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(73) 2730 Fri 31 Aug 2018 LESSON (73) Fri 31 Aug 2007 Do Good Be Mindful - Awakened One with Awareness (AOA) WHAT IS THE SUTTANTA PITAKA? Diploma course in Buddhist Studies Mahabodhi Research Centre (Affiliated to Karnataka Sanskrit University, Bengaluru) Maha Bodhi Society 14 Kalidasa Road, Gandhinagar =, Bengaluru - 560009, INDIA-Sarvajan Hitay Sarvajan Sukhay-For The Gain of The Many and For The Welfare of The Many-SC issues notices in Gomti Nagar flat allotment case -FIR against CBI chief by West Bengal police in Nithari row-Set Up Second SRC To Break Behemoths Into Smaller States-Puris banned in mid-day meals in UP-Illegal cracker factory unearthed
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2730 Fri 31 Aug 2018 LESSON (73) Fri 31 Aug 2007


Do Good Be Mindful  -  Awakened One with Awareness (AOA)

WHAT IS THE SUTTANTA PITAKA?

Diploma course in Buddhist Studies
Mahabodhi Research Centre
(Affiliated to Karnataka Sanskrit University, Bengaluru)
Maha Bodhi Society
14 Kalidasa Road, Gandhinagar =, Bengaluru - 560009, INDIA


Chapter I


WHAT IS THE SUTTANTA PITAKA?

The
Suttanta Pitaka is a collection
of all the discourses in their entirety delivered by the
Buddha on
various occasions. (A few discourses delivered by some of
the distinguished
disciples of the Buddha, such as the Venerable Særiputta,
Maha Moggallæna, Ananda, etc., as well as some narratives are also
included in the
books of the Suttanta Pitaka.) The discourses of the Buddha
compiled
together in the Suttanta Pitaka were expounded to suit
different occasions,
for various persons with different temperaments. Although
the discourses
were mostly intended for the benefit of bhikkhus, and deal
with the
practice of the pure life and with the exposition of the
Teaching,
there are also several other discourses which deal with the
material
and moral progress of the lay disciples.

The Suttanta Pitaka brings out the meaning of the Buddha’s teachings,
expresses them clearly, protects and guards them against distortion
and misconstruction. Just like a string which serves as a plumb-line
to guide the carpenters in their work, just like a thread which protects
flowers from being scattered or dispersed when strung together by
it, likewise by means of suttas, the meaning of Buddha’s teachings
may be brought out clearly, grasped and understood correctly and given
perfect protection from being misconstrued.

The Suttanta Pi¥aka is divided into five separate collections known
as Nikæyas. They are Døgha Nikæya, Majjhima Nikæya, Saµyutta
Nikæya, A³guttara Nikæya and Khuddaka Nikæya.

https://www.buddhanet.net/observe.htm

Guide to Tipitaka


SUTTANTA PITAKA



WHAT IS
THE SUTTANTA PITAKA?

Observances and Practices
in the Teaching of the Buddha.

In the Suttanta Pi¥aka are found not only the fundamentals of
the Dhamma but also pragmatic guidelines to make the Dhamma meaningful and applicable to
daily life. All observances and practices which form practical steps in the Buddha’s
Noble Path of Eight Constituents lead to spiritual purification at three levels:

  • Sila: moral purity through right
    conduct;


  • Samadhi: purity of mind through
    concentration (Samatha);


  • Pañña: purity of Insight through
    Vipassana Meditation.

To begin with, one must make the right resolution
to take refuge in the Buddha, to follow the Buddha’s Teaching,
and to be guided by the Saµgha. The first disciples who made the
declaration of faith in the Buddha and committed themselves to follow
his Teaching were the two merchant brothers, Tapussa and Bhallika.
They were travelling with their followers in five hundred carts
when they saw the Buddha in the vicinity of the Bodhi Tree after
his Enlightenment. The two merchants offered him honey rice cakes.
Accepting their offering and thus breaking the fast he had imposed
on himself for seven weeks, the Buddha made them his disciples by
letting them recite after him:

“Buddham Saranam Gacchami (I take refuge in the Buddha).”

“Dhammam Saranam Gacchami (I take refuge in the Dhamma).”

This recitation became the formula of declaration
of faith in the Buddha and his Teaching, Later when the Sangha became
established, the formula was extended to include the third commitment:

“Sangham Saranam Gacchami (I take refuge in the Sangha).”

ON THE RIGHT WAY TO GIVE ALMS

As a practical step,
capable of immediate and fruitful use by people in all walks of life, the Buddha gave
discourses on charity, alms-giving, explaining its virtues and on the right way and the
right attitude of mind with which an offering is to be made for spiritual uplift.

The motivating force in an act of charity is the volition, the will to give. Charity is
a meritorious action that arises only out of volition. Without the will to give, there is
no act of giving. Volition in giving alms is of three types:

(i) The volition that starts with the thought ‘I shall make an offering’ and
that exists during the period of preparations for making the offering - Pubba Cetana,
volition before the act.

(ii) The volition that arises at the moment of making the offering while handing it
over to the donee - Muñca Cetana, volition during the act.

(iii) The volition accompanying the joy and rejoicing which arise during repeated
recollection of or reflection on the act of giving - Apara Cetana, volition after the
act.

Whether the offering is made in homage to the living Buddha or to a minute particle of
his relics after his passing away, it is the volition, its strength and purity that
determine the nature of the result thereof.

There is also explained in the discourses the wrong attitude of mind with which no act
of charity should be performed.

A donor should avoid looking down on others who cannot make a similar offering; nor
should he exult over his own charity. Defiled by such unworthy thoughts, his volition is
only of inferior grade.

When the act of charity is motivated by expectations of beneficial results of immediate
prosperity and happiness, or rebirth in higher existences, the accompanying volition is
classed as mediocre.

It is only when the good deed of alms-giving is performed out of a spirit of
renunciation, motivated by thoughts of pure selflessness, aspiring only for attainment to
Nibbæna where all suffering ends, that the volition that brings about the act is regarded
as of superior grade.

Examples abound in the discourses concerning charity and modes of giving alms.

https://www.buddhanet.net/sila.htm



Moral Purity
through right conduct, Sila

Practice of Sila forms a most fundamental
aspect of Buddhism. It consists of practice of Right Speech, Right Action and Right
Livelihood to purge oneself of impure deeds, words and thoughts. Together with the
commitment to the Threefold Refuge (as described above) a Buddhist lay disciple observes
the Five Precepts by making a formal undertaking:

(i) I undertake to observe the precept of abstaining from killing.
(ii) I undertake to observe the precept of abstaining from stealing.
(iii) I undertake to observe the precept of abstaining from sexual misconduct.
(iv) I undertake to observe the precept of abstaining from telling lies.
(v) I undertake to observe the precept of abstaining from alcoholic drinks, drugs or
intoxicants that becloud the mind.

In addition to the negative aspect of the above formula which emphasizes abstinence,
there is also the positive aspect of Søla. For instance, we find in many discourses the
statement: ‘He refrains from killing, puts aside the cudgel and the sword; full of
kindness and compassion he lives for the welfare and happiness of all living things.’
Every precept laid down in the formula has these two aspects.

Depending upon the individual and the stage of one’s progress, other forms of
precepts, namely, Eight Precepts, Ten Precepts etc. may be observed. For the bhikkhus of
the Order, higher and advanced types of practices of morality are laid down. The Five
Precepts are to be always observed by lay disciples who may occasionally enhance their
self-discipline by observing the Eight or Ten Precepts. For those who have already
embarked on the path of a holy life, the Ten Precepts are essential preliminaries to
further progress.

Søla of perfect purity serves as a foundation for the next stage of progress, namely,
Samædhi purity of mind through concentration-meditation.

https://www.buddhanet.net/samadhi.htm

Practical methods of mental cultivation for development
of concentration, samadhi.

Mental cultivation for spiritual uplift consists
of two steps. The first step is to purify the mind from all defilements and corruption and
to have it focused on a point. A determined effort (Right Exertion) must be made to narrow
down the range of thoughts in the wavering, unsteady mind. Then attention (Right
Mindfulness or Attentiveness) must be fixed on a selected object of meditation until
one-pointedness of mind (Right Concentration) is achieved. In such a state, the mind
becomes freed from hindrances, pure, tranquil, powerful and bright. It is then ready to
advance to the second step by which Magga Insight and Fruition may be attained in order to
transcend the state of woe and sorrow.

The Suttanta Pitaka records numerous methods of meditation to bring about
one-pointedness of mind. In the Suttas of the Pitaka are dispersed these methods of
meditation, explained by the Buddha sometimes singly, sometimes collectively to suit the
occasion and the purpose for which they are recommended. The Buddha knew the diversity of
character and mental make-up of each individual, the different temperaments and
inclinations of those who approached him for guidance. Accordingly he recommended
different methods to different persons to suit the special character and need of each
individual.

The practice of mental cultivation which results ultimately in one-pointedness of mind
is known as Samadhi Bhavana. Whoever wishes to develop Samadhi Bhævanæ must have
been established in the observance of the precepts, with the senses controlled, calm and
self-possessed, and must be contented. Having been established in these four conditions he
selects a place suitable for meditation, a secluded spot. Then he should sit cross-legged
keeping his body erect and his mind alert; he should start purifying his mind of five
hindrances, namely, sensual desire, ill will, sloth and torpor, restlessness and worry,
and doubt, by choosing a meditation method suitable to him, practicing meditation with
zeal and ardour. For instance, with the Anapana method he keeps watching the incoming
and outgoing breath until he can have his mind fixed securely on the breath at the tip of
the nose.

When he realizes that the five hindrances have been got rid of, he becomes gladdened,
delighted, calm and blissful. This is the beginning of samadhi, concentration, which will
further develop until it attains one-pointedness of mind.

Thus one-pointedness of mind is concentration of mind when it is aware of one object,
and only one of a wholesome, salutary nature. This is attained by the practice of
meditation upon one of the subjects recommended for the purpose by the Buddha.

https://www.buddhanet.net/vipasana.htm


Practical methods of mental cultivation for development of
Insight Knowledge, pañña
.

The subject and methods of meditation as taught
in the suttas of the Pitaka are designed both for attainment of samædhi as well as for
development of Insight Knowledge, Vipassana Ñana, as a direct path to Nibbana.

As a second step in the practice of meditation, after achieving samadhi, when the
concentrated mind has become purified, firm and imperturbable, the meditator directs and
inclines his mind to Insight Knowledge, Vipassana Ñana. With this Insight Knowledge he
discerns the three characteristics of the phenomenal world, namely, Impermanence (Anicca),
Suffering (Dukkha) and Non-Self (Anatta).

As he advances in his practice and his mind becomes more and more purified, firm and
imperturbable, he directs and inclines his mind to the knowledge of the extinction of
moral intoxicants, Asavakkhaya Ñana. He then truly understands dukkha, the cause of
dukkha, the cessation of dukkha and the path leading to the cessation of dukkha. He also
comes to understand fully the moral intoxicants (asavas) as they really are, the cause of
æsavas, the cessation of asavas and the path leading to the cessation of the asavas.

With this knowledge of extinction of æsavas he becomes liberated. The knowledge of
liberation arises in him. He knows that rebirth is no more, that he has lived the holy
life; he has done what he has to do for the realization of Magga; there is nothing more
for him to do for such realization.

The Buddha taught with only one object: the extinction of Suffering and release from
conditioned existence. That object is to be obtained by the practice of meditation (for
Calm and Insight) as laid down in numerous suttas of the Suttanta Pitaka.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hwhyFmF-s0U


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hwhyFmF-s0U
Digha Nikaya (Part 1/62)
E P
Published on Feb 12, 2018
DN 01 Brahmajala (2011-07-16) Part A

————————————————————–

Treasury of The Buddha’s Discourses

RETURN TO THE ORIGINAL BUDDHA’S TEACHINGS

Speaker: Ven. Dhammavuddho Mahathera

Website:

http://www.suttavinaya.com/disc-8-dig

http://vbgnet.org/

Facebook:

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http://www.thaiworldview.com/bouddha/ceremon7.htm
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GIVING ALMS

Increase or decrease font size for easier reading :
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A-

ตักบาตร or “TAK BAT” means giving alms to monks.

Going out for alms
Going out for alms

The monks walk in straight line one by one. The oldest one or the
temple abbot leads the monks. The other one follows by seniority age spent in Buddhist community.

Giving alms
Giving alms


Thai women, kneeling, or Thai men, standing, put food inside the monk’s bowl.
The women cannot touch the monks or his belongings.


Monks are going out for alms everyday around 5 AM to 6 AM, except during the 3 months’
rainy season (July to october). They carry their bowl with both hands and close
to the belly.

As a city, district or village can contain several Buddhist temples,
the abbots agree together on the path reserved for each temple.

Giving alms
Giving alms


The monks do not thank for the food as they give opportunity for the laypeople to
do good deeds and earn merits.

Going out for alms is called “BIN THA BAT”
(บิณฑบาตร).

Giving alms
Giving alms


Alms bowl (
บาตร) is the monk’s emblem.
According to Buddhist rules, it is the only dish that monks can possess.

Traditionaly, the housewife or her youngest daughter are waiting
in front of the house. They greet the monks through a “WAI” (ไหว้)
and put food inside the bowl.

Giving alms
Giving alms


The monk shall not look at the women, neither thank them. No words are said.
If a young novice receives food from his mother, he can bless her.

The monks walk bare foot and shall accept any food given to them.

Going out for alms
Going out for alms


If the bowl is full, the monk puts the lid (
ฝาบาตร)
on it in order that laypeople can put a few last food offerings on the lid.

Traditionaly, rice offered shall be recently cooked rice.
People also offer curry dishes, sweets, fruits, flowers, incense sticks…

Going out for alms
Going out for alms


Food offered shall always be the best. Giving good allows receiving
good deeds and merits.

Then back to the pagoda, the monks share the received food
inside the Buddhist community.

Going out for alms
Going out for alms


People, who just gave alms to monks, can share this offering with deceased ancestors
through a small ceremony called “KRUAT NAM” (
กรวดน้ำ).

This libation allows giving merits to defunct ancestors. Water is put
inside the cooking pot and pour down slowly on the right hand forefinger to the soil. So merits go down
from the cooking pot through the hand to the earth. The Earth deity
“MAE THORANI” (แม่ธรณี) shall give the merits to
the right ancestors.

Going out for alms
Going out for alms


Traditionaly, if a monk bowl falls in front of a house, it is seen as a bad omen.

Giving alms
Giving alms


Some Thai people give alms everyday but some give alms on specific events only such as
Buddhist holy days (“WAN PHRA” -
วันพระ),
birthday and so on… On such occasion, they can request a blessing from the monks.

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SC issues notices in Gomti Nagar flat allotment case

2 November 2007

The Supreme Court has issued notices to former Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Mulayam Singh Yadav, Samajwadi Party General Secretary Amar Singh, Mulayam’s brother Shivpal Singh Yadav and 30 others on a petition filed by the Uttar Pradesh government seeking cancellation of allotment of flats by the Mulayam Singh government in Gomti Nagar, Lucknow, in 2005.

The notice was issued when the application was mentioned for early hearing.

A bench comprising Justices C K Thakker and Altamas Kabir issued notices after hearing the counsel for Uttar Pradesh government, headed by Mayawati, who contended that the allotments were illegal and were made from the discretionary quota of the Chief Minister only to Samajwadi Party leaders and their favourites, violating all the rules and regulations.

The Uttar Pradesh counsel prayed for permission to register criminal cases against the 28 allotees, the then Chief Minister Mulayam Singh, SP leader Amar Singh, who was the chairman of the Uttar Pradesh Development Corporation, Shivpal Singh Yadav and the then top officials of the Lucknow Development Authority, who were involved in the scandal of allotting flats in the posh Gomti Nagar colony at throwaway prices.

The inquiry conducted by the Lucknow Development Commissioner has found the allegations of ‘nepotism and favouritism’ true and the report, submitted to the state government, has recommended cancellation of the said allotments and appropriate action against those involved in the scandal.

(UNI)

FIR against CBI chief by West Bengal police in Nithari row

NEW DELHI: The West Bengal police has registered an FIR against CBI director Vijay Sankar and two other officials in connection with mysterious death of Jatin Sarkar, a key witness in the Nithari serial killings in Uttar Pradesh.

Besides the CBI director, the FIR registered with the Behrampur Police Station under Murshidabad district has named two other officials - SJM Gillani (SP) of CBI and Dinesh Yadav, the suspended circle officer of Nithari sub division of Uttar Pradesh police.

Cases under IPC Sections 302(murder), 506 (criminal intimidation) 201 (causing disapperance of evidence) and 34 (common intention) have been registered against the three top officials.

Murshidabad Superintendent of Police Rahul Shrivastava confirmed that the FIR was registered on November 1. However, he refrained from giving further details on the issue.

The registration of FIR assumes significance as on November 1, the Supreme Court had sought a a response from the CBI on an allegation made by Bandana Sarkar that the CBI chief and some of its officers had connived with the main accused Moninder Singh Pandher to give the latter a clean chit in the serial killings that shocked the nation’s conscience.

Special Article

New federal map

Set Up Second SRC To Break Behemoths Into Smaller States

By Sumer Kaul

Mayawati’s call for trifurcation of Uttar Pradesh may have evoked no political reaction and very little media attention but it certainly comes as a surprise. Several new states have been carved out of old ones since the States Reorganisation Commission revamped the post-independence federal map in 1955. One cannot recall any other case of a chief minister advocating division of his or her domain.
So what has prompted the BSP leader to suggest multiple partition of UP? After all, it is no ordinary state she is ruling (and how!). Even after Uttarakhand was hived off seven years ago, if UP were a country it would be the ninth most populous in the world. It sends the largest bloc of MPs to the Lok Sabha, which lends the dominant party in the state quite some clout in national politics as well as in politicking with the Centre, especially in these wobbly coalition times. This leverage will substantially weaken if the behemoth is broken up into smaller states.

UP into three

Be that as it may, this essay is not meant to be an analysis of Mayawati’s political motivation and strategy (instructive as that would be about present-day politics and politicians). My purpose is to examine the desirability of having smaller states, starting off with her suggestion of splitting UP into three. Let me say rightaway that I endorse it, as I endorsed the creation of Uttarakhand. In 1995 when the popular movement for a separate state for the hill districts of UP was gathering steam and was being widely opposed elsewhere in the state and outside, I wrote (in my column in the Hindustan Times): “Given these people’s long catalogue of woe and neglect… the question in all conscience is not why a separate state but why not.”
This question applies with equal validity to a further division of Uttar Pradesh. Among other considerations, woe and neglect continue to be the fate of people in vast swathes of the state. The basic fact of the matter is that UP has been a victim of abysmal governance over the decades. While the credit for this must primarily go to the kind of governments it has had, a major cause for the state’s general and largely abject backwardness has been, and is, its size and gargantuan population. Splitting it into three states will not transform the situation overnight but will facilitate and speed up development in each.
This is not a vain assertion; it is borne out by experience. The good old Assam-NEFA was broken into as many as seven states. While progress has been somewhat patchy, people as a whole are demonstrably better off than they were in the erstwhile administrative monolith. Punjab is less than one-third of the original Punjab but is now among the most prosperous states. When Haryana was carved out of it, many believed that the new state was so unviable that it would soon wither away. Haryana is doing pretty well, certainly compared to its sprawling eastern neighbour.
Given all this, why talk of UP alone? Absolutely right. There are other big states most of which, it is no coincidence, are also largely backward and ill-governed and, no coincidence again, face separate statehood movements in their regions. These too need to be split into smaller states. This is the call of good sense. But good sense is alien to those in and outside active politics who have vested interests in the status quo.
Unfortunately, there are also very many well-meaning people who see dire consequences in creating more and smaller states. Their main objections are: Proliferation of states will lead to balkanisation of the country; small states will make the Centre all-powerful and autocratic; more states will mean more inter-state disputes; and costs of administration will shoot up and that will put, still higher burden on tax-payers. These, as we shall see, are baseless or curable fears.
Nearly a dozen new states have come up since 1955. Has this in any way changed the Centre-state equation against the latter? Why should it change if, say, another one dozen states are created? Equally implausible is the argument that more states will necessarily mean more inter-state disputes. Such quarrels arise from complex factors, including and indeed accentuated by exigencies of party politics. If the conventional problem-solving spirit of give and take is not forthcoming in such matters, the answer lies in activating the Constitutionally-provided Inter-State Council and empowering it with the authority to give binding decisions.
As for the cost factor, the basic fact is that government expenditure in this blessed country has less to do with needs of governance and more with our political (and bureaucratic) culture of pomp and profligacy ~ and corruption. Yes, given the bloated and exorbitant character of ministries and bureaucracies, new states will mean new costs. At the same time, however, smaller states should also mean smaller outgo under various expenditure heads ~ for the new entities as well as the diminished mother state.
That apart and far more significantly, if we are honest about economy of costs, there are several ways to go about it and effect massive savings: Reduce by half the size of ministries from the present ceiling of 15 per cent and cut to reasonable levels the obscenely high perks and privileges given to ministers and legislators (and senior bureaucrats); abolish, where these still exists, the white elephants called Vidhan Parishads; make the hugely under-employed personages in those viceregal Raj Bhavans governors of a bunch of states ~ that is, if we don’t have the democratic courage to altogether do away with this redundant colonial institution. Highly desirable things to do in themselves, these reforms will release enough of the tax-payers’ money to meet a considerable part of a new state’s expenditure.

Balkanisation

Finally, the balkanisation point. This is a bogus fear. There is no god-given figure of states a country can have. If a nation’s territorial integrity were contingent on the number of its provinces, then a country called the USA with its 51 very autonomous states should have dissolved long ago. Nor has the near doubling of states in India abridged its territory. (The areas lost to Pakistan in J&K and there and elsewhere to China, needless to say, have nothing whatsoever to do with the number or size of states.)
There are close to a dozen separate statehood movements brewing in various states, including Telengana in Andhra Pradesh. When the Telengana Rashtriya Samiti made an impressive showing in the elections three years ago, the Congress sought and secured its support at the Centre on the promise that a second SRC would be set up to consider, among other cases, the demand for a Telengana state. The Congress-led UPA government is still considering ~ setting up the commission!
Must we wait for and act only when things turn ugly ~ and then go about it piecemeal? Wisdom demands the setting up of a body of intelligent and far-sighted men and women to dispassionately examine the whole situation and evolve a new federal map, principally by slicing up unwieldy behemoths into smaller states. This will go a long way in bringing about more decentralisation, more democracy, more popular involvement with and check on administration ~ objectives that are ardently supported by enlightened public opinion and to which all political parties claim to be committed. Then why dither and delay?

The author is a veteran columnist and former editor

Puris banned in mid-day meals in UP

Puris have been banned with immediate effect in mid-day meals served in schools across Uttar Pradesh.

This follows a preliminary study that revealed that the bulk of the 600-odd children who fell ill in the current academic session had consumed puris during their mid-day meals in government-run primary schools in the state.

“The bulk of the cases occurred after consumption of meals on Thursdays when puris are served as a matter of routine. We have reasons to suspect that the cooking medium used for making puris was sub-standard. As such we have banned puris with immediate effect,” Uttar Pradesh principal secretary for basic education Rohit Nandan told IANS.

“We had already taken measures to disallow use of loose oil as the cooking medium,” he said. “In place of puris children will now get rotis or dalia (wheat porridge).”

Nearly 23 million children are covered under the daily mid-day meal scheme in the state.

While taking note of recurrence of illness among children after consumption of mid-day meal in the Uttar Pradesh schools, Chief Minister Mayawati shot off a letter a week ago to Prime Minister Manmohan Singh suggesting drastic changes in the entire mid-day meal exercise carried out by the central government.

Illegal cracker factory unearthed

Budaun: An illegal cracker factory was unearthed in the district and six persons were arrested in this connection, police said on Friday.

Acting on specific information, police conducted a raid and seized two trucks of crackers, they said.

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(72) 2729 Thu 30 Aug 2018 LESSON (72) Thu 30 Aug 2007 Do Good Be Mindful - Awakened One with Awareness (AOA) WHAT IS THE SUTTANTA PITAKA? -The Blessed,Noble,Awakened One-The Tathagata-Vijaya
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Do Good Be Mindful  -  Awakened One with Awareness (AOA)

WHAT IS THE SUTTANTA PITAKA?


https://www.buddhanet.net/suttanta.htm

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SUTTANTA PITAKA

WHAT IS THE SUTTANTA PITAKA?

The Suttanta Pitaka is a collection
of all the discourses in their entirety delivered by the Buddha on
various occasions. (A few discourses delivered by some of the distinguished
disciples of the Buddha, such as the Venerable Særiputta, Mahæ Moggallæna,
Ænanda, etc., as well as some narratives are also included in the
books of the Suttanta Pi¥aka.) The discourses of the Buddha compiled
together in the Suttanta Pi¥aka were expounded to suit different occasions,
for various persons with different temperaments. Although the discourses
were mostly intended for the benefit of bhikkhus, and deal with the
practice of the pure life and with the exposition of the Teaching,
there are also several other discourses which deal with the material
and moral progress of the lay disciples.

The Suttanta Pi¥aka brings out the meaning of the Buddha’s teachings,
expresses them clearly, protects and guards them against distortion
and misconstruction. Just like a string which serves as a plumb-line
to guide the carpenters in their work, just like a thread which protects
flowers from being scattered or dispersed when strung together by
it, likewise by means of suttas, the meaning of Buddha’s teachings
may be brought out clearly, grasped and understood correctly and given
perfect protection from being misconstrued.

The Suttanta Pi¥aka is divided into five separate collections known
as Nikæyas. They are Døgha Nikæya, Majjhima Nikæya, Saµyutta
Nikæya, A³guttara Nikæya and Khuddaka Nikæya.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sutta_Pitaka

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The Sutta Pitaka (suttapiṭaka; or Suttanta Pitaka;
Basket of Discourse; cf Sanskrit सूत्र पिटक Sūtra Piṭaka) is the second of the three divisions of the Tripitaka or Pali Canon, the Pali collection of Buddhist writings of Theravada Buddhism. The Sutta Pitaka contains more than 10,000 suttas (teachings) attributed to the Buddha or his close companions.

The other two collections are the Vinaya Pitaka and the Abhidhamma Pitaka.

Contents





Origins

This
scripture describes the first Buddhist council. It was held shortly
after the Buddha’s death, and collected the set of rules (Vinaya) and five sets of Dhamma.
Tradition holds that little was added to the Canon after this. Scholars
are more skeptical, but differ in their degrees of skepticism. Richard Gombrich thinks most of the first four nikayas (see below) go back to the Buddha, in content but not in form.[1] The late Professor Hirakawa Akira says[2]
that the First Council collected only short prose passages or verses
expressing important doctrines, and that these were expanded into full
length suttas over the next century.

Contents

Further information: List of suttas

There are five nikayas (collections) of suttas:

  1. Digha Nikāya (dīghanikāya), the “long” discourses.
  2. Majjhima Nikāya, the “middle-length” discourses.
  3. Saṁyutta Nikāya (saṃyutta-), the “connected” discourses.
  4. Anguttara Nikāya (aṅguttara-), the “numerical” discourses.
  5. Khuddaka Nikāya, the “minor collection”.

Digha Nikāya

Main article: Digha Nikāya

This includes The Greater Discourse on the Foundations of Mindfulness, The Fruits of the Contemplative Life, and The Buddha’s Last Days. There are 34 long suttas in this nikaya.

Majjhima Nikāya

Main article: Majjhima Nikāya

This includes Shorter Exposition of Kamma, Mindfulness of Breathing, and Mindfulness of the Body. There are 152 medium-length suttas in this nikaya.

Samyutta Nikaya

Main article: Saṁyutta Nikāya

There are, according to one reckoning, 2,889, but according to the commentary 7,762, shorter suttas in this Nikaya.

Anguttara Nikāya

Main article: Anguttara Nikāya

These teachings are arranged numerically. It includes, according to
the commentary’s reckoning, 9,565 short suttas grouped by number from
ones to elevens. According to Keown,
“there is considerable disparity between the Pāli and the Sarvāstivādin
versions, with more than two-thirds of the sūtras found in one but not
the other compilation, which suggests that much of this portion of the
Sūtra Piṭaka was not formed until a fairly late date.”[3]

Khuddaka Nikāya

Main article: Khuddaka Nikāya

This is a heterogeneous mix of sermons, doctrines, and poetry
attributed to the Buddha and his disciples. The contents vary somewhat
between editions. The Thai edition includes 1-15 below, the Sinhalese
edition 1-17 and the Burmese edition 1-18.

  1. Khuddakapatha
  2. Dhammapada
  3. Udana
  4. Itivuttaka
  5. Suttanipata
  6. Vimanavatthu
  7. Petavatthu
  8. Theragatha
  9. Therigatha
  10. Jataka
  11. Niddesa
  12. Patisambhidamagga
  13. Apadana
  14. Buddhavamsa
  15. Cariyapitaka
  16. Nettipakarana or Netti
  17. Petakopadesa
  18. Milinda Panha

For more on these editions also see Pali Canon

Translations

The first four nikayas and more than half of the fifth have been translated by the Pali Text Society[1]. The first four have also been translated in the Teachings of the Buddha series by Wisdom Publications.

Selections (including material from at least two nikayas):

  • Buddhist Suttas, ed & tr T. W. Rhys Davids, Sacred Books of the East, volume XI, Clarendon/Oxford, 1881; reprinted by Motilal Banarsidass, Delhi (& ?Dover, New York)
  • The Word of the Buddha, ed & tr Nyanatiloka, 1935
  • Early Buddhist Poetry, ed I. B. Horner, Ananda Semage, Colombo, 1963
  • The Book of Protection, tr Piyadassi, Buddhist Publication Society, Kandy, Sri Lanka, 1981; translation of the paritta
  • In the Buddha’s Words, ed & tr Bodhi, Wisdom Pubns, 2005
  • Early Buddhist Discourses, ed & tr John J. Holder, 2006
  • Sayings of the Buddha, ed & tr Rupert Gethin, Oxford University Press, 2008
  • Basic Teachings of the Buddha, ed & tr Glenn Wallis, New York: Random House, 2007
https://www.britannica.com/topic/Sutta-Pitaka

ENCYCLOPÆDIA BRITANNICA

Sutta Pitaka

Buddhist literature
Alternative Title:
“Sutra Pitaka”

Sutta Pitaka, (Pali: “Basket of Discourse”) Sanskrit Sutra Pitaka, extensive body of texts constituting the basic doctrinal section of the Buddhist canon—properly speaking, the canon of the so-called Hinayana (Lesser Vehicle) doctrinal schools, including the Theravada (Way of the Elders) form of Buddhism predominant in present-day Sri Lanka (Ceylon) and Southeast Asia. The contents of the Sutta Pitaka are attributed, with few exceptions, to the Gautama Buddha himself. The schools whose works were written in Sanskrit divided this body of literature into four collections, called Agamas. Roughly comparable collections, called Nikayas, comprise the Pali texts of the Theravada school, but with a fifth group added—the Khuddaka Nikaya (“Short Collection”). The other four Nikayas are as follows:

1. Digha Nikaya (“Long Collection”; Sanskrit Dirghagama), 34 long suttas including doctrinal expositions, legends, and moral rules. The first, the Brahmajala Sutta
(“Discourse on the Divine Net”), renowned and much quoted, deals with
fundamental Buddhist doctrines and with rival philosophies and tells
much about everyday life and religious practices of the period. The Ambattha Sutta (“Discourse of Ambattha”) denounces the principles of caste and the pretensions of Brahmins. The Mahanidana Sutta (“Discourse on the Great Origin”) gives the fullest canonical treatment of the doctrine of dependent origination, or the chain of causation. The famous Mahaparinibbana Sutta
(“Discourse on the Great Final Extinction”—i.e., the Buddha’s release
from the round of rebirths), one of the oldest texts in the canon
(though containing later interpolations), narrates the activities and
teachings of the Buddha’s last year and describes his death. The Sigalovada Sutta (“Discourse of Sigalovada”), the only one of these discourses directly addressed to laymen, is a comprehensive treatment of domestic and social ethics.

2. Majjhima Nikaya (“Medium [Length] Collection”; Sanskrit Madhyamagama), 152 suttas, some of them attributed to disciples,
covering nearly all aspects of Buddhism. Included are texts dealing
with monastic life, the excesses of asceticism, the evils of caste,
Buddha’s debates with the Jains, and meditation, together with basic doctrinal and ethical teachings and many legends and stories.

3. Samyutta Nikaya (“Cluster Collection”; Sanskrit Samyuktagama), a total of 7,762 individual suttas, some quite brief, arranged more or less by subject matter into 56 samyuttas, or “clusters.” The best known of these is the Dhammacakkappavattana-sutta (“Discourse on the Turning of the Wheel of the Law”), which contains the Buddha’s first sermon.

4. Anguttara Nikaya (“Item-more Collection”; Sanskrit Ekottarikagama), a numerical arrangement, for mnemonic purposes, of 9,557 terse suttas. Its first nipata (“group”) contains suttas dealing with single things, such as the mind or the Buddha; the suttas in the second nipata
speak of pairs—e.g., 2 kinds of sin; in the third there are triplets;
and so on up to 11. Examples are the 3 praiseworthy acts, the 4 places
of pilgrimage, the 5 obstacles, the 6-fold duty of a monk, 7 kinds of
wealth, 8 causes of earthquake, 9 types of person, 10 objects of
contemplation, and 11 kinds of happiness.

Learn More in these related Britannica articles:


https://accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/sutta.html



Sutta Pitaka
The Basket of Suttas



The Sutta Pitaka, the second division of the Tipitaka,
consists of more than 10,000 suttas (discourses) delivered by the
Buddha and his close disciples during and shortly after the Buddha’s
forty-five year teaching career, as well as many additional verses by
other members of the Sangha. More than one thousand sutta translations
are available on this website.


The suttas are grouped into five nikayas, or collections:


Digha Nikaya
The “Long” Discourses (Pali digha = “long”) consists of 34
suttas, including the longest ones in the Canon. The subject matter of
these suttas ranges widely, from colorful folkloric accounts of the
beings inhabiting the deva worlds (DN 20) to down-to-earth practical meditation instructions (DN 22),
and everything in between. Recent scholarship suggests that a
distinguishing trait of the Digha Nikaya may be that it was “intended
for the purpose of propaganda, to attract converts to the new religion.”
[1]
Majjhima Nikaya
The “Middle-length” Discourses (Pali majjhima = “middle”)
consists of 152 suttas of varying length. These range from some of the
most profound and difficult suttas in the Canon (e.g., MN 1) to engaging stories full of human pathos and drama that illustrate important principles of the law of kamma (e.g., MN 57, MN 86).
Samyutta Nikaya
The “Grouped” Discourses (Pali samyutta = “group” or “collection”) consists of 2,889 relatively short suttas grouped together by theme into 56 samyuttas.
Anguttara Nikaya
The “Further-factored” Discourses (Pali anga = “factor” + uttara = “beyond,” “further”) consists of several thousand short suttas, grouped together into eleven nipatas according to the number of items of Dhamma covered in each sutta. For example, the Eka-nipata (”Book of the Ones”) contains suttas about a single item of Dhamma; the Duka-nipata (”Book of the Twos”) contains suttas dealing with two items of Dhamma, and so on.
Khuddaka Nikaya

The “Division of Short Books” (Pali khudda = “smaller,” “lesser”), consisting of fifteen books (eighteen in the Burmese edition):

  1. Khuddakapatha — The Short Passages
  2. Dhammapada — The Path of Dhamma
  3. Udana — Exclamations
  4. Itivuttaka — The Thus-saids
  5. Sutta Nipata — The Sutta Collection
  6. Vimanavatthu — Stories of the Celestial Mansions
  7. Petavatthu — Stories of the Hungry Ghosts
  8. Theragatha — Verses of the Elder Monks
  9. Therigatha — Verses of the Elder Nuns
  10. Jataka — Birth Stories
  11. Niddesa — Exposition
  12. Patisambhidamagga — Path of Discrimination
  13. Apadana — Stories
  14. Buddhavamsa — History of the Buddhas
  15. Cariyapitaka — Basket of Conduct
  16. Nettippakarana (Burmese Tipitaka only)
  17. Petakopadesa (Burmese Tipitaka only)
  18. Milindapañha — Questions of Milinda (Burmese Tipitaka only)


Notes

1.
Bhikkhu Bodhi, Connected Discourses of the Buddha
(Somerville, Mass.: Wisdom Publications, 2000), p.31, referring to Joy
Manné’s “Categories of Sutta in the Pali Nikayas and Their Implications
for Our Appreciation of the Buddhist Teaching and Literature,” Journal of the Pali Text Society 15 (1990): 29-87.



https://www.budsas.org/ebud/guide-tipitaka/guidetipitaka-03.htm

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English Section



GUIDE TO TIPITAKA
BURMA PITAKA ASSOCIATION, 1986




Chapter
III

WHAT IS SUTTANTA PITAKA?

The Suttanta Pitaka is a collection
of all the discourses in their entirety delivered by the Buddha on various occasions. (A
few discourses delivered by some of the distinguished disciples of the Buddha, such as the
Venerable Sariputta, Maha Moggallana, Ananda, etc., as well as some narratives are also
included in the books of the Suttanta Pitaka.) The discourses of the Buddha compiled
together in the Suttanta Pitaka were expounded to suit different occasions, for various
persons with different temperaments. Although the discourses were mostly intended for the
benefit of bhikkhus, and deal with the practice of’ the pure life and with the exposition
of the Teaching, there are also several other discourses which deal with the material and
moral progress of the lay disciples.

The Suttanta Pitaka brings out the meaning of the Buddha’s
teachings, expresses them clearly, protects and guards them against distortion and
misconstruction. Just like a string which serves as an plumb-line to guide the carpenters
in their work, just like a thread which protects flowers from being scattered or dispersed
when strung together by it, likewise by means of’ suttas, the meaning of Buddha’s
teachings may be brought out clearly, grasped and understood correctly and given perfect
protection from being misconstrued.

The Suttanta Pitaka is divided into five separate
collections known as Nikayas. They are Digha Nikaya, Majjhima Nikaya, Samyutta Nikaya,
Anguttara Nikaya and Khuddaka Nikaya.

(a) Observances
and Practices in the Teaching of the Buddha

In the Suttanta Pitaka are found not only the fundamentals
of the Dhamma but also pragmatic guidelines to make the Dhamma meaningful and applicable
to daily life. All observances and practices which form practical steps in the Buddha’s
Noble Path of Eight Constituents lead to spiritual purification at three levels:

Sila moral: purity through right conduct,

Samadhi: purity of mind through concentration (Samatha),

Panna: purity of Insight through Vipassana

To begin with, one must make the right resolution to take
refuge in the Buddha, to follow the Buddha’s Teaching, and to be guided by the Samgha. The
first disciples who made the declaration of faith in the Buddha and committed themselves
to follow his Teaching were the two merchant brothers, Tapussa and Bhallika. They were
travelling with their followers in five hundred carts when they saw the Buddha in the
vicinity of’ the Bodhi free after his Enlightenment. The two merchants offered him honey
rice cakes. Accepting their offering and thus breaking the fast he had imposed on himself
for seven weeks, the Buddha made them his disciples by letting them recite after him:

Buddham Saranam Gacchami (I take refuge in
the Buddha).”

Dhamman Saranam Gacchami (I take refuge in
the Dhamma ) “

This recitation became the formula of declaration of faith
in the Buddha and his Teaching. Later when the Samgha became established, the formula was
extended to include the third commitment:

“Samgha Saranam Gacchami. (I take refuge in
the Samgha).”

(b) On the
right way to give alms.

As a practical step, capable of immediate and fruitful use
by people in all walks of life, the Buddha gave discourses on charity, alms-giving,
explaining its virtues and on the right way and the right attitude of mind with which an
offering is to be made for spiritual uplift. The motivating force in an act of charity is
the volition, the will to give. Charity is a meritorious action that arises only cut of
volition. Without the will to give, there is no act of giving. Volition in giving alms is
of three types:

(i) The volition that starts with the thought ‘I shall
make an offering’ and that exists during the period of preparations for making the
offering - Pubba Cetana, volition before the act.

(ii) The volition that arises at the moment of making the
offering while handing it over to the donee - Munca Cetana, volition during the act.

(iii) The volition accompanying the joy and rejoicing
which arise during repeated recollection of or reflection on the act of giving - Apara
Cetana, volition after the act.

Whether the offering is made in homage to the living
Buddha or to a minute particle of his relics after his passing away, it is the volition,
its strength and purity that determine the nature of the result thereof.

There is also explained in the discourses the wrong
attitude of mind with which no act of charity should be performed.

A donor should avoid looking down on others who cannot
make a similar offering; nor should he exult over his own charity. Defiled by such
unworthy thoughts, his volition is only of inferior grade.

When the act of charity is motivated by expectations of
beneficial results of immediate prosperity and happiness, or rebirth in higher existences,
the accompanying volition is classed as mediocre.

It is only when the good deed of alms-giving is performed
out of a spirit of renunciation, motivated by thoughts of pure selflessness, aspiring only
for attainment to Nibbana where all suffering ends, that the volition that brings about
the act is regarded as of superior grade.

Examples abound in the discourses concerning charity and
modes of giving alms.

(c) Moral Purity
through right conduct, Sila.

Practice of Sila forms a most fundamental aspect of
Buddhism. It consists of practice of Right Speech, Right Action and Right Livelihood to
purge oneself of impure deeds, words and thoughts. Together with the commitment to the
Threefold Refuge (as described above) a Buddhist lay disciple observes the Five Precepts
by making a formal vow:

(i) I undertale to observe the precept of abstaining from
killings

(ii) I undertake to observe the precept of abstaining from
stealing.

(iii) I undertake to observe the precept of abstaining
from sexual misconduct.

(vi) I undertake to observe the precept of abstaining from
telling lies.

(v) I undertake to observe the precept of abstaining from
alcoholic drinks, drugs or intoxicants that becloud the mind.

In addition to the negative aspect of the above formula
which emphasizes abstinence, there is also the positive aspect of sila. For instance, we
find in many discourses the statement: ‘He refrains from killing, puts aside the cudgel
and the sword; full of kindness and compassion he lives for the welfare and happiness of
all living things.’ Every precept laid down in the formula has these two aspects.

Depending upon the individual and the stage of one’s
progress, other forms of precepts, namely, Eight Precepts, Ten Precepts etc., may be
observed. For the bhikkhus of the Order, higher and advanced types of practices of
morality are laid down. The Five Precepts are to be always observed by lay disciples who
may occasionally enhance their self-discipline by observing the Eight or Ten Precepts. For
those who have already embarked on the path of a holy life, the Ten Precepts are essential
preliminaries to further progress.

Sila of perfect purity serves as a foundation for the next
stage of progress, namely, Samadhi - purity of mind through concentration-meditation.

(d) Practical
methods of mental cultivation for develop ment of concentration, samadhi.

Mental cultivation for spiritual uplift consists of two
steps. The first step is to purify the mind from all defilements and corruption and to
have it focused on a point. A determined effort (Right Exertion) must be made to narrow
down the range of thoughts in the wavering, unsteady mind. Then attention (Right
Mindfulness or Attentiveness) must be fixed on a selected object of meditation until
one-pointedness of mind (Right concentration) is achieved. In such a state, the mind
becomes freed from hindrances, pure, tranquil, powerful and bright. It is then ready to
advance to the second step by which Magga Insight and Fruition may be attained in order to
transcend the state of woe and sorrow.

The Suttanta Pitaka records numerous methods of Meditation
to bring about one-pointedness of mind. In the Suttas of the Pitaka are dispersed these
methods of meditation, explained by the Buddha sometimes singly, sometimes collectively to
suit the occasion and the purpose for which they are recommended. The Buddha knew the
diversity of character and mental make-up of each individual, the different temperaments
and inclinations of those who approached him for guidance. Accordingly he recommended
different methods to different persons to suit the special character and need of each
individual.

The practice of mental cultivation which results
ultimately in one-pointedness of mind is known as Samadhi Bhavana. Whoever wishes to
develop Samadhi Bhavana must have been established in the observance of the precepts, with
the senses controlled, calm and self-possessed, and must be contented. Having been
established in these four conditions he selects a place suitable for meditation, a
secluded spot. Then he should sit cross-legged keeping his body erect and his mind alert;
he should start purifying his mind of five hindrances, namely, sensual desire, ill will,
sloth and torpor, restlessness and worry, and doubt, by choosing a meditation method
suitable to him, practising meditation with zeal and ardour. For instance, with the
Anapana method he keeps watching the incoming and outgoing breath until he can have his
mind fixed securely on the breath at the tip of the nose.

When he realizes that the five hindrances have been got
rid of, he becomes gladdened, delighted, calm and blissful. This is the beginning of
samadhi, concentration, which will further develop until it attains one-pointedness of
mind.

Thus one-pointedness of mind is concentration of mind when
it is aware of one object, and only one of a wholesome, salutary nature. This is attained
by the practice of meditation upon one of the subjects recomended for the purpose by the
Buddha.

(e) Practical methods of mental
cultivation for development of Insight Knowledge, panna.

The subject and methods of meditation as taught in the
suttas of the Pitaka are designed both for attainment of samadhi as well as for
development of Insight Knowledge, Vipassana as a direct path to Nibbana.

As a second step in the practice of meditation, after
achieving samadhi, when the concentrated mind has become purified, firm and imperturbable,
the meditator directs and inclines his mind to Insight Knowledge, Vipassana Nana. With
this Insight Knowledge he discerns the three characteristics of the phenomenal world,
namely, Impermanence (Anicca), Suffering (Dukkha) and Non-Self (Anatta).

As he advances in his practice and his mind be comes more
and more purified, firm and imperturbable, he directs and inclines his mind to the
knowledge of the extinction of moral intoxicants, Asavakkhaya Nana. He then truly
understands dukkha, the cause of dukkha, the cessation of dukkha and the path leading to
the cessation of dukkha. He also comes to understand fully the moral intoxicants (asavas)
as they really are, the cause of asavas, the cessation of asavas and the path leading to
the cessation of the asavas.

With this knowledge of extinction of asavas he becomes
liberated. The knowledge of liberation arises in him. He knows that rebirth is no more,
that he has lived the holy life; he has done what he has to do for the realization of
Magga; there is nothing more for him to do for such realization. The Buddha taught with
only one object - the extinction of Suffering and release from conditioned existence. That
object is to be obtained by the practice of meditation (for Calm and Insight) as laid down
in numerous suttas of the Suttanta Pitaka.

-ooOoo-


[Contents]



Source: http://www.nibbana.com



http://buddhism.redzambala.com/buddhism/philosophy/what-is-suttanta-pitaka-overview.html
Buddhism | Red Zambala

What is Suttanta Pitaka? | Overview



Category: 


What is Suttanta Pitaka?

The Suttanta Piṭaka is a collection of all the discourses in their entirety delivered by the Buddha on various occasions;

(A few discourses delivered by some of the distinguished disciples of the Buddha, such as the Venerable Sāriputta, Maha Moggallāna, Ānanda, etc., as well as some narratives are also included in the books of the Suttanta Piṭaka.)

The discourses of the Buddha compiled together in the Suttanta Piṭaka
were expounded to suit different occasions, for various persons with
different temperaments.

Although the discourses were mostly intended for the benefit of bhikkhus,
and deal with the practice of the pure life and with the exposition of
the Teaching, there are also several other discourses which deal with
the material and moral progress of the lay disciples.

The Suttanta Piṭaka brings out the meaning of the
Buddha’s teachings, expresses them clearly, protects and guards them
against distortion and misconstruction.

Just like a string which serves as a plumb- line to guide the
carpenters in their work, just like a thread which protects flowers from
being scattered or dispersed when strung together by it,

likewise by means of Suttas, the meaning of Buddha’s
teachings may be brought out clearly, grasped and understood correctly
and given perfect protection from being misconstrued.

The Suttanta Pitaka is divided into five separate collections known as Nikāyas. They are:

1. Dīgha Nikāya,
2. Majjhima Nikāya,
3. Samyutta Nikāya,
4. Aṅguttara Nikāya and
5. Khuddaka Nikāya.

(a) Observances and Practices in the Teaching of the Buddha.

In the Suttanta Pitaka are found not only the fundamentals of the
Dhamma but also pragmatic guidelines to make the Dhamma meaningful and
applicable to daily life.

All observances and practices which form practical steps in the
Buddha’s Noble Path of Eight Constituents lead to spiritual purification
at three levels:

Śīla — moral purity through right conduct,

Samādhi —  purity of mind through concentration (Śamatha),

Paññā  — purity of Insight through Vipassanā Meditation.

To begin with, one must make the right resolution to take refuge in
the Buddha, to follow the Buddhas Teaching, and to be guided by the
Sangha.

The first disciples who made the declaration of faith in the Buddha
and committed themselves to follow his Teaching were the two merchant
brothers, Tapussa and Bhallika.

They were travelling with their followers in five hundred carts when
they saw the Buddha in the vicinity of the Bodhi Tree after his
Enlightenment.

The two merchants offered him honey rice cakes. Accepting their
offering and thus breaking the fast he had imposed on himself for seven
weeks, the Buddha made them his disciples by letting them recite after
him:

“Buddham Saranam Gacchāmi (I take refuge in the Buddha).”
“Dhammam Saranam Gacchāmi (I take refuge in the Dhamma).”

This recitation became the formula of declaration of faith in the Buddha and his Teaching.

Later when the Sangha became established, the formula was extended to include the third commitment:

“Sangham Saranam Gacchāmi (I take refuge in the Sangha).”

(b) On the right way to give alms.

As a practical step, capable of immediate and fruitful use by people
in all walks of life, the Buddha gave discourses on charity,
alms­giving, explaining its virtues and on the right way and the right
attitude of mind with which an offering is to be made for spiritual
uplift.

The motivating force in an act of charity is the volition, the will
to give. Charity is a meritorious action that arises only out of
volition. Without the will to give, there is no act of giving.

Volition in giving alms is of 3 types:

(I)The volition that starts with the thought “I shall make an
offering” and that exists during the period of preparations for making
the offering — Pubba Cetanā, volition before the act.

(II)The volition that arises at the moment of making the
offering while handing it over to the donee — Muñca Cetanā, volition
during the act.

(III)The volition accompanying the joy and rejoicing which
arise during repeated recollection of or reflection on the act of giving
— Apara Cetanā, volition after the act.

Whether the offering is made in homage to the living Buddha or to a
minute particle of his relics after his passing away, it is the
volition, its strength and purity that determine the nature of the
result thereof.

There is also explained in the discourses the wrong attitude of mind with which no act of charity should be performed:

A donor should avoid looking down on others who cannot make a similar
offering; nor should he exult over his own charity. Defiled by such
unworthy thoughts, his volition is only of inferior grade.

When the act of charity is motivated by expectations of beneficial
results of immediate prosperity and happiness, or rebirth in higher
existences, the accompanying volition is classed as mediocre.

It is only when the good deed of alms-giving is performed out of a
spirit of renunciation, motivated by thoughts of pure selflessness,
aspiring only for attainment to Nibbāna where all suffering ends, that
the volition that brings about the act is regarded as of superior grade.

Examples abound in the discourses concerning charity and modes of giving alms.

(c) Moral Purity through right conduct, Śīla.

Practice of Śīla forms a most fundamental aspect of
Buddhism. It consists of practice of Right Speech, Right Action and
Right Livelihood to purge oneself of impure deeds, words and thoughts.

Together with the commitment
to the Threefold Refuge (as described above) a Buddhist lay disciple
observes the Five Precepts by making a formal vow:

(I) I undertake to observe the precept of abstaining from killing.

(II) I undertake to observe the precept of abstaining from stealing.

(III) I undertake to observe the precept of abstaining from sexual misconduct.

(IV) I undertake to observe the precept of abstaining from telling lies.

(V) I undertake to observe the precept of abstaining from alcoholic drinks, drugs or intoxicants that becloud the mind.

In addition to the negative aspect of the above formula which
emphasizes abstinence, there is also the positive aspect of Śīla. For
instance, we find in many discourses the statement:

“He refrains from killing, puts aside the cudgel and the sword; full
of kindness and compassion he lives for the welfare and happiness of all
living things.”

Every precept laid down in the formula has these two aspects.

Depending upon the individual and the stage of one’s progress, other
forms of precepts, namely, Eight Precepts, Ten Precepts etc. may be
observed. For the bhikkhus of the Order, higher and advanced types of
practices of morality are laid down. The Five Precepts are to be always
observed by lay disciples who may occasionally enhance their
self­-discipline by observing the Eight or Ten Precepts. For those who
have already embarked on the path of a holy life, the Ten Precepts are
essential preliminaries to further progress.

Śīla of perfect purity serves
as a foundation for the next stage of progress, namely, Samādhi purity
of mind through concentration- meditation.

(d) Practical methods of mental cultivation for development of concentration, Samādhi.

Mental cultivation for spiritual uplift consists of 2 steps:

The first step is to purify the mind from all
defilements and corruption and to have it focused on a point. A
determined effort (Right Exertion) must be made to narrow down the range
of thoughts in the wavering, unsteady mind.

Then attention (Right Mindfulness or Attentiveness)
must be fixed on a selected object of meditation until one-pointedness
of mind (Right Concentration) is achieved.

In such a state, the mind becomes freed from hindrances, pure,
tranquil, powerful and bright. It is then ready to advance to the second
step by which Magga Insight and Fruition may be attained in order to
transcend the state of woe and sorrow.

The Suttanta Pitaka records numerous methods of meditation to bring about one-pointedness of mind.

In the Suttas of the Pitaka are dispersed these methods of
meditation, explained by the Buddha sometimes singly, sometimes
collectively to suit the occasion and the purpose for which they are
recommended.

The Buddha knew the diversity of character and mental make-up of each
individual, the different temperaments and inclinations of those who
approached him for guidance.

Accordingly he recommended different methods to different persons to suit the special character and need of each individual.

The practice of mental cultivation which results ultimately in one- pointedness of mind is known as Samādhi Bhāvanā:

Whoever wishes to develop Samādhi Bhāvanā must have been
established in the observance of the precepts, with the senses
controlled, calm and self-possessed, and must be contented.

Having been established in these four conditions he selects a place
suitable for meditation, a secluded spot. Then he should sit
cross-legged keeping his body erect and his mind alert;

he should start purifying his mind of five hindrances, namely,
sensual desire, ill will, sloth and torpor, restlessness and worry, and
doubt, by choosing a meditation method suitable to him, practicing
meditation with zeal and ardour.

For instance, with the Ānāpāna method he keeps watching the
incoming and outgoing breath until he can have his mind fixed securely
on the breath at the tip of the nose.

When he realizes that the five hindrances have been got rid of, he
becomes gladdened, delighted, calm and blissful. This is the beginning
of Samādhi, concentration, which will further develop until it attains one- pointedness of mind.

Thus one-pointedness of mind is concentration of mind when it is
aware of one object, and only one of a wholesome, salutary nature. This
is attained by the practice of meditation upon one of the subjects
recommended for the purpose by the Buddha.

(e) Practical methods of mental cultivation for development of Insight Knowledge, paññā.

The subject and methods of
meditation as taught in the suttas of the Pitaka are designed both for
attainment of Samādhi as well as for develop­ment of Insight Knowledge,
Vipassanā Ñāṇa, as a direct path to Nibbāna.

As a second step in the practice of meditation, after achieving Samādhi,
when the concentrated mind has become purified, firm and imperturbable,
the meditator directs and inclines his mind to Insight Knowledge,
Vipassanā Ñāṇa.

With this Insight Knowledge he
discerns the three characteristics of the phenomenal world, namely:
Impermanence (Anicca), Suffering (Dukkha) and Non-Self (Anatta).

As he advances in his practice and his mind becomes more and more
purified, firm and imperturbable, he directs and inclines his mind to
the knowledge of the extinction of moral intoxicants, Āsavakkhaya Ñāṇa.

He then truly understands dukkha, the cause of dukkha, the cessation of dukkha and the path leading to the cessation of dukkha.

He also comes to understand fully the moral intoxicants (āsavas) as they really are: the cause of āsavas, the cessation of āsavas and the path leading to the cessation of the āsavas.

With this knowledge of extinction of āsavas he becomes liberated. The knowledge of liberation arises in him.

He knows that rebirth is no more, that he has lived the holy life; he
has done what he has to do for the realization of Magga; there is
nothing more for him to do for such realization.

The Buddha taught with only one object — the extinction of Suffering
and release from conditioned existence. That object is to be obtained by
the practice of meditation (for Calm and Insight) as laid down in
numerous suttas of the Suttanta Pitaka.






Don't let your birth to decide your path

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The Blessed,Noble,Awakened One-The Tathagata

Vijaya

Setting at Savatthi. Then, in the morning, the bhikkhuni Vijaya dressed… she sat down at the foot of a tree for the day’s abiding.

Then Mara the Evil One, desiring to arouse fear, trepidation, and terror in the bhikkhuni Vijaya,
desiring to make her fall away from concentration, approached her and addressed her in verse:

You are so young and beautiful,
And I too am in the bloom of youth.
Come, noble lady, let us rejoice
With the music of a fivefold ensemble.

Then it occurred to the bhikkhuni Vijaya: “Now who is this…? This is Mara the Evil One… desiring to make me fall away from concentration.”

Then the bhikkhuni Vijaya, having understood, “This is Mara the Evil One,” replied to him in verses:

Forms and sounds, tastes and odors,
Tactile objects that delight the mind:
I offer them right back to you,
For I, O Mara, do not need them.

I am repelled and humiliated
By this foul, putrid body,
Subject to break up, fragile:
I’ve uprooted sensual craving.

As to those beings who fare amidst form,
And those who abide in the formless,
And those peaceful attainments too:
Everywhere darkness has been destroyed.

Then Mara the Evil One, realizing “The bhikkhuni Vijaya knows me,” sad and disappointed, disappeared right there.

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2728 Wed 29 Aug 2018 LESSON (71) Wed 29 Aug 2007 Do Good Be Mindful - Awakened One with Awareness (AOA) BDS Sangha (Noble Order)-Learning / Studing Gatha -Parinibbana-How to learn Pali Language? - 1 — Dhammapada-Doctrine-True Practice of The Path Shown by The Blessed,Noble,Awakened One-The Tathagata-Knowing Oneself and Knowing Others
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Posted by: site admin @ 9:43 am



2728 Wed 29 Aug 2018 LESSON (71) Wed 29 Aug 2007


Do Good Be Mindful  -  Awakened One with Awareness (AOA)

BDS

Sangha (Noble Order)-Learning / Studing Gatha -Parinibbana-How to learn Pali Language? - 1  —

Dhammapada


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MPNHKnYctYM




Published on Mar 26, 2012


Dear
friends,

Buddha Dhamma Sagararanna had their new temple opening ceremony at Port
Dickson last Sunday. Many sangha members from around the world attended
the ceremony… including nuns from Taiwan, nuns of Myanmmar and local
Dharma practitioners. How beautiful! I was invited to attend the
opening, due to hectic schedule I was not able to attend, but Kechara’s
Liaison Irene Lim attended and presented gifts on my behalf.

The sangha members were led by Venerable Chang Ern from Buddha Dhamma
Sagararanna Buddhist Association. Venerable Chang Ern also serves as the
Chief of Malaysia Buddhist Association (MBA), Negeri Sembilan branch.

Kechara’s liaisons Irene was contacted by Venerable Chang Ern, and Irene
immediately offered to host the group of sangha members for dinner at
Kechara Oasis (KO), Jaya One. This was a Dana offering on behalf of
Kechara at our own Vegetarian Restaurant!

At KO, Irene gave a warm welcome to this group of sangha members with an
opening speech thanking them for giving her the opportunity to offer
Dana. Pastor Ngeow and Liaison Paul Yap were also there to represent
Kechara House. The group was offered delicious, healthy and vegetarian
food… I was told that they liked the food offered to them very much!

After dinner, Irene and the group of sangha members went to the Kechara
House gompa for a visit. The sangha members and other lay Dharma
practitioners were then given a tour of our Kechara Gallery.

During this time, Ven Chang Ern and the group of nuns from Taiwan left
to another Dharma center to escort Venerable Chuan Dao (4th abbot of
Miao Xin Si, Taiwan) and Venerable Zong Hong (abbot of Jin Gang Chan Si
in OUG, Kuala Lumpur) to our center. Venerable Zong Hong is the Head of
MBA’s Youth Section.

I only got to know of the visit a few hours before they arrived at KO!
As it’s very meritorious to make offerings to sangha members, I decided
to go to Kechara House to meet the group and present a few offerings to
them. So while the monks and nuns were having dinner, I was with Paris
and my Private Office arranging offerings for these holy monks and nuns.

When I arrived, I was surprised to see so many of our Kechara members
upstairs at the main prayer hall! They only got to know about the last
minute visit 30 minutes before I arrived, so I did not expect it at
all… I was happy to see all of them. After I presented the offerings
to the sangha members and their assistants, they had to leave because it
was quite late already. I did not want to keep them up for too long,
especially the older sangha members who had very kindly changed their
schedule to visit KH…

I felt inspired to give a short Dharma talk to our Kechara members on
why we make offerings to the sangha. I don’t like my students to do
things blindly without understanding why they are doing it. I feel with
knowledge, Dharma activity and study and practice becomes more
meaningful.

I explained that our karma with each other is relational. This means the
weight of our karma depends on the person’s relationship with us. For
example, the karma of hurting our family and friends is heavier than the
karma of hurting total strangers who we have never met before. Likewise
the karma of hurting our parents is much heavier than the karma of
hurting our brothers and sisters. The karma of hurting our mother is
also heavier than the karma of hurting our brother, because she carried
us in her womb for 9 months. Now that is at an ordinary level. Then our
relational karma with strangers, friends, parents, spouse and sangha are
explained in brief here in this talk.

Actually I have spoken about this many times before but I wanted to
share it with Kecharians again because I feel it is very very important
that we make offerings to the Sangha to support their dharma practice
and generate merits for our KWPC or Kechara World Peace Centre which is
our retreat land in the mountains and our own attainments. I hope you
will listen to this talk and really put it into your mind. It will
greatly benefit your understanding of why supporting the sangha is
important.

Tsem Rinpoche

see my blog post on this: http://blog.tsemtulku.com/tsem-tulku-…


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PPydLZ0cavc
Maha-parinibbana Sutta — Last Days of the Buddha
HAPPY LOTUS
Published on Apr 19, 2014
The Great Discourse on the Total Unbinding
This wide-ranging sutta, the longest one in the Pali canon, describes
the events leading up to, during, and immediately following the death
and final release (parinibbana) of the Buddha. This colorful narrative
contains a wealth of Dhamma teachings, including the Buddha’s final
instructions that defined how Buddhism would be lived and practiced long
after the Buddha’s death — even to this day. But this sutta also
depicts, in simple language, the poignant human drama that unfolds among
the Buddha’s many devoted followers around the time of the death of
their beloved teacher.
Category
People & Blogs


youtube.com
The Great Discourse on the Total Unbinding This wide-ranging sutta, the longest one in the Pali canon,…

Published on Sep 5, 2012


Venerable Kiribathgoda Gnanananda Thero

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_lmqWiBRgfg
The life of Buddha # 12 Buddha Parinibbana
Sabar Sukarno
Published on Mar 16, 2016
https://dharma-insight.blogspot.co.id

Sang Buddha parinibbana (wafat) di Kusinara. Pada saat-saat terakhir
Buddha menyampaikan pesan-pesan penting kepada bhikkhu Ananda dan para
bhikkhu lain. Pada kesempatan itu Buddha melakukan penahbisan terakhir
yaitu kepada Bhikkhu Subhadda. Sang Buddha wafat disaksikan oleh para
bhikkhu dan dewa serta brahma. Relik (sisa organ jasmani) Buddha
disimpan di stupa untuk dijadikan sebagai pengingat dan obyek pemujaan
bagi umat Buddha
Category
People & Blogs


youtube.com
https://dharma-insight.blogspot.co.id Sang Buddha parinibbana (wafat) di Kusinara. Pada saat-saat terakhir Buddha menyampaikan pesan-pesan penting kepada…


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IX-48yn3W1U

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IX-48yn3W1U
PARINIBBANA
YOPPY LIBERU
Published on May 21, 2016
Lagu Buddhis - Karya Yoppy Liberu
Category
People & Blogs


youtube.com
Lagu Buddhis - Karya Yoppy Liberu

Practicing Vipassana
Rupa
Patipatti -Practicing Meditation
Samatha Vipassana

Jhana Attained

16 kinds of Vipassana

Pali Language & Literature

History of pali Language and Literature(2)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V5W2t9tXW-Y&t=45s
Pali (Pāli) is a Prakrit language
worldbuddhistradio
Published on Jan 9, 2016
Pali (Pāli) is a Prakrit language native to the Indian subcontinent. It
is widely studied because it is the language of many of the earliest
extant literature of Buddhism as collected in the Pāli Canon or Tipiṭaka
and is the sacred language of Theravada Buddhism.
Category
Education
Jagatheesan Chandrasekharan
Jagatheesan Chandrasekharan
3 months ago
Magadhi Prakrit-
Pali (Pāli) is a Prakrit language
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C0TTGgcq3qU
Jagatheesan Chandrasekharan
Jagatheesan Chandrasekharan 1 second ago
When a just born baby is separated and kept alone, it will speak a
language like any other living being that have their own languages which
is a communicating instrument. That human language is Magadhi a prakrit
and Pali (Pāli) is a Prakrit language. All other languages are off
shoot of Magadhi and hence all languages are noble and classical.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C0TTGgcq3qU
Magadhi Prakrit
WikiWikiup
Published on Aug 7, 2016
Magadhi Prakrit is of one of the three Dramatic Prakrits, the written
languages of Ancient India following the decline of Pali and
Sanskrit.Magadhi Prakrit was spoken in the eastern Indian subcontinent,
in a region spanning what is now eastern India, Bangladesh, and Nepal.It
is believed to be the language spoken by the important religious
figures Gautama Buddha and Mahavira and was also the language of the
courts of the Magadha mahajanapada and the Maurya Empire; the edicts of
Ashoka were composed in it.Magadhi Prakrit later evolved into the
Eastern Zone Indo-Aryan languages, including Assamese, Bengali, Odia and
the Bihari languages .

This channel is dedicated to make
Wikipedia, one of the biggest knowledge databases in the world available
to people with limited vision.
Magadhi Prakrit
Magadhi Prakrit
is of one of the three Dramatic Prakrits, the written languages of
Ancient India following the decline of Pali and…
youtube.com

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V5W2t9tXW-Y
Pali (Pāli) is a Prakrit language

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V5W2t9tXW-Y
Pali (Pāli) is a Prakrit language
worldbuddhistradio
Published on Jan 9, 2016
Pali (Pāli) is a Prakrit language native to the Indian subcontinent. It
is widely studied because it is the language of many of the earliest
extant literature of Buddhism as collected in the Pāli Canon or Tipiṭaka
and is the sacred language of Theravada Buddhism….
See more
Pali (Pāli) is a Prakrit language
Pali (Pāli) is a Prakrit language native to the Indian subcontinent. It
is widely studied because it is the language of many of the…
youtube.com


youtube.com
Pali
(Pāli) is a Prakrit language native to the Indian subcontinent. It is
widely studied because it is the language of many of the earliest extant
literatur…
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9jAPBTF9SWU&t=12s

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9jAPBTF9SWU&t=12s
How to learn Pali Language? - 1

Dhamma Us
Published on Apr 28, 2017
About UWest Pali Society:

UWest Pali Society is committed to promoting Theravada Pali tradition
both academically and ritually. We welcome all the UWest community
members to join us and feel good with us. Individuals outside the UWest
community can be included with the invitation from the members.

The objectives of the UWest Pali Society would be:

1. Pali Sutta Reading & Translation (Free):
Here we read & translate selected original Pali suttas and discuss
the key Pali terms leading to further discussions. We invite all those
like-minded faculty, staff and students to join us and learn research
and share the experience.

2. Pali Learning (Free):

We are
more than happy to introduce Pali language to those who are interested.
We teach Pali language from the very beginning to advanced level.

3. Online Pali Group (Free):

We have already started an online Pali teaching program. Those who are
interested in joining, please contact admin@dhammausa.com

3. Guest Speeches (Free):

We organize monthly guest speeches by eminent scholars and visiting
Buddhist monks to propagate and promote Pali Language and Literature.

Meeting Dates: Please check for updates here www.dhammausa.com
About DhammaUS:

DHAMMA US is a non-profit, charity organization engaged in Community
Care, Spiritual Care & Pali Studies. We conduct Meditation, Yoga,
Spiritual Counselling, Healing & Therapeutic Chanting and Teaching
Pali Language. We promote peace, harmony, non-violence along with the
message of the Buddha. We are happy to share the Theravada Buddhist
Studies with any like minded individual or community. However, we
support and promote unconditionally all the other Buddhist schools
without any discrimination. We also respect all the other religions and
their teachings on humanity, world peace, non-violence, and
environmental care.

Contact:

Website: http://www.dhammausa.com/
Blog: http://dhammaus.blogspot.com
Twitter: https://twitter.com/Dhamma_Us
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dhammaus15
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6dg
Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dhamma-us
Google+: https://plus.google.com/1085636941523
Email: info@dhammausa.com

Keywords:
UWest Pali Society
UWest
University of the West
Pali
Buddhism
Buddhist
Chanting
Spiritual
Religion
USA
California
Lankarama Buddhist Institute
Category
Education


youtube.com
About
UWest Pali Society: UWest Pali Society is committed to promoting
Theravada Pali tradition both academically and ritually. We welcome all
the UWest…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AKKg07tv72I&t=439s
Dhamma Us
Published on Apr 28, 2017
About UWest Pali Society:

UWest Pali Society is committed to promoting Theravada Pali tradition
both academically and ritually. We welcome all the UWest community
members to join us and feel good with us. Individuals outside the UWest
community can be included with the invitation from the members.

The objectives of the UWest Pali Society would be:

1. Pali Sutta Reading & Translation (Free):
Here we read & translate selected original Pali suttas and discuss
the key Pali terms leading to further discussions. We invite all those
like-minded faculty, staff and students to join us and learn research
and share the experience.

2. Pali Learning (Free):

We are
more than happy to introduce Pali language to those who are interested.
We teach Pali language from the very beginning to advanced level.

3. Online Pali Group (Free):

We have already started an online Pali teaching program. Those who are
interested in joining, please contact admin@dhammausa.com

3. Guest Speeches (Free):

We organize monthly guest speeches by eminent scholars and visiting
Buddhist monks to propagate and promote Pali Language and Literature.

Meeting Dates: Please check for updates here www.dhammausa.com
About DhammaUS:

DHAMMA US is a non-profit, charity organization engaged in Community
Care, Spiritual Care & Pali Studies. We conduct Meditation, Yoga,
Spiritual Counselling, Healing & Therapeutic Chanting and Teaching
Pali Language. We promote peace, harmony, non-violence along with the
message of the Buddha. We are happy to share the Theravada Buddhist
Studies with any like minded individual or community. However, we
support and promote unconditionally all the other Buddhist schools
without any discrimination. We also respect all the other religions and
their teachings on humanity, world peace, non-violence, and
environmental care.

Contact:

Website: http://www.dhammausa.com/
Blog: http://dhammaus.blogspot.com
Twitter: https://twitter.com/Dhamma_Us
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dhammaus15
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6dg
Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dhamma-us
Google+: https://plus.google.com/1085636941523
Email: info@dhammausa.com

Keywords:
UWest Pali Society
UWest
University of the West
Pali
Buddhism
Buddhist
Chanting
Spiritual
Religion
USA
California
Lankarama Buddhist Institute
Category
Education


youtube.com
About
UWest Pali Society: UWest Pali Society is committed to promoting
Theravada Pali tradition both academically and ritually. We welcome all
the UWest…

LikeShow More Reactions
Comment
Comments
Parts of Speech
-Noun
-Verb-Pronoun
Paricles
Location

Suttanta  Pitaka
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ArY597Dax84&list=PLtbULbSYv-ds8iUUoZXSQXbyPIQZDb3w6

https://www.youtube.com/watch…
From the Holy Buddhist Tipitaka: Sutta Pitaka - Samyutta Nikaya

Supreme Master Television
Published on Jul 12, 2008
http://suprememastertv.com/ - From the Holy Buddhist Tipitaka: Sutta Pitaka -Samyutta Nikaya (In English), Episode: 618, Air date: 24 - May - 2008
Category
Entertainment


youtube.com
The Satipaṭṭhāna Sutta[1] (MN 10) (Sanskrit: Smṛtyupasthāna Sūtra स्मृत्युपस्थान सूत्र, Chinese:…

Dhammapada

Published on Jul 8, 2015


The
Dhammapada is a collection of sayings of the Buddha in verse form and
one of the most widely read and best known Buddhist scriptures. The
original version of the Dhammapada is in the Khuddaka Nikaya, a division
of the Pali Canon of Theravada Buddhism.

The Buddhist scholar and commentator Buddhaghosa explains that each
saying recorded in the collection was made on a different occasion in
response to a unique situation that had arisen in the life of the Buddha
and his monastic community. His commentary, the Dhammapada Atthakatha,
presents the details of these events and is a rich source of legend for
the life and times of the Buddha.

·

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8H_6uieRvm8&t=603s
The Dhammapada [Wisdom of The Buddha] - Full Audiobook
Infinite Paths
Published on Jul 8, 2015
The Dhammapada is a collection of sayings of the Buddha in verse form
and one of the most widely read and best known Buddhist scriptures. The
original version of the Dhammapada is in the Khuddaka Nikaya, a division
of the Pali Canon of Theravada Buddhism.

The Buddhist scholar and commentator Buddhaghosa explains that each
saying recorded in the collection was made on a different occasion in
response to a unique situation that had arisen in the life of the Buddha
and his monastic community. His commentary, the Dhammapada Atthakatha,
presents the details of these events and is a rich source of legend for
the life and times of the Buddha.
Category
EducationInfinite Paths
Published on Jul 8, 2015
The Dhammapada is a collection of sayings of the Buddha in verse form
and one of the most widely read and best known Buddhist scriptures. The
original version of the Dhammapada is in the Khuddaka Nikaya, a division
of the Pali Canon of Theravada Buddhism.

The Buddhist scholar
and commentator Buddhaghosa explains that each saying recorded in the
collection was made on a different occasion in response to a unique
situation that had arisen in the life of the Buddha and his monastic
community. His commentary, the Dhammapada Atthakatha, presents the
details of these events and is a rich source of legend for the life and
times of the Buddha.
Category
Education


youtube.com
The Dhammapada is a collection of sayings of the Buddha in verse form and one of the most widely…






2728 Wed 29 Aug 2018 LESSON (71) Wed 29 Aug 2007


Do Good Be Mindful  -  Awakened One with Awareness (AOA)

BDS

Sangha (Noble Order)-Learning / Studing Gatha -Parinibbana-How to learn Pali Language? - 1  —

Dhammapada


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MPNHKnYctYM




Published on Mar 26, 2012


Dear
friends,

Buddha Dhamma Sagararanna had their new temple opening ceremony at Port
Dickson last Sunday. Many sangha members from around the world attended
the ceremony… including nuns from Taiwan, nuns of Myanmmar and local
Dharma practitioners. How beautiful! I was invited to attend the
opening, due to hectic schedule I was not able to attend, but Kechara’s
Liaison Irene Lim attended and presented gifts on my behalf.

The sangha members were led by Venerable Chang Ern from Buddha Dhamma
Sagararanna Buddhist Association. Venerable Chang Ern also serves as the
Chief of Malaysia Buddhist Association (MBA), Negeri Sembilan branch.

Kechara’s liaisons Irene was contacted by Venerable Chang Ern, and Irene
immediately offered to host the group of sangha members for dinner at
Kechara Oasis (KO), Jaya One. This was a Dana offering on behalf of
Kechara at our own Vegetarian Restaurant!

At KO, Irene gave a warm welcome to this group of sangha members with an
opening speech thanking them for giving her the opportunity to offer
Dana. Pastor Ngeow and Liaison Paul Yap were also there to represent
Kechara House. The group was offered delicious, healthy and vegetarian
food… I was told that they liked the food offered to them very much!

After dinner, Irene and the group of sangha members went to the Kechara
House gompa for a visit. The sangha members and other lay Dharma
practitioners were then given a tour of our Kechara Gallery.

During this time, Ven Chang Ern and the group of nuns from Taiwan left
to another Dharma center to escort Venerable Chuan Dao (4th abbot of
Miao Xin Si, Taiwan) and Venerable Zong Hong (abbot of Jin Gang Chan Si
in OUG, Kuala Lumpur) to our center. Venerable Zong Hong is the Head of
MBA’s Youth Section.

I only got to know of the visit a few hours before they arrived at KO!
As it’s very meritorious to make offerings to sangha members, I decided
to go to Kechara House to meet the group and present a few offerings to
them. So while the monks and nuns were having dinner, I was with Paris
and my Private Office arranging offerings for these holy monks and nuns.

When I arrived, I was surprised to see so many of our Kechara members
upstairs at the main prayer hall! They only got to know about the last
minute visit 30 minutes before I arrived, so I did not expect it at
all… I was happy to see all of them. After I presented the offerings
to the sangha members and their assistants, they had to leave because it
was quite late already. I did not want to keep them up for too long,
especially the older sangha members who had very kindly changed their
schedule to visit KH…

I felt inspired to give a short Dharma talk to our Kechara members on
why we make offerings to the sangha. I don’t like my students to do
things blindly without understanding why they are doing it. I feel with
knowledge, Dharma activity and study and practice becomes more
meaningful.

I explained that our karma with each other is relational. This means the
weight of our karma depends on the person’s relationship with us. For
example, the karma of hurting our family and friends is heavier than the
karma of hurting total strangers who we have never met before. Likewise
the karma of hurting our parents is much heavier than the karma of
hurting our brothers and sisters. The karma of hurting our mother is
also heavier than the karma of hurting our brother, because she carried
us in her womb for 9 months. Now that is at an ordinary level. Then our
relational karma with strangers, friends, parents, spouse and sangha are
explained in brief here in this talk.

Actually I have spoken about this many times before but I wanted to
share it with Kecharians again because I feel it is very very important
that we make offerings to the Sangha to support their dharma practice
and generate merits for our KWPC or Kechara World Peace Centre which is
our retreat land in the mountains and our own attainments. I hope you
will listen to this talk and really put it into your mind. It will
greatly benefit your understanding of why supporting the sangha is
important.

Tsem Rinpoche

see my blog post on this: http://blog.tsemtulku.com/tsem-tulku-…


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PPydLZ0cavc
Maha-parinibbana Sutta — Last Days of the Buddha
HAPPY LOTUS
Published on Apr 19, 2014
The Great Discourse on the Total Unbinding
This wide-ranging sutta, the longest one in the Pali canon, describes
the events leading up to, during, and immediately following the death
and final release (parinibbana) of the Buddha. This colorful narrative
contains a wealth of Dhamma teachings, including the Buddha’s final
instructions that defined how Buddhism would be lived and practiced long
after the Buddha’s death — even to this day. But this sutta also
depicts, in simple language, the poignant human drama that unfolds among
the Buddha’s many devoted followers around the time of the death of
their beloved teacher.
Category
People & Blogs


youtube.com
The Great Discourse on the Total Unbinding This wide-ranging sutta, the longest one in the Pali canon,…

Published on Sep 5, 2012


Venerable Kiribathgoda Gnanananda Thero

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_lmqWiBRgfg
The life of Buddha # 12 Buddha Parinibbana
Sabar Sukarno
Published on Mar 16, 2016
https://dharma-insight.blogspot.co.id

Sang Buddha parinibbana (wafat) di Kusinara. Pada saat-saat terakhir
Buddha menyampaikan pesan-pesan penting kepada bhikkhu Ananda dan para
bhikkhu lain. Pada kesempatan itu Buddha melakukan penahbisan terakhir
yaitu kepada Bhikkhu Subhadda. Sang Buddha wafat disaksikan oleh para
bhikkhu dan dewa serta brahma. Relik (sisa organ jasmani) Buddha
disimpan di stupa untuk dijadikan sebagai pengingat dan obyek pemujaan
bagi umat Buddha
Category
People & Blogs


youtube.com
https://dharma-insight.blogspot.co.id Sang Buddha parinibbana (wafat) di Kusinara. Pada saat-saat terakhir Buddha menyampaikan pesan-pesan penting kepada…


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IX-48yn3W1U

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IX-48yn3W1U
PARINIBBANA
YOPPY LIBERU
Published on May 21, 2016
Lagu Buddhis - Karya Yoppy Liberu
Category
People & Blogs


youtube.com
Lagu Buddhis - Karya Yoppy Liberu

Practicing Vipassana
Rupa
Patipatti -Practicing Meditation
Samatha Vipassana

Jhana Attained

16 kinds of Vipassana

Pali Language & Literature

History of pali Language and Literature(2)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V5W2t9tXW-Y&t=45s
Pali (Pāli) is a Prakrit language
worldbuddhistradio
Published on Jan 9, 2016
Pali (Pāli) is a Prakrit language native to the Indian subcontinent. It
is widely studied because it is the language of many of the earliest
extant literature of Buddhism as collected in the Pāli Canon or Tipiṭaka
and is the sacred language of Theravada Buddhism.
Category
Education
Jagatheesan Chandrasekharan
Jagatheesan Chandrasekharan
3 months ago
Magadhi Prakrit-
Pali (Pāli) is a Prakrit language
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C0TTGgcq3qU
Jagatheesan Chandrasekharan
Jagatheesan Chandrasekharan 1 second ago
When a just born baby is separated and kept alone, it will speak a
language like any other living being that have their own languages which
is a communicating instrument. That human language is Magadhi a prakrit
and Pali (Pāli) is a Prakrit language. All other languages are off
shoot of Magadhi and hence all languages are noble and classical.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C0TTGgcq3qU
Magadhi Prakrit
WikiWikiup
Published on Aug 7, 2016
Magadhi Prakrit is of one of the three Dramatic Prakrits, the written
languages of Ancient India following the decline of Pali and
Sanskrit.Magadhi Prakrit was spoken in the eastern Indian subcontinent,
in a region spanning what is now eastern India, Bangladesh, and Nepal.It
is believed to be the language spoken by the important religious
figures Gautama Buddha and Mahavira and was also the language of the
courts of the Magadha mahajanapada and the Maurya Empire; the edicts of
Ashoka were composed in it.Magadhi Prakrit later evolved into the
Eastern Zone Indo-Aryan languages, including Assamese, Bengali, Odia and
the Bihari languages .

This channel is dedicated to make
Wikipedia, one of the biggest knowledge databases in the world available
to people with limited vision.
Magadhi Prakrit
Magadhi Prakrit
is of one of the three Dramatic Prakrits, the written languages of
Ancient India following the decline of Pali and…
youtube.com

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V5W2t9tXW-Y
Pali (Pāli) is a Prakrit language

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V5W2t9tXW-Y
Pali (Pāli) is a Prakrit language
worldbuddhistradio
Published on Jan 9, 2016
Pali (Pāli) is a Prakrit language native to the Indian subcontinent. It
is widely studied because it is the language of many of the earliest
extant literature of Buddhism as collected in the Pāli Canon or Tipiṭaka
and is the sacred language of Theravada Buddhism….
See more
Pali (Pāli) is a Prakrit language
Pali (Pāli) is a Prakrit language native to the Indian subcontinent. It
is widely studied because it is the language of many of the…
youtube.com


youtube.com
Pali
(Pāli) is a Prakrit language native to the Indian subcontinent. It is
widely studied because it is the language of many of the earliest extant
literatur…
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9jAPBTF9SWU&t=12s

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9jAPBTF9SWU&t=12s
How to learn Pali Language? - 1

Dhamma Us
Published on Apr 28, 2017
About UWest Pali Society:

UWest Pali Society is committed to promoting Theravada Pali tradition
both academically and ritually. We welcome all the UWest community
members to join us and feel good with us. Individuals outside the UWest
community can be included with the invitation from the members.

The objectives of the UWest Pali Society would be:

1. Pali Sutta Reading & Translation (Free):
Here we read & translate selected original Pali suttas and discuss
the key Pali terms leading to further discussions. We invite all those
like-minded faculty, staff and students to join us and learn research
and share the experience.

2. Pali Learning (Free):

We are
more than happy to introduce Pali language to those who are interested.
We teach Pali language from the very beginning to advanced level.

3. Online Pali Group (Free):

We have already started an online Pali teaching program. Those who are
interested in joining, please contact admin@dhammausa.com

3. Guest Speeches (Free):

We organize monthly guest speeches by eminent scholars and visiting
Buddhist monks to propagate and promote Pali Language and Literature.

Meeting Dates: Please check for updates here www.dhammausa.com
About DhammaUS:

DHAMMA US is a non-profit, charity organization engaged in Community
Care, Spiritual Care & Pali Studies. We conduct Meditation, Yoga,
Spiritual Counselling, Healing & Therapeutic Chanting and Teaching
Pali Language. We promote peace, harmony, non-violence along with the
message of the Buddha. We are happy to share the Theravada Buddhist
Studies with any like minded individual or community. However, we
support and promote unconditionally all the other Buddhist schools
without any discrimination. We also respect all the other religions and
their teachings on humanity, world peace, non-violence, and
environmental care.

Contact:

Website: http://www.dhammausa.com/
Blog: http://dhammaus.blogspot.com
Twitter: https://twitter.com/Dhamma_Us
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dhammaus15
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6dg
Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dhamma-us
Google+: https://plus.google.com/1085636941523
Email: info@dhammausa.com

Keywords:
UWest Pali Society
UWest
University of the West
Pali
Buddhism
Buddhist
Chanting
Spiritual
Religion
USA
California
Lankarama Buddhist Institute
Category
Education


youtube.com
About
UWest Pali Society: UWest Pali Society is committed to promoting
Theravada Pali tradition both academically and ritually. We welcome all
the UWest…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AKKg07tv72I&t=439s
Dhamma Us
Published on Apr 28, 2017
About UWest Pali Society:

UWest Pali Society is committed to promoting Theravada Pali tradition
both academically and ritually. We welcome all the UWest community
members to join us and feel good with us. Individuals outside the UWest
community can be included with the invitation from the members.

The objectives of the UWest Pali Society would be:

1. Pali Sutta Reading & Translation (Free):
Here we read & translate selected original Pali suttas and discuss
the key Pali terms leading to further discussions. We invite all those
like-minded faculty, staff and students to join us and learn research
and share the experience.

2. Pali Learning (Free):

We are
more than happy to introduce Pali language to those who are interested.
We teach Pali language from the very beginning to advanced level.

3. Online Pali Group (Free):

We have already started an online Pali teaching program. Those who are
interested in joining, please contact admin@dhammausa.com

3. Guest Speeches (Free):

We organize monthly guest speeches by eminent scholars and visiting
Buddhist monks to propagate and promote Pali Language and Literature.

Meeting Dates: Please check for updates here www.dhammausa.com
About DhammaUS:

DHAMMA US is a non-profit, charity organization engaged in Community
Care, Spiritual Care & Pali Studies. We conduct Meditation, Yoga,
Spiritual Counselling, Healing & Therapeutic Chanting and Teaching
Pali Language. We promote peace, harmony, non-violence along with the
message of the Buddha. We are happy to share the Theravada Buddhist
Studies with any like minded individual or community. However, we
support and promote unconditionally all the other Buddhist schools
without any discrimination. We also respect all the other religions and
their teachings on humanity, world peace, non-violence, and
environmental care.

Contact:

Website: http://www.dhammausa.com/
Blog: http://dhammaus.blogspot.com
Twitter: https://twitter.com/Dhamma_Us
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dhammaus15
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6dg
Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dhamma-us
Google+: https://plus.google.com/1085636941523
Email: info@dhammausa.com

Keywords:
UWest Pali Society
UWest
University of the West
Pali
Buddhism
Buddhist
Chanting
Spiritual
Religion
USA
California
Lankarama Buddhist Institute
Category
Education


youtube.com
About
UWest Pali Society: UWest Pali Society is committed to promoting
Theravada Pali tradition both academically and ritually. We welcome all
the UWest…

LikeShow More Reactions
Comment
Comments
Parts of Speech
-Noun
-Verb-Pronoun
Paricles
Location

Suttanta  Pitaka
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ArY597Dax84&list=PLtbULbSYv-ds8iUUoZXSQXbyPIQZDb3w6

https://www.youtube.com/watch…
From the Holy Buddhist Tipitaka: Sutta Pitaka - Samyutta Nikaya

Supreme Master Television
Published on Jul 12, 2008
http://suprememastertv.com/ - From the Holy Buddhist Tipitaka: Sutta Pitaka -Samyutta Nikaya (In English), Episode: 618, Air date: 24 - May - 2008
Category
Entertainment


youtube.com
The Satipaṭṭhāna Sutta[1] (MN 10) (Sanskrit: Smṛtyupasthāna Sūtra स्मृत्युपस्थान सूत्र, Chinese:…

Dhammapada

Published on Jul 8, 2015


The
Dhammapada is a collection of sayings of the Buddha in verse form and
one of the most widely read and best known Buddhist scriptures. The
original version of the Dhammapada is in the Khuddaka Nikaya, a division
of the Pali Canon of Theravada Buddhism.

The Buddhist scholar and commentator Buddhaghosa explains that each
saying recorded in the collection was made on a different occasion in
response to a unique situation that had arisen in the life of the Buddha
and his monastic community. His commentary, the Dhammapada Atthakatha,
presents the details of these events and is a rich source of legend for
the life and times of the Buddha.

·

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8H_6uieRvm8&t=603s
The Dhammapada [Wisdom of The Buddha] - Full Audiobook
Infinite Paths
Published on Jul 8, 2015
The Dhammapada is a collection of sayings of the Buddha in verse form
and one of the most widely read and best known Buddhist scriptures. The
original version of the Dhammapada is in the Khuddaka Nikaya, a division
of the Pali Canon of Theravada Buddhism.

The Buddhist scholar and commentator Buddhaghosa explains that each
saying recorded in the collection was made on a different occasion in
response to a unique situation that had arisen in the life of the Buddha
and his monastic community. His commentary, the Dhammapada Atthakatha,
presents the details of these events and is a rich source of legend for
the life and times of the Buddha.
Category
EducationInfinite Paths
Published on Jul 8, 2015
The Dhammapada is a collection of sayings of the Buddha in verse form
and one of the most widely read and best known Buddhist scriptures. The
original version of the Dhammapada is in the Khuddaka Nikaya, a division
of the Pali Canon of Theravada Buddhism.

The Buddhist scholar
and commentator Buddhaghosa explains that each saying recorded in the
collection was made on a different occasion in response to a unique
situation that had arisen in the life of the Buddha and his monastic
community. His commentary, the Dhammapada Atthakatha, presents the
details of these events and is a rich source of legend for the life and
times of the Buddha.
Category
Education


youtube.com
The Dhammapada is a collection of sayings of the Buddha in verse form and one of the most widely…





Doctrine-True Practice of The Path Shown by The Blessed,Noble,Awakened One-The Tathagata

Knowing Oneself and Knowing Others

The Buddha taught us to contemplate our body, for example: hair of the head, hair of the body, nails, teeth, skin… it’s all body. Take a look! We are told to investigate right here. If we don’t see these things clearly as they are in ourselves, we won’t understand regarding other people. We won’t see others clearly nor will we see ourselves. However, if we do understand and see clearly the nature of our own bodies, our doubts and wonderings regarding others will disappear. This is because body and mind (Rupa and Nama) are the same for everybody. It isn’t necessary to go and examine all the bodies in the world since we know that they are the same as us — we are the same as them. If we have this kind of understanding then our burden becomes lighter. Without this kind of understanding, all we do is develop a heavier burden. In order to know about others we would have to go and examine everybody in the entire world. That would be very difficult. We would soon become discouraged.

Our Vinaya is similar to this. When we look at our Vinaya (Code of Monks’ Discipline) we feel that it’s very difficult. We must keep every rule, study every rule, review our practice with every rule. If we just think about it, “Oh, it’s impossible!” We read the literal meaning of all the numerous rules and, if we merely follow our thinking about them, we could well decide that it’s beyond our ability to keep them all. Anyone who has had this kind of attitude towards the Vinaya has the same feeling about it — there are a lot of rules!

The scriptures tell us that we must examine ourselves regarding each and every rule and keep them all strictly. We must know them all and observe them perfectly. This is the same as saying that to understand about others we must go and examine absolutely everybody. This is a very heavy attitude. And it’s like this because we take what is said literally. If we follow the textbooks, this is the way we must go. Some Teachers teach in this manner — strict adherence to what the textbooks say. It just can’t work that way.17

Actually, if we study theory like this, our practice won’t develop at all. In fact our faith will disappear, our faith in the Way will be destroyed. This is because we haven’t yet understood. When there is wisdom we will understand that all the people in the entire world really amount to just this one person. They are the same as this very being. So we study and contemplate our own body and mind. With seeing and understanding the nature of our own body and mind comes understanding the bodies and minds of everyone. And so, in this way, the weight of our practice becomes lighter.

The Buddha said to teach and instruct ourselves — nobody else can do it for us. When we study and understand the nature of our own existence, we will understand the nature of all existence. Everyone is really the same. We are all the same “make” and come from the same company — there are only different shades, that’s all! Just like “Bort-hai” and “Tum-jai.” They are both pain-killers and do the same thing, but one type is called “Bort-hai” and the other “Tum-jai.” Really they aren’t different.

You will find that this way of seeing things gets easier and easier as you gradually bring it all together. We call this “feeling our way,” and this is how we begin to practice. We’ll become skilled at doing it. We keep on with it until we arrive at understanding, and when this understanding arises, we will see reality clearly.

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2727 Tue 28 Aug 2018 LESSON (68) Tue 28 Aug 2007 Do Good Be Mindful - Awakened One with Awareness (AOA) Learn How To Meditate Vipassana As taught by S.N. Goenka TeachLing annual recruitment drive!Spiritual Community of The Followers of The Path Shown by The Blessed,Noble,Awakened One-The Tathagata-Virtue (sila)
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2727 Tue 28 Aug 2018 LESSON (68) Tue 28 Aug 2007

Do Good Be Mindful  -  Awakened One with Awareness (AOA)



Learn How To Meditate

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How To Approach
This New Beginning

This Astonishing Mystery Called Life


We are stardust that somehow came alive and no one knows how or why
that happened – no one knows what created life. Yet here we are – alive
on a tiny speck of dirt and water floating through endless space. For
most people including us, this mystery called life is most sacred, and
it fills us with awe and wonder. This site is about how to relax into
this mystery and be present in it every moment.

This site is
about being more aware of what’s obvious, not about finding something
that’s hidden. It’s about connecting with what’s sacred through your
experiences, not through beliefs or faith. Our experience is that life
is already so filled with sacredness that faith and beliefs need not
figure in.

In short, this site is about how to replace
words and thoughts about life with your direct experiences of life, and
how to then evaluate and trust your experiences. It is about connecting
directly with sacredness through increasing inner peace, love,
fellowship, and goodness in your life.

Another Approach


Long ago our ancestors created religions and spiritualities that
promised inner peace, love, fellowship, goodness, and connection with
what’s most sacred. Today most people still want those promises
fulfilled but many now distrust traditional religions and spiritualities
because those often divide society and separate people from one
another.

The view on this web site is that traditional
religions and spiritualities do provide ways to fulfill those promises,
and some of those ways are described on this site along with new ways of
fulfilling those promises developed by medicine and science in recent
years. However our view is also that traditional religions and
spiritualities are based on a flawed principle that undermines the
fulfillment of those promises, that divides society, and that separates
people from one another:

Traditional religions and a great many
spiritual teachings today are based on the flawed principle that someone
else knows better than you what’s best for you. They require you to
accept that they alone know how to connect you with what’s sacred and
provide you with inner peace, love, fellowship and goodness. By
accepting that requirement you thereby give them your power and your
authority, which disempowers you and empowers them. They can then tell
you what’s best for you because you gave them the power and authority to
do so.

This web site is based on a different principle, which is
that you know better than anyone what actually works best for you; that
you know better than anyone what increases or decreases your inner
peace and brings you closer to what is most sacred. With this approach
you do not give your power to some other authority – you retain your
power and you are the authority.

With this approach you continue
to learn by watching how others do things but you then decide what works
best in your life. With this approach you choose friends and advisors
who agree to be good listeners and provide their perspectives, and to
respect you by not pushing their agendas and beliefs on you.

In
short, this web site is about learning to trust yourself and build your
self-confidence. It’s about learning to connect with your intuition and
trust what it’s telling you. It’s about learning to see and think for
yourself.

Through your own eyes you learned what the moon looks
like: how could you learn that through the eyes of someone else? In that
same way learn for yourself what expands inner peace, love, fellowship,
goodness and what is most sacred in your life.

Good luck.

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Our mind wants our beliefs to be certain and true, which separates us
from others, while our heart wants our beliefs to bring us closer to
others and increase love. And so we are forced to choose between love
and the certainty of our beliefs. Learn how to resolve this conflict.


“The ideas in this book have transformed my life. Letting go of
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trapped in their minds. I could never thank you enough for writing this
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and how they increase or decrease your inner peace. When finished you can download the Quiz, your answers and

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We live two lives: we live life in our thoughts and we live life as our
experience of the present moment. Freedom comes as our life in thoughts
diminishes and

our experience of the present moment predominates. Freedom comes

through learning how to balance thoughts and the present moment.

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You are stardust that somehow came alive, and whatever made that happen remains a mystery. Inner peace is about knowing who

you are, where you came from and how you got here.

Learn More >

We are here today because our ancestors learned that survival

depended on every person doing the right thing and having each other’s back. Today our survival still depends on

that, as do our inner peace and sense of well-being.

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If you want your heart to be more open, if you want to feel more
connected to others, get together with friends and sing. On this page
are some songs we like to sing to celebrate being alive, and to express
our gratitude, our wonder and our joy.

Celebrate Life >


We are living in the dawn of a new beginning. Traditional religious and
spiritual ways are in decline and new ways are replacing them. This is


happening because people want inner peace, not just promises of inner
peace. People want to experience what is sacred directly, not through
the words of middlemen. People want lives filled with love and
fellowship, not lives filled with stress and separation. People want
communities that truly have their back, not communities that let the
powerful prey on them. This web site provides tools for this new
beginning.
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http://www.dhamma.org/en/about/privacy

Vipassana

As taught by S.N. Goenka
Aniwheel
Meditation

in the tradition of Sayagyi U Ba Khin

About
Courses
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English

Privacy Policy


Thank you for visiting the Vipassana Meditation Website. Your privacy
is important to our organizations. To better protect your privacy, we
provide this notice telling you about our information practices and the
things you should be aware of about how your information is collected
and used both at this site and in general by the many local or regional
Vipassana organizations around the world. However, please note that the
specific details of the privacy policies of the Vipassana organizations
around the world may differ from country to country. A copy of the
particular privacy policy applicable to your information may be obtained
from the Vipassana course registrar or at the Vipassana course site
upon your arrival. Click here to download a PDF copy of Dhamma.org Privacy Policy.
The Information We Collect


If you choose to register for a Vipassana meditation course via our
on-line or conventional registration application, the types of
personally identifiable information that may be collected include: name,
address, e-mail address, telephone number, fax number, and all the
other highly personal information that is called for on the application
form and on the course registration form. Your personal information
contained in your course application and registration forms are stored
in a secure manner within our facilities and the only persons having
access thereto are those who have a specific “need to know”, such as the
course registrar, the center/course manager and the assistant
teacher(s) conducting the course(s) to which you seek admission.


If you choose to utilize our “Tell A Friend About Vipassana” service you
necessarily submit both yours and another person’s e-mail address to
send an electronic greeting and the address of our website to that other
person. The types of personally identifiable information that may be
collected about you by that service is your email address and the types
of personally identifiable information that may be collected about the
other people at these pages includes the recipient’s email address. We
also may collect certain non-personally identifiable information when
you visit our website pages such as the type of browser you are using
(e.g., Firefox, Netscape, Opera or Internet Explorer), the type of
operating system you are using, (e.g., Windows, Mac OS or Linux) and the
domain name of your Internet service provider (e.g., America Online,
Earthlink).
How We Use Your Information

We use the
information you provide about yourself in your application and
registration forms to enable the local or regional Vipassana
organization to which you have applied to evaluate your application for
admission to a course and to register you for that course. In addition,
we have found that people who attend a Vipassana course frequently
attend subsequent courses over their lifetime. In order to facilitate
subsequent attendance at courses and to maintain a record of a student’s
history and experience the local or regional Vipassana organization(s)
may maintain the course data of each student indefinitely in the absence
of a legal prohibition to do so in certain jurisdictions. In some
cases, the local or regional Vipassana organization may use your name
postal address and/or email address to send you information about
Vipassana related activities and facilities, if you have not opted-out
of such contact. We use the information that you provide about others in
our “Tell a Friend” service to enable us to send them your greeting and
our website address. We sometimes use the non-personally identifiable
information that we collect to improve the design and content of our
site and to enable us to understand who is accessing our site from which
locations and which files they are accessing within the site, i.e., to
use this information in the aggregate to analyze site usage. This
Vipassana Website does not ever make your personally identifiable
information available to third parties, for commercial or any other
reason. However, certain regional Vipassana websites may accept credit
card based donations, in which case, personal information related to
those donation financial transactions is processed in the usual manner.
Otherwise, we do not disclose your personal information outside of the
facilities of the local or regional Vipassana organizations and their
common infrastructure except when required to do so by law, for example,
in response to a court order or subpoena. We may also disclose such
information in response to a law enforcement agency’s request or other
legal requirement.

All teachers and assistant teachers of
Vipassana as well as all meditation center staff and Dhamma workers only
have access to your information submitted on the course application and
registration forms on a “need to know” basis. Through confidentiality
agreements and other documentation, we take all reasonable steps to
ensure that such information is maintained in confidence and safeguarded
against disclosure to or access by third parties once it reaches the
center or the non-center course registrar to which it is submitted.
However, the particular manner in which your information is maintained,
stored and used is governed by the particular privacy policy applicable
within the country where the particular course for which you are
registering is being held. The only risk of inadvertent disclosure of
your information can be in the case of applications submitted by email
and that is while the information is being sent over the open internet,
as under some circumstances our email application facilities are not
secure. Please do not use the email application facility on this website
unless you are prepared to personally take this risk.

Our
application forms and the personal data contained therein are handled by
storage and processing on computers. In addition, the computers of the
different Vipassana organizations are located in various countries of
the world. Your submission of an application form to attend one of our
courses constitutes your unequivocal consent to the storage and
processing of your application data on a computer and to the
cross-border transfer of your personal information contained in the
application form as well as the handling and storage of all information
you submit to us in the registration process in accordance with the
privacy regulations of the local jurisdiction. In addition, in some
cases the email service of a center to which an application is submitted
may be provided through Google Apps. As a result the handling of the
data in your application to that center is subject to the privacy and
security policies of Google, as set forth in their publications that are
available on their websites. For the welfare of the students, the local
or regional Vipassana organization may consider it necessary to take
and retain notes on any health concern or behavior in relation to the
course that is inconsistent with the Code of Discipline or that
otherwise indicates that a student should be restricted from attending
future courses or will need additional support during a future course.
In the rare event of this occurring, it is our understanding that the
local or regional Vipassana organization will ensure that such notes
will be entered on a computer and shared in confidence with assistant
teachers and authorized course registrars involved in future courses.
Your attendance at a course will constitute unequivocal consent to the
handling and storage of such notes and the cross-border transfer thereof
subject to applicable laws, including those discussed below (“Specific
Privacy Requirements”). Should you wish to know more about how such
notes are retained you should contact the local or regional Vipassana
organization to determine what its privacy policies are concerning such
notes and other personal data.
Collection of Information by Third-Party Sites


This Privacy Policy only addresses the use and dissemination of
information that we collect from you. Our website may contain links to
other sites whose information practices may be different than ours.
Visitors should consult the other sites’ privacy notices as we have no
control over information that is submitted to, or collected by, these
third parties. Since the various Vipassana organizations do not control
the privacy policies of third parties, you are subject to the privacy
customs and policies, if any, of that third party, and the vipassana
organizations shall not be responsible for the use or dissemination of
your personal information by that third party. Therefore, we encourage
you to ask questions before you disclose your personal information to
others.
Cookies

A “cookie” is a text file containing a small
amount of information which our server downloads to your personal
computer when you visit our website. The file contains a unique number
so that our server knows which PC it is talking to. We create a session
cookie when you use our online application form to register for a
course. We also use a session cookie to know whether you have logged in
as an old student or not. Some cookies are allocated to your PC only for
the duration of your visit to a website, and these are called session
based cookies. These are automatically deleted when you close down your
browser. Some other “regional” Vipassana websites may also use cookies.
Children’s Privacy


In accordance with the U.S. Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act of
1998 (and comparable legislation of other countries, including GDPR),
we will never knowingly request or solicit personally identifiable
information from anyone under the age of 13 without verifiable parental
consent. In the event we receive actual knowledge that we have collected
such personal information without the requisite and verifiable parental
consent, we will delete that information from our database as quickly
as is practical.
Specific Privacy Requirements

Please note
that individual countries may have particular privacy law requirements.
Vipassana organizations around the world have developed specific privacy
policies to comply with these requirements that may differ in specific
details from the more general policies set forth above. You may obtain a
hard copy of these specific requirements by contacting the course
registrar of the center to which you have submitted your application
and/or registration forms or at the course site upon your arrival.

Dhamma.org is committed to protecting the “rights and freedoms” of individuals whose information Dhamma.org collects in accordance with such laws including but not limited to the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).


Pursuant to the applicable privacy regulations, you may have the
following rights, among others, with regard to any data we collect or
retain that relates to you:

the right of access, i.e. the
right to obtain confirmation as to whether or not personal data is being
processed, and where this is the case, to obtain access thereto;

the right to rectification and erasure, i.e. the right to have
inaccurate data rectified and/or to have incomplete data completed, and
the right to have personal data erased for legitimate reasons;

the right to impose restrictions on the processing of personal data,
i.e. the right to request the suspension of data processing for
legitimate reasons;
the right to data portability, i.e. the
right to receive the data in a structured, commonly-used and easily
readable format, as well as the right to transmit the data to another
data controller
the right to object, i.e. the right to oppose
the processing of data where legitimate reasons for this exist,
including data processed for marketing and profiling purposes, if this
is envisaged;
the right to contact the competent data protection authority in case of unlawful data processing.

You may exercise the rights listed above by writing to dhamma.org
at privacy@dhamma.org. In addition to the foregoing rights, each
application form to register for a Vipassana Meditation course or
related activity contains a series of disclosures and consents, which
are also intended to protect your rights.
Opt-Out/Opt-In


Local or regional Vipassana organizations may provide you provide you
with the opportunity to “opt-out” of having them send you e-mail or
postal mail about their services or other information related to
Vipassana. In other cases, it may be possible for you to “opt-in” to
certain local or regional information distribution lists. If you choose
to have your name, email address or other personally identifiable
information removed from any of those databases, you can do so by
contacting your local or regional Vipassana organization and request
removal.
How to Contact Us

If you have any questions or
concerns about the privacy or any other policies of the Vipassana
Website or its implementation you may contact us at: privacy@dhamma.org.
Effective Date


This Privacy Policy is effective as of May 25, 2018. We reserve the
right to modify the terms of this policy at any time and in our sole
discretion. Your use of this website constitutes a binding acceptance of
the above-referenced policies.

Dhamma.org

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Homepage of Vipassana Meditation as taught by S.N. Goenka in the tradition of Sayagyi U Ba Khin

lpren@caltalk.cal.org 
To:CAL Language Policy Research Network

27 Aug at 8:03 PM
CAL Language Policy Research Network
*************************************
Hello one and all…

It’s that time of year again: the annual recruitment drive for TeachLing, the world’s
biggest online community for university linguistics teaching! As the serendipity and
adventure of conference season winds down, as people change jobs (or finally get
jobs), as the ivory tower ushers us back and the lecture halls beckon us into their
warm embrace, now is the time to join our online community. We currently have 793
members from all over the world, and regular useful discussions about a delightful
diversity of pedagogical topics and subdisciplinary areas! What’s not to like??

As if all this wasn’t exciting enough, this year I thought I’d remind everyone of a
resource I put together in 2014, and kept updating regularly since. It’s a full list
of all the linguistics-related strips from my favourite web comic, XKCD:
https://is.gd/p5uFOJ. Useful in bringing presentations to life! For other comics
related to linguistics, there’s also this page by Hal Schiffman (U Penn):
http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/plc/clpp/images/cartoons/cartoons.html. (Discussions on

TeachLing are usually more academically robust, honest.)

ANYWAY… down to business: joining TeachLing! Please do join our little community by
adding your email address here: https://goo.gl/34wVVk. (People on mobile toys will

need to tap the little pencil icon in the top right, then install the Google Docs app
if it isn’t already installed.)

Feel free to forward this message far and wide, and please share the tweet
announcement too! https://twitter.com/DaveJSayers/status/1032938278234869761.

See you on TeachLing :)

Dave


Dr. Dave Sayers, ORCID no. 0000-0003-1124-7132
Senior Lecturer, Dept Language & Communication Studies, University of Jyväskylä,
Finland | www.jyu.fi
Honorary Research Fellow, Cardiff University & WISERD | www.wiserd.ac.uk
Communications Secretary, BAAL Language Policy group | www.langpol.ac.uk
dave.sayers@cantab.net | http://jyu.academia.edu/DaveSayers


LPReN
serves as a conduit for the dissemination of information by its members
without implying endorsement of concepts or opinions expressed.


You are currently subscribed to lpren as: sarvajanow@yahoo.co.in.



Spiritual Community of The Followers of The Path Shown by The Blessed,Noble,Awakened One-The Tathagata

Virtue (sila)

Right view and right resolve continue to mature through the development of the path factors associated with sila, or virtue — namely, right speech, right action, and right livelihood. These are condensed into a very practical form in the five precepts, the basic code of ethical conduct to which every practicing Buddhist subscribes: refraining from killing, stealing, sexual misconduct, lying, and using intoxicants. Even the monks’ complex code of 227 rules and the nuns’ 311 ultimately have these five basic precepts at their core.

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