datvā averaṃ datvā
abyābajjhaṃ datvā, aparimāṇassa abhayassa averassa abyābajjhassa bhāgī
hoti. idaṃ, bhikkhave, pañcamaṃ dānaṃ mahādānaṃ aggaññaṃ rattaññaṃ
vaṃsaññaṃ porāṇaṃ asaṃkiṇṇaṃ asaṃkiṇṇapubbaṃ, na saṃkiyati na
saṃkiyissati, appaṭikuṭṭhaṃ samaṇehi brāhmaṇehi viññūhi. ayaṃ kho,
bhikkhave, aṭṭhamo puññābhisando kusalābhisando sukhassāhāro sovaggiko
sukhavipāko saggasaṃvattaniko, iṭṭhāya kantāya manāpāya hitāya sukhāya
saṃvattati. ime kho, bhikkhave, aṭṭha puññābhisandā kusalābhisandā
sukhassāhārā sovaggikā sukhavipākā saggasaṃvattanikā, iṭṭhāya kantāya
manāpāya hitāya sukhāya saṃvattantī”ti.

“Furthermore, abandoning illicit sex, the disciple of the noble ones abstains from illicit sex.
In doing so, he gives freedom from danger, freedom from animosity,
freedom from oppression to limitless numbers of beings. In giving
freedom from danger, freedom from animosity, freedom from oppression to
limitless numbers of beings, he gains a share in limitless freedom from
danger, freedom from animosity, and freedom from oppression. This is the
third gift, the third great gift
— original, long-standing, traditional, ancient, unadulterated,
unadulterated from the beginning — that is not open to suspicion, will
never be open to suspicion, and is unfaulted by knowledgeable contemplatives & brahmans. And this is the sixth reward of merit, reward of skillfulness, nourishment of happiness, celestial, resulting in happiness, leading to heaven, leading to what is desirable, pleasurable, & appealing; to welfare & to happiness.

“puna caparaṃ, bhikkhave, ariyasāvako musāvādaṃ pahāya musāvādā
paṭivirato hoti. musāvādā paṭivirato, bhikkhave, ariyasāvako
aparimāṇānaṃ sattānaṃ abhayaṃ deti averaṃ deti abyābajjhaṃ deti.
aparimāṇānaṃ sattānaṃ abhayaṃ datvā averaṃ datvā abyābajjhaṃ datvā,
aparimāṇassa abhayassa averassa abyābajjhassa bhāgī hoti. idaṃ,
bhikkhave, pañcamaṃ dānaṃ mahādānaṃ aggaññaṃ rattaññaṃ vaṃsaññaṃ porāṇaṃ
asaṃkiṇṇaṃ asaṃkiṇṇapubbaṃ, na saṃkiyati na saṃkiyissati, appaṭikuṭṭhaṃ
samaṇehi brāhmaṇehi viññūhi. ayaṃ kho, bhikkhave, aṭṭhamo puññābhisando
kusalābhisando sukhassāhāro sovaggiko sukhavipāko saggasaṃvattaniko,
iṭṭhāya kantāya manāpāya hitāya sukhāya saṃvattati. ime kho, bhikkhave,
aṭṭha puññābhisandā kusalābhisandā sukhassāhārā sovaggikā sukhavipākā
saggasaṃvattanikā, iṭṭhāya kantāya manāpāya hitāya sukhāya
saṃvattantī”ti.

“Furthermore, abandoning lying, the disciple of the noble ones abstains from lying.
In doing so, he gives freedom from danger, freedom from animosity,
freedom from oppression to limitless numbers of beings. In giving
freedom from danger, freedom from animosity, freedom from oppression to
limitless numbers of beings, he gains a share in limitless freedom from
danger, freedom from animosity, and freedom from oppression. This is the
fourth gift, the fourth great gift
— original, long-standing, traditional, ancient, unadulterated,
unadulterated from the beginning — that is not open to suspicion, will
never be open to suspicion, and is unfaulted by knowledgeable contemplatives & brahmans. And this is the seventh reward of merit, reward of skillfulness, nourishment of happiness, celestial, resulting in happiness, leading to heaven, leading to what is desirable, pleasurable, & appealing; to welfare & to happiness.

“puna caparaṃ, bhikkhave, ariyasāvako surāmerayamajjapamādaṭṭhānaṃ
pahāya surāmerayamajjapamādaṭṭhānā paṭivirato hoti.
surāmerayamajjapamādaṭṭhānā paṭivirato, bhikkhave, ariyasāvako
aparimāṇānaṃ sattānaṃ abhayaṃ deti averaṃ deti abyābajjhaṃ deti.
aparimāṇānaṃ sattānaṃ abhayaṃ datvā averaṃ datvā abyābajjhaṃ datvā,
aparimāṇassa abhayassa averassa abyābajjhassa bhāgī hoti. idaṃ,
bhikkhave, pañcamaṃ dānaṃ mahādānaṃ aggaññaṃ rattaññaṃ vaṃsaññaṃ porāṇaṃ
asaṃkiṇṇaṃ asaṃkiṇṇapubbaṃ, na saṃkiyati na saṃkiyissati, appaṭikuṭṭhaṃ
samaṇehi brāhmaṇehi viññūhi. ayaṃ kho, bhikkhave, aṭṭhamo puññābhisando
kusalābhisando sukhassāhāro sovaggiko sukhavipāko saggasaṃvattaniko,
iṭṭhāya kantāya manāpāya hitāya sukhāya saṃvattati. ime kho, bhikkhave,
aṭṭha puññābhisandā kusalābhisandā sukhassāhārā sovaggikā sukhavipākā
saggasaṃvattanikā, iṭṭhāya kantāya manāpāya hitāya sukhāya
saṃvattantī”ti.

“Furthermore, abandoning the use of intoxicants, the disciple of the noble ones abstains from taking intoxicants.
In doing so, he gives freedom from danger, freedom from animosity,
freedom from oppression to limitless numbers of beings. In giving
freedom from danger, freedom from animosity, freedom from oppression to
limitless numbers of beings, he gains a share in limitless freedom from
danger, freedom from animosity, and freedom from oppression. This is the
fifth gift, the fifth great gift
— original, long-standing, traditional, ancient, unadulterated,
unadulterated from the beginning — that is not open to suspicion, will
never be open to suspicion, and is unfaulted by knowledgeable contemplatives & brahmans. And this is the eighth reward of merit, reward of skillfulness, nourishment of happiness, celestial, resulting in happiness, leading to heaven, leading to what is desirable, pleasurable, & appealing; to welfare & to happiness.

ime kho, bhikkhave, aṭṭha puññābhisandā kusalābhisandā sukhassāhārā
sovaggikā sukhavipākā saggasaṃvattanikā, iṭṭhāya kantāya manāpāya hitāya
sukhāya saṃvattantī”ti.

“Monks, these are the eight rewards of merit, rewards of skillfulness, nourishments of happiness, celestial, resulting in happiness, leading to heaven, leading to what is desirable, pleasurable, & appealing, to welfare & happiness.


Bodhi leaf



“Abhisanda Sutta: Rewards”, translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu. Access to Insight (Legacy Edition), 30 November 2013.

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In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Mind; heart; state of consciousness.(Source): Access to Insight: A Glossary of Pali and Buddhist Terms

1. Citta (called Cittagahapati) - A
householder of Macchikasanda, where he was Treasurer. He was later declared by
the Buddha to be pre eminent among laymen who preached the Doctrine (A.i.26). On
the day of his birth the whole city was covered knee deep with flowers of
various hues, hence his name.

When Mahanama visited Macchikasanda, Citta,
pleased with his demeanour, invited him to his park, the Ambatakarama, and built
for him a monastery there. And there the Elder preached to Citta the
Sala yatana vibhatti and Citta became an Anagami. Thereafter many monks visited
the Ambatakarama and accepted Cittas hospitality. Among them was Isidatta
(q.v.), a former acquaintance of Citta, but Isidatta left when he found that his
identity had been discovered. Mahanama and Mahaka did likewise, after having
performed miracles at the request of Citta.

The Citta Samyutta (S.iv.282ff)
contains a record of conversations between Citta and members of the Order, among
whom, besides those already mentioned, were Kamabhu and Godatta. Citta is also
said to have had discussions with Nigantha Nataputta and Acela Kassapa and to
have refuted their views.

A thera named Sudhamma was a permanent
resident in the Ambatakarama and was looked after by Citta. Once, when the two
Chief Disciples and several other eminent Elders came to the Ambatakarama, Citta
invited first these and then Sudhamma; the latter, feeling slighted, blamed
Citta beyond measure, but the Buddha, hearing of this, sent Sudhamma to ask for
Cittas pardon (Vin.ii.15ff; DhA.ii.74f; for details see Sudhamma).

Some time later, Citta visited the
Buddha. He was accompanied by two thousand others and took with him five hundred
cartloads of offerings to the Buddha and the Order. As he fell at the feet of
the Buddha, flowers of five hues showered from the sky and the Buddha preached
to him the Salayatana vibhatti. For a fortnight he continued distributing his
gifts to the Order and the devas filled his carts with all kinds of valuables
(AA.i.210).

When Citta lay ill just before his
death, devas visited him and advised him to wish for kingship among them, but he
refused to aspire to anything so impermanent, and instructed the devas and his
kinsfolk gathered round him, telling them of the Buddha and his teachings
(S.iv.302f). He is regarded as the ideal layman (E.g., at A.i.88; ii.164;
iii.451).

He owned a tributary village called
Migapattaka (SA.iii.93).

In the time of Padumuttara Buddha, Citta
conceived his desire to be placed first among laymen in the teaching of the
Dhamma. In the time of Kassapa Buddha he was a huntsman. One day, seeing a monk
in a glen, and being pleased thereat, he hurried home, prepared a meal and
brought it to the monk, together with flowers he had gathered on the way. After
the offering,

— or —

1. Citta - One of the four wives of Magha.(Source): Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names

(mind, thought).

(Source): Dhamma Dana: Pali English Glossary

‘mind’, ‘consciousness’, ’state of consciousness’, is a synonym of
mano and
viññāna (s. khandha and
Tab. 1).

Dhs. divides all phenomena into consciousness (citta), mental
concomitants (cetasika) and corporeality
(rūpa).

In adhicitta, ‘higher mentality’, it signifies the concentrated,
quietened mind, and is one of the 3 trainings (s.
sikkhā).

The concentration (or intensification) of consciousness is one of the 4 roads
to power (s. iddhipāda).

— or —

viññāna (s. khandha),

citta (q.v.),
mano (q v ) -

Moment of °: citta-kkhana (q.v.).

Contemplation of
°: cittānupassanā: s. satipatthāna -

Corporeality produced by °:
citta-ja-rūpa, s. samutthāna -

Abodes or supports of °: cf.
viññānatthiti (q.v.)

Functions of °: viññāna-kicca (q.v.).

(Source): Pali Kanon: Manual of Buddhist Terms and Doctrines
context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).


Abhidhamma

See One Hundred and Tweny One Cittas

Citta means consciousness. It is the nature that is aware of its
object. No other dhamma or nature can know anything including
themselves. But citta can know everything possible including cittas.

Citta always leads other nama dhamma and rupa dhamma. A citta arises,
it passes away immediately after its arising. Another citta arises, and
again it falls away. Next arises and dies out immediately. This kind of
uninterruptedness is the manifestation of citta. There are immediate
causes for arising of citta. They are cittas themselves, nama dhamma and
rupa dhamma.

There are 89 cittas in total.

  • 81 cittas are mundane consciousness and
  • 8 cittas are supramundane consciousness.

At another time, citta can be counted as 121 cittas in total.

This happens when 8 lokuttara cittas arise when in jhana. These are
called lokuttara jhana cittas. As there are 5 jhanas, then there are 40
lokuttara jhana cittas.

Together with lokiya cittas 40 and 81 will make 121 cittas in total.

When 89 cittas are analysed according to their jati or origin or parentage, there are four classes of citta. They are

  1. 12 akusala cittas ( 8 lobha + 2 dosa + 2 moha citta )
  2. 21 kusala cittas ( 8 mahakusala + 5 rupakusala + 4 arupakusala + 4 lokuttarakusala or magga citta )
  3. 36 vipaka cittas ( 7 ahetuka akusala + 8 ahetuka kusala + 8
    mahavipaka + 5 rupavipaka + 4 arupavipaka + 4 lokuttaravipaka or phala
    citta )
  4. 20 kiriya cittas ( 3 ahetukakiriya + 8 mahakiriya + 5 rupakiriya + 4 arupakiriya )

12 + 21 + 36 + 20 = 89 cittas in total.

When cittas are viewed by bhumi or place or plane of existence, there are 4 classes of citta. They are

  1. 54 kamavacara cittas ( 12 akusala + 18 ahetuka cittas + 24 sobhana cittas )
  2. 15 rupavacara cittas ( 5 rupakusala + 5 rupavipaka + 5 rupakiriya )
  3. 12 arupavacara cittas ( 4 arupakusala + 4 arupavipaka + 4 arupakiriya )
  4. 8 lokuttara cittas (4 lokuttara kusala or magga + 4 lokuttara vipaka or phala)

54 + 15 + 12 + 8 = 89 cittas in total.

When lokuttara cittas arise in parallel with jhana, there will be 121
cittas in total. Then, according to jati or origin or parentage, cittas
can be classified as

  1. 37 kusala cittas ( 8 mahakusala, 5 rupakusala, 4arupakusala, 20 lokuttarakusala cittas )
  2. 52 vipaka cittas ( 15 ahetukavipaka, 8 mahavipaka, 5 rupavipaka, 4 arupavipaka, 20 lokuttaravipaka cittas )
  3. 20 kiriya cittas ( 3 ahetuka kiriya, 8 mahakiriya, 5 rupakiriya, 4 arupakiriya )
  4. 12 akusala cittas ( 8 lobha , 2 dosa, 2 moha )

37 + 52 + 20 + 12 = 121 cittas in total.

According to bhumi or place or plane of existence, there are 4 classes of citta. They are

  1. 54 kamavacara cittas ( 12 akusala, 18 ahetuka, 24 sobhana cittas )
  2. 15 rupavacara cittas ( 5 rupakusala, 5 rupavipaka, 5 rupakiriya )
  3. 12 arupavacara cittas ( 4 arupakusala, 4 arupavipaka, 4 arupakiriya )
  4. 40 lokuttara cittas ( 20 lokuttara kusala, 20 lokuttara vipaka )

54 + 15 + 12 + 40 = 121 cittas in total.

(Source): Journey to Nibbana: Patthana Dhama

Citta,
or consciousness, is the Dhamma which is the leader in knowing what
appears, such as seeing or hearing. Cittas have been classified as 89
types in all, or, in special cases, as 121 types.

Citta is an element, which experiences something, a reality which
experiences an object. It is the “chief”, the leader in knowing the
object which appears.

There is not only citta, which sees, citta that hears, citta which
smells, citta which tastes or citta which experiences tangible object,
there is also citta which thinks about many diverse subjects. The world
of each person is ruled by his citta.

(Source): Buddhist Information: A Survey of Paramattha Dhammas

What we call mind are in reality different fleeting moments of
consciousness succeeding one another very rapidly. Since “mind” has in
psychology a meaning different from “mind” according to the Buddhist
teaching, it is to be preferred to use the Pali term citta (pronounced:
chitta).

The mind is variable, it changes very rapidly. At one moment there is a
mind with attachment, at another moment a mind with generosity, at
another moment a mind with anger. At each moment there is a different
mind. Through the Buddhist teachings we learn that in reality the mind
is different from what we mean by the word “mind” in conventional
language.

(Source): Dhamma Study: Cetasikas

Citta
is derived from the PaIi word for thinking (cinteti). All cittas have
in common that they “think” of an object, but we have to take thinking
here in a very general sense, meaning, being conscious of an object, or
cognizing an object.

Cittas perform different functions. For examine, seeing is a function (kicca) of citta.

A citta cannot arise alone, it has to be accompanied by cetasikas.
The citta is the “leader”, while the cetasikas which share the same
object perform each their own task.

There is a great variety of cetasikas accompanying the different
cittas. Akusala cittas are accompanied by cetasikas which are
defilements, whereas kusala cittas are accompanied by cetasikas which
are good qualities. Apart from defilements and good qualities there are
also cetasikas which accompany cittas which are unwholesome, cittas
which are wholesome and cittas which are neither wholesome nor
unwholesome.

(Source): Dhamma Study: Cetasikas
Abhidhamma book cover
context information

Abhidhamma (अभिधम्म) usually refers to the last section (piṭaka)
of the Pali canon and includes schematic classifications of scholastic
literature dealing with Theravāda Buddhism. Primary topics include
psychology, philosophy, methodology and metaphysics which are rendered
into exhaustive enumerations and commentaries.


Pali

citta : (nt.) mind; thought; (m.), name of a month: March-April. (adj.), variegated; manifold; beautiful. (nt.), a painting; picture.

(Source): BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

1) Citta, 2 (cp. Sk. caitra, the first month of the year:
MarchApril, orig. N. of the star Spica (in Virgo); see E. Plunket,
Ancient Calendars, etc., pp. 134 sq., 171 sq.) N. of the month Chaitra
PvA.135. Cp. Citra-māsa KhA 192. (Page 268)

2) Citta, 2 (nt.) (Sk. citta, orig. pp. of cinteti, cit, cp. yutta› yuñjati, mutta›muñcati. On etym. from cit. see cinteti). Meaning:—the heart (psychologically), i.e.
the centre & focus of man’s emotional nature as well as that
intellectual element which inheres in & accompanies its
manifestations; i.e. thought. In this wise citta denotes both
the agent & that which is enacted (see kamma II. introd.), for in
Indian Psychology citta is the seat & organ of thought (cetasā
cinteti; cp. Gr. frήn, although on the whole it corresponds more to the
Homeric qumόs). As in the verb (cinteti) there are two stems closely
allied and almost inseparable in meaning (see § III, ), viz. cit &
cet (citta & cetas); cp. ye should restrain, curb, subdue citta by
ceto, M.I, 120, 242 (cp. attanā coday’attānaṃ Dhp 379 f.); cetasā cittaṃ samannesati S.I, 194 (cp. cetasā cittaṃ samannesati S.I, 194). In their general use there is no distinction to be made between the two (see § III,).

The meaning of citta is best understood when explaining it by
expressions familiar to us, as: with all my heart; heart and soul; I
have no heart to do it; blessed are the pure in heart; singleness of
heart (cp. ekagga); all of which emphasize the emotional & conative
side or “thought” more than its mental & rational side (for which
see manas & viññāṇa). It may therefore be rendered by intention,
impulse, design; mood, disposition, state of mind, reaction to
impressions. It is only in later scholastic lgg. that we are justified
in applying the term “thought” in its technical sense. It needs to be
pointed out, as complementary to this view, that citta nearly always
occurs in the singular (=heart), & out of 150 cases in the Nikāyas
only 3 times in the plural (=thoughts). The substantiality of citta
(cetas) is also evident from its connection with kamma (heart as source
of action), kāma & the senses in general. ‹-› On the whole subject
see Mrs. Rh. D. Buddh. Psych. Eth. introd. & Bud. Psy. ch. II.

3.a) Citta (adjective.) (to cetati; *(s)qait to shine, to be bright, cp. Sk. citra, Sk. P. ketu, Av. ciprō, Lat. caelum, Ags. hador, Ohg. heitar, see also citta2) variegated, manifold, beautiful; tasty, sweet, spiced (of cakes), J.IV, 30 (geṇḍuka); Dh.171 (rājaratha); Vv 479; Pv.II, 112 (aneka°); IV, 313 (pūvā=madhurā PvA.251).

3.b) Citta (neuter.) painting Th.1, 674.—Sn.50 (kāmā=Nd2 240 nānāvaṇṇā), 251 (gāthā); J.V, 196 (geṇḍuka), 241 VI, 218.

(Source): Sutta: The Pali Text Society’s Pali-English Dictionary

Pali book cover
context information

Pali
is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda
Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to
Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.


General definition (in Buddhism)

Consciousness is the mind, which perceives the different aspects of objects

(Source): Wisdom Library: Buddhism

First kind of Nama.

1. Citta (consciousness) is of 89 different types. Cittas are divided into four categories:

  1. Moral or skillful consciousness (kusala citta) – 21 types
  2. Immoral or unskillful consciousness (akusala citta) –12 types
  3. Resultant consciousness (vipaka citta) –36 types
  4. Inoperative consciousness (kiriya citta) –20 types

2. Citta is the chief mental phenomena of experience. So in seeing,
for example, the function of the moment of seeing (citta) is to see the
object. Citta is the chief experiencer.

(Source): Dhamma Study: Introduction to the Dhamma
 http://buddhism.redzambala.com/dhammapada/dhammapada-3-citta-vagga.html

Dhammapada | 3. Citta Vagga

3. Citta Vagga
The Mind

1. Phandanaṁ capalaṁ cittaṁ,
dūrakkhaṁ dunnivārayaṁ
Ujuṁ karoti medhāvī, usukāro’va tejanaṁ.

2. Vārijo’va thale khitto, okamokata ubbhato
Pariphandatimidaṁ cittaṁ, māradheyyaṁ pahātave.

Straighten the Fickle Mind

1. The flickering, fickle mind, difficult to guard, difficult to control — the
wise person straightens it as a fletcher straightens an arrow.

2. Like a fish that is drawn from its watery abode and thrown upon land,
even so does this mind flutter. Hence should the realm of the passions be
shunned.

The Elder Meghiya

On his return from alms-round, Meghiya Thera saw a mango grove, and wished to spend the day there in meditation.

He requested permission from the Buddha, who asked him to wait for
another monk to come. Meghiya repeated his request a second and third
time, so the Buddha told him to do what he thought right.

He paid respects and departed for the mango grove. The whole day he
was assailed by unwholesome thoughts, and couldn’t gain concentration.

In the evening he came to see the Buddha who taught him about the
five things conducive to the maturing of insight: having a good friend,
restraint by the Pāṭimokkha, suitable talk, energy, and wisdom.

Furthermore, one should contemplate the repulsive to dispel lust,
loving-kindness to dispel ill-will, mindfulness of breathing to overcome
distraction, and the perception of impermanence to establish the
perception of not-self and eradicate the conceit “I am.”

Control the Mind Well

3. Dunniggahassa lahuno, yattha kāmanipātino
Cittassa damatho sādhu, cittaṁ dantaṁ sukhāvahaṁ.

3. The mind is hard to restrain, swift, it flies wherever it likes:
To control it is good. A controlled mind is conducive to happiness.

It is Hard to Stay with A Mind-reader

Some forest monks dwelt near the village of Mātika. A devout woman,
receiving instruction from the monks, attained Non-returning and the
ability to read others’ thoughts.

Since she knew every thought of the monks, she provided whatever they
needed without even being asked. Before long the monks attained
Arahantship and returned to pay respects to the Buddha. On being asked,
they told him how well the lay woman had looked after their needs.

Hearing this, a certain monk asked permission to go there. From the moment he arrived, she provided everything he wanted.

The monk, fearing that evil thoughts might arise, soon left and told
the Buddha why he couldn’t remain there. The Buddha told him to return
and to restrain his wild mind. He did so, and soon gained Arahantship.

Guard the Mind Well

4. Sududdasaṁ sunipuṇaṁ. yatthakāmanipātinaṁ
Cittaṁ rakkhetha medhāvī, cittaṁ guttaṁ sukhāvahaṁ.

4. The mind is very hard to perceive, extremely subtle, flits wherever it
lists. Let the wise person guard it; a guarded mind is conducive to
happiness.

A Discontented Monk

A devout lay follower became a monk. His preceptor was a master of Vinaya and his teacher was an expert in the Abhidhamma.

The newly ordained monk found the monk’s life onerous due to the many
rules explained by his preceptor and the difficult studies given by his
teacher.

He lost faith and wanted to return to lay life. The Buddha asked him
if he could do one thing. He asked what that was. The Buddha advised him
just to guard his mind well.

Freedom From Māra

5. Dūraṅgamaṁ ekacaraṁ, asarīraṁ guhāsayaṁ
Ye cittaṁ saṁyamessanti, mokkhanti mārabandhanā.

5. Faring far, wandering alone, bodiless, lying in a cave, is the mind.
Those who subdue it are freed from the bond of Māra.

Elder Saṅgharakkhita’s Nephew

A young monk named Saṅgharakkhita soon gained Arahantship. His
sister’s son was named after him, and when he came of age, he also
became a monk.

When the nephew received two pieces of cloth, he presented the
biggest to his uncle, who repeatedly declined the offer. He felt so
rejected that he thought it would be better to disrobe.

While fanning his uncle, he thought that he would sell that piece of
cloth and buy a she-goat to earn some money. The goat would produce many
offspring.

Before long he would have enough money to get married and would have a
son. Then he would ride in a bullock-cart to pay a visit to his uncle
with his wife and child.

On the way his wife would accidentally drop his child under the wheel
of the cart, killing him. He would get angry and hit his wife with a
stick.

Day dreaming thus he struck his uncle with the fan.

Knowing all the thoughts that had passed through his nephew’s mind,
the elder asked him why he was hitting an elderly monk just because he
could not hit his wife.

The nephew was so ashamed that he dropped the fan and ran away. The
novices seized him and brought him to the Buddha. The Buddha described
the fickle nature of the mind.

The Vigilant Have No Fear

6. Anavaṭṭhitacittassa, saddhammaṁ avijānato
Pariplavapasādassa, paññā na paripūrati.
7. Anavassutacittassa, ananvāhatacetaso
Puññapāpapahīṇassa, natthi jāgarato bhayaṁ.

6. He whose mind is not
steadfast, he who knows not the true doctrine, he whose confidence
wavers — the wisdom of such a one will never be perfect.

7. He whose mind is not
soaked (by lust) he who is not affected (by hatred), he who has
transcended both good and evil — for such a vigilant one there is no
fear.

The Mind-tossed Elder

After searching in the forest for his lost ox, a farmer approached
the monks hoping to get some food. The leftovers he received were so
delicious he became a monk thinking it would be an easy life. He soon
became fat and lazy.

Thinking it was too arduous to walk for alms every day, he disrobed
and resumed farming. He disrobed and re-entered the Saṅgha six times, so
the monks named him “Cittahattha Thera — Mind-tossed Elder.”

On returning from the field, seeing his pregnant wife snoring, he
became disgusted with worldly life, and left the house for the seventh
time.

On the way to the monastery he contemplated impermanence and
suffering, and gained the fruit of Stream-entry. He implored the monks
to ordain him once more.

They refused at first, saying that his head was like a whetstone. Finally they relented, and he soon attained Arahantship.

When he stayed for a long time, the monks asked him why, and he told
them that he was now free from attachment. The monks told this to the
Buddha, who explained his state of mind before and after his realisation
of nibbāna.

Fortify the Mind and Be Non-attached

8. Kumbhūpamaṁ kāyamimaṁ viditvā,
nagarūpamaṁ cittamidaṁ ṭhapetvā
Yodhetha māraṁ paññāvudhena,
jitañca rakkhe anivesano siyā.

8. Realising that this
body is (as fragile) as a jar, establishing this mind (as firm) as a
(fortified) city he should attack Māra with the weapon of wisdom. He
should guard his conquest and be without attachment.

The Benefits of Loving-kindness

Five hundred monks who were meditating in a forest were troubled by
the tree-deities, who were inconvenienced by their presence, so made all
manner of frightening sights and sounds to make the monks go away.

The monks sought the advice of the Buddha, who taught them the
Karanīya Metta Sutta, advising them to extend loving-kindness towards
all beings. They did so with the result that those deities protected
them.

Comparing the body to a water jar, the monks developed insight. The
Buddha read their thoughts, and projecting himself before them, he
confirmed what they had thought.

The Body Will Soon Be Cast Aside

9. Aciraṁ vat’ayaṁ kāyo, paṭhaviṁ adhisessati
Chuddho apetaviññāṇo, niratthaṁ ’va kaḷiṅgaraṁ.

9. Before long, alas! this body will lie upon the ground, cast aside, devoid of consciousness, even as a useless charred log.

The Elder Pūtigatta Tissa

A monk named Tissa became afflicted with bone cancer and boils that
oozed pus. Due to the bad odour he was known as Pūtigatta Tissa Thera —
the elder with a stinking body. As the disease worsened, his fellow
monks stayed away from him and no one cared for him.

Knowing this, the Buddha came there, prepared scented water, had the
monks wash his robes, and himself bathed the elder’s body with warm
water. Then he taught him the nature of the body.

The elder attained Arahantship, and passed away, attaining
parinibbāna. The monks asked the Buddha what the elder had done in
previous lives to die in that way.

The Buddha explained that in a previous life he had made a living by selling birds:

He would break the wings and legs of any birds that were unsold at
the end of the day to prevent them escaping, and then sell them the next
day.

One day, when fragrant food had been prepared for him, he saw a monk
coming for alms, who was an Arahant. Wishing to atone for his evil
deeds, he offered the food to the monk, wishing to attain the fruit that
he had attained.

Due to injuring the birds, he died a painful death. Thanks to his
wish for Arahantship, he finally attained it and put an end to
suffering.

An Ill-Directed Mind Can Do Great Harm

10. Diso disaṁ yaṁ taṁ kayirā, verī vā pana verinaṁ
Micchāpanihitaṁ cittaṁ, pāpiyo naṁ tato kare.

10. Whatever (harm) a foe may do to a foe, or a hater to a hater,
An ill-directed mind can do one far greater (harm).

Nanda the Herdsman

A wealthy herdsman offered alms to the Buddha and the Saṅgha for seven days.

When the Buddha departed, he accompanied him for some distance, but
turned back when the Buddha told him to stop. As he returned he was
killed by a stray arrow.

The monks remarked that if the Buddha had not visited that place, the man would not have met with that fatal accident.

The Buddha replied that under no circumstances would he have escaped
death due to past evil kamma. The Buddha added that an ill-directed mind
could cause great harm.

A Well-directed Mind is of Great Benefit

11. Na taṁ mātā pitā kayirā, aññe vā pi ca ñātakā
Sammā panihitaṁ cittaṁ, seyyaso naṁ tato kare.

11. What neither mother, nor father, nor any other relative can do,
A well-directed mind does and thereby elevates one.

A Story of Sex Change

While going to bathe with a close friend, a millionaire with two sons
harboured a lustful thought on seeing the body of Mahākassapa, who was
putting on his robe to enter Soreyya for alms.

He thought, “May this elder be my wife, or may my wife’s body be like his.” As that thought arose, he changed into a woman.

She was so embarrassed that she ran away and made her way to the
distant city of Takkasila. There she married and had two sons. Thus she
was mother of two, and father of two.

Some time later, the millionaire’s close friend went to Takkasila on
business. Recognising him, the millionaire had him invited to his
mansion and after treating him to the usual hospitality, inquired about
his own parents. Then she revealed her former identity and confessed the
thought that had caused the sex change.

The friend advised the millionaire to ask the elder for forgiveness.
As Mahākassapa was living nearby, she invited him for alms and asked for
forgiveness. As soon as Mahākassapa forgave her, she changed back to a
man.

He took leave of the father of his sons in Takkasila, kissed his sons
goodbye, and became a monk. He was known as the Elder Soreyya.

Travelling with Mahākassapa, Soreyya Thera arrived back at Sāvatthī.

Hearing about his past, the people of the country asked him
repeatedly which two sons he had the most affection for. He replied
patiently that had more affection for those two sons of whom he was the
mother.

Soreyya went into solitude and soon attained Arahantship. Later, when
asked the same question again he replied that he no affection for
anyone.

The monks wondered whether this was true, and reported it to the
Buddha who confirmed that Soreyya was now free from affection. The
Buddha praised him and recited the verse saying that a well-directed
mind was of even greater benefit than a mother or a father.






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The Blessed,Noble,Awakened One-The Tathagata


leaving no track {arahant}



Not hoarding,
having understood food,
their pasture — emptiness
& freedom without sign:
their trail,
like that of birds through space,
can’t be traced.
	
Effluents ended,
independent of nutriment,
their pasture — emptiness
& freedom without sign:
their trail,
like that of birds through space,
can’t be traced.
\"Y3\"

Sela



Setting at Savatthi. Then, in the morning, the bhikkhuni Sela dressed… she sat down at the foot of a tree for the day’s abiding.

Then Mara the Evil One, desiring to arouse fear, trepidation, and terror in the bhikkhuni Sela, desiring to make her fall away from concentration, approached her and addressed her in verse:

http://www.fashioninc.org/2006/09/

By whom has this puppet been created?
Where is the maker of the puppet?
Where has the puppet arisen?
Where does the puppet cease?

Then it occurred to the bhikkhuni Sela: “Now who is this…? This is Mara the Evil One… desiring to make me fall away from concentration.”

Then the bhikkhuni Sela, having understood, “This is Mara the Evil One,” replied to him in verses:

This puppet is not made by itself,
Nor is this misery made by another.
It has come to be dependent on a cause,
When the cause dissolves then it will cease.
	
As when a seed is sown in a field
It grows depending on a pair of factors:
It requires both the soil’s nutrients
And a steady supply of moisture.
	
Just so the aggregates and elements,
And these six bases of sensory contact,
Have come to be dependent on a cause;
When the cause dissolves they will cease.

Then Mara the Evil One, realizing, “The bhikkhuni Sela knows me,” sad and disappointed, disappeared right there.

(90) 2748 Tue 18 Sep 2018 LESSON (91) Tue 18 Sep 2007 Do Good Be Mindful - Awakened One with Awareness (AOA) Tipiṭaka (Kannada) Abhisambidhana Sutta Theravada (major branch of Buddhism) Dhammapada | 3. Citta VaggaDoctrine-True Practice of The Path Shown by The Blessed,Noble,Awakened One-The Tathagata-Disenchantment
Filed under: General
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(90)

2748 Tue 18 Sep 2018 LESSON (91) Tue 18 Sep 2007 Do Good Be Mindful - Awakened One with Awareness (AOA)


Abhisambidhana Sutta

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Dhammapada | 3. Citta Vagga






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೮. ಮಹಾಸೀಹನಾದಸುತ್ತವಣ್ಣನಾ
೯. ಪೋಟ್ಠಪಾದಸುತ್ತವಣ್ಣನಾ

೧೦. ಸುಭಸುತ್ತವಣ್ಣನಾ
೧೧. ಕೇವಟ್ಟಸುತ್ತವಣ್ಣನಾ
೧೨. ಲೋಹಿಚ್ಚಸುತ್ತವಣ್ಣನಾ

೧೨. ಲೋಹಿಚ್ಚಸುತ್ತವಣ್ಣನಾ


ಲೋಹಿಚ್ಚಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣವತ್ಥುವಣ್ಣನಾ


೫೦೧. ಏವಂ ಮೇ ಸುತಂ…ಪೇ॰… ಕೋಸಲೇಸೂತಿ ಲೋಹಿಚ್ಚಸುತ್ತಂ। ತತ್ರಾಯಂ ಅನುತ್ತಾನಪದವಣ್ಣನಾ। ಸಾಲವತಿಕಾತಿ ತಸ್ಸ ಗಾಮಸ್ಸ ನಾಮಂ, ಸೋ ಕಿರ ವತಿಯಾ ವಿಯ ಸಮನ್ತತೋ ಸಾಲಪನ್ತಿಯಾ ಪರಿಕ್ಖಿತ್ತೋ। ತಸ್ಮಾ ಸಾಲವತಿಕಾತಿ ವುಚ್ಚತಿ। ಲೋಹಿಚ್ಚೋತಿ ತಸ್ಸ ಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣಸ್ಸ ನಾಮಂ।


೫೦೨-೫೦೩. ಪಾಪಕನ್ತಿ ಪರಾನುಕಮ್ಪಾ ವಿರಹಿತತ್ತಾ ಲಾಮಕಂ, ನ ಪನ ಉಚ್ಛೇದಸಸ್ಸತಾನಂ ಅಞ್ಞತರಂ। ಉಪ್ಪನ್ನಂ ಹೋತೀತಿ ಜಾತಂ ಹೋತಿ, ನ ಕೇವಲಞ್ಚ ಚಿತ್ತೇ ಜಾತಮತ್ತಮೇವ। ಸೋ ಕಿರ ತಸ್ಸ ವಸೇನ ಪರಿಸಮಜ್ಝೇಪಿ ಏವಂ ಭಾಸತಿಯೇವ। ಕಿಞ್ಹಿ ಪರೋ ಪರಸ್ಸಾತಿ
ಪರೋ ಯೋ ಅನುಸಾಸೀಯತಿ, ಸೋ ತಸ್ಸ ಅನುಸಾಸಕಸ್ಸ ಕಿಂ ಕರಿಸ್ಸತಿ। ಅತ್ತನಾ ಪಟಿಲದ್ಧಂ
ಕುಸಲಂ ಧಮ್ಮಂ ಅತ್ತನಾವ ಸಕ್ಕತ್ವಾ ಗರುಂ ಕತ್ವಾ ವಿಹಾತಬ್ಬನ್ತಿ ವದತಿ।


೫೦೪-೪೦೭. ರೋಸಿಕಂ ನ್ಹಾಪಿತಂ ಆಮನ್ತೇಸೀತಿ
ರೋಸಿಕಾತಿ ಏವಂ ಇತ್ಥಿಲಿಙ್ಗವಸೇನ ಲದ್ಧನಾಮಂ ನ್ಹಾಪಿತಂ ಆಮನ್ತೇಸಿ। ಸೋ ಕಿರ ಭಗವತೋ
ಆಗಮನಂ ಸುತ್ವಾ ಚಿನ್ತೇಸಿ – ‘‘ವಿಹಾರಂ ಗನ್ತ್ವಾ ದಿಟ್ಠಂ ನಾಮಂ ಭಾರೋ, ಗೇಹಂ ಪನ
ಆಣಾಪೇತ್ವಾ ಪಸ್ಸಿಸ್ಸಾಮಿ ಚೇವ ಯಥಾಸತ್ತಿ ಚ ಆಗನ್ತುಕಭಿಕ್ಖಂ ದಸ್ಸಾಮೀ’’ತಿ, ತಸ್ಮಾ
ಏವಂ ನ್ಹಾಪಿತಂ ಆಮನ್ತೇಸಿ।


೫೦೮. ಪಿಟ್ಠಿತೋ ಪಿಟ್ಠಿತೋತಿ ಕಥಾಫಾಸುಕತ್ಥಂ ಪಚ್ಛತೋ ಪಚ್ಛತೋ ಅನುಬನ್ಧೋ ಹೋತಿ। ವಿವೇಚೇತೂತಿ ವಿಮೋಚೇತು, ತಂ ದಿಟ್ಠಿಗತಂ ವಿನೋದೇತೂತಿ ವದತಿ। ಅಯಂ ಕಿರ ಉಪಾಸಕೋ ಲೋಹಿಚ್ಚಸ್ಸ ಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣಸ್ಸ ಪಿಯಸಹಾಯಕೋ। ತಸ್ಮಾ ತಸ್ಸ ಅತ್ಥಕಾಮತಾಯ ಏವಮಾಹ। ಅಪ್ಪೇವ ನಾಮ ಸಿಯಾತಿ ಏತ್ಥ ಪಠಮವಚನೇನ ಭಗವಾ ಗಜ್ಜತಿ, ದುತಿಯವಚನೇನ ಅನುಗಜ್ಜತಿ। ಅಯಂ ಕಿರೇತ್ಥ ಅಧಿಪ್ಪಾಯೋ – ರೋಸಿಕೇ ಏತದತ್ಥಮೇವ ಮಯಾ ಚತ್ತಾರಿ ಅಸಙ್ಖ್ಯೇಯ್ಯಾನಿ। ಕಪ್ಪಸತಸಹಸ್ಸಞ್ಚ ವಿವಿಧಾನಿ ದುಕ್ಕರಾನಿ ಕರೋನ್ತೇನ ಪಾರಮಿಯೋ ಪೂರಿತಾ ,
ಏತದತ್ಥಮೇವ ಸಬ್ಬಞ್ಞುತಞ್ಞಾಣಂ ಪಟಿವಿದ್ಧಂ, ನ ಮೇ ಲೋಹಿಚ್ಚಸ್ಸ ದಿಟ್ಠಿಗತಂ
ಭಿನ್ದಿತುಂ ಭಾರೋತಿ, ಇಮಮತ್ಥಂ ದಸ್ಸೇನ್ತೋ ಪಠಮವಚನೇನ ಭಗವಾ ಗಜ್ಜತಿ। ಕೇವಲಂ ರೋಸಿಕೇ
ಲೋಹಿಚ್ಚಸ್ಸ ಮಮ ಸನ್ತಿಕೇ ಆಗಮನಂ ವಾ ನಿಸಜ್ಜಾ ವಾ ಅಲ್ಲಾಪಸಲ್ಲಾಪೋ ವಾ ಹೋತು, ಸಚೇಪಿ
ಲೋಹಿಚ್ಚಸದಿಸಾನಂ ಸತಸಹಸ್ಸಸ್ಸ ಕಙ್ಖಾ ಹೋತಿ, ಪಟಿಬಲೋ ಅಹಂ ವಿನೋದೇತುಂ ಲೋಹಿಚ್ಚಸ್ಸ ಪನ
ಏಕಸ್ಸ ದಿಟ್ಠಿವಿನೋದನೇ ಮಯ್ಹಂ ಕೋ ಭಾರೋತಿ ಇಮಮತ್ಥಂ ದಸ್ಸೇನ್ತೋ ದುತಿಯವಚನೇನ ಭಗವಾ
ಅನುಗಜ್ಜತೀತಿ ವೇದಿತಬ್ಬೋ।


ಲೋಹಿಚ್ಚಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣಾನುಯೋಗವಣ್ಣನಾ


೫೦೯. ಸಮುದಯಸಞ್ಜಾತೀತಿ ಸಮುದಯಸ್ಸ ಸಞ್ಜಾತಿ ಭೋಗುಪ್ಪಾದೋ, ತತೋ ಉಟ್ಠಿತಂ ಧನಧಞ್ಞನ್ತಿ ಅತ್ಥೋ। ಯೇ ತಂ ಉಪಜೀವನ್ತೀತಿ ಯೇ ಞಾತಿಪರಿಜನದಾಸಕಮ್ಮಕರಾದಯೋ ಜನಾ ತಂ ನಿಸ್ಸಾಯ ಜೀವನ್ತಿ। ಅನ್ತರಾಯಕರೋತಿ ಲಾಭನ್ತರಾಯಕರೋ। ಹಿತಾನುಕಮ್ಪೀತಿ ಏತ್ಥ ಹಿತನ್ತಿ ವುಡ್ಢಿ। ಅನುಕಮ್ಪತೀತಿ ಅನುಕಮ್ಪೀ, ಇಚ್ಛತೀತಿ ಅತ್ಥೋ, ವುಡ್ಢಿಂ ಇಚ್ಛತಿ ವಾ ನೋ ವಾತಿ ವುತ್ತಂ ಹೋತಿ। ನಿರಯಂ ವಾ ತಿರಚ್ಛಾನಯೋನಿಂ ವಾತಿ ಸಚೇ ಸಾ ಮಿಚ್ಛಾದಿಟ್ಠಿ ಸಮ್ಪಜ್ಜತಿ, ನಿಯತಾ ಹೋತಿ, ಏಕಂಸೇನ ನಿರಯೇ ನಿಬ್ಬತ್ತತಿ, ನೋ ಚೇ, ತಿರಚ್ಛಾನಯೋನಿಯಂ ನಿಬ್ಬತ್ತತೀತಿ ಅತ್ಥೋ।


೫೧೦-೫೧೨.
ಇದಾನಿ ಯಸ್ಮಾ ಯಥಾ ಅತ್ತನೋ ಲಾಭನ್ತರಾಯೇನ ಸತ್ತಾ ಸಂವಿಜ್ಜನ್ತಿ ನ ತಥಾ ಪರೇಸಂ, ತಸ್ಮಾ
ಸುಟ್ಠುತರಂ ಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣಂ ಪವೇಚೇತುಕಾಮೋ ‘‘ತಂ ಕಿಂ ಮಞ್ಞಸೀ’’ತಿ ದುತಿಯಂ ಉಪಪತ್ತಿಮಾಹ। ಯೇ ಚಿಮೇತಿ ಯೇ ಚ ಇಮೇ ತಥಾಗತಸ್ಸ ಧಮ್ಮದೇಸನಂ ಸುತ್ವಾ ಅರಿಯಭೂಮಿಂ ಓಕ್ಕಮಿತುಂ ಅಸಕ್ಕೋನ್ತಾ ಕುಲಪುತ್ತಾ ದಿಬ್ಬಾ ಗಬ್ಭಾತಿ ಉಪಯೋಗತ್ಥೇ ಪಚ್ಚತ್ತವಚನಂ, ದಿಬ್ಬೇ ಗಬ್ಭೇತಿ ಅತ್ಥೋ। ದಿಬ್ಬಾ, ಗಬ್ಭಾತಿ ಚ ಛನ್ನಂ ದೇವಲೋಕಾನಮೇತಂ ಅಧಿವಚನಂ। ಪರಿಪಾಚೇನ್ತೀತಿ
ದೇವಲೋಕಗಾಮಿನಿಂ ಪಟಿಪದಂ ಪೂರಯಮಾನಾ ದಾನಂ, ದದಮಾನಾ, ಸೀಲಂ ರಕ್ಖಮಾನಾ,
ಗನ್ಧಮಾಲಾದೀಹಿ, ಪೂಜಂ ಕುರುಮಾನಾ ಭಾವನಂ ಭಾವಯಮಾನಾ ಪಾಚೇನ್ತಿ ವಿಪಾಚೇನ್ತಿ
ಪರಿಪಾಚೇನ್ತಿ ಪರಿಣಾಮಂ ಗಮೇನ್ತಿ। ದಿಬ್ಬಾನಂ ಭವಾನಂ ಅಭಿನಿಬ್ಬತ್ತಿಯಾತಿ ದಿಬ್ಬಭವಾ ನಾಮ ದೇವಾನಂ ವಿಮಾನಾನಿ , ತೇಸಂ ನಿಬ್ಬತ್ತನತ್ಥಾಯಾತಿ ಅತ್ಥೋ। ಅಥ ವಾ ದಿಬ್ಬಾ ಗಬ್ಭಾತಿ ದಾನಾದಯೋ ಪುಞ್ಞವಿಸೇಸಾ। ದಿಬ್ಬಾ ಭವಾತಿ ದೇವಲೋಕೇ ವಿಪಾಕಕ್ಖನ್ಧಾ, ತೇಸಂ ನಿಬ್ಬತ್ತನತ್ಥಾಯ ತಾನಿ ಪುಞ್ಞಾನಿ ಕರೋನ್ತೀತಿ ಅತ್ಥೋ। ತೇಸಂ ಅನ್ತರಾಯಕರೋತಿ ತೇಸಂ ಮಗ್ಗಸಮ್ಪತ್ತಿಫಲಸಮ್ಪತ್ತಿದಿಬ್ಬಭವವಿಸೇಸಾನಂ ಅನ್ತರಾಯಕರೋ। ಇತಿ ಭಗವಾ ಏತ್ತಾವತಾ ಅನಿಯಮಿತೇನೇವ ಓಪಮ್ಮವಿಧಿನಾ ಯಾವ ಭವಗ್ಗಾ ಉಗ್ಗತಂ ಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣಸ್ಸ ಮಾನಂ ಭಿನ್ದಿತ್ವಾ ಇದಾನಿ ಚೋದನಾರಹೇ ತಯೋ ಸತ್ಥಾರೇ ದಸ್ಸೇತುಂ ‘‘ತಯೋ ಖೋ ಮೇ, ಲೋಹಿಚ್ಚಾ’’ತಿಆದಿಮಾಹ।


ತಯೋ ಚೋದನಾರಹವಣ್ಣನಾ


೫೧೩. ತತ್ಥ ಸಾ ಚೋದನಾತಿ ತಯೋ ಸತ್ಥಾರೇ ಚೋದೇನ್ತಸ್ಸ ಚೋದನಾ। ನ ಅಞ್ಞಾ ಚಿತ್ತಂ ಉಪಟ್ಠಪೇನ್ತೀತಿ ಅಞ್ಞಾಯ ಆಜಾನನತ್ಥಾಯ ಚಿತ್ತಂ ನ ಉಪಟ್ಠಪೇನ್ತಿ। ವೋಕ್ಕಮ್ಮಾತಿ ನಿರನ್ತರಂ ತಸ್ಸ ಸಾಸನಂ ಅಕತ್ವಾ ತತೋ ಉಕ್ಕಮಿತ್ವಾ ವತ್ತನ್ತೀತಿ ಅತ್ಥೋ। ಓಸಕ್ಕನ್ತಿಯಾ ವಾ ಉಸ್ಸಕ್ಕೇಯ್ಯಾತಿ ಪಟಿಕ್ಕಮನ್ತಿಯಾ ಉಪಗಚ್ಛೇಯ್ಯ, ಅನಿಚ್ಛನ್ತಿಯಾ ಇಚ್ಛೇಯ್ಯ, ಏಕಾಯ ಸಮ್ಪಯೋಗಂ ಅನಿಚ್ಛನ್ತಿಯಾ ಏಕೋ ಇಚ್ಛೇಯ್ಯಾತಿ ವುತ್ತಂ ಹೋತಿ। ಪರಮ್ಮುಖಿಂ ವಾ ಆಲಿಙ್ಗೇಯ್ಯಾತಿ ದಟ್ಠುಮ್ಪಿ ಅನಿಚ್ಛಮಾನಂ ಪರಮ್ಮುಖಿಂ ಠಿತಂ ಪಚ್ಛತೋ ಗನ್ತ್ವಾ ಆಲಿಙ್ಗೇಯ್ಯ। ಏವಂಸಮ್ಪದಮಿದನ್ತಿ
ಇಮಸ್ಸಾಪಿ ಸತ್ಥುನೋ ‘‘ಮಮ ಇಮೇ ಸಾವಕಾ’’ತಿ ಸಾಸನಾ ವೋಕ್ಕಮ್ಮ ವತ್ತಮಾನೇಪಿ ತೇ ಲೋಭೇನ
ಅನುಸಾಸತೋ ಇಮಂ ಲೋಭಧಮ್ಮಂ ಏವಂಸಮ್ಪದಮೇವ ಈದಿಸಮೇವ ವದಾಮಿ। ಇತಿ ಸೋ ಏವರೂಪೋ ತವ
ಲೋಭಧಮ್ಮೋ ಯೇನ ತ್ವಂ ಓಸಕ್ಕನ್ತಿಯಾ ಉಸ್ಸಕ್ಕನ್ತೋ ವಿಯ ಪರಮ್ಮುಖಿಂ ಆಲಿಙ್ಗನ್ತೋ ವಿಯ
ಅಹೋಸೀತಿಪಿ ತಂ ಚೋದನಂ ಅರಹತಿ। ಕಿಞ್ಹಿ ಪರೋ ಪರಸ್ಸ ಕರಿಸ್ಸತೀತಿ ಯೇನ ಧಮ್ಮೇನ ಪರೇ ಅನುಸಾಸಿ, ಅತ್ತಾನಮೇವ ತಾವ ತತ್ಥ ಸಮ್ಪಾದೇಹಿ, ಉಜುಂ ಕರೋಹಿ। ಕಿಞ್ಹಿ ಪರೋ ಪರಸ್ಸ ಕರಿಸ್ಸತೀತಿ ಚೋದನಂ ಅರಹತಿ।


೫೧೪. ನಿದ್ದಾಯಿತಬ್ಬನ್ತಿ ಸಸ್ಸರೂಪಕಾನಿ ತಿಣಾನಿ ಉಪ್ಪಾಟೇತ್ವಾ ಪರಿಸುದ್ಧಂ ಕಾತಬ್ಬಂ।


೫೧೫. ತತಿಯಚೋದನಾಯ ಕಿಞ್ಹಿ ಪರೋ ಪರಸ್ಸಾತಿ ಅನುಸಾಸನಂ ಅಸಮ್ಪಟಿಚ್ಛನಕಾಲತೋ ಪಟ್ಠಾಯ ಪರೋ ಅನುಸಾಸಿತಬ್ಬೋ, ಪರಸ್ಸ
ಅನುಸಾಸಕಸ್ಸ ಕಿಂ ಕರಿಸ್ಸತೀತಿ ನನು ತತ್ಥ ಅಪ್ಪೋಸ್ಸುಕ್ಕತಂ ಆಪಜ್ಜಿತ್ವಾ ಅತ್ತನಾ
ಪಟಿವಿದ್ಧಧಮ್ಮಂ ಅತ್ತನಾವ ಮಾನೇತ್ವಾ ಪೂಜೇತ್ವಾ ವಿಹಾತಬ್ಬನ್ತಿ ಏವಂ ಚೋದನಂ ಅರಹತೀತಿ
ಅತ್ಥೋ।


ನ ಚೋದನಾರಹಸತ್ಥುವಣ್ಣನಾ


೫೧೬. ಚೋದನಾರಹೋತಿ
ಅಯಞ್ಹಿ ಯಸ್ಮಾ ಪಠಮಮೇವ ಅತ್ತಾನಂ ಪತಿರೂಪೇ ಪತಿಟ್ಠಾಪೇತ್ವಾ ಸಾವಕಾನಂ ಧಮ್ಮಂ ದೇಸೇತಿ।
ಸಾವಕಾ ಚಸ್ಸ ಅಸ್ಸವಾ ಹುತ್ವಾ ಯಥಾನುಸಿಟ್ಠಂ ಪಟಿಪಜ್ಜನ್ತಿ, ತಾಯ ಚ ಪಟಿಪತ್ತಿಯಾ
ಮಹನ್ತಂ ವಿಸೇಸಮಧಿಗಚ್ಛನ್ತಿ। ತಸ್ಮಾ ನ ಚೋದನಾರಹೋತಿ।


೫೧೭. ನರಕಪಪಾತಂ ಪಪತನ್ತೋತಿ ಮಯಾ ಗಹಿತಾಯ ದಿಟ್ಠಿಯಾ ಅಹಂ ನರಕಪಪಾತಂ ಪಪತನ್ತೋ। ಉದ್ಧರಿತ್ವಾ ಥಲೇ ಪತಿಟ್ಠಾಪಿತೋತಿ ತಂ ದಿಟ್ಠಿಂ ಭಿನ್ದಿತ್ವಾ ಧಮ್ಮದೇಸನಾಹತ್ಥೇನ ಅಪಾಯಪತನತೋ ಉದ್ಧರಿತ್ವಾ ಸಗ್ಗಮಗ್ಗಥಲೇ ಠಪಿತೋಮ್ಹೀತಿ ವದತಿ। ಸೇಸಮೇತ್ಥ ಉತ್ತಾನಮೇವಾತಿ।


ಇತಿ ಸುಮಙ್ಗಲವಿಲಾಸಿನಿಯಾ ದೀಘನಿಕಾಯಟ್ಠಕಥಾಯಂ


ಲೋಹಿಚ್ಚಸುತ್ತವಣ್ಣನಾ ನಿಟ್ಠಿತಾ।


















೮. ಮಹಾಸೀಹನಾದಸುತ್ತವಣ್ಣನಾ
೯. ಪೋಟ್ಠಪಾದಸುತ್ತವಣ್ಣನಾ

೧೦. ಸುಭಸುತ್ತವಣ್ಣನಾ
೧೧. ಕೇವಟ್ಟಸುತ್ತವಣ್ಣನಾ
೧೨. ಲೋಹಿಚ್ಚಸುತ್ತವಣ್ಣನಾ
೧೩. ತೇವಿಜ್ಜಸುತ್ತವಣ್ಣನಾ

೧೩. ತೇವಿಜ್ಜಸುತ್ತವಣ್ಣನಾ


೫೧೮. ಏವಂ ಮೇ ಸುತಂ…ಪೇ॰… ಕೋಸಲೇಸೂತಿ ತೇವಿಜ್ಜಸುತ್ತಂ। ತತ್ರಾಯಂ ಅನುತ್ತಾನಪದವಣ್ಣನಾ। ಮನಸಾಕಟನ್ತಿ ತಸ್ಸ ಗಾಮಸ್ಸ ನಾಮಂ। ಉತ್ತರೇನ ಮನಸಾಕಟಸ್ಸಾತಿ ಮನಸಾಕಟತೋ ಅವಿದೂರೇ ಉತ್ತರಪಸ್ಸೇ। ಅಮ್ಬವನೇತಿ
ತರುಣಅಮ್ಬರುಕ್ಖಸಣ್ಡೇ, ರಮಣೀಯೋ ಕಿರ ಸೋ ಭೂಮಿಭಾಗೋ, ಹೇಟ್ಠಾ ರಜತಪಟ್ಟಸದಿಸಾ ವಾಲಿಕಾ
ವಿಪ್ಪಕಿಣ್ಣಾ, ಉಪರಿ ಮಣಿವಿತಾನಂ ವಿಯ ಘನಸಾಖಾಪತ್ತಂ ಅಮ್ಬವನಂ। ತಸ್ಮಿಂ ಬುದ್ಧಾನಂ
ಅನುಚ್ಛವಿಕೇ ಪವಿವೇಕಸುಖೇ ಅಮ್ಬವನೇ ವಿಹರತೀತಿ ಅತ್ಥೋ।


೫೧೯. ಅಭಿಞ್ಞಾತಾ ಅಭಿಞ್ಞಾತಾತಿ ಕುಲಚಾರಿತ್ತಾದಿಸಮ್ಪತ್ತಿಯಾ ತತ್ಥ ತತ್ಥ ಪಞ್ಞಾತಾ। ಚಙ್ಕೀತಿಆದೀನಿ ತೇಸಂ ನಾಮಾನಿ। ತತ್ಥ ಚಙ್ಕೀ ಓಪಾಸಾದವಾಸಿಕೋ। ತಾರುಕ್ಖೋ ಇಚ್ಛಾನಙ್ಗಲವಾಸಿಕೋ। ಪೋಕ್ಖರಸಾತೀ ಉಕ್ಕಟ್ಠವಾಸಿಕೋ। ಜಾಣುಸೋಣೀ ಸಾವತ್ಥಿವಾಸಿಕೋ। ತೋದೇಯ್ಯೋ ತುದಿಗಾಮವಾಸಿಕೋ। ಅಞ್ಞೇ ಚಾತಿ
ಅಞ್ಞೇ ಚ ಬಹುಜನಾ। ಅತ್ತನೋ ಅತ್ತನೋ ನಿವಾಸಟ್ಠಾನೇಹಿ ಆಗನ್ತ್ವಾ ಮನ್ತಸಜ್ಝಾಯಕರಣತ್ಥಂ
ತತ್ಥ ಪಟಿವಸನ್ತಿ। ಮನಸಾಕಟಸ್ಸ ಕಿರ ರಮಣೀಯತಾಯ ತೇ ಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣಾ ತತ್ಥ ನದೀತೀರೇ ಗೇಹಾನಿ
ಕಾರೇತ್ವಾ ಪರಿಕ್ಖಿಪಾಪೇತ್ವಾ ಅಞ್ಞೇಸಂ ಬಹೂನಂ ಪವೇಸನಂ ನಿವಾರೇತ್ವಾ ಅನ್ತರನ್ತರಾ ತತ್ಥ
ಗನ್ತ್ವಾ ವಸನ್ತಿ।


೫೨೦-೫೨೧. ವಾಸೇಟ್ಠಭಾರದ್ವಾಜಾನನ್ತಿ ವಾಸೇಟ್ಠಸ್ಸ ಚ ಪೋಕ್ಖರಸಾತಿನೋ ಅನ್ತೇವಾಸಿಕಸ್ಸ, ಭಾರದ್ವಾಜಸ್ಸ ಚ ತಾರುಕ್ಖನ್ತೇವಾಸಿಕಸ್ಸ। ಏತೇ ಕಿರ ದ್ವೇ ಜಾತಿಸಮ್ಪನ್ನಾ ತಿಣ್ಣಂ ವೇದಾನಂ ಪಾರಗೂ ಅಹೇಸುಂ। ಜಙ್ಘವಿಹಾರನ್ತಿ
ಅತಿಚಿರನಿಸಜ್ಜಪಚ್ಚಯಾ ಕಿಲಮಥವಿನೋದನತ್ಥಾಯ ಜಙ್ಘಚಾರಂ। ತೇ ಕಿರ ದಿವಸಂ ಸಜ್ಝಾಯಂ
ಕತ್ವಾ ಸಾಯನ್ಹೇ ವುಟ್ಠಾಯ ನ್ಹಾನೀಯಸಮ್ಭಾರಗನ್ಧಮಾಲತೇಲಧೋತವತ್ಥಾನಿ ಗಾಹಾಪೇತ್ವಾ
ಅತ್ತನೋ ಪರಿಜನಪರಿವುತಾ ನ್ಹಾಯಿತುಕಾಮಾ ನದೀತೀರಂ ಗನ್ತ್ವಾ
ರಜತಪಟ್ಟವಣ್ಣೇ ವಾಲಿಕಾಸಣ್ಡೇ ಅಪರಾಪರಂ ಚಙ್ಕಮಿಂಸು। ಏಕಂ ಚಙ್ಕಮನ್ತಂ ಇತರೋ
ಅನುಚಙ್ಕಮಿ, ಪುನ ಇತರಂ ಇತರೋತಿ। ತೇನ ವುತ್ತಂ ‘‘ಅನುಚಙ್ಕಮನ್ತಾನಂ
ಅನುವಿಚರನ್ತಾನ’’ನ್ತಿ। ಮಗ್ಗಾಮಗ್ಗೇತಿ ಮಗ್ಗೇ ಚ ಅಮಗ್ಗೇ
ಚ। ಕತಮಂ ನು ಖೋ ಪಟಿಪದಂ ಪೂರೇತ್ವಾ ಕತಮೇನ ಮಗ್ಗೇನ ಸಕ್ಕಾ ಸುಖಂ ಬ್ರಹ್ಮಲೋಕಂ
ಗನ್ತುನ್ತಿ ಏವಂ ಮಗ್ಗಾಮಗ್ಗಂ ಆರಬ್ಭ ಕಥಂ ಸಮುಟ್ಠಾಪೇಸುನ್ತಿ ಅತ್ಥೋ। ಅಞ್ಜಸಾಯನೋತಿ ಉಜುಮಗ್ಗಸ್ಸೇತಂ ವೇವಚನಂ, ಅಞ್ಜಸಾ ವಾ ಉಜುಕಮೇವ ಏತೇನ ಆಯನ್ತಿ ಆಗಚ್ಛನ್ತೀತಿ ಅಞ್ಜಸಾಯನೋ ನಿಯ್ಯಾನಿಕೋ ನಿಯ್ಯಾತೀತಿ ನಿಯ್ಯಾಯನ್ತೋ ನಿಯ್ಯಾತಿ, ಗಚ್ಛನ್ತೋ ಗಚ್ಛತೀತಿ ಅತ್ಥೋ।


ತಕ್ಕರಸ್ಸ ಬ್ರಹ್ಮಸಹಬ್ಯತಾಯಾತಿ ಯೋ ತಂ ಮಗ್ಗಂ ಕರೋತಿ ಪಟಿಪಜ್ಜತಿ, ತಸ್ಸ ಬ್ರಹ್ಮುನಾ ಸದ್ಧಿಂ ಸಹಭಾವಾಯ, ಏಕಟ್ಠಾನೇ ಪಾತುಭಾವಾಯ ಗಚ್ಛತೀತಿ ಅತ್ಥೋ। ಯ್ವಾಯನ್ತಿ ಯೋ ಅಯಂ। ಅಕ್ಖಾತೋತಿ ಕಥಿತೋ ದೀಪಿತೋ। ಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣೇನ ಪೋಕ್ಖರಸಾತಿನಾತಿ ಅತ್ತನೋ ಆಚರಿಯಂ ಅಪದಿಸತಿ। ಇತಿ ವಾಸೇಟ್ಠೋ ಸಕಮೇವ ಆಚರಿಯವಾದಂ ಥೋಮೇತ್ವಾ ಪಗ್ಗಣ್ಹಿತ್ವಾ ವಿಚರತಿ। ಭಾರದ್ವಾಜೋಪಿ ಸಕಮೇವಾತಿ। ತೇನ ವುತ್ತಂ ‘‘ನೇವ ಖೋ ಅಸಕ್ಖಿ ವಾಸೇಟ್ಠೋ’’ತಿಆದಿ।


ತತೋ ವಾಸೇಟ್ಠೋ ‘‘ಉಭಿನ್ನಮ್ಪಿ ಅಮ್ಹಾಕಂ ಕಥಾ ಅನಿಯ್ಯಾನಿಕಾವ,
ಇಮಸ್ಮಿಞ್ಚ ಲೋಕೇ ಮಗ್ಗಕುಸಲೋ ನಾಮ ಭೋತಾ ಗೋತಮೇನ ಸದಿಸೋ ನತ್ಥಿ, ಭವಞ್ಚ ಗೋತಮೋ
ಅವಿದೂರೇ ವಸತಿ, ಸೋ ನೋ ತುಲಂ ಗಹೇತ್ವಾ ನಿಸಿನ್ನವಾಣಿಜೋ ವಿಯ ಕಙ್ಖಂ ಛಿನ್ದಿಸ್ಸತೀ’’ತಿ
ಚಿನ್ತೇತ್ವಾ ತಮತ್ಥಂ ಭಾರದ್ವಾಜಸ್ಸ ಆರೋಚೇತ್ವಾ ಉಭೋಪಿ ಗನ್ತ್ವಾ ಅತ್ತನೋ ಕಥಂ ಭಗವತೋ
ಆರೋಚೇಸುಂ। ತೇನ ವುತ್ತಂ ‘‘ಅಥ ಖೋ ವಾಸೇಟ್ಠೋ…ಪೇ॰… ಯ್ವಾಯಂ ಅಕ್ಖಾತೋ ಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣೇನ
ತಾರುಕ್ಖೇನಾ’’ತಿ।


೫೨೨. ಏತ್ಥ ಭೋ ಗೋತಮಾತಿ ಏತಸ್ಮಿಂ ಮಗ್ಗಾಮಗ್ಗೇ। ವಿಗ್ಗಹೋ ವಿವಾದೋತಿಆದೀಸು ಪುಬ್ಬುಪ್ಪತ್ತಿಕೋ ವಿಗ್ಗಹೋ। ಅಪರಭಾಗೇ ವಿವಾದೋ। ದುವಿಧೋಪಿ ಏಸೋ ನಾನಾಆಚರಿಯಾನಂ ವಾದತೋ ನಾನಾವಾದೋ।


೫೨೩. ಅಥ ಕಿಸ್ಮಿಂ ಪನ ವೋತಿ
ತ್ವಮ್ಪಿ ಅಯಮೇವ ಮಗ್ಗೋತಿ ಅತ್ತನೋ ಆಚರಿಯವಾದಮೇವ ಪಗ್ಗಯ್ಹ ತಿಟ್ಠಸಿ, ಭಾರದ್ವಾಜೋಪಿ
ಅತ್ತನೋ ಆಚರಿಯವಾದಮೇವ, ಏಕಸ್ಸಾಪಿ ಏಕಸ್ಮಿಂ ಸಂಸಯೋ ನತ್ಥಿ। ಏವಂ ಸತಿ ಕಿಸ್ಮಿಂ ವೋ
ವಿಗ್ಗಹೋತಿ ಪುಚ್ಛತಿ।


೫೨೪. ಮಗ್ಗಾಮಗ್ಗೇ , ಭೋ ಗೋತಮಾತಿ
ಮಗ್ಗೇ ಭೋ ಗೋತಮ ಅಮಗ್ಗೇ ಚ, ಉಜುಮಗ್ಗೇ ಚ ಅನುಜುಮಗ್ಗೇ ಚಾತಿ ಅತ್ಥೋ। ಏಸ ಕಿರ
ಏಕಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣಸ್ಸಾಪಿ ಮಗ್ಗಂ ‘‘ನ ಮಗ್ಗೋ’’ತಿ ನ ವದತಿ। ಯಥಾ ಪನ ಅತ್ತನೋ ಆಚರಿಯಸ್ಸ
ಮಗ್ಗೋ ಉಜುಮಗ್ಗೋ, ನ ಏವಂ ಅಞ್ಞೇಸಂ ಅನುಜಾನಾತಿ, ತಸ್ಮಾ ತಮೇವತ್ಥಂ ದೀಪೇನ್ತೋ ‘‘ಕಿಞ್ಚಾಪಿ ಭೋ ಗೋತಮಾ’’ತಿಆದಿಮಾಹ।


ಸಬ್ಬಾನಿ ತಾನೀತಿ ಲಿಙ್ಗವಿಪಲ್ಲಾಸೇನ ವದತಿ, ಸಬ್ಬೇ ತೇತಿ ವುತ್ತಂ ಹೋತಿ। ಬಹೂನೀತಿ ಅಟ್ಠ ವಾ ದಸ ವಾ। ನಾನಾಮಗ್ಗಾನೀತಿ ಮಹನ್ತಾಮಹನ್ತಜಙ್ಘಮಗ್ಗಸಕಟಮಗ್ಗಾದಿವಸೇನ ನಾನಾವಿಧಾನಿ ಸಾಮನ್ತಾ ಗಾಮನದೀತಳಾಕಖೇತ್ತಾದೀಹಿ ಆಗನ್ತ್ವಾ ಗಾಮಂ ಪವಿಸನಮಗ್ಗಾನಿ।


೫೨೫-೫೨೬. ‘‘ನಿಯ್ಯನ್ತೀತಿ
ವಾಸೇಟ್ಠ ವದೇಸೀ’’ತಿ ಭಗವಾ ತಿಕ್ಖತ್ತುಂ ವಚೀಭೇದಂ ಕತ್ವಾ ಪಟಿಞ್ಞಂ ಕಾರಾಪೇಸಿ।
ಕಸ್ಮಾ? ತಿತ್ಥಿಯಾ ಹಿ ಪಟಿಜಾನಿತ್ವಾ ಪಚ್ಛಾ ನಿಗ್ಗಯ್ಹಮಾನಾ ಅವಜಾನನ್ತಿ। ಸೋ ತಥಾ
ಕಾತುಂ ನ ಸಕ್ಖಿಸ್ಸತೀತಿ।


೫೨೭-೫೨೯. ತೇವ ತೇವಿಜ್ಜಾತಿ ತೇ ತೇವಿಜ್ಜಾ। ವಕಾರೋ ಆಗಮಸನ್ಧಿಮತ್ತಂ। ಅನ್ಧವೇಣೀತಿ
ಅನ್ಧಪವೇಣೀ, ಏಕೇನ ಚಕ್ಖುಮತಾ ಗಹಿತಯಟ್ಠಿಯಾ ಕೋಟಿಂ ಏಕೋ ಅನ್ಧೋ ಗಣ್ಹತಿ, ತಂ ಅನ್ಧಂ
ಅಞ್ಞೋ ತಂ ಅಞ್ಞೋತಿ ಏವಂ ಪಣ್ಣಾಸಸಟ್ಠಿ ಅನ್ಧಾ ಪಟಿಪಾಟಿಯಾ ಘಟಿತಾ ಅನ್ಧವೇಣೀತಿ
ವುಚ್ಚತಿ। ಪರಮ್ಪರಸಂಸತ್ತಾತಿ ಅಞ್ಞಮಞ್ಞಂ ಲಗ್ಗಾ,
ಯಟ್ಠಿಗಾಹಕೇನಪಿ ಚಕ್ಖುಮತಾ ವಿರಹಿತಾತಿ ಅತ್ಥೋ। ಏಕೋ ಕಿರ ಧುತ್ತೋ ಅನ್ಧಗಣಂ ದಿಸ್ವಾ
‘‘ಅಸುಕಸ್ಮಿಂ ನಾಮ ಗಾಮೇ ಖಜ್ಜಭೋಜ್ಜಂ ಸುಲಭ’’ನ್ತಿ ಉಸ್ಸಾಹೇತ್ವಾ ‘‘ತೇನ ಹಿ ತತ್ಥ ನೋ
ಸಾಮಿ ನೇಹಿ, ಇದಂ ನಾಮ ತೇ ದೇಮಾ’’ತಿ ವುತ್ತೇ, ಲಞ್ಜಂ ಗಹೇತ್ವಾ ಅನ್ತರಾಮಗ್ಗೇ ಮಗ್ಗಾ
ಓಕ್ಕಮ್ಮ ಮಹನ್ತಂ ಗಚ್ಛಂ ಅನುಪರಿಗನ್ತ್ವಾ ಪುರಿಮಸ್ಸ ಹತ್ಥೇನ ಪಚ್ಛಿಮಸ್ಸ ಕಚ್ಛಂ
ಗಣ್ಹಾಪೇತ್ವಾ ‘‘ಕಿಞ್ಚಿ ಕಮ್ಮಂ ಅತ್ಥಿ, ಗಚ್ಛಥ ತಾವ ತುಮ್ಹೇ’’ತಿ ವತ್ವಾ ಪಲಾಯಿ, ತೇ
ದಿವಸಮ್ಪಿ ಗನ್ತ್ವಾ ಮಗ್ಗಂ ಅವಿನ್ದಮಾನಾ ‘‘ಕುಹಿಂ ನೋ ಚಕ್ಖುಮಾ, ಕುಹಿಂ ಮಗ್ಗೋ’’ತಿ
ಪರಿದೇವಿತ್ವಾ ಮಗ್ಗಂ ಅವಿನ್ದಮಾನಾ ತತ್ಥೇವ ಮರಿಂಸು। ತೇ ಸನ್ಧಾಯ ವುತ್ತಂ
‘‘ಪರಮ್ಪರಸಂಸತ್ತಾ’’ತಿ। ಪುರಿಮೋಪೀತಿ ಪುರಿಮೇಸು ದಸಸು ಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣೇಸು ಏಕೋಪಿ। ಮಜ್ಝಿಮೋಪೀತಿ ಮಜ್ಝಿಮೇಸು ಆಚರಿಯಪಾಚರಿಯೇಸು ಏಕೋಪಿ। ಪಚ್ಛಿಮೋಪೀತಿ ಇದಾನಿ ತೇವಿಜ್ಜೇಸು ಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣೇಸು ಏಕೋಪಿ। ಹಸ್ಸಕಞ್ಞೇವಾತಿ ಹಸಿತಬ್ಬಮೇವ। ನಾಮಕಞ್ಞೇವಾತಿ ಲಾಮಕಂಯೇವ। ತದೇತಂ ಅತ್ಥಾಭಾವೇನ ರಿತ್ತಕಂ, ರಿತ್ತಕತ್ತಾಯೇವ ತುಚ್ಛಕಂ।
ಇದಾನಿ ಬ್ರಹ್ಮಲೋಕೋ ತಾವ ತಿಟ್ಠತು, ಯೋ ತೇವಿಜ್ಜೇಹಿ ನ ದಿಟ್ಠಪುಬ್ಬೋವ। ಯೇಪಿ
ಚನ್ದಿಮಸೂರಿಯೇ ತೇವಿಜ್ಜಾ ಪಸ್ಸನ್ತಿ, ತೇಸಮ್ಪಿ ಸಹಬ್ಯತಾಯ ಮಗ್ಗಂ ದೇಸೇತುಂ
ನಪ್ಪಹೋನ್ತೀತಿ ದಸ್ಸನತ್ಥಂ ‘‘ತಂ ಕಿಂ ಮಞ್ಞಸೀ’’ತಿಆದಿಮಾಹ।


೫೩೦. ತತ್ಥ ಯತೋ ಚನ್ದಿಮಸೂರಿಯಾ ಉಗ್ಗಚ್ಛನ್ತೀತಿ ಯಸ್ಮಿಂ ಕಾಲೇ ಉಗ್ಗಚ್ಛನ್ತಿ। ಯತ್ಥ ಚ ಓಗ್ಗಚ್ಛನ್ತೀತಿ ಯಸ್ಮಿಂ ಕಾಲೇ ಅತ್ಥಮೇನ್ತಿ, ಉಗ್ಗಮನಕಾಲೇ ಚ ಅತ್ಥಙ್ಗಮನಕಾಲೇ ಚ ಪಸ್ಸನ್ತೀತಿ ಅತ್ಥೋ। ಆಯಾಚನ್ತೀತಿ ‘‘ಉದೇಹಿ ಭವಂ ಚನ್ದ, ಉದೇಹಿ ಭವಂ ಸೂರಿಯಾ’’ತಿ ಏವಂ ಆಯಾಚನ್ತಿ। ಥೋಮಯನ್ತೀತಿ ‘‘ಸೋಮ್ಮೋ ಚನ್ದೋ, ಪರಿಮಣ್ಡಲೋ ಚನ್ದೋ, ಸಪ್ಪಭೋ ಚನ್ದೋ’’ತಿಆದೀನಿ ವದನ್ತಾ ಪಸಂಸನ್ತಿ। ಪಞ್ಜಲಿಕಾತಿ ಪಗ್ಗಹಿತಅಞ್ಜಲಿಕಾ। ನಮಸ್ಸಮಾನಾತಿ ‘‘ನಮೋ ನಮೋ’’ತಿ ವದಮಾನಾ।


೫೩೧-೫೩೨. ಯಂ ಪಸ್ಸನ್ತೀತಿ ಏತ್ಥ ನ್ತಿ ನಿಪಾತಮತ್ತಂ। ಕಿಂ ಪನ ನ ಕಿರಾತಿ ಏತ್ಥ ಇಧ ಪನ ಕಿಂ ವತ್ತಬ್ಬಂ। ಯತ್ಥ ಕಿರ ತೇವಿಜ್ಜೇಹಿ ಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣೇಹಿ ನ ಬ್ರಹ್ಮಾ ಸಕ್ಖಿದಿಟ್ಠೋತಿ ಏವಮತ್ಥೋ ದಟ್ಠಬ್ಬೋ।


ಅಚಿರವತೀನದೀಉಪಮಾಕಥಾ


೫೪೨. ಸಮತಿತ್ತಿಕಾತಿ ಸಮಭರಿತಾ। ಕಾಕಪೇಯ್ಯಾತಿ ಯತ್ಥ ಕತ್ಥಚಿ ತೀರೇ ಠಿತೇನ ಕಾಕೇನ ಸಕ್ಕಾ ಪಾತುನ್ತಿ ಕಾಕಪೇಯ್ಯಾ। ಪಾರಂ ತರಿತುಕಾಮೋತಿ ನದಿಂ ಅತಿಕ್ಕಮಿತ್ವಾ ಪರತೀರಂ ಗನ್ತುಕಾಮೋ। ಅವ್ಹೇಯ್ಯಾತಿ ಪಕ್ಕೋಸೇಯ್ಯ। ಏಹಿ ಪಾರಾಪಾರನ್ತಿ ಅಮ್ಭೋ ಪಾರ ಅಪಾರಂ ಏಹಿ, ಅಥ ಮಂ ಸಹಸಾವ ಗಹೇತ್ವಾ ಗಮಿಸ್ಸಸಿ, ಅತ್ಥಿ ಮೇ ಅಚ್ಚಾಯಿಕಕಮ್ಮನ್ತಿ ಅತ್ಥೋ।


೫೪೪. ಯೇ ಧಮ್ಮಾ ಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣಕಾರಕಾತಿ ಏತ್ಥ ಪಞ್ಚಸೀಲದಸಕುಸಲಕಮ್ಮಪಥಭೇದಾ ಧಮ್ಮಾ ಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣಕಾರಕಾತಿ ವೇದಿತಬ್ಬಾ , ತಬ್ಬಿಪರೀತಾ ಅಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣಕಾರಕಾ। ಇನ್ದಮವ್ಹಾಯಾಮಾತಿ
ಇನ್ದಂ ಅವ್ಹಾಯಾಮ ಪಕ್ಕೋಸಾಮ। ಏವಂ ಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣಾನಂ ಅವ್ಹಾಯನಸ್ಸ ನಿರತ್ಥಕತಂ ದಸ್ಸೇತ್ವಾ
ಪುನಪಿ ಭಗವಾ ಅಣ್ಣವಕುಚ್ಛಿಯಂ ಸೂರಿಯೋ ವಿಯ ಜಲಮಾನೋ ಪಞ್ಚಸತಭಿಕ್ಖುಪರಿವುತೋ
ಅಚಿರವತಿಯಾ ತೀರೇ ನಿಸಿನ್ನೋ ಅಪರಮ್ಪಿ ನದೀಉಪಮಂಯೇವ ಆಹರನ್ತೋ
‘‘ಸೇಯ್ಯಥಾಪೀ’’ತಿಆದಿಮಾಹ।


೫೪೬. ಕಾಮಗುಣಾತಿ
ಕಾಮಯಿತಬ್ಬಟ್ಠೇನ ಕಾಮಾ, ಬನ್ಧನಟ್ಠೇನ ಗುಣಾ। ‘‘ಅನುಜಾನಾಮಿ ಭಿಕ್ಖವೇ, ಅಹತಾನಂ
ವತ್ಥಾನಂ ದಿಗುಣಂ ಸಙ್ಘಾಟಿ’’ನ್ತಿ (ಮಹಾವ॰ ೩೪೮) ಏತ್ಥ ಹಿ ಪಟಲಟ್ಠೋ ಗುಣಟ್ಠೋ।
‘‘ಅಚ್ಚೇನ್ತಿ ಕಾಲಾ ತರಯನ್ತಿ ರತ್ತಿಯೋ, ವಯೋಗುಣಾ ಅನುಪುಬ್ಬಂ ಜಹನ್ತೀ’’ತಿ ಏತ್ಥ
ರಾಸಟ್ಠೋ ಗುಣಟ್ಠೋ। ‘‘ಸತಗುಣಾ ದಕ್ಖಿಣಾ ಪಾಟಿಕಙ್ಖಿತಬ್ಬಾ’’ತಿ
(ಮ॰ ನಿ॰ ೩.೩೭೯) ಏತ್ಥ ಆನಿಸಂಸಟ್ಠೋ ಗುಣಟ್ಠೋ। ‘‘ಅನ್ತಂ ಅನ್ತಗುಣಂ (ಖು॰ ಪಾ॰ ೩.೧)
ಕಯಿರಾ ಮಾಲಾಗುಣೇ ಬಹೂ’’ತಿ (ಧ॰ ಪ॰ ೫೩) ಚ ಏತ್ಥ ಬನ್ಧನಟ್ಠೋ ಗುಣಟ್ಠೋ। ಇಧಾಪಿ ಏಸೇವ
ಅಧಿಪ್ಪೇತೋ। ತೇನ ವುತ್ತಂ ‘‘ಬನ್ಧನಟ್ಠೇನ ಗುಣಾ’’ತಿ। ಚಕ್ಖುವಿಞ್ಞೇಯ್ಯಾತಿ ಚಕ್ಖುವಿಞ್ಞಾಣೇನ ಪಸ್ಸಿತಬ್ಬಾ। ಏತೇನುಪಾಯೇನ ಸೋತವಿಞ್ಞೇಯ್ಯಾದೀಸುಪಿ ಅತ್ಥೋ ವೇದಿತಬ್ಬೋ। ಇಟ್ಠಾತಿ ಪರಿಯಿಟ್ಠಾ ವಾ ಹೋನ್ತು, ಮಾ ವಾ, ಇಟ್ಠಾರಮ್ಮಣಭೂತಾತಿ ಅತ್ಥೋ। ಕನ್ತಾತಿ ಕಾಮನೀಯಾ। ಮನಾಪಾತಿ ಮನವಡ್ಢನಕಾ। ಪಿಯರೂಪಾತಿ ಪಿಯಜಾತಿಕಾ। ಕಾಮೂಪಸಞ್ಹಿತಾತಿ ಆರಮ್ಮಣಂ ಕತ್ವಾ ಉಪ್ಪಜ್ಜಮಾನೇನ ಕಾಮೇನ ಉಪಸಞ್ಹಿತಾ। ರಜನೀಯಾತಿ ರಞ್ಜನೀಯಾ, ರಾಗುಪ್ಪತ್ತಿಕಾರಣಭೂತಾತಿ ಅತ್ಥೋ।


ಗಧಿತಾತಿ ಗೇಧೇನ ಅಭಿಭೂತಾ ಹುತ್ವಾ। ಮುಚ್ಛಿತಾತಿ ಮುಚ್ಛಾಕಾರಪ್ಪತ್ತಾಯ ಅಧಿಮತ್ತಕಾಯ ತಣ್ಹಾಯ ಅಭಿಭೂತಾ। ಅಜ್ಝೋಪನ್ನಾತಿ ಅಧಿಓಪನ್ನಾ ಓಗಾಳ್ಹಾ ‘‘ಇದಂ ಸಾರ’’ನ್ತಿ ಪರಿನಿಟ್ಠಾನಪ್ಪತ್ತಾ ಹುತ್ವಾ। ಅನಾದೀನವದಸ್ಸಾವಿನೋತಿ ಆದೀನವಂ ಅಪಸ್ಸನ್ತಾ। ಅನಿಸ್ಸರಣಪಞ್ಞಾತಿ ಇದಮೇತ್ಥ ನಿಸ್ಸರಣನ್ತಿ, ಏವಂ ಪರಿಜಾನನಪಞ್ಞಾವಿರಹಿತಾ, ಪಚ್ಚವೇಕ್ಖಣಪರಿಭೋಗವಿರಹಿತಾತಿ ಅತ್ಥೋ।


೫೪೮. ಆವರಣಾತಿಆದೀಸು ಆವರನ್ತೀತಿ ಆವರಣಾ। ನಿವಾರೇನ್ತೀತಿ ನೀವರಣಾ। ಓನನ್ಧನ್ತೀತಿ ಓನಾಹನಾ। ಪರಿಯೋನನ್ಧನ್ತೀತಿ ಪರಿಯೋನಾಹನಾ। ಕಾಮಚ್ಛನ್ದಾದೀನಂ ವಿತ್ಥಾರಕಥಾ ವಿಸುದ್ಧಿಮಗ್ಗತೋ ಗಹೇತಬ್ಬಾ।


೫೪೯-೫೫೦. ಆವುತಾ ನಿವುತಾ ಓನದ್ಧಾ ಪರಿಯೋನದ್ಧಾತಿ ಪದಾನಿ ಆವರಣಾದೀನಂ ವಸೇನ ವುತ್ತಾನಿ। ಸಪರಿಗ್ಗಹೋತಿ ಇತ್ಥಿಪರಿಗ್ಗಹೇನ ಸಪರಿಗ್ಗಹೋತಿ ಪುಚ್ಛತಿ। ಅಪರಿಗ್ಗಹೋ ಭೋ ಗೋತಮಾತಿಆದೀಸುಪಿ
ಕಾಮಚ್ಛನ್ದಸ್ಸ ಅಭಾವತೋ ಇತ್ಥಿಪರಿಗ್ಗಹೇನ ಅಪರಿಗ್ಗಹೋ। ಬ್ಯಾಪಾದಸ್ಸ ಅಭಾವತೋ ಕೇನಚಿ
ಸದ್ಧಿಂ ವೇರಚಿತ್ತೇನ ಅವೇರೋ। ಥಿನಮಿದ್ಧಸ್ಸ ಅಭಾವತೋ ಚಿತ್ತಗೇಲಞ್ಞಸಙ್ಖಾತೇನ
ಬ್ಯಾಪಜ್ಜೇನ ಅಬ್ಯಾಪಜ್ಜೋ। ಉದ್ಧಚ್ಚಕುಕ್ಕುಚ್ಚಾಭಾವತೋ ಉದ್ಧಚ್ಚಕುಕ್ಕುಚ್ಚಾದೀಹಿ
ಸಂಕಿಲೇಸೇಹಿ ಅಸಂಕಿಲಿಟ್ಠಚಿತ್ತೋ ಸುಪರಿಸುದ್ಧಮಾನಸೋ। ವಿಚಿಕಿಚ್ಛಾಯ ಅಭಾವತೋ ಚಿತ್ತಂ
ವಸೇ ವತ್ತೇತಿ। ಯಥಾ ಚ ಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣಾ ಚಿತ್ತಗತಿಕಾ ಹೋನ್ತೀತಿ, ಚಿತ್ತಸ್ಸ ವಸೇನ
ವತ್ತನ್ತಿ, ನ ತಾದಿಸೋತಿ ವಸವತ್ತೀ।


೫೫೨. ಇಧ ಖೋ ಪನಾತಿ ಇಧ ಬ್ರಹ್ಮಲೋಕಮಗ್ಗೇ। ಆಸೀದಿತ್ವಾತಿ ಅಮಗ್ಗಮೇವ ‘‘ಮಗ್ಗೋ’’ತಿ ಉಪಗನ್ತ್ವಾ। ಸಂಸೀದನ್ತೀತಿ ‘‘ಸಮತಲ’’ನ್ತಿ ಸಞ್ಞಾಯ ಪಙ್ಕಂ ಓತಿಣ್ಣಾ ವಿಯ ಅನುಪ್ಪವಿಸನ್ತಿ। ಸಂಸೀದಿತ್ವಾ ವಿಸಾರಂ ಪಾಪುಣನ್ತೀತಿ ಏವಂ ಪಙ್ಕೇ ವಿಯ ಸಂಸೀದಿತ್ವಾ ವಿಸಾರಂ ಅಙ್ಗಮಙ್ಗಸಂಭಞ್ಜನಂ ಪಾಪುಣನ್ತಿ। ಸುಕ್ಖತರಂ ಮಞ್ಞೇ ತರನ್ತೀತಿ
ಮರೀಚಿಕಾಯ ವಞ್ಚೇತ್ವಾ ‘‘ಕಾಕಪೇಯ್ಯಾ ನದೀ’’ತಿ ಸಞ್ಞಾಯ ‘‘ತರಿಸ್ಸಾಮಾ’’ತಿ ಹತ್ಥೇಹಿ ಚ
ಪಾದೇಹಿ ಚ ವಾಯಮಮಾನಾ ಸುಕ್ಖತರಣಂ ಮಞ್ಞೇ ತರನ್ತಿ। ತಸ್ಮಾ ಯಥಾ ಹತ್ಥಪಾದಾದೀನಂ
ಸಂಭಞ್ಜನಂ ಪರಿಭಞ್ಜನಂ, ಏವಂ ಅಪಾಯೇಸು ಸಂಭಞ್ಜನಂ ಪರಿಭಞ್ಜನಂ ಪಾಪುಣನ್ತಿ। ಇಧೇವ ಚ
ಸುಖಂ ವಾ ಸಾತಂ ವಾ ನ ಲಭನ್ತಿ। ತಸ್ಮಾ ಇದಂ ತೇವಿಜ್ಜಾನಂ ಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣಾನನ್ತಿ ತಸ್ಮಾ ಇದಂ ಬ್ರಹ್ಮಸಹಬ್ಯತಾಯ ಮಗ್ಗದೀಪಕಂ ತೇವಿಜ್ಜಕಂ ಪಾವಚನಂ ತೇವಿಜ್ಜಾನಂ ಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣಾನಂ। ತೇವಿಜ್ಜಾಇರಿಣನ್ತಿ ತೇವಿಜ್ಜಾಅರಞ್ಞಂ ಇರಿಣನ್ತಿ ಹಿ ಅಗಾಮಕಂ ಮಹಾಅರಞ್ಞಂ ವುಚ್ಚತಿ। ತೇವಿಜ್ಜಾವಿವನನ್ತಿ ಪುಪ್ಫಫಲೇಹಿ ಅಪರಿಭೋಗರುಕ್ಖೇಹಿ ಸಞ್ಛನ್ನಂ ನಿರುದಕಂ ಅರಞ್ಞಂ । ಯತ್ಥ ಮಗ್ಗತೋ ಉಕ್ಕಮಿತ್ವಾ ಪರಿವತ್ತಿತುಮ್ಪಿ ನ ಸಕ್ಕಾ ಹೋನ್ತಿ, ತಂ ಸನ್ಧಾಯಾಹ ‘‘ತೇವಿಜ್ಜಾವಿವನನ್ತಿಪಿ ವುಚ್ಚತೀ’’ತಿ। ತೇವಿಜ್ಜಾಬ್ಯಸನನ್ತಿ
ತೇವಿಜ್ಜಾನಂ ಪಞ್ಚವಿಧಬ್ಯಸನಸದಿಸಮೇತಂ। ಯಥಾ ಹಿ ಞಾತಿರೋಗಭೋಗ ದಿಟ್ಠಿ
ಸೀಲಬ್ಯಸನಪ್ಪತ್ತಸ್ಸ ಸುಖಂ ನಾಮ ನತ್ಥಿ, ಏವಂ ತೇವಿಜ್ಜಾನಂ ತೇವಿಜ್ಜಕಂ ಪಾವಚನಂ ಆಗಮ್ಮ
ಸುಖಂ ನಾಮ ನತ್ಥೀತಿ ದಸ್ಸೇತಿ।


೫೫೪. ಜಾತಸಂವಡ್ಢೋತಿ ಜಾತೋ ಚ ವಡ್ಢಿತೋ ಚ, ಯೋ ಹಿ ಕೇವಲಂ ತತ್ಥ ಜಾತೋವ ಹೋತಿ, ಅಞ್ಞತ್ಥ
ವಡ್ಢಿತೋ, ತಸ್ಸ ಸಮನ್ತಾ ಗಾಮಮಗ್ಗಾ ನ ಸಬ್ಬಸೋ ಪಚ್ಚಕ್ಖಾ ಹೋನ್ತಿ, ತಸ್ಮಾ
ಜಾತಸಂವಡ್ಢೋತಿ ಆಹ। ಜಾತಸಂವಡ್ಢೋಪಿ ಯೋ ಚಿರನಿಕ್ಖನ್ತೋ, ತಸ್ಸ ನ ಸಬ್ಬಸೋ ಪಚ್ಚಕ್ಖಾ
ಹೋನ್ತಿ। ತಸ್ಮಾ ‘‘ತಾವದೇವ ಅವಸಟ’’ನ್ತಿ ಆಹ, ತಙ್ಖಣಮೇವ ನಿಕ್ಖನ್ತನ್ತಿ ಅತ್ಥೋ। ದನ್ಧಾಯಿತತ್ತನ್ತಿ ಅಯಂ ನು ಖೋ ಮಗ್ಗೋ, ಅಯಂ ನ ನುಖೋತಿ ಕಙ್ಖಾವಸೇನ ಚಿರಾಯಿತತ್ತಂ। ವಿತ್ಥಾಯಿತತ್ತನ್ತಿ ಯಥಾ ಸುಖುಮಂ ಅತ್ಥಜಾತಂ ಸಹಸಾ ಪುಚ್ಛಿತಸ್ಸ ಕಸ್ಸಚಿ ಸರೀರಂ ಥದ್ಧಭಾವಂ ಗಣ್ಹಾತಿ, ಏವಂ ಥದ್ಧಭಾವಗ್ಗಹಣಂ। ನ ತ್ವೇವಾತಿ ಇಮಿನಾ ಸಬ್ಬಞ್ಞುತಞ್ಞಾಣಸ್ಸ ಅಪ್ಪಟಿಹತಭಾವಂ ದಸ್ಸೇತಿ। ತಸ್ಸ ಹಿ ಪುರಿಸಸ್ಸ ಮಾರಾವಟ್ಟನಾದಿವಸೇನ ಸಿಯಾ ಞಾಣಸ್ಸ ಪಟಿಘಾತೋ। ತೇನ ಸೋ ದನ್ಧಾಯೇಯ್ಯ ವಾ ವಿತ್ಥಾಯೇಯ್ಯ ವಾ। ಸಬ್ಬಞ್ಞುತಞ್ಞಾಣಂ ಪನ ಅಪ್ಪಟಿಹತಂ, ನ ಸಕ್ಕಾ ತಸ್ಸ ಕೇನಚಿ ಅನ್ತರಾಯೋ ಕಾತುನ್ತಿ ದೀಪೇತಿ।


೫೫೫. ಉಲ್ಲುಮ್ಪತು ಭವಂ ಗೋತಮೋತಿ ಉದ್ಧರತು ಭವಂ ಗೋತಮೋ। ಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣಿಂ ಪಜನ್ತಿ
ಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣದಾರಕಂ, ಭವಂ ಗೋತಮೋ ಮಮ ಬ್ರಾಹ್ಮಣಪುತ್ತಂ ಅಪಾಯಮಗ್ಗತೋ ಉದ್ಧರಿತ್ವಾ
ಬ್ರಹ್ಮಲೋಕಮಗ್ಗೇ ಪತಿಟ್ಠಪೇತೂತಿ ಅತ್ಥೋ। ಅಥಸ್ಸ ಭಗವಾ ಬುದ್ಧುಪ್ಪಾದಂ ದಸ್ಸೇತ್ವಾ
ಸದ್ಧಿಂ ಪುಬ್ಬಭಾಗಪಟಿಪದಾಯ ಮೇತ್ತಾವಿಹಾರಾದಿಬ್ರಹ್ಮಲೋಕಗಾಮಿಮಗ್ಗಂ ದೇಸೇತುಕಾಮೋ ‘‘ತೇನ
ಹಿ ವಾಸೇಟ್ಠಾ’’ತಿಆದಿಮಾಹ। ತತ್ಥ ‘‘ಇಧ ತಥಾಗತೋ’’ತಿಆದಿ ಸಾಮಞ್ಞಫಲೇ ವಿತ್ಥಾರಿತಂ।
ಮೇತ್ತಾಸಹಗತೇನಾತಿಆದೀಸು ಯಂ ವತ್ತಬ್ಬಂ, ತಂ ಸಬ್ಬಂ ವಿಸುದ್ಧಿಮಗ್ಗೇ
ಬ್ರಹ್ಮವಿಹಾರಕಮ್ಮಟ್ಠಾನಕಥಾಯಂ ವುತ್ತಂ। ಸೇಯ್ಯಥಾಪಿ ವಾಸೇಟ್ಠ ಬಲವಾ ಸಙ್ಖಧಮೋತಿಆದಿ ಪನ ಇಧ ಅಪುಬ್ಬಂ। ತತ್ಥ ಬಲವಾತಿ ಬಲಸಮ್ಪನ್ನೋ। ಸಙ್ಖಧಮೋತಿ ಸಙ್ಖಧಮಕೋ। ಅಪ್ಪಕಸಿರೇನಾತಿ
ಅಕಿಚ್ಛೇನ ಅದುಕ್ಖೇನ। ದುಬ್ಬಲೋ ಹಿ ಸಙ್ಖಧಮೋ ಸಙ್ಖಂ ಧಮನ್ತೋಪಿ ನ ಸಕ್ಕೋತಿ ಚತಸ್ಸೋ
ದಿಸಾ ಸರೇನ ವಿಞ್ಞಾಪೇತುಂ, ನಾಸ್ಸ ಸಙ್ಖಸದ್ದೋ ಸಬ್ಬತೋ ಫರತಿ। ಬಲವತೋ ಪನ ವಿಪ್ಫಾರಿಕೋ
ಹೋತಿ, ತಸ್ಮಾ ‘‘ಬಲವಾ’’ತಿಆದಿಮಾಹ। ಮೇತ್ತಾಯ ಚೇತೋವಿಮುತ್ತಿಯಾತಿ ಏತ್ಥ ಮೇತ್ತಾತಿ ವುತ್ತೇ ಉಪಚಾರೋಪಿ ಅಪ್ಪನಾಪಿ ವಟ್ಟತಿ, ‘‘ಚೇತ್ತೋವಿಮುತ್ತೀ’’ತಿ ವುತ್ತೇ ಪನ ಅಪ್ಪನಾವ ವಟ್ಟತಿ। ಯಂ ಪಮಾಣಕತಂ ಕಮ್ಮನ್ತಿ
ಪಮಾಣಕತಂ ಕಮ್ಮಂ ನಾಮ ಕಾಮಾವಚರಂ ವುಚ್ಚತಿ। ಅಪ್ಪಮಾಣಕತಂ ಕಮ್ಮಂ ನಾಮ ರೂಪಾರೂಪಾವಚರಂ।
ತಞ್ಹಿ ಪಮಾಣಂ ಅತಿಕ್ಕಮಿತ್ವಾ ಓದಿಸ್ಸಕಅನೋದಿಸ್ಸಕದಿಸಾಫರಣವಸೇನ ವಡ್ಢೇತ್ವಾ ಕತತ್ತಾ
ಅಪ್ಪಮಾಣಕತನ್ತಿ ವುಚ್ಚತಿ। ನ ತಂ ತತ್ರಾವಸಿಸ್ಸತಿ ನ ತಂ ತತ್ರಾವತಿಟ್ಠತೀತಿ
ತಂ ಕಾಮಾವಚರಕಮ್ಮಂ ತಸ್ಮಿಂ ರೂಪಾವಚರಾರೂಪಾವಚರಕಮ್ಮೇ ನ ಓಹೀಯತಿ, ನ ತಿಟ್ಠತಿ। ಕಿಂ
ವುತ್ತಂ ಹೋತಿ – ತಂ ಕಾಮಾವಚರಕಮ್ಮಂ ತಸ್ಸ ರೂಪಾರೂಪಾವಚರಕಮ್ಮಸ್ಸ ಅನ್ತರಾ ಲಗ್ಗಿತುಂ ವಾ
ಠಾತುಂ ವಾ ರೂಪಾರೂಪಾವಚರಕಮ್ಮಂ ಫರಿತ್ವಾ ಪರಿಯಾದಿಯಿತ್ವಾ ಅತ್ತನೋ ಓಕಾಸಂ ಗಹೇತ್ವಾ
ಪತಿಟ್ಠಾತುಂ ನ ಸಕ್ಕೋತಿ। ಅಥ ಖೋ ರೂಪಾವಚರಾರೂಪಾವಚರಕಮ್ಮಮೇವ ಕಾಮಾವಚರಂ ಮಹೋಘೋ ವಿಯ
ಪರಿತ್ತಂ ಉದಕಂ ಫರಿತ್ವಾ ಪರಿಯಾದಿಯಿತ್ವಾ ಅತ್ತನೋ ಓಕಾಸಂ ಗಹೇತ್ವಾ ತಿಟ್ಠತಿ। ತಸ್ಸ
ವಿಪಾಕಂ ಪಟಿಬಾಹಿತ್ವಾ ಸಯಮೇವ ಬ್ರಹ್ಮಸಹಬ್ಯತಂ ಉಪನೇತೀತಿ। ಏವಂವಿಹಾರೀತಿ ಏವಂ ಮೇತ್ತಾದಿವಿಹಾರೀ।


೫೫೯. ಏತೇ ಮಯಂ ಭವನ್ತಂ ಗೋತಮನ್ತಿ
ಇದಂ ತೇಸಂ ದುತಿಯಂ ಸರಣಗಮನಂ। ಪಠಮಮೇವ ಹೇತೇ ಮಜ್ಝಿಮಪಣ್ಣಾಸಕೇ ವಾಸೇಟ್ಠಸುತ್ತಂ
ಸುತ್ವಾ ಸರಣಂ ಗತಾ, ಇಮಂ ಪನ ತೇವಿಜ್ಜಸುತ್ತಂ ಸುತ್ವಾ ದುತಿಯಮ್ಪಿ ಸರಣಂ ಗತಾ।
ಕತಿಪಾಹಚ್ಚಯೇನ ಪಬ್ಬಜಿತ್ವಾ ಅಗ್ಗಞ್ಞಸುತ್ತೇ ಉಪಸಮ್ಪದಞ್ಚೇವ ಅರಹತ್ತಞ್ಚ ಅಲತ್ಥುಂ।
ಸೇಸಂ ಸಬ್ಬತ್ಥ ಉತ್ತಾನಮೇವಾತಿ।


ಇತಿ ಸುಮಙ್ಗಲವಿಲಾಸಿನಿಯಾ ದೀಘನಿಕಾಯಟ್ಠಕಥಾಯಂ


ತೇವಿಜ್ಜಸುತ್ತವಣ್ಣನಾ ನಿಟ್ಠಿತಾ।


ನಿಟ್ಠಿತಾ ಚ ತೇರಸಸುತ್ತಪಟಿಮಣ್ಡಿತಸ್ಸ ಸೀಲಕ್ಖನ್ಧವಗ್ಗಸ್ಸ


ಅತ್ಥವಣ್ಣನಾತಿ।


ಸೀಲಕ್ಖನ್ಧವಗ್ಗಟ್ಠಕಥಾ ನಿಟ್ಠಿತಾ।


image.png

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gVt34_vDFJA
Abhisambidhana Sutta
Harshana Hiripitiya
Published on Oct 20, 2017
නමෝ අභිසම්භිදානේ
යුත්තේ යුත්තේ පජ්ජලති පජ්ජලති
තීහුම් තීහුම් ලුහු ලුහු පරමේස්වාහා

නමෝ සම්මා සම්බුද්ධේ
යුත්තේ යුත්තේ පජ්ජලති පජ්ජලති
තීහුම් තීහුම් ලුහු ලුහු පරමේස්වාහා

නමෝ පච්චේක සම්බුද්ධේ
යුත්තේ යුත්තේ පජ්ජලති පජ්ජලති
තීහුම් තීහුම් ලුහු ලුහු පරමේස්වාහා

නමෝ සාරිපුත්ත මොග්ගල්ලානේ
යුත්තේ යුත්තේ පජ්ජලති පජ්ජලති
තීහුම් තීහුම් ලුහු ලුහු පරමේස්වාහා

නමෝ අංගුලිමාල මහා ථෙරෝ මහා වීරෝ මහා බලෝ
යුත්තේ යුත්තේ පජ්ජලති පජ්ජලති
තීහුම් තීහුම් ලුහු ලුහු පරමේස්වාහා

නමෝ සීවලීච මහා ථෙරෝ මහා කායෝ මහා ලාභී
යුත්තේ යුත්තේ පජ්ජලති පජ්ජලති
තීහුම් තීහුම් ලුහු ලුහු පරමේස්වාහා

නමෝ සප්තතිංස බෝධි පක්ඛිය ධම්මා චත්තාරෝ සතිපට්ඨානා
චත්තාරෝ ඉද්ධි පාදා චත්තාරෝ සම්මප්පදානා
පංචින්ද්රියානි / පංචබලානි සප්ත බොජ්ජංගානි
අරියෝ අට්ඨංගිකෝ මග්ගො බුද්ධ මන්තංච මත්තං
ධම්ම මන්තංච මත්තං සංඝ මන්තංච මත්තං..

තුම්හාකං සබ්බ රෝග/සබ්බ දෝෂ/සබ්බන්තරායා විනස්සන්තු..
යුත්තේ යුත්තේ පජ්ජලති පජ්ජලති
තීහුම් තීහුම් ලුහු ලුහු පරමේස්වාහා

එතේන සච්ච වජ්ජේන සොත්තිතේ හෝතු සබ්බධා…..
එතේන සච්ච වජ්ජේන සොත්තිතේ හෝතු සබ්බධා…..
එතේන සච්ච වජ්ජේන සොත්තිතේ හෝතු සබ්බධා…..
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AN 8.39 (A iv 245)

Abhisanda Sutta

— Results —

Here are eight ways in which all serious disciples of the Buddha create much merit for themselves.



Note: info·bubbles on all “underdotted” words


Pāḷi



English


“aṭṭhime, bhikkhave, puññābhisandā kusalābhisandā sukhassāhārā sovaggikā
sukhavipākā saggasaṃvattanikā, iṭṭhāya kantāya manāpāya hitāya sukhāya
saṃvattanti. katame aṭṭha?

“Monks, there are these eight rewards of merit, rewards of skillfulness, nourishments of happiness, celestial, resulting in happiness, leading to heaven, leading to what is desirable, pleasurable, & appealing, to welfare & happiness. Which eight?

idha, bhikkhave, ariyasāvako buddhaṃ saraṇaṃ gato hoti. ayaṃ, bhikkhave,
paṭhamo puññābhisando kusalābhisando sukhassāhāro sovaggiko sukhavipāko
saggasaṃvattaniko, iṭṭhāya kantāya manāpāya hitāya sukhāya saṃvattati.

“There is the case where a disciple of the noble ones has gone to the Buddha for refuge. This is the first reward of merit, reward of skillfulness, nourishment of happiness, celestial, resulting in happiness, leading to heaven, leading to what is desirable, pleasurable, & appealing; to welfare & to happiness.

“puna caparaṃ, bhikkhave, ariyasāvako dhammaṃ saraṇaṃ gato hoti. ayaṃ,
bhikkhave, dutiyo puññābhisando kusalābhisando sukhassāhāro sovaggiko
sukhavipāko saggasaṃvattaniko, iṭṭhāya kantāya manāpāya hitāya sukhāya
saṃvattati.

“Furthermore, the disciple of the noble ones has gone to the Dhamma for refuge. This is the second reward of merit, reward of skillfulness, nourishment of happiness, celestial, resulting in happiness, leading to heaven, leading to what is desirable, pleasurable, & appealing; to welfare & to happiness.

“puna caparaṃ, bhikkhave, ariyasāvako saṅghaṃ saraṇaṃ gato hoti. ayaṃ,
bhikkhave, tatiyo puññābhisando kusalābhisando sukhassāhāro sovaggiko
sukhavipāko saggasaṃvattaniko, iṭṭhāya kantāya manāpāya hitāya sukhāya
saṃvattati.

“Furthermore, the disciple of the noble ones has gone to the Sangha for refuge. This is the third reward of merit, reward of skillfulness, nourishment of happiness, celestial, resulting in happiness, leading to heaven, leading to what is desirable, pleasurable, & appealing; to welfare & to happiness.

“pañcimāni, bhikkhave, dānāni mahādānāni aggaññāni rattaññāni vaṃsaññāni
porāṇāni asaṃkiṇṇāni asaṃkiṇṇapubbāni, na saṃkiyanti na saṃkiyissanti,
appaṭikuṭṭhāni samaṇehi brāhmaṇehi viññūhi. katamāni pañca?

“Now, there are these five gifts, five great gifts
— original, long-standing, traditional, ancient, unadulterated,
unadulterated from the beginning — that are not open to suspicion, will
never be open to suspicion, and are unfaulted by knowledgeable contemplatives & brahmans. Which five?

idha, bhikkhave, ariyasāvako pāṇātipātaṃ pahāya pāṇātipātā paṭivirato
hoti. pāṇātipātā paṭivirato, bhikkhave, ariyasāvako aparimāṇānaṃ
sattānaṃ abhayaṃ deti, averaṃ deti, abyābajjhaṃ deti. aparimāṇānaṃ
sattānaṃ abhayaṃ datvā averaṃ datvā abyābajjhaṃ datvā aparimāṇassa
abhayassa averassa abyābajjhassa bhāgī hoti. idaṃ, bhikkhave, paṭhamaṃ
dānaṃ mahādānaṃ aggaññaṃ rattaññaṃ vaṃsaññaṃ porāṇaṃ asaṃkiṇṇaṃ
asaṃkiṇṇapubbaṃ, na saṃkiyati na saṃkiyissati, appaṭikuṭṭhaṃ samaṇehi
brāhmaṇehi viññūhi. ayaṃ, bhikkhave, catuttho puññābhisando
kusalābhisando sukhassāhāro sovaggiko sukhavipāko saggasaṃvattaniko,
iṭṭhāya kantāya manāpāya hitāya sukhāya saṃvattati.

“There is the case where a disciple of the noble ones, abandoning the taking of life, abstains from taking life.
In doing so, he gives freedom from danger, freedom from animosity,
freedom from oppression to limitless numbers of beings. In giving
freedom from danger, freedom from animosity, freedom from oppression to
limitless numbers of beings, he gains a share in limitless freedom from
danger, freedom from animosity, and freedom from oppression. This is the
first gift, the first great gift
— original, long-standing, traditional, ancient, unadulterated,
unadulterated from the beginning — that is not open to suspicion, will
never be open to suspicion, and is unfaulted by knowledgeable contemplatives & brahmans. And this is the fourth reward of merit, reward of skillfulness, nourishment of happiness, celestial, resulting in happiness, leading to heaven, leading to what is desirable, pleasurable, & appealing; to welfare & to happiness.

“puna caparaṃ, bhikkhave, ariyasāvako adinnādānaṃ pahāya adinnādānā
paṭivirato hoti. adinnādānā paṭivirato, bhikkhave, ariyasāvako
aparimāṇānaṃ sattānaṃ abhayaṃ deti averaṃ deti abyābajjhaṃ deti.
aparimāṇānaṃ sattānaṃ abhayaṃ datvā averaṃ datvā abyābajjhaṃ datvā,
aparimāṇassa abhayassa averassa abyābajjhassa bhāgī hoti. idaṃ,
bhikkhave, pañcamaṃ dānaṃ mahādānaṃ aggaññaṃ rattaññaṃ vaṃsaññaṃ porāṇaṃ
asaṃkiṇṇaṃ asaṃkiṇṇapubbaṃ, na saṃkiyati na saṃkiyissati, appaṭikuṭṭhaṃ
samaṇehi brāhmaṇehi viññūhi. ayaṃ kho, bhikkhave, aṭṭhamo puññābhisando
kusalābhisando sukhassāhāro sovaggiko sukhavipāko saggasaṃvattaniko,
iṭṭhāya kantāya manāpāya hitāya sukhāya saṃvattati.

“Furthermore, abandoning taking what is not given (stealing), the disciple of the noble ones abstains from taking what is not given.
In doing so, he gives freedom from danger, freedom from animosity,
freedom from oppression to limitless numbers of beings. In giving
freedom from danger, freedom from animosity, freedom from oppression to
limitless numbers of beings, he gains a share in limitless freedom from
danger, freedom from animosity, and freedom from oppression. This is the
second gift, the second great gift
— original, long-standing, traditional, ancient, unadulterated,
unadulterated from the beginning — that is not open to suspicion, will
never be open to suspicion, and is unfaulted by knowledgeable contemplatives & brahmans. And this is the fifth reward of merit, reward of skillfulness, nourishment of happiness, celestial, resulting in happiness, leading to heaven, leading to what is desirable, pleasurable, & appealing; to welfare & to happiness.

“puna caparaṃ, bhikkhave, ariyasāvako kāmesumicchācāraṃ pahāya
kāmesumicchācārā paṭivirato hoti. kāmesumicchācārā paṭivirato,
bhikkhave, ariyasāvako aparimāṇānaṃ sattānaṃ abhayaṃ deti averaṃ deti
abyābajjhaṃ deti. aparimāṇānaṃ sattānaṃ abhayaṃ datvā averaṃ datvā
abyābajjhaṃ datvā, aparimāṇassa abhayassa averassa abyābajjhassa bhāgī
hoti. idaṃ, bhikkhave, pañcamaṃ dānaṃ mahādānaṃ aggaññaṃ rattaññaṃ
vaṃsaññaṃ porāṇaṃ asaṃkiṇṇaṃ asaṃkiṇṇapubbaṃ, na saṃkiyati na
saṃkiyissati, appaṭikuṭṭhaṃ samaṇehi brāhmaṇehi viññūhi. ayaṃ kho,
bhikkhave, aṭṭhamo puññābhisando kusalābhisando sukhassāhāro sovaggiko
sukhavipāko saggasaṃvattaniko, iṭṭhāya kantāya manāpāya hitāya sukhāya
saṃvattati. ime kho, bhikkhave, aṭṭha puññābhisandā kusalābhisandā
sukhassāhārā sovaggikā sukhavipākā saggasaṃvattanikā, iṭṭhāya kantāya
manāpāya hitāya sukhāya saṃvattantī”ti.

“Furthermore, abandoning illicit sex, the disciple of the noble ones abstains from illicit sex.
In doing so, he gives freedom from danger, freedom from animosity,
freedom from oppression to limitless numbers of beings. In giving
freedom from danger, freedom from animosity, freedom from oppression to
limitless numbers of beings, he gains a share in limitless freedom from
danger, freedom from animosity, and freedom from oppression. This is the
third gift, the third great gift
— original, long-standing, traditional, ancient, unadulterated,
unadulterated from the beginning — that is not open to suspicion, will
never be open to suspicion, and is unfaulted by knowledgeable contemplatives & brahmans. And this is the sixth reward of merit, reward of skillfulness, nourishment of happiness, celestial, resulting in happiness, leading to heaven, leading to what is desirable, pleasurable, & appealing; to welfare & to happiness.

“puna caparaṃ, bhikkhave, ariyasāvako musāvādaṃ pahāya musāvādā
paṭivirato hoti. musāvādā paṭivirato, bhikkhave, ariyasāvako
aparimāṇānaṃ sattānaṃ abhayaṃ deti averaṃ deti abyābajjhaṃ deti.
aparimāṇānaṃ sattānaṃ abhayaṃ datvā averaṃ datvā abyābajjhaṃ datvā,
aparimāṇassa abhayassa averassa abyābajjhassa bhāgī hoti. idaṃ,
bhikkhave, pañcamaṃ dānaṃ mahādānaṃ aggaññaṃ rattaññaṃ vaṃsaññaṃ porāṇaṃ
asaṃkiṇṇaṃ asaṃkiṇṇapubbaṃ, na saṃkiyati na saṃkiyissati, appaṭikuṭṭhaṃ
samaṇehi brāhmaṇehi viññūhi. ayaṃ kho, bhikkhave, aṭṭhamo puññābhisando
kusalābhisando sukhassāhāro sovaggiko sukhavipāko saggasaṃvattaniko,
iṭṭhāya kantāya manāpāya hitāya sukhāya saṃvattati. ime kho, bhikkhave,
aṭṭha puññābhisandā kusalābhisandā sukhassāhārā sovaggikā sukhavipākā
saggasaṃvattanikā, iṭṭhāya kantāya manāpāya hitāya sukhāya
saṃvattantī”ti.

“Furthermore, abandoning lying, the disciple of the noble ones abstains from lying.
In doing so, he gives freedom from danger, freedom from animosity,
freedom from oppression to limitless numbers of beings. In giving
freedom from danger, freedom from animosity, freedom from oppression to
limitless numbers of beings, he gains a share in limitless freedom from
danger, freedom from animosity, and freedom from oppression. This is the
fourth gift, the fourth great gift
— original, long-standing, traditional, ancient, unadulterated,
unadulterated from the beginning — that is not open to suspicion, will
never be open to suspicion, and is unfaulted by knowledgeable contemplatives & brahmans. And this is the seventh reward of merit, reward of skillfulness, nourishment of happiness, celestial, resulting in happiness, leading to heaven, leading to what is desirable, pleasurable, & appealing; to welfare & to happiness.

“puna caparaṃ, bhikkhave, ariyasāvako surāmerayamajjapamādaṭṭhānaṃ
pahāya surāmerayamajjapamādaṭṭhānā paṭivirato hoti.
surāmerayamajjapamādaṭṭhānā paṭivirato, bhikkhave, ariyasāvako
aparimāṇānaṃ sattānaṃ abhayaṃ deti averaṃ deti abyābajjhaṃ deti.
aparimāṇānaṃ sattānaṃ abhayaṃ datvā averaṃ datvā abyābajjhaṃ datvā,
aparimāṇassa abhayassa averassa abyābajjhassa bhāgī hoti. idaṃ,
bhikkhave, pañcamaṃ dānaṃ mahādānaṃ aggaññaṃ rattaññaṃ vaṃsaññaṃ porāṇaṃ
asaṃkiṇṇaṃ asaṃkiṇṇapubbaṃ, na saṃkiyati na saṃkiyissati, appaṭikuṭṭhaṃ
samaṇehi brāhmaṇehi viññūhi. ayaṃ kho, bhikkhave, aṭṭhamo puññābhisando
kusalābhisando sukhassāhāro sovaggiko sukhavipāko saggasaṃvattaniko,
iṭṭhāya kantāya manāpāya hitāya sukhāya saṃvattati. ime kho, bhikkhave,
aṭṭha puññābhisandā kusalābhisandā sukhassāhārā sovaggikā sukhavipākā
saggasaṃvattanikā, iṭṭhāya kantāya manāpāya hitāya sukhāya
saṃvattantī”ti.

“Furthermore, abandoning the use of intoxicants, the disciple of the noble ones abstains from taking intoxicants.
In doing so, he gives freedom from danger, freedom from animosity,
freedom from oppression to limitless numbers of beings. In giving
freedom from danger, freedom from animosity, freedom from oppression to
limitless numbers of beings, he gains a share in limitless freedom from
danger, freedom from animosity, and freedom from oppression. This is the
fifth gift, the fifth great gift
— original, long-standing, traditional, ancient, unadulterated,
unadulterated from the beginning — that is not open to suspicion, will
never be open to suspicion, and is unfaulted by knowledgeable contemplatives & brahmans. And this is the eighth reward of merit, reward of skillfulness, nourishment of happiness, celestial, resulting in happiness, leading to heaven, leading to what is desirable, pleasurable, & appealing; to welfare & to happiness.

ime kho, bhikkhave, aṭṭha puññābhisandā kusalābhisandā sukhassāhārā
sovaggikā sukhavipākā saggasaṃvattanikā, iṭṭhāya kantāya manāpāya hitāya
sukhāya saṃvattantī”ti.

“Monks, these are the eight rewards of merit, rewards of skillfulness, nourishments of happiness, celestial, resulting in happiness, leading to heaven, leading to what is desirable, pleasurable, & appealing, to welfare & happiness.


Bodhi leaf



“Abhisanda Sutta: Rewards”, translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu. Access to Insight (Legacy Edition), 30 November 2013.

———oOo———
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In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Mind; heart; state of consciousness.(Source): Access to Insight: A Glossary of Pali and Buddhist Terms

1. Citta (called Cittagahapati) - A
householder of Macchikasanda, where he was Treasurer. He was later declared by
the Buddha to be pre eminent among laymen who preached the Doctrine (A.i.26). On
the day of his birth the whole city was covered knee deep with flowers of
various hues, hence his name.

When Mahanama visited Macchikasanda, Citta,
pleased with his demeanour, invited him to his park, the Ambatakarama, and built
for him a monastery there. And there the Elder preached to Citta the
Sala yatana vibhatti and Citta became an Anagami. Thereafter many monks visited
the Ambatakarama and accepted Cittas hospitality. Among them was Isidatta
(q.v.), a former acquaintance of Citta, but Isidatta left when he found that his
identity had been discovered. Mahanama and Mahaka did likewise, after having
performed miracles at the request of Citta.

The Citta Samyutta (S.iv.282ff)
contains a record of conversations between Citta and members of the Order, among
whom, besides those already mentioned, were Kamabhu and Godatta. Citta is also
said to have had discussions with Nigantha Nataputta and Acela Kassapa and to
have refuted their views.

A thera named Sudhamma was a permanent
resident in the Ambatakarama and was looked after by Citta. Once, when the two
Chief Disciples and several other eminent Elders came to the Ambatakarama, Citta
invited first these and then Sudhamma; the latter, feeling slighted, blamed
Citta beyond measure, but the Buddha, hearing of this, sent Sudhamma to ask for
Cittas pardon (Vin.ii.15ff; DhA.ii.74f; for details see Sudhamma).

Some time later, Citta visited the
Buddha. He was accompanied by two thousand others and took with him five hundred
cartloads of offerings to the Buddha and the Order. As he fell at the feet of
the Buddha, flowers of five hues showered from the sky and the Buddha preached
to him the Salayatana vibhatti. For a fortnight he continued distributing his
gifts to the Order and the devas filled his carts with all kinds of valuables
(AA.i.210).

When Citta lay ill just before his
death, devas visited him and advised him to wish for kingship among them, but he
refused to aspire to anything so impermanent, and instructed the devas and his
kinsfolk gathered round him, telling them of the Buddha and his teachings
(S.iv.302f). He is regarded as the ideal layman (E.g., at A.i.88; ii.164;
iii.451).

He owned a tributary village called
Migapattaka (SA.iii.93).

In the time of Padumuttara Buddha, Citta
conceived his desire to be placed first among laymen in the teaching of the
Dhamma. In the time of Kassapa Buddha he was a huntsman. One day, seeing a monk
in a glen, and being pleased thereat, he hurried home, prepared a meal and
brought it to the monk, together with flowers he had gathered on the way. After
the offering,

— or —

1. Citta - One of the four wives of Magha.(Source): Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names

(mind, thought).

(Source): Dhamma Dana: Pali English Glossary

‘mind’, ‘consciousness’, ’state of consciousness’, is a synonym of
mano and
viññāna (s. khandha and
Tab. 1).

Dhs. divides all phenomena into consciousness (citta), mental
concomitants (cetasika) and corporeality
(rūpa).

In adhicitta, ‘higher mentality’, it signifies the concentrated,
quietened mind, and is one of the 3 trainings (s.
sikkhā).

The concentration (or intensification) of consciousness is one of the 4 roads
to power (s. iddhipāda).

— or —

viññāna (s. khandha),

citta (q.v.),
mano (q v ) -

Moment of °: citta-kkhana (q.v.).

Contemplation of
°: cittānupassanā: s. satipatthāna -

Corporeality produced by °:
citta-ja-rūpa, s. samutthāna -

Abodes or supports of °: cf.
viññānatthiti (q.v.)

Functions of °: viññāna-kicca (q.v.).

(Source): Pali Kanon: Manual of Buddhist Terms and Doctrines
context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).


Abhidhamma

See One Hundred and Tweny One Cittas

Citta means consciousness. It is the nature that is aware of its
object. No other dhamma or nature can know anything including
themselves. But citta can know everything possible including cittas.

Citta always leads other nama dhamma and rupa dhamma. A citta arises,
it passes away immediately after its arising. Another citta arises, and
again it falls away. Next arises and dies out immediately. This kind of
uninterruptedness is the manifestation of citta. There are immediate
causes for arising of citta. They are cittas themselves, nama dhamma and
rupa dhamma.

There are 89 cittas in total.

  • 81 cittas are mundane consciousness and
  • 8 cittas are supramundane consciousness.

At another time, citta can be counted as 121 cittas in total.

This happens when 8 lokuttara cittas arise when in jhana. These are
called lokuttara jhana cittas. As there are 5 jhanas, then there are 40
lokuttara jhana cittas.

Together with lokiya cittas 40 and 81 will make 121 cittas in total.

When 89 cittas are analysed according to their jati or origin or parentage, there are four classes of citta. They are

  1. 12 akusala cittas ( 8 lobha + 2 dosa + 2 moha citta )
  2. 21 kusala cittas ( 8 mahakusala + 5 rupakusala + 4 arupakusala + 4 lokuttarakusala or magga citta )
  3. 36 vipaka cittas ( 7 ahetuka akusala + 8 ahetuka kusala + 8
    mahavipaka + 5 rupavipaka + 4 arupavipaka + 4 lokuttaravipaka or phala
    citta )
  4. 20 kiriya cittas ( 3 ahetukakiriya + 8 mahakiriya + 5 rupakiriya + 4 arupakiriya )

12 + 21 + 36 + 20 = 89 cittas in total.

When cittas are viewed by bhumi or place or plane of existence, there are 4 classes of citta. They are

  1. 54 kamavacara cittas ( 12 akusala + 18 ahetuka cittas + 24 sobhana cittas )
  2. 15 rupavacara cittas ( 5 rupakusala + 5 rupavipaka + 5 rupakiriya )
  3. 12 arupavacara cittas ( 4 arupakusala + 4 arupavipaka + 4 arupakiriya )
  4. 8 lokuttara cittas (4 lokuttara kusala or magga + 4 lokuttara vipaka or phala)

54 + 15 + 12 + 8 = 89 cittas in total.

When lokuttara cittas arise in parallel with jhana, there will be 121
cittas in total. Then, according to jati or origin or parentage, cittas
can be classified as

  1. 37 kusala cittas ( 8 mahakusala, 5 rupakusala, 4arupakusala, 20 lokuttarakusala cittas )
  2. 52 vipaka cittas ( 15 ahetukavipaka, 8 mahavipaka, 5 rupavipaka, 4 arupavipaka, 20 lokuttaravipaka cittas )
  3. 20 kiriya cittas ( 3 ahetuka kiriya, 8 mahakiriya, 5 rupakiriya, 4 arupakiriya )
  4. 12 akusala cittas ( 8 lobha , 2 dosa, 2 moha )

37 + 52 + 20 + 12 = 121 cittas in total.

According to bhumi or place or plane of existence, there are 4 classes of citta. They are

  1. 54 kamavacara cittas ( 12 akusala, 18 ahetuka, 24 sobhana cittas )
  2. 15 rupavacara cittas ( 5 rupakusala, 5 rupavipaka, 5 rupakiriya )
  3. 12 arupavacara cittas ( 4 arupakusala, 4 arupavipaka, 4 arupakiriya )
  4. 40 lokuttara cittas ( 20 lokuttara kusala, 20 lokuttara vipaka )

54 + 15 + 12 + 40 = 121 cittas in total.

(Source): Journey to Nibbana: Patthana Dhama

Citta,
or consciousness, is the Dhamma which is the leader in knowing what
appears, such as seeing or hearing. Cittas have been classified as 89
types in all, or, in special cases, as 121 types.

Citta is an element, which experiences something, a reality which
experiences an object. It is the “chief”, the leader in knowing the
object which appears.

There is not only citta, which sees, citta that hears, citta which
smells, citta which tastes or citta which experiences tangible object,
there is also citta which thinks about many diverse subjects. The world
of each person is ruled by his citta.

(Source): Buddhist Information: A Survey of Paramattha Dhammas

What we call mind are in reality different fleeting moments of
consciousness succeeding one another very rapidly. Since “mind” has in
psychology a meaning different from “mind” according to the Buddhist
teaching, it is to be preferred to use the Pali term citta (pronounced:
chitta).

The mind is variable, it changes very rapidly. At one moment there is a
mind with attachment, at another moment a mind with generosity, at
another moment a mind with anger. At each moment there is a different
mind. Through the Buddhist teachings we learn that in reality the mind
is different from what we mean by the word “mind” in conventional
language.

(Source): Dhamma Study: Cetasikas

Citta
is derived from the PaIi word for thinking (cinteti). All cittas have
in common that they “think” of an object, but we have to take thinking
here in a very general sense, meaning, being conscious of an object, or
cognizing an object.

Cittas perform different functions. For examine, seeing is a function (kicca) of citta.

A citta cannot arise alone, it has to be accompanied by cetasikas.
The citta is the “leader”, while the cetasikas which share the same
object perform each their own task.

There is a great variety of cetasikas accompanying the different
cittas. Akusala cittas are accompanied by cetasikas which are
defilements, whereas kusala cittas are accompanied by cetasikas which
are good qualities. Apart from defilements and good qualities there are
also cetasikas which accompany cittas which are unwholesome, cittas
which are wholesome and cittas which are neither wholesome nor
unwholesome.

(Source): Dhamma Study: Cetasikas
Abhidhamma book cover
context information

Abhidhamma (अभिधम्म) usually refers to the last section (piṭaka)
of the Pali canon and includes schematic classifications of scholastic
literature dealing with Theravāda Buddhism. Primary topics include
psychology, philosophy, methodology and metaphysics which are rendered
into exhaustive enumerations and commentaries.


Pali

citta : (nt.) mind; thought; (m.), name of a month: March-April. (adj.), variegated; manifold; beautiful. (nt.), a painting; picture.

(Source): BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

1) Citta, 2 (cp. Sk. caitra, the first month of the year:
MarchApril, orig. N. of the star Spica (in Virgo); see E. Plunket,
Ancient Calendars, etc., pp. 134 sq., 171 sq.) N. of the month Chaitra
PvA.135. Cp. Citra-māsa KhA 192. (Page 268)

2) Citta, 2 (nt.) (Sk. citta, orig. pp. of cinteti, cit, cp. yutta› yuñjati, mutta›muñcati. On etym. from cit. see cinteti). Meaning:—the heart (psychologically), i.e.
the centre & focus of man’s emotional nature as well as that
intellectual element which inheres in & accompanies its
manifestations; i.e. thought. In this wise citta denotes both
the agent & that which is enacted (see kamma II. introd.), for in
Indian Psychology citta is the seat & organ of thought (cetasā
cinteti; cp. Gr. frήn, although on the whole it corresponds more to the
Homeric qumόs). As in the verb (cinteti) there are two stems closely
allied and almost inseparable in meaning (see § III, ), viz. cit &
cet (citta & cetas); cp. ye should restrain, curb, subdue citta by
ceto, M.I, 120, 242 (cp. attanā coday’attānaṃ Dhp 379 f.); cetasā cittaṃ samannesati S.I, 194 (cp. cetasā cittaṃ samannesati S.I, 194). In their general use there is no distinction to be made between the two (see § III,).

The meaning of citta is best understood when explaining it by
expressions familiar to us, as: with all my heart; heart and soul; I
have no heart to do it; blessed are the pure in heart; singleness of
heart (cp. ekagga); all of which emphasize the emotional & conative
side or “thought” more than its mental & rational side (for which
see manas & viññāṇa). It may therefore be rendered by intention,
impulse, design; mood, disposition, state of mind, reaction to
impressions. It is only in later scholastic lgg. that we are justified
in applying the term “thought” in its technical sense. It needs to be
pointed out, as complementary to this view, that citta nearly always
occurs in the singular (=heart), & out of 150 cases in the Nikāyas
only 3 times in the plural (=thoughts). The substantiality of citta
(cetas) is also evident from its connection with kamma (heart as source
of action), kāma & the senses in general. ‹-› On the whole subject
see Mrs. Rh. D. Buddh. Psych. Eth. introd. & Bud. Psy. ch. II.

3.a) Citta (adjective.) (to cetati; *(s)qait to shine, to be bright, cp. Sk. citra, Sk. P. ketu, Av. ciprō, Lat. caelum, Ags. hador, Ohg. heitar, see also citta2) variegated, manifold, beautiful; tasty, sweet, spiced (of cakes), J.IV, 30 (geṇḍuka); Dh.171 (rājaratha); Vv 479; Pv.II, 112 (aneka°); IV, 313 (pūvā=madhurā PvA.251).

3.b) Citta (neuter.) painting Th.1, 674.—Sn.50 (kāmā=Nd2 240 nānāvaṇṇā), 251 (gāthā); J.V, 196 (geṇḍuka), 241 VI, 218.

(Source): Sutta: The Pali Text Society’s Pali-English Dictionary

Pali book cover
context information

Pali
is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda
Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to
Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.


General definition (in Buddhism)

Consciousness is the mind, which perceives the different aspects of objects

(Source): Wisdom Library: Buddhism

First kind of Nama.

1. Citta (consciousness) is of 89 different types. Cittas are divided into four categories:

  1. Moral or skillful consciousness (kusala citta) – 21 types
  2. Immoral or unskillful consciousness (akusala citta) –12 types
  3. Resultant consciousness (vipaka citta) –36 types
  4. Inoperative consciousness (kiriya citta) –20 types

2. Citta is the chief mental phenomena of experience. So in seeing,
for example, the function of the moment of seeing (citta) is to see the
object. Citta is the chief experiencer.

(Source): Dhamma Study: Introduction to the Dhamma
 http://buddhism.redzambala.com/dhammapada/dhammapada-3-citta-vagga.html

Dhammapada | 3. Citta Vagga

3. Citta Vagga
The Mind

1. Phandanaṁ capalaṁ cittaṁ,
dūrakkhaṁ dunnivārayaṁ
Ujuṁ karoti medhāvī, usukāro’va tejanaṁ.

2. Vārijo’va thale khitto, okamokata ubbhato
Pariphandatimidaṁ cittaṁ, māradheyyaṁ pahātave.

Straighten the Fickle Mind

1. The flickering, fickle mind, difficult to guard, difficult to control — the
wise person straightens it as a fletcher straightens an arrow.

2. Like a fish that is drawn from its watery abode and thrown upon land,
even so does this mind flutter. Hence should the realm of the passions be
shunned.

The Elder Meghiya

On his return from alms-round, Meghiya Thera saw a mango grove, and wished to spend the day there in meditation.

He requested permission from the Buddha, who asked him to wait for
another monk to come. Meghiya repeated his request a second and third
time, so the Buddha told him to do what he thought right.

He paid respects and departed for the mango grove. The whole day he
was assailed by unwholesome thoughts, and couldn’t gain concentration.

In the evening he came to see the Buddha who taught him about the
five things conducive to the maturing of insight: having a good friend,
restraint by the Pāṭimokkha, suitable talk, energy, and wisdom.

Furthermore, one should contemplate the repulsive to dispel lust,
loving-kindness to dispel ill-will, mindfulness of breathing to overcome
distraction, and the perception of impermanence to establish the
perception of not-self and eradicate the conceit “I am.”

Control the Mind Well

3. Dunniggahassa lahuno, yattha kāmanipātino
Cittassa damatho sādhu, cittaṁ dantaṁ sukhāvahaṁ.

3. The mind is hard to restrain, swift, it flies wherever it likes:
To control it is good. A controlled mind is conducive to happiness.

It is Hard to Stay with A Mind-reader

Some forest monks dwelt near the village of Mātika. A devout woman,
receiving instruction from the monks, attained Non-returning and the
ability to read others’ thoughts.

Since she knew every thought of the monks, she provided whatever they
needed without even being asked. Before long the monks attained
Arahantship and returned to pay respects to the Buddha. On being asked,
they told him how well the lay woman had looked after their needs.

Hearing this, a certain monk asked permission to go there. From the moment he arrived, she provided everything he wanted.

The monk, fearing that evil thoughts might arise, soon left and told
the Buddha why he couldn’t remain there. The Buddha told him to return
and to restrain his wild mind. He did so, and soon gained Arahantship.

Guard the Mind Well

4. Sududdasaṁ sunipuṇaṁ. yatthakāmanipātinaṁ
Cittaṁ rakkhetha medhāvī, cittaṁ guttaṁ sukhāvahaṁ.

4. The mind is very hard to perceive, extremely subtle, flits wherever it
lists. Let the wise person guard it; a guarded mind is conducive to
happiness.

A Discontented Monk

A devout lay follower became a monk. His preceptor was a master of Vinaya and his teacher was an expert in the Abhidhamma.

The newly ordained monk found the monk’s life onerous due to the many
rules explained by his preceptor and the difficult studies given by his
teacher.

He lost faith and wanted to return to lay life. The Buddha asked him
if he could do one thing. He asked what that was. The Buddha advised him
just to guard his mind well.

Freedom From Māra

5. Dūraṅgamaṁ ekacaraṁ, asarīraṁ guhāsayaṁ
Ye cittaṁ saṁyamessanti, mokkhanti mārabandhanā.

5. Faring far, wandering alone, bodiless, lying in a cave, is the mind.
Those who subdue it are freed from the bond of Māra.

Elder Saṅgharakkhita’s Nephew

A young monk named Saṅgharakkhita soon gained Arahantship. His
sister’s son was named after him, and when he came of age, he also
became a monk.

When the nephew received two pieces of cloth, he presented the
biggest to his uncle, who repeatedly declined the offer. He felt so
rejected that he thought it would be better to disrobe.

While fanning his uncle, he thought that he would sell that piece of
cloth and buy a she-goat to earn some money. The goat would produce many
offspring.

Before long he would have enough money to get married and would have a
son. Then he would ride in a bullock-cart to pay a visit to his uncle
with his wife and child.

On the way his wife would accidentally drop his child under the wheel
of the cart, killing him. He would get angry and hit his wife with a
stick.

Day dreaming thus he struck his uncle with the fan.

Knowing all the thoughts that had passed through his nephew’s mind,
the elder asked him why he was hitting an elderly monk just because he
could not hit his wife.

The nephew was so ashamed that he dropped the fan and ran away. The
novices seized him and brought him to the Buddha. The Buddha described
the fickle nature of the mind.

The Vigilant Have No Fear

6. Anavaṭṭhitacittassa, saddhammaṁ avijānato
Pariplavapasādassa, paññā na paripūrati.
7. Anavassutacittassa, ananvāhatacetaso
Puññapāpapahīṇassa, natthi jāgarato bhayaṁ.

6. He whose mind is not
steadfast, he who knows not the true doctrine, he whose confidence
wavers — the wisdom of such a one will never be perfect.

7. He whose mind is not
soaked (by lust) he who is not affected (by hatred), he who has
transcended both good and evil — for such a vigilant one there is no
fear.

The Mind-tossed Elder

After searching in the forest for his lost ox, a farmer approached
the monks hoping to get some food. The leftovers he received were so
delicious he became a monk thinking it would be an easy life. He soon
became fat and lazy.

Thinking it was too arduous to walk for alms every day, he disrobed
and resumed farming. He disrobed and re-entered the Saṅgha six times, so
the monks named him “Cittahattha Thera — Mind-tossed Elder.”

On returning from the field, seeing his pregnant wife snoring, he
became disgusted with worldly life, and left the house for the seventh
time.

On the way to the monastery he contemplated impermanence and
suffering, and gained the fruit of Stream-entry. He implored the monks
to ordain him once more.

They refused at first, saying that his head was like a whetstone. Finally they relented, and he soon attained Arahantship.

When he stayed for a long time, the monks asked him why, and he told
them that he was now free from attachment. The monks told this to the
Buddha, who explained his state of mind before and after his realisation
of nibbāna.

Fortify the Mind and Be Non-attached

8. Kumbhūpamaṁ kāyamimaṁ viditvā,
nagarūpamaṁ cittamidaṁ ṭhapetvā
Yodhetha māraṁ paññāvudhena,
jitañca rakkhe anivesano siyā.

8. Realising that this
body is (as fragile) as a jar, establishing this mind (as firm) as a
(fortified) city he should attack Māra with the weapon of wisdom. He
should guard his conquest and be without attachment.

The Benefits of Loving-kindness

Five hundred monks who were meditating in a forest were troubled by
the tree-deities, who were inconvenienced by their presence, so made all
manner of frightening sights and sounds to make the monks go away.

The monks sought the advice of the Buddha, who taught them the
Karanīya Metta Sutta, advising them to extend loving-kindness towards
all beings. They did so with the result that those deities protected
them.

Comparing the body to a water jar, the monks developed insight. The
Buddha read their thoughts, and projecting himself before them, he
confirmed what they had thought.

The Body Will Soon Be Cast Aside

9. Aciraṁ vat’ayaṁ kāyo, paṭhaviṁ adhisessati
Chuddho apetaviññāṇo, niratthaṁ ’va kaḷiṅgaraṁ.

9. Before long, alas! this body will lie upon the ground, cast aside, devoid of consciousness, even as a useless charred log.

The Elder Pūtigatta Tissa

A monk named Tissa became afflicted with bone cancer and boils that
oozed pus. Due to the bad odour he was known as Pūtigatta Tissa Thera —
the elder with a stinking body. As the disease worsened, his fellow
monks stayed away from him and no one cared for him.

Knowing this, the Buddha came there, prepared scented water, had the
monks wash his robes, and himself bathed the elder’s body with warm
water. Then he taught him the nature of the body.

The elder attained Arahantship, and passed away, attaining
parinibbāna. The monks asked the Buddha what the elder had done in
previous lives to die in that way.

The Buddha explained that in a previous life he had made a living by selling birds:

He would break the wings and legs of any birds that were unsold at
the end of the day to prevent them escaping, and then sell them the next
day.

One day, when fragrant food had been prepared for him, he saw a monk
coming for alms, who was an Arahant. Wishing to atone for his evil
deeds, he offered the food to the monk, wishing to attain the fruit that
he had attained.

Due to injuring the birds, he died a painful death. Thanks to his
wish for Arahantship, he finally attained it and put an end to
suffering.

An Ill-Directed Mind Can Do Great Harm

10. Diso disaṁ yaṁ taṁ kayirā, verī vā pana verinaṁ
Micchāpanihitaṁ cittaṁ, pāpiyo naṁ tato kare.

10. Whatever (harm) a foe may do to a foe, or a hater to a hater,
An ill-directed mind can do one far greater (harm).

Nanda the Herdsman

A wealthy herdsman offered alms to the Buddha and the Saṅgha for seven days.

When the Buddha departed, he accompanied him for some distance, but
turned back when the Buddha told him to stop. As he returned he was
killed by a stray arrow.

The monks remarked that if the Buddha had not visited that place, the man would not have met with that fatal accident.

The Buddha replied that under no circumstances would he have escaped
death due to past evil kamma. The Buddha added that an ill-directed mind
could cause great harm.

A Well-directed Mind is of Great Benefit

11. Na taṁ mātā pitā kayirā, aññe vā pi ca ñātakā
Sammā panihitaṁ cittaṁ, seyyaso naṁ tato kare.

11. What neither mother, nor father, nor any other relative can do,
A well-directed mind does and thereby elevates one.

A Story of Sex Change

While going to bathe with a close friend, a millionaire with two sons
harboured a lustful thought on seeing the body of Mahākassapa, who was
putting on his robe to enter Soreyya for alms.

He thought, “May this elder be my wife, or may my wife’s body be like his.” As that thought arose, he changed into a woman.

She was so embarrassed that she ran away and made her way to the
distant city of Takkasila. There she married and had two sons. Thus she
was mother of two, and father of two.

Some time later, the millionaire’s close friend went to Takkasila on
business. Recognising him, the millionaire had him invited to his
mansion and after treating him to the usual hospitality, inquired about
his own parents. Then she revealed her former identity and confessed the
thought that had caused the sex change.

The friend advised the millionaire to ask the elder for forgiveness.
As Mahākassapa was living nearby, she invited him for alms and asked for
forgiveness. As soon as Mahākassapa forgave her, she changed back to a
man.

He took leave of the father of his sons in Takkasila, kissed his sons
goodbye, and became a monk. He was known as the Elder Soreyya.

Travelling with Mahākassapa, Soreyya Thera arrived back at Sāvatthī.

Hearing about his past, the people of the country asked him
repeatedly which two sons he had the most affection for. He replied
patiently that had more affection for those two sons of whom he was the
mother.

Soreyya went into solitude and soon attained Arahantship. Later, when
asked the same question again he replied that he no affection for
anyone.

The monks wondered whether this was true, and reported it to the
Buddha who confirmed that Soreyya was now free from affection. The
Buddha praised him and recited the verse saying that a well-directed
mind was of even greater benefit than a mother or a father.





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Doctrine-True Practice of The Path Shown by The Blessed,Noble,Awakened One-The Tathagata



Disenchantment


When we come to see impermanence, unsatisfactoriness and not-self in ourselves, in this body and mind, in this world, then we’ll find that a kind of boredom will arise. This isn’t the everyday boredom that makes us feel like not wanting to know or see or say anything, or not wanting to have anything to do with anybody at all. That isn’t real boredom, it still has attachment, we still don’t understand. We still have feelings of envy and resentment and are still clinging to the things which cause us suffering.


The kind of boredom which the Buddha talked about is a condition without anger or lust. It arises out of seeing everything as impermanent. When pleasant feeling arises in our mind, we see that it isn’t lasting. This is the kind of boredom we have. We call it Nibbida or disenchantment. That means that it’s far from sensual craving and passion. We see nothing as being worthy of desire. Whether or not things accord with our likes and dislikes, it doesn’t matter to us, we don’t identify with them. We don’t give them any special value.


Practicing like this we don’t give things reason to cause us difficulty. We have seen suffering and have seen that identifying with moods can not give rise to any real happiness. It causes clinging to happiness and unhappiness and clinging to liking and disliking, which is in itself the cause of suffering. When we are still clinging like this we don’t have an even-minded attitude towards things. Some states of mind we like and others we dislike. If we are still liking and disliking, then both happiness and unhappiness are suffering. It’s this kind of attachment which causes suffering. The Buddha taught that whatever causes us suffering is in itself unsatisfactory.


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Spiritual Community of The Followers of The Path Shown by The Blessed,Noble,Awakened One-The Tathagata

Refuge

An Introduction to the Buddha, Dhamma, & Sangha
by
Thanissaro Bhikkhu
http://www.atpm.com/6.07/national-parks/grand-teton-mountains.shtmlhttp://www.ccconserv.org/forests-waterways.htmlhttp://www.1-costaricalink.com/costa_rica_parks_a-z.htmhttp://www.johnlovett.com/trees.htm
 
They go to many a refuge,
to mountains, forests,
parks, trees, and shrines:
people threatened with danger.
That’s not the secure refuge,
that’s not the highest refuge,
that’s not the refuge,
having gone to which,
you gain release
from all suffering and stress.
http://www.majordojo.com/archives/000408.php
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But when, having gone for refuge
to the Buddha, Dhamma, and Sangha,
you see with right discernment
the four Noble Truths —
stress,
the cause of stress,
the transcending of stress,
and the Noble Eightfold Path,
the way to the stilling of stress:
That’s the secure refuge,
that, the highest refuge,
that is the refuge,
having gone to which,
you gain release
from all suffering and stress.

— Dhammapada, 188-192

Offering At Sambodhi

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