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199 LESSONS  17 03 2011 Dhatu vibhanga Sutta An Analysis of the Properties FREE ONLINE eNālandā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY to VOTE for BSP ELEPHANT for Social Transformation and Economic Emancipation to attain Ultimate Bliss-POLITICS is Sacred with GOOD GOVERNANCE-Buddhism and Politics-Hon’ble Chief Minister ji decides to implement ambitious Manyawar Sri Kanshiram ji Shahri SC/ST Bahulya Basti Samgra Vikas Yojana to improve living conditions of these dwellings-About Rs. 2000 crore to be spent on the scheme-250 SC/ST dominated urban bastis to be selected in descending order

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LESSON 199

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/mn/mn.140.than.html

MN 140 

PTS: M iii 237

Dhatu-vibhanga Sutta: An Analysis of the Properties

translated from the Pali by

Thanissaro Bhikkhu

© 1997–2011

I have heard that on one occasion, as the Blessed One was wandering among theMagadhans, he entered Rajagaha, went to the potter Bhaggava, and on arrival said to him, “If it is no inconvenience for you, Bhaggava, I will stay for one night in your shed.”

“It’s no inconvenience for me, lord, but there is a wanderer who has already taken up residence there. If he gives his permission, you may stay there as you like.”

Now at that time a clansman named Pukkusati had left home and gone forth into homelessness through faith, out of dedication to the Blessed One. He was the one who had already taken up residence in the potter’s shed. So the Blessed One approached Ven. Pukkusati and said to him, “If it is no inconvenience for you, monk, I will stay one night in the shed.”

“The shed is roomy, my friend. Stay as you like.”

So the Blessed One, entering the potter’s shed and, setting out a spread of grass to one side, sat down folding his legs crosswise, holding his body erect, and setting mindfulness to the fore. He spent most of the night sitting [in meditation]. Ven. Pukkusati also spent most of the night sitting [in meditation]. The thought occurred to the Blessed One, “How inspiring is the way this clansman behaves! What if I were to question him?” So he said to Ven. Pukkusati, “Out of dedication to whom, monk, have you gone forth? Who is your teacher? Of whose Dhamma do you approve?”

“There is, my friend, Gotama the contemplative, a son of the Sakyans, gone forth from a Sakyan clan. Now, this excellent report about the honorable Gotama has been spread about: ‘Indeed, the Blessed One is worthy & rightly self-awakened, consummate in knowledge & conduct, well-gone, an expert with regard to the worlds, unexcelled as a trainer for those people fit to be tamed, the Teacher of divine & human beings, awakened, blessed.’ I have gone forth out of dedication to that Blessed One. That Blessed One is my teacher. It is of that Blessed One’s Dhamma that I approve.”

“But where, monk, is that Blessed One — worthy & rightly self-awakened — staying now?”

“There is, my friend, a city in the northern lands named Savatthi. That is where the Blessed One — worthy & rightly self-awakened — is staying now.”

“Have you ever seen that Blessed One before? On seeing him, would you recognize him?”

“No, my friend, I have never seen the Blessed One before, nor on seeing him would I recognize him.”

Then the thought occurred to the Blessed One: “It is out of dedication to me that this clansman has gone forth. What if I were to teach him the Dhamma?” So he said to Ven. Pukkusati, “I will teach you the Dhamma, monk. Listen & pay close attention. I will speak.”

“As you say, friend,” replied Ven. Pukkusati.

The Blessed One said: “A person has six properties, six media of sensory contact, eighteen considerations, & four determinations. He has been stilled where the currents of construing do not flow. And when the currents of construing do not flow, he is said to be a sage at peace. One should not be negligent of discernment, should guard the truth, be devoted to relinquishment, and train only for calm. This is the summary of the analysis of the six properties.

“‘A person has six properties.’ Thus was it said. In reference to what was it said? These are the six properties: the earth property, the liquid property, the fire property, the wind property, the space property, the consciousness property. ‘A person has six properties.’ Thus was it said, and in reference to this was it said.

“‘A person has six media of sensory contact.’ Thus was it said. In reference to what was it said? These are the six media of sensory contact: the eye as a medium of sensory contact, the ear… the nose… the tongue… the body… the intellect as a medium of sensory contact. ‘A person has six media of sensory contact.’ Thus was it said, and in reference to this was it said.

“‘A person has eighteen considerations.’ Thus was it said. In reference to what was it said? These are the eighteen considerations: On seeing a form with the eye, one considers a form that can act as a basis for joy, a form that can act as a basis for sadness, or a form that can act as a basis for equanimity. On hearing a sound with the ear… On smelling an aroma with the nose… On tasting a flavor with the tongue… On feeling a tactile sensation with the body… On cognizing an idea with the intellect, one considers an idea that can act as a basis for joy, an idea that can act as a basis for sadness, or an idea that can act as a basis for equanimity. Thus there are six considerations conducive to joy, six conducive to sadness, & six conducive to equanimity. ‘A person has eighteen considerations.’ Thus was it said, and in reference to this was it said.

“‘A person has four determinations.’ Thus was it said. In reference to what was it said? These are the four determinations: the determination for discernment, the determination for truth, the determination for relinquishment, the determination for calm. ‘A person has four determinations.’ Thus was it said, and in reference to this was it said.

“‘One should not be negligent of discernment, should guard the truth, be devoted to relinquishment, and train only for calm.’ Thus was it said. In reference to what was it said? And how is one not negligent of discernment? These are the six properties: the earth property, the liquid property, the fire property, the wind property, the space property, the consciousness property.

“And what is the earth property? The earth property can be either internal or external. What is the internal earth property? Anything internal, within oneself, that’s hard, solid, & sustained [by craving]: head hairs, body hairs, nails, teeth, skin, flesh, tendons, bones, bone marrow, kidneys, heart, liver, membranes, spleen, lungs, large intestines, small intestines, contents of the stomach, feces, or anything else internal, within oneself, that’s hard, solid, and sustained: This is called the internal earth property. Now both the internal earth property & the external earth property are simply earth property. And that should be seen as it actually is present with right discernment: ‘This is not mine, this is not me, this is not my self.’ When one sees it thus as it actually is present with right discernment, one becomes disenchanted with the earth property and makes the earth property fade from the mind.

“And what is the liquid property? The liquid property may be either internal or external. What is the internal liquid property? Anything internal, belonging to oneself, that’s liquid, watery, & sustained: bile, phlegm, pus, blood, sweat, fat, tears, oil, saliva, mucus, oil-of-the-joints, urine, or anything else internal, within oneself, that’s liquid, watery, & sustained: This is called the internal liquid property. Now both the internal liquid property & the external liquid property are simply liquid property. And that should be seen as it actually is present with right discernment: ‘This is not mine, this is not me, this is not my self.’ When one sees it thus as it actually is present with right discernment, one becomes disenchanted with the liquid property and makes the liquid property fade from the mind.

“And what is the fire property? The fire property may be either internal or external. What is the internal fire property? Anything internal, belonging to oneself, that’s fire, fiery, & sustained: that by which [the body] is warmed, aged, & consumed with fever; and that by which what is eaten, drunk, consumed & tasted gets properly digested; or anything else internal, within oneself, that’s fire, fiery, & sustained: This is called the internal fire property. Now both the internal fire property & the external fire property are simply fire property. And that should be seen as it actually is present with right discernment: ‘This is not mine, this is not me, this is not my self.’ When one sees it thus as it actually is present with right discernment, one becomes disenchanted with the fire property and makes the fire property fade from the mind.

“And what is the wind property? The wind property may be either internal or external. What is the internal wind property? Anything internal, belonging to oneself, that’s wind, windy, & sustained: up-going winds, down-going winds, winds in the stomach, winds in the intestines, winds that course through the body, in-and-out breathing, or anything else internal, within oneself, that’s wind, windy, & sustained: This is called the internal wind property. Now both the internal wind property & the external wind property are simply wind property. And that should be seen as it actually is present with right discernment: ‘This is not mine, this is not me, this is not my self.’ When one sees it thus as it actually is present with right discernment, one becomes disenchanted with the wind property and makes the wind property fade from the mind.

“And what is the space property? The space property may be either internal or external. What is the internal space property? Anything internal, belonging to oneself, that’s space, spatial, & sustained: the holes of the ears, the nostrils, the mouth, the [passage] whereby what is eaten, drunk, consumed, & tasted gets swallowed, and where it collects, and whereby it is excreted from below, or anything else internal, within oneself, that’s space, spatial, & sustained: This is called the internal space property. Now both the internal space property & the external space property are simply space property. And that should be seen as it actually is present with right discernment: ‘This is not mine, this is not me, this is not my self.’ When one sees it thus as it actually is present with right discernment, one becomes disenchanted with the space property and makes the space property fade from the mind.

“There remains only consciousness: pure & bright. What does one cognize with that consciousness? One cognizes ‘pleasure.’ One cognizes ‘pain.’ One cognizes ‘neither pleasure nor pain.’ In dependence on a sensory contact that is to be felt as pleasure, there arises a feeling of pleasure. When sensing a feeling of pleasure, one discerns that ‘I am sensing a feeling of pleasure.’ One discerns that ‘With the cessation of that very sensory contact that is to be felt as pleasure, the concomitant feeling — the feeling of pleasure that has arisen in dependence on the sensory contact that is to be felt as pleasure — ceases, is stilled.’ In dependence on a sensory contact that is to be felt as pain… In dependence on a sensory contact that is to be felt as neither pleasure nor pain, there arises a feeling of neither pleasure nor pain. When sensing a feeling of neither pleasure nor pain, one discerns that ‘I am sensing a feeling of neither pleasure nor pain.’ One discerns that ‘With the cessation of that very sensory contact that is to be felt as neither pleasure nor pain, the concomitant feeling — the feeling of neither pleasure nor pain that has arisen in dependence on the sensory contact that is to be felt as neither pleasure nor pain — ceases, is stilled.’

“Just as when, from the friction & conjunction of two fire sticks, heat is born and fire appears, and from the separation & disjunction of those very same fire sticks, the concomitant heat ceases, is stilled; in the same way, in dependence on a sensory contact that is to be felt as pleasure, there arises a feeling of pleasure… In dependence on a sensory contact that is to be felt as pain… In dependence on a sensory contact that is to be felt as neither pleasure nor pain, there arises a feeling of neither pleasure nor pain… One discerns that ‘With the cessation of that very sensory contact that is to be felt as neither pleasure nor pain, the concomitant feeling… ceases, is stilled.’

“There remains only equanimity: pure & bright, pliant, malleable, & luminous. Just as if a skilled goldsmith or goldsmith’s apprentice were to prepare a furnace, heat up a crucible, and, taking gold with a pair of tongs, place it in the crucible: He would blow on it time & again, sprinkle water on it time & again, examine it time & again, so that the gold would become refined, well-refined, thoroughly refined, flawless, free from dross, pliant, malleable, & luminous. Then whatever sort of ornament he had in mind — whether a belt, an earring, a necklace, or a gold chain — it would serve his purpose. In the same way, there remains only equanimity: pure & bright, pliant, malleable, & luminous. One discerns that ‘If I were to direct equanimity as pure & bright as this toward the dimension of the infinitude of space, I would develop the mind along those lines, and thus this equanimity of mine — thus supported, thus sustained — would last for a long time. One discerns that ‘If I were to direct equanimity as pure and bright as this toward the dimension of the infinitude of consciousness… the dimension of nothingness… the dimension of neither perception nor non-perception, I would develop the mind along those lines, and thus this equanimity of mine — thus supported, thus sustained — would last for a long time.’

“One discerns that ‘If I were to direct equanimity as pure & bright as this towards the dimension of the infinitude of space and to develop the mind along those lines, that would be fabricated. One discerns that ‘If I were to direct equanimity as pure and bright as this towards the dimension of the infinitude of consciousness… the dimension of nothingness… the dimension of neither perception nor non-perception and to develop the mind along those lines, that would be fabricated.’ One neither fabricates nor mentally fashions for the sake of becoming or un-becoming. This being the case, one is not sustained by anything in the world (does not cling to anything in the world). Unsustained, one is not agitated. Unagitated, one is totally unbound right within. One discerns that ‘Birth is ended, the holy life fulfilled, the task done. There is nothing further for this world.’

“Sensing a feeling of pleasure, one discerns that it is fleeting, not grasped at, not relished. Sensing a feeling of pain… Sensing a feeling of neither pleasure nor pain, one discerns that it is fleeting, not grasped at, not relished. Sensing a feeling of pleasure, one senses it disjoined from it. Sensing a feeling of pain… Sensing a feeling of neither pleasure nor pain, one senses it disjoined from it. When sensing a feeling limited to the body, one discerns that ‘I am sensing a feeling limited to the body.’ When sensing a feeling limited to life, one discerns that ‘I am sensing a feeling limited to life.’ One discerns that ‘With the break-up of the body, after the termination of life, all that is sensed, not being relished, will grow cold right here.’

“Just as an oil lamp burns in dependence on oil & wick; and from the termination of the oil & wick — and from not being provided any other sustenance — it goes out unnourished; even so, when sensing a feeling limited to the body, one discerns that ‘I am sensing a feeling limited to the body.’ When sensing a feeling limited to life, one discerns that ‘I am sensing a feeling limited to life.’ One discerns that ‘With the break-up of the body, after the termination of life, all that is sensed, not being relished, will grow cold right here.’

“Thus a monk so endowed is endowed with the highest determination for discernment, for this — the knowledge of the passing away of all suffering & stress — is the highest noble discernment.

“His release, being founded on truth, does not fluctuate, for whatever is deceptive is false; Unbinding — the undeceptive — is true. Thus a monk so endowed is endowed with the highest determination for truth, for this — Unbinding, the undeceptive — is the highest noble truth.

“Whereas formerly he foolishly had taken on mental acquisitions and brought them to completion, he has now abandoned them, their root destroyed, made like a palmyra stump, deprived of the conditions of development, not destined for future arising. Thus a monk so endowed is endowed with the highest determination for relinquishment, for this — the renunciation of all mental acquisitions — is the highest noble relinquishment.

“Whereas formerly he foolishly had greed — as well as desire & infatuation — he has now abandoned them, their root destroyed made like a palmyra stump, deprived of the conditions of development, not destined for future arising. Whereas formerly he foolishly had malice — as well as ill-will & hatred — he has now abandoned them… Whereas formerly he foolishly had ignorance — as well as delusion & confusion — he has now abandoned them, their root destroyed made like a palmyra stump, deprived of the conditions of development, not destined for future arising. Thus a monk so endowed is endowed with the highest determination for calm, for this — the calming of passions, aversions, & delusions — is the highest noble calm. ‘One should not be negligent of discernment, should guard the truth, be devoted to relinquishment, and train only for calm.’ Thus was it said, and in reference to this was it said.

“‘He has been stilled where the currents of construing do not flow. And when the currents of construing do not flow, he is said to be a sage at peace.’ Thus was it said. With reference to what was it said? ‘I am’ is a construing. ‘I am this’ is a construing. ‘I shall be’ is a construing. ‘I shall not be’… ‘I shall be possessed of form’… ‘I shall not be possessed of form’… ‘I shall be percipient’… ‘I shall not be percipient’… ‘I shall be neither percipient nor non-percipient’ is a construing. Construing is a disease, construing is a cancer, construing is an arrow. By going beyond all construing, he is said to be a sage at peace.

“Furthermore, a sage at peace is not born, does not age, does not die, is unagitated, and is free from longing. He has nothing whereby he would be born. Not being born, will he age? Not aging, will he die? Not dying, will he be agitated? Not being agitated, for what will he long? It was in reference to this that it was said, ‘He has been stilled where the currents of construing do not flow. And when the currents of construing do not flow, he is said to be a sage at peace.’ Now, monk, you should remember this, my brief analysis of the six properties.”

Then the thought occurred to Ven. Pukkusati: “Surely, the Teacher has come to me! Surely, the One Well-gone has come to me! Surely, the Rightly Self-awakened One has come to me!” Getting up from his seat, arranging his upper robe over one shoulder, and bowing down with his head at the Blessed One’s feet, he said, “A transgression has overcome me, lord, in that I was so foolish, so muddle-headed, and so unskilled as to assume that it was proper to address the Blessed One as ‘friend.’ May the Blessed One please accept this confession of my transgression as such, so that I may achieve restraint in the future.”

“Yes, monk, a transgression overcame you in that you were so foolish, so muddle-headed, and so unskilled as to assume that it was proper to address me as ‘friend.’ But because you see your transgression as such and make amends in accordance with the Dhamma, we accept your confession. For it is a cause of growth in the Dhamma & Discipline of the noble ones when, seeing a transgression as such, one makes amends in accordance with the Dhamma and achieves restraint in the future.”

“Lord, may I receive full acceptance (ordination as a monk) from the Blessed One?”

“And are your robes & bowl complete?”

“No, lord, my robes & bowl are not complete.”

“Tathagatas do not give full acceptance to one whose robes & bowl are not complete.”

Then Ven. Pukkusati, delighting & rejoicing in the Blessed One’s words, got up from his seat, bowed down to the Blessed One and, keeping him on his right, left in search of robes and a bowl. And while he was searching for robes & a bowl, a runaway cow killed him.

Then a large number of monks approached the Blessed One and, on arrival, having bowed down to him, sat to one side. As they were sitting there, they said to the Blessed One, “Lord, the clansman Pukkusati, whom the Blessed One instructed with a brief instruction, has died. What is his destination? What is his future state?”

“Monks, the clansman Pukkusati was wise. He practiced the Dhamma in accordance with the Dhamma and did not pester me with issues related to the Dhamma. With the destruction of the first five fetters, he has arisen spontaneously [in the Pure Abodes], there to be totally unbound, never again to return from that world.”

That is what the Blessed One said. Gratified, the monks delighted in the Blessed One’s words.

MN 106.

 

POLITICS is Sacred with GOOD GOVERNANCE

 

Buddhism and Politics

The Buddha had gone beyond all worldly affairs, but still gave advice on good government.

The Buddha came from a warrior caste and was naturally brought into association with kings, princes and ministers. Despite His origin and association, He never resorted to the influence of political power to introduce His teaching, nor allowed His Teaching to be misused for gaining political power. But today, many politicians try to drag the Buddha’s name into politics by introducing Him as a communist, capitalist, or even an imperialist. They have forgotten that the new political philosophy as we know it really developed in the West long after the Buddha’s time. Those who try to make use of the good name of the Buddha for their own personal advantage must remember that the Buddha was the Supremely Awakened One who had gone beyond all worldly concerns.

There is an inherent problem of trying to intermingle religion with politics. The basis of religion is morality, purity and faith, while that for politics is power. In the course of history, religion has often been used to give legitimacy to those in power and their exercise of that power. Religion was used to justify wars and conquests, persecutions, atrocities, rebellions, destruction of works of art and culture.

When religion is used to pander to political whims, it has to forego its high moral ideals and become debased by worldly political demands.

The thrust of the Buddha Dhamma is not directed to the creation of new political institutions and establishing political arrangements. Basically, it seeks to approach the problems of society by reforming the individuals constituting that society and by suggesting some general principles through which the society can be guided towards greater humanism, improved welfare of its members, and more equitable sharing of resources.

There is a limit to the extent to which a political system can safeguard the happiness and prosperity of its people. No political system, no matter how ideal it may appear to be, can bring about peace and happiness as long as the people in the system are dominated by greed, hatred and delusion. In addition, no matter what political system is adopted, there are certain universal factors which the members of that society will have to experience: the effects of good and bad kamma, the lack of real satisfaction or everlasting happiness in the world characterized by dukkha (unsatisfactoriness),anicca (impermanence), and anatta (egolessness). To the Buddhist, nowhere in Samsara is therereal freedom, not even in the heavens or the world of Brahama.

Although a good and just political system which guarantees basic human rights and contains checks and balances to the use of power is an important condition for a happy in society, people should not fritter away their time by endlessly searching for the ultimate political system where men can be completely free, because complete freedom cannot be found in any system but only in minds which are free. To be free, people will have to look within their own minds and work towards freeing themselves from the chains of ignorance and craving. Freedom in the truest sense is only possible when a person uses Dhamma to develop his character through good speech and action and to train his mind so as to expand his mental potential and achieve his ultimate aim of enlightenment.

While recognizing the usefulness of separating religion from politics and the limitations of political systems in bringing about peace and happiness, there are several aspects of the Buddha’s teaching which have close correspondence to the political arrangements of the present day. Firstly, the Buddha spoke about the equality of all human beings long before Abraham Lincoln, and that classes and castes are artificial barriers erected by society. The only classification of human beings, according to the Buddha, is based on the quality of their moral conduct. Secondly, the Buddha encouraged the spirit of social -co-operation and active participation in society. This spirit is actively promoted in the political process of modern societies. Thirdly, since no one was appointed as the Buddha’s successor, the members of the Order were to be guided by the Dhamma and Vinaya, or in short, the Rule of Law. Until today very member of the Sangha is to abide by the Rule of Law which governs and guides their conduct.

Fourthly, the Buddha encouraged the spirit of consultation and the democratic process. This is shown within the community of the Order in which all members have the right to decide on matters of general concern. When a serious question arose demanding attention, the issues were put before the monks and discussed in a manner similar to the democratic parliamentary system used today. This self-governing procedure may come as a surprise to many to learn that in the assemblies of Buddhists in India 2,500 years and more ago are to be found the rudiments of the parliamentary practice of the present day. A special officer similar to ‘Mr. Speaker’ was appointed to preserve the dignity of the Parliamentary Chief Whip, was also appointed to see if the quorum was secured. Matters were put forward in the form of a motion which was open to discussion. In some cases it was done once, in others three times, thus anticipating the practice of Parliament in requiring that a bill be read a third time before it becomes law. If the discussion showed a difference of opinion, it was to be settled by the vote of the majority through balloting.

The Buddhist approach to political power is the moralization and the responsible use of public power. The Buddha preached non-violence and peace as a universal message. He did not approve of violence or the destruction of life, and declared that there is no such thing as a ‘just’ war. He taught: ‘The victor breeds hatred, the defeated lives in misery. He who renounces both victory and defeat is happy and peaceful.’ Not only did the Buddha teach non-violence and peace, He was perhaps the first and only religious teacher who went to the battlefield personally to prevent the outbreak of a war. He diffused tension between the Sakyas and the Koliyas who were about to wage war over the waters of Rohini. He also dissuaded King Ajatasattu from attacking the Kingdom of the Vajjis.

The Buddha discussed the importance and the prerequisites of a good government. He showed how the country could become corrupt, degenerate and unhappy when the head of the government becomes corrupt and unjust. He spoke against corruption and how a government should act based on humanitarian principles.

The Buddha once said, ‘When the ruler of a country is just and good, the ministers become just and good; when the ministers are just and good, the higher officials become just and good; when the higher officials are just and good, the rank and file become just and good; when the rank and file become just and good, the people become just and good.’(Anguttara Nikaya)

In the Cakkavatti Sihananda Sutta, the Buddha said that immorality and crime, such as theft, falsehood, violence, hatred, cruelty, could arise from poverty. Kings and governments may try to suppress crime through punishment, but it is futile to eradicate crimes through force.

In the Kutadanta Sutta, the Buddha suggested economic development instead of force to reduce crime. The government should use the country’s resources to improve the economic conditions of the country. It could embark on agricultural and rural development, provide financial support to entrepreneurs and business, provide adequate wages for workers to maintain a decent life with human dignity.

In the Jataka, the Buddha had given to rules for Good Government, known as ‘Dasa Raja Dharma’. These ten rules can be applied even today by any government which wishes to rule the country peacefully. The rules are as follows:

1) be liberal and avoid selfishness,


2) maintain a high moral character,


3) be prepared to sacrifice one’s own pleasure for the well-being of the subjects,


4) be honest and maintain absolute integrity,


5) be kind and gentle,


6) lead a simple life for the subjects to emulate,


7) be free from hatred of any kind,


8) exercise non-violence,


9) practise patience, and


10) respect public opinion to promote peace and harmony.

Regarding the behavior of rulers, He further advised:

- A good ruler should act impartially and should not be biased and discriminate between one particular group of subjects against another.

- A good ruler should not harbor any form of hatred against any of his subjects.

- A good ruler should show no fear whatsoever in the enforcement of the law, if it is justifiable.

- A good ruler must possess a clear understanding of the law to be enforced. It should not be enforced just because the ruler has the authority to enforce the law. It must be done in a reasonable manner and with common sense. — (Cakkavatti Sihananda Sutta)

In the Milinda Panha,it is stated: ‘If a man, who is unfit, incompetent, immoral, improper, unable and unworthy of kingship, has enthroned himself a king or a ruler with great authority, he is subject to be tortured‚ to be subject to a variety of punishment by the people, because, being unfit and unworthy, he has placed himself unrighteously in the seat of sovereignty. The ruler, like others who violate and transgress moral codes and basic rules of all social laws of mankind, is equally subject to punishment; and moreover, to be censured is the ruler who conducts himself as a robber of the public.’ In a Jataka story, it is mentioned that a ruler who punishes innocent people and does not punish the culprit is not suitable to rule a country.

The king always improves himself and carefully examines his own conduct in deeds, words and thoughts, trying to discover and listen to public opinion as to whether or not he had been guilty of any faults and mistakes in ruling the kingdom. If it is found that he rules unrighteously, the public will complain that they are ruined by the wicked ruler with unjust treatment, punishment, taxation, or other oppressions including corruption of any kind, and they will react against him in one way or another. On the contrary, if he rules righteously they will bless him: ‘Long live His Majesty.’(Majjhima Nikaya)

The Buddha’semphasis on the moral duty of a ruler to use public power to improve the welfare of the people had inspired Emperor Asoka in the Third Century B.C. to do likewise. Emperor Asoka, a sparkling example of this principle, resolved to live according to and preach the Dhamma and to serve his subjects and all humanity. He declared his non-aggressive intentions to his neighbors, assuring them of his goodwill and sending envoys to distant kings bearing his message of peace and non-aggression. He promoted the energetic practice of the socio-moral virtues of honesty, truthfulness, compassion, benevolence, non-violence, considerate behavior towards all, non-extravagance, non-acquisitiveness, and non-injury to animals. He encouraged religious freedom and mutual respect for each other’s creed. He went on periodic tours preaching the Dhamma to the rural people. He undertook works of public utility, such as founding of hospitals for men and animals, supplying of medicine, planting of roadside trees and groves, digging of wells, and construction of watering sheds and rest houses. He expressly forbade cruelty to animals.

Sometimes the Buddha is said to be a social reformer. Among other things, He condemned the caste system, recognized the equality of people, spoke on the need to improve socio-economic conditions, recognized the importance of a more equitable distribution of wealth among the rich and the poor, raised the status of women, recommended the incorporation of humanism in government and administration, and taught that a society should not be run by greed but with consideration and compassion for the people. Despite all these, His contribution to mankind is much greater because He took off at a point which no other social reformer before or ever since had done, that is, by going to the deepest roots of human ill which are found in the human mind. It is only in the human mind that true reform can be effected. Reforms imposed by force upon the external world have a very short life because they have no roots. But those reforms which spring as a result of the transformation of man’s inner consciousness remain rooted. While their branches spread outwards, they draw their nourishment from an unfailing source — the subconscious imperatives of the life-stream itself. So reforms come about when men’s minds have prepared the way for them, and they live as long as men revitalize them out of their own love of truth, justice and their fellow men.

The doctrine preached by the Buddha is not one based on ‘Political Philosophy’. Nor is it a doctrine that encourages men to worldly pleasures. It sets out a way to attain Nibbana. In other words, its ultimate aim is to put an end to craving (Tanha) that keeps them in bondage to this world. A stanza from the Dhammapada best summarizes this statement: ‘The path that leads to worldly gain is one, and the path that leads to Nibbana(by leading a religious life)is another.’

However, this does not mean that Buddhists cannot or should not get involved in the political process, which is a social reality. The lives of the members of a society are shaped by laws and regulations, economic arrangements allowed within a country, institutional arrangements, which are influenced by the political arrangements of that society. Nevertheless, if a Buddhist wishes to be involved in politics, he should not misuse religion to gain political powers, nor is it advisable for those who have renounced the worldly life to lead a pure, religious life to be actively involved in politics.

-ooOoo-

 

 

Press Information Bureau

(C.M. Information Campus)

Information & Public Relations Department, U.P.

Hon’ble Chief Minister ji decides to implement ambitious Manyawar Sri Kanshiram ji Shahri SC/ST Bahulya Basti Samgra Vikas Yojana to improve living conditions of these dwellings

About Rs. 2000 crore to be spent on the scheme

250 SC/ST dominated urban bastis to be selected in descending order

Lucknow : 11 March 2011

The Hon’ble Chief Minister of Uttar Pradesh Ms. Mayawati ji, with

a view to improving the living conditions of the SC/ST dominated bastis

of urban areas, has decided to implement Manyawar Sri Kanshiram ji

Shahri SC/ST Bahulya Basti Samgra Vikas Yojana. About Rs. 2000 crore

would be spent under this scheme.

Giving this information here today, the Cabinet Secretary Mr.

Shashank Shekhar Singh said that during the surprise inspection

conducted by the Hon’ble Chief Minister ji recently, she felt that the

urban dalits and poor had not got their dues so far. He said that the

Hon’ble Chief Minister ji from time to time has repeated that the SC/STs,

backwards and other deprived sections had been totally ignored for

centuries under the unequal social system prevalent in the country,

but under the Indian Constitution, framed by Baba Saheb Dr. Bhimrao

Ambedkar, these sections got legal rights to get the benefit of

development for the first time.

The Cabinet Secretary said that the Hon’ble Chief Minister ji

giving serious thought to the poor condition of the SC/STs and other

deprived sections, at first decided to implement Dr. Ambedkar Gram

Sabha Vikas Yojana for the all-round development of SC/ST dominated

villages of the State. Several development schemes were being

implemented under this scheme in the rural areas.

Likewise, the Hon’ble Chief Minister ji decided to implement

various schemes like Manyawar Sri Kanshiram ji Shahri Samgra Vikas

Yojana, Sarvjan Hitay Shahri Garib Makan (Slum area) Malikana Haq

Yojana and Manyawar Sri Kanshiram ji Shahri Garib Avas Yojana for

the benefit of SC/STs residing in urban areas. He said that the Hon’ble

U.P. Chief Minister ji is the only Chief Minister of the Country who has

conducted surprise inspection of all the districts of the State.

The Cabinet Secretary said that under the scheme these bastis

would be saturated with all the 18 programmes in a phased and timely

manner. He said that the master plan of the selected bastis would be

prepared by the Chief Town Planner. Under the scheme, 250 SC/ST

dominated urban bastis would be selected which had 50 per cent or

above SC/ST population in a descending order during the first phase. A

provision of Rs. 3 crore has been made for C.C. roads only for the

bastis falling within the limits of Nagar Nigam areas. The selection of

the bastis would be made by the committee headed by DM/Division

Commissioner.

Mr. Singh said that the review of the financial and physical

progress of various programmes to be implemented under the

schemes would be made at division and district level on regular basis.

He said that these bastis would also be benefited by various schemes

and facilities being implemented previously. He said that under the

scheme, facilities like drinking water supply, sewerage, drains, solid

waste management (waste management), construction of C.C. roads

and closed drains in selected SC/ST bastis, electrification/street lighting

etc would be provided. Besides, these bastis would also be covered by

various pension schemes like, old age pension, family benefit scheme,

aid to destitute widows and disabled pension. Moreover, mother and

child welfare health centres would also be set up and various health

schemes which include setting up of health centres, vaccination,

mother and child welfare, birth-death registration, blindness control,

T.B. control and leprosy eradication programme etc. would also be

implemented. He said that primary schools would also be set up in the

selected bastis and students belonging to SC/ST, backward caste,

minorities, general category and disabled students would be covered

under the scholarship scheme. He said that the eligible persons would

be provided ration cards and housing facilities. Besides, the eligible

persons would also be covered under employment schemes like Swarn

Jayanti Shahri Rozgar Yojana, Pradhan Mantri Rozgar Yojana, Saghan

Mini Dairy Yojana (wherever applicable), Khadi Gramodyog, minorities,

backward classes and SC/ST employment programmes. They would

also be benefited by Swachchhkar Vimukti Yojana. Besides, community

centres would also be constructed and beautification of parks would

also be undertaken. Moreover, schemes like Savitri Bai Phule Shiksha

Madad Yojana, U.P. Mukhyamantri Mahamaya Garib Arthik Madad

Yojana and Mahamaya Garib Balika Ashirwad Yojana would also be

implemented.

******

 

MAHA BODHI SOCIETY BENGALURU, INDIA

DHAMMAPADA FESTIVAL

90TH Birthday Celebration of

Venerable Acharya Buddharakkhita

12-20 March 2011

17th March 2011 Thursday

9:00 AM to 11:00 AM and 2:0 PM to 4:00 PM

Practice of Paritta Chanting

4:00 PM Hospital Dana Service at

Kidwai Cancer Hospital

Hosur Road, bengaluru

5:30 PM Dhamma Discourse at Maha Bodhi Society

 

VOICE OF SARVAJAN HONEYLEAKS

How To Help Japan: Earthquake Relief Options

On March 11, 2011, a huge
8.9 earthquake and subsequent tsunami hit Japan, causing widespread destruction.

President Obama has already released a statement sending “deepest condolences”

and promising support to the stricken country.

“The United States stands ready to help the Japanese people in this time of
great trial.”

Additionally, many organizations and funds have mobilized to provide relief to

those affected by the disaster.

In response to the quake, The Red Cross has already launched efforts in Japan.

Visit Redcross.org or text REDCROSS to 90999 to donate $10 from your phone. < ?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = “urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office” /> 

Save the Children has also responded.


Eiichi Sadamatsu of the organization released a statement, saying:

“We are extremely concerned for the welfare of children and their families
who have been affected by the disaster. We stand ready to meet the needs
of children who are always the most vulnerable in a disaster.”

The organization is currently organizing efforts and

donations to its Children’s Emergency Fund will support outreach. 

International Medical Corps is responding to the health needs of the disaster’s

victims. Nancy Aossey, President & CEO, International Medical Corps said in a statement:

“We are putting together relief teams, as well as supplies, and are in
contact with partners in Japan and other affected countries to assess
needs and coordinate our activities.”

Story continues below

To donate or learn about other ways you can contribute to its medical response,

visit Internationalmedicalcorps.org. Also, text MED to 80888 from any mobile phone

to give $10. 

The Japan Earthquake and Tsunami Relief Fund was launched at

GlobalGiving.org to garner funds that will be given to a variety of relief organizations

helping victims of the earthquake. It has already raised over $100,000, particularly

from concerned Twitter users around the world.  

The project page explains:

We are working with International Medical Corps, Save the Children,
and other organizations on the ground to provide support.
Our partners on the ground are working hard to provide immediate relief.

Salvation Army personnel are organizing efforts in Tokyo and

will soon send a team to help the severely damaged city of Sendai, Japan.

To contribute to earthquake relief, text ‘JAPAN’ or ‘QUAKE’ to 80888 to make

a $10 donation or visit SalvationArmyUSA.org 

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is

sending two three-person teams to the Iwate and Miyagi prefectures in Japan.

To learn more about the organization’s efforts or make a donation,

visit Doctorswithoutborders.org.

Other relief organizations are also sending representatives to disaster sites,

including AmeriCare and Shelterbox.


MercyCorps is gathering donations for its overseas partner, Peace Winds Japan,

which currently has personnel on the ground distributing emergency relief in Japan.

Along with an appeal for monetary donations,

Operation USA has also announced efforts to collect bulk corporate donations

of health care supplies. If you are interested in donating bulk medical items,

visit OpUSA.org 

On March 15, the International Fund for Animal Welfare will be deploying

a team to assess needs regarding animal rescue. Dick Green, the organization’s

emergency relief manager for disasters, wrote on IFAW’s blog:

“As we saw most recently in Haiti, major disasters require long-term
planning and a concerted effort between NGO and governmental ranks
to ensure that the greatest number of animals and humans benefit
from the intervention.”

They are encouraging support through donations, which will be used to buy pet food,

veterinary supplies, vaccines and other necessities for animals needing help.  

For any who have loved ones abroad, Google has stepped up to help.

Along with a tsunami alert posted on its front page, Google has launched the

Person Finder: 2011 Japan Earthquake to help connect people that may have

been displaced due to the disaster.

Google has also launched a crisis response page filled with local resources

and emergency information.

Judy Chang, head of PayPal’s nonprofit group, announced that transactional fees

incurred by money transfers to US 501(c)(3) organizations (or charities registered

with the Canada Revenue Agency) between March 11 and April 10 will aid

relief efforts in Japan.

World Vision has announced global mobilization in response to tsunami warnings.

Geoff Shepherd, the organization’s humanitarian and emergency affairs director

for the Asia-Pacific region, released a statement on World Vision’s website, saying:

“We’ve also alerted our Global Rapid Response Team and have put team members
on standby for possible deployment to affected areas. This could be a very serious
disaster in multiple countries and our staff are prepared to respond.”

Let’s show some gratitude towards humanity.


Best Regards,
Jay Shah, FRM

—————————————————-
Your comments and feedbacks always welcome
at 
Cybugle@yahoo.com  as well as atbruntno1@yahoo.com
———— ——— ——— ———————-

Working for God on earth does not pay much,  
but His
Retirement plan is out of this world.

Help someone have a nice day,

visit www.thehungersite. com

With best wishes,


Along with the  relief options

Practice of Paritta Chanting

May we chant Maha Paritta Chantings for safety of all

http://www.thisismyanmar.com/nibbana/mahapri1.htm

 

THE TEXT OF GREAT PROTECTION

Mingun Sayadaw (Recitation), Sao H H Win (Text) & DPPS (Myanmar Text)

TEXTS (Romanised Pali, Translation in English & Burmese), AUDIO in Burmese

For Individual Paritta

1.

Invocation / 
Mangala Sutta

2.

Ratana 
Sutta

3.

Metta 
Sutta

4.

Khandha
Sutta

5.

Mora 
Sutta

6.

Vatta 
Sutta

7.

Dhajagga
Sutta

8.

Atanatiya
Sutta

9.

Angulimala 
Sutta

10

Bojjhanga 
Sutta

11

Pubbanha
Sutta



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Maha Parittas (External Site)



Paritta Chanting by Sayadaw U Pandita - Penang


 

INVOCATION AND PRAYER

Paritta-parikamma




1.


Samanta cakkavalesu, atragacchantu devata,

saddhammam munirajassa, sunantu saggamokkhadam




2.


dhammassavanakalo ayam bhadanta,

dhammassavanakalo ayam bhadanta,

dhammassavanakalo ayam bhadanta.




3.


namo tassa bhagavato arahato sammasambuddhassa.




4.


ye santa santacita, tisaranasarana, ettha lokantareva,

bhumabhuma ca deva, gunaganagahana byavata sabbakalam.

ete ayantu deva varakanakamaye meruraje vasanto,

santo santosahetum munivaravacanam sotumaggam samagga

5.


sabbesu cakkavalesu yakkha deva ca brahmano;

yam amhehi katam punnam sabbasampattisadhakam.




6.


sabbe tam anumoditva samagga sasane rata

pamadarahita hontu arakkhasu visesato.




7.


sasanassa ca lokassa vuddhi bhavatu sabbada;

sasanampi ca lokanca deva rakkhantu sabbada.




8.


saddhim hontu sukhi sabbe parivarehi attano;

anigha sumana hontu saha sabbehi natibhi,




9.


rajato va corato va

manussato va amanussato va

aggito va udakato va

pisacato va khanukato va

kandakato va nakkhattato va

janapadarogato va asaddhammato va

asanditthito va asappurisato va

canda-hatthi-assa-miga-gona-kukkura ahi-vicchikka-manisappa-dipi-accha

taraccha-sukara-mahimsa-yakkha-rakkhasadihi

nanabhayato va nanarogato va

nanaupaddavato va arakkham ganhantu.

MANGALA SUTTA

uyyojanna

10.


yam mangalam dvadassahi cintayimsu sadevaka

sotthanam nadhigacchanti atha tim sanca mangalam.




11.


desitam devadevena sabbapapa vinasanam

sabbaloka hitatthaya mangalam tam bhanama he.




12.


evam me sutam: Ekam samayam bhagava Savatthiyam

viharati Jetavane Anathapindi kassa arame.

atha kho annatara devata abhikkantaya rattiya

abhikkanta vanna kevalakappam Jetavanam Obhasetva.

Yena Bhagava tenupasankami

upasankamitva bhagavantam abhiva detva ekamantam atthasi.

ekamantam thita kho sadevata bhagavantam gathaya ajjhabhasi:




13.


bahu deva manussaca mangalani acintayum

akan khamana sotthanam byuhi mangalamuttamam.




14.


asevana ca balanam panditanan ca sevana

puja ca pujaneyyanam etam mangalamuttamam




15.


patirupadesavaso ca pubbeca katapunnata

attasammapanidhi ca etam mangalamuttamam.




16.


bahusaccana sippanca vinayo ca susikkhito

subhasita ca ya vaca etam mangalamuttamam.




17.


matapitu uptthanam puttadarassa sangaho

anakula ca kammanta etam mangalamuttamam.




18


dananca dhammacariyaca natakananca sangaho

anavajjani kammani etam mangalamuttamam.




19


arati viratipapa majjapana ca samyamo

appamado ca dhammesu etam mangalamuttamam.




20.


garavo ca nivato ca santutthi ca katannuta

kalena dhammasavanam etam mangalamuttamam




21.


khanti ca sovacassata samananan ca dassanam

kalena dhammasakaccha etam mangalamuttamam.




22.


tapo ca brahmacariyanca ariyasaccana dassanam

nibbana sacchikiriya ca etam mangalamuttamam




23.


phutthassa lokadhammehi cittam yassa na kampati

asokam virajam khemam etam mangalamuttamam




24.


etadisani katvana sabbattha maparajita

sabbattha sotthim gacchanti tam tesam mangalamuttamam

MAHA PARITTA PALI

THE TEXT OF GREAT PROTECTION

    May veneration be dedicated to Him, the Almighty, the Most Infallible, and the Self-enlightened Supreme Buddha. Invocation and Prayer

Invocation of the Prayer

1.

    O deities, who are residing in the environs of various (ten thousand) universes, may you come here to this place, and listen to the sacred doctrine of the Lord of Sages, which can yield the divine bliss and perfect emancipation.

2.

    O deities, this is the right time to listen to the doctrine.

3.

    May our veneration be dedicated to Him, the Almighty, the Most Infallible, and the Self-enlightened Supreme Buddha.

4.

    Those who are tranquil and peaceful in mind, who have taken refuge in the three holy creeds, here in this world or in other spheres;

    the deities of terrestrial and celestial, who always are anxious to accrue the accumulation of merits.

    Those deities (and the King of gods) who are residing on royal Meru, the majestic golden mountain,

    and all those virtuous ones may come here in unity to listen to the noble words of the Great Sage, which are the root cause of contentment.

5.

    The demons, the deities, and the Brahma - gods in all universes.

    (may rejoice, in) whichever meritorious deeds we have done for the accomplishment of all enjoyments.

6.

    Having rejoiced in this sharing of merit, may all be comfortable and unanimous in His Teachings.

    May all be free from negligence especially in the duties of protection.

7.

    May there always be prosperity in the religions as well as in the world.

    May the deities always guard the religion as well as the world.

8.

    May all of you together with your own ( fellow ) retinues be happy.

    May you together with all of your relative be painless and joyful.

9.

    May you take care in protecting from the dangers of tyrants, robbers, human enemies, inhuman beings, conflagration, flood, demons, tree-stumps, thorns, evil planets, village diseases, law-breakers, heretics, impious men, and of dangers from the wild elephants, horses, beasts, bulls, dogs, serpents, scorpions, copper-head snakes, panthers, bears, hyenas, boars, buffaloes, ogres, devils, etc.

    and also of dangers from various fears, various diseases and various disasters.

1. MANGALA SUTTA

   The Mangala Sutta is sometimes highly esteemed by the Burman as Mahamangala Sutta - the Discourse on Great Auspices.

   It is alleged to have been expounded by Lord Buddha when requested by a certain deity to explain to him what the ideal auspices really might be. Eventually the Lord elaborated thirty eight items of auspices which are to be approved as supreme. This discourse is the first and most famous of eleven paritta suttas prescribed in Burmese Buddhism. The fifteen stanzas of the text in Pali are learnt by heart and recited not only for protection from dangers, but as a mean to attain every problematic end in view of worldly affairs and supramundane realizations.

   It has been usually chanted by the monks soon after they are honoured and served formally or informally by the lay devotees. And the faithful Buddhists believe that having listened to the recital of this discourse of Auspices, they would be undefeated in every respect, and would go in safety every where, now and forever - from here to eternity.

   This Sutta composed of fifteen stanzas, is the eminent generator of the Burmese spirit. It exhorts the social ethics and delivers the guiding principles which every Burman Buddhist shall observe in different stages of his daily life career.

MANGALA*-SUTTA

DISCOURSE ON AUSPICES

Introduction

10.

   The meaning of the term “Auspice” had been speculated by gods and men for twelve years;

   however they could not acquire the actual meaning of it. So, the discourse on thirty-eight auspices

11.

   which can eradicate all sins and evils, was expounded by the Supreme Deity (Buddha)

   for the benefit and welfare of the entire world. Oh thou! Let us recite this discourse on the Auspices now.

12.

   Thus have I heard: On one occasion the Glorious Lord was dwelling near Savatthi at the Jeta’s grove in the pleasaunce of Anathapindika.

   Thereupon a certain deity

   whose surpassing radiance illuminating the entire Jeta grove,

   approached the Glorious Lord quite late at night. He respect fully saluted the Lord and stood at one side. And so standing, he addressed the Glorious One in verse thus.

13.

   Many gods and men yearning for happiness have speculated about the problem of Auspices.

   Please explain to me what supreme Auspices really are.

14.

   Not to associate with the foolish (1) but to associate with the wise (2);

   and to honour those worthy of honour (3)-

   -this is the auspice supreme.

15.

   To dwell in suitable locality (4) to be endowed with merits accrued in the past (5)

   and to establish oneself rightfully (6)

   -this is the auspice supreme.

16.

   To have immensity of knowledge (7); to acquire skill in sciences (8) to be well-trained in discipline (9);

   and to have words well spoken (10)

   -this is the auspice supreme.

17.

   To serve thy parents (11); to support thy wife and children (12);

   to be engaged in peaceful occupations (13)

   -this is the auspice supreme.

18.

   Generosity (14); lawful-conduct (15); to support thy relatives (16);

   and to perform faultless actions (17)

   -this is the auspice supreme.

19.

   To abstain from evil (l8); to refrain from sin (19): to restrain from intoxicating drinks (20);

   and to be diligent in Laws (21)

   -this is the auspice supreme.

20.

   Reverence (22); modesty (23); contentment (24); gratitude towards

   the grateful (25);

   timely audition of the doctrines (26)

    -this is the auspice supreme.

21.

   Patience (27); obedience (28); to visit the monks (29);

   and the timely discussions of the doctrines (30)

   -this is the auspice supreme.

22.

   Ascetic practices (31); chastity (32); to discern the noble - truths (33); to realize the Nibbana. (34)

    -this is the auspice supreme.

23.

   The mind which is touched by the (eight) vicissitudes of life does not move (35):

   be free from anxiety (36); be stainlessly pure (37); and be perfectly secure (38)

   -this is the auspice supreme.

24.

   Those who have done suchlike auspices are unvanquished (successful) everywhere,

   and attain bliss (happiness) everywhere. To them these are the auspices. supreme.

   Here ends the Mangala Sutta, the Discourse on Auspices.


   * Mangala=Auspice; Good Omen; Luck; Blessing Beatitude; Fortune.


   The Minor Readings; P.T.S. tr. Bhikkhu Nanamoli;
   Luzac and Co. Ltd. London, 1960. pp.2-4.

   The Good Omen Discourse.
   The Illustrator of Ultimate Meaning: P.T.S. Chapter V. pp. 94-172.

The Significance of Paritta Chanting

Paritta chanting is the recital of some of the Sutras uttered by the Buddha in the Pali language for the blessing and protection of the devotees.

Paritta Chanting or Sutra Chanting is a well-known Buddhist practice conducted all over the world, especially in Theravada Buddhist countries where the Pali language is used for recitals. Many of these are important sutras from the basic teachings of the Buddha which were selected by His disciples. Originally, these sutras were recorded on ola leaves about two thousand years ago. Later, they were compiled into a book known as the ‘Paritta Chanting Book’. The names of the original books from which these sutras were selected are the Anguttara Nikaya, Majjhima Nikaya, Digha Nikaya, Samyutta Nikaya and Kuddaka Nikaya in the Sutra Pitaka.

The sutras that Buddhists recite for protection are known as Paritta Chanting. Here ‘protection’ means shielding ourselves from various forms of evil spirits, misfortune, sickness and influence of the planetary systems as well as instilling confidence in the mind. The vibrant sound of the chanting creates a very pleasing atmosphere in the vicinity. The rhythm of the chanting is also important. One might have noticed that when monks recite these sutras, different intonations are adopted to harmonize with different sutras intended for different quarters. It was found very early during man’s spiritual development that certain rhythms of the human voice could produce significant psychological states of peacefulness and serenity in the minds of ardent listeners. Furthermore, intonation at certain levels would appeal to devas, whilst certain rhythms would created a good influence over lower beings like animals, snakes, or even spirits or ghosts. Therefore, a soothing and correct rhythm is an important aspect of Paritta Chanting.

The use of these rhythms is not confined to Buddhism alone. In every religion, when the followers recite their prayers by using the holy books, they follow certain rhythms. We can observe this when we listen to Quran reading by Muslims and the Veda Mantra Chanting by Hindu priests in the Sanskrit language. Some lovely chanting is also carried out by certain Christian groups, especially the Roman Catholic and Greek orthodox sects.

When the sutras are chanted, three great and powerful forces are activated. These are the forces of the Buddha, Dhamma and the Sangha. Buddhism is the combination of these ‘Three Jewels’ and when invoked together they can bring great blessing to mankind:

The Buddha. He had cultivated all the great virtues, wisdom and enlightenment, developed His spiritual power and gave us His noble Teachings. Even though the physical presence of the Teacher is no more with us, His Teachings have remained for the benefit of mankind. Similarly, the man who discovered electricity is no more with us, yet by using his knowledge, the effect of his wisdom still remains. The illumination that we enjoy today is the result of his wisdom. The scientists who discovered atomic energy are no longer living, but the knowledge to use it remains with us. Likewise the Noble Teachings given us through the Buddha’s wisdom and enlightenment, are a most effective power for people to draw inspiration from. When you remember Him and respect Him, you develop confidence in Him. When you recite or listen to the words uttered by Him, you invoke the power of His blessings.

The Dhamma. It is the power of truth, justice and peace discovered by the Buddha which provides spiritual solace for devotees to maintain peace and happiness. When you develop your compassion, devotion and understanding, this power of the Dhamma protects you and helps you to develop more confidence and strength in your mind. Then your mind itself becomes a very powerful force for your own protection. When it is known that you uphold the Dhamma, people and other beings will respect you. The power of the Dhamma protects you from various kinds of bad influence and evil forces. Those who cannot understand the power of the Dhamma and how to live in accordance with the Dhamma, invariably surrender themselves to all forms of superstitious beliefs and subject themselves to the influence of many kinds of gods, spirits and mystical powers which require them to perform odd rites and rituals. By so doing, they only develop more fear and suspicion born out of ignorance. Large sums of money are spent on such practices and this could be easily avoided if people were to develop their confidence in the Dhamma. Dhamma is also described as ‘nature’ or ‘natural phenomena’ and ‘cosmic law’. Those who have learnt the nature of these forces can protect themselves through the Dhamma. When the mind is calmed through perfect knowledge disturbances cannot create fear in the mind.

The Sangha. It refers to the holy order of monks who have renounced their worldly life for their spiritual development. They are considered as disciples of the Buddha, who have cultivated great virtues to attain sainthood or Arahantahood. We pay respect to the Sangha community as the custodians of the Buddha Sasana or those who had protected and introduced the Dhamma to the world over the last 2,500 years. The services rendered by the Sangha community has guided mankind to lead a righteous and noble life. They are the living link with the Enlightened One who bring His message to us through the recital of the words uttered by Him.

The chanting of sutras for blessing was started during the Buddha’s time. Later, in certain Buddhist countries such as Sri Lanka, Thailand and Burma, this practice was developed further by organizing prolonged chanting for one whole night or for several days. With great devotion, devotees participated in the chanting sessions by listening attentively and intelligently. There were some occasions when the Buddha and His disciples chanted sutras to bring spiritual solace to people suffering from epidemics, famines, sickness and other natural disasters. On once occasion, when a child was reported to be affected by some evil influence, the Buddha instructed His monks to recite sutras to give protection to the child from the evil forces.

The blessing service, by way of chanting, was effective. Of course, there were instances when the sutra chanting could not be effective if the victims had committed some strong bad kamma. Nevertheless, certain minor bad kammic effects can be overcome by the vibrant power combined with the great virtues and compassion of those holy people who chant these sutras. Here, the overcoming of a bad kammic effect does not mean the complete eradication of the effect, but only a temporary suspension of such an effect.

Devotees who were tired fatigued have experienced relief and calmness after listening to the chanting of sutras. Such an experience is different from that provided by music because music can create excitement in our mind and pander to our emotions but does not create spiritual devotion and confidence.

For the last 2,500 years, Buddhist devotees have experienced the good effects of sutra chanting. We should try to understand how and why the words uttered by the Buddha for blessing purposes could be so effective even after His passing away. It is mentioned in the Buddha’s teaching that ever since he had the aspiration to become a Buddha during His previous births, He had strongly upheld one particular principle, namely, to abstain from ‘telling lies’. Without abusing or misusing His words, He spoke gently without hurting the feelings of others. The power of Truth has become a source of strength in the words uttered by the Buddha with great compassion. However, the power of the Buddha’s word alone is not enough to secure blessing without the devotion and understanding of the devotees.

The miraculous effect experienced by many people in ridding themselves of their sickness and many other mental disturbances through the medium of the Buddhist sutras, enabled them to develop their faith and confidence in this form of religious service.

-ooOoo-

Awakeness Practices

All 84,000 Khandas As Found in the Pali Suttas



Traditionally the are 84,000 Dharma Doors - 84,000 ways to get Awakeness. Maybe so; certainly the Buddha taught a large number of practices that lead to Awakeness. This web page attempts to catalogue those found in the Pali Suttas (DN, MN, SN, AN, Ud & Sn 1). There are 3 sections:

The discourses of Buddha are divided into 84,000, as to separate addresses. The division includes all that was spoken by Buddha.”I received from Buddha,” said Ananda, “82,000 Khandas, and  from the priests 2000; these are 84,000 Khandas maintained by me.” They are divided into 275,250, as to the stanzas of the original text, and into 361,550, as to the stanzas of the commentary. All the discourses including both those of Buddha and those of the commentator, are divided  into 2,547 banawaras, containing 737,000 stanzas, and 29,368,000 separate letters.

BUDDHA (EDUCATE)!    DHAMMA (MEDITATE)!  SANGHA (ORGANISE)!

WISDOM IS POWER

Awakened One Shows the Path to Attain Eternal Bliss

Using such an instrument

The Free ONLINE e-Nālandā Research and Practice University has been re-organized to function through the following Schools of Learning :

Buddha’s Sangha Practiced His Dhamma Free of cost, hence the Free- e-Nālandā Research and Practice University follows suit

As the Original Nālandā University did not offer any Degree, so also the Free  e-Nālandā Research and Practice University.

The teachings of Buddha are eternal, but even then Buddha did not proclaim them to be infallible. The religion of Buddha has the capacity to change according to times, a quality which no other religion can claim to have…Now what is the basis of Buddhism? If you study carefully, you will see that Buddhism is based on reason. There is an element of flexibility inherent in it, which is not found in any other religion.

Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar , Indian scholar, philosopher and architect of Constitution of India, in his writing and speeches

IKAMMA,REBIRTH,AWAKEN-NESS,BUDDHA,THUS COME ONE,DHAMMA II.ARHA ,FOUR HOLY TRUTHS,EIGHTFOLD PATH,TWELVEFOLD CONDITIONED ARISING,BODHISATTVA,PARAMITA,SIX PARAMITAS III.SIX SPIRITUAL POWERS,SIX PATHS OF REBIRTH,TEN DHARMA REALMS,FIVE SKANDHAS,EIGHTEEN REALMS,FIVE MORAL PRECEPTS IV. MEDITATION,MINDFULNESS,FOUR APPLICATIONS OF MINDFULNESS,LOTUS POSTURE,SAMADHI,CHAN SCHOOL,FOUR JHANAS,FOUR FORMLESS REALMS V. FIVE TYPES OF BUDDHIST STUDY AND PRACTICE,MAHAYANA AND HINAYANA COMPARED,PURE LAND,BUDDHA RECITATION,EIGHT CONSCIOUSNESSES,ONE HUNDRED DHARMAS,EMPTINESS VI. DEMON,LINEAGE

with

Level I: Introduction to Buddhism,Level II: Buddhist Studies,

TO ATTAIN

Level III: Stream-Enterer,Level IV: Once – Returner,Level V: Non-Returner,Level VI: Arhat

Jambudvipa, i.e, PraBuddha Bharath scientific thought in

mathematics,astronomy,alchemy,andanatomy

Philosophy and Comparative Religions;Historical Studies;International Relations and Peace Studies;Business Management in relation to Public Policy and Development Studies;Languages and Literature;and Ecology and Environmental Studies

Jambudvipa, i.e, PraBuddha Bharath scientific thought in

Mathematics

Astronomy

Alchemy

And Andanatomy

Buddhist perception of humanity

Buddhism and Information Technology

Buddhist perception of Business Management in Relation to Public Policy and Development and Ecology and Environment

Buddhist perception of Languages and Literature

 

 

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198 LESSONS 16 03 2011 Bija Sutta Means of Propagation FREE ONLINE eNālandā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY to VOTE for BSP ELEPHANT for Social Transformation and Economic Emancipation to attain Ultimate Bliss-POLITICS is SACRED with GOOD GOVERNANCE-C.M. greets people on the birthday of BSP founder Manyawar Shri Kanshiram ji-Manyawar Shri Kanshiram Ji’s life was a perfect example of sacrifice, commitment and struggle —Hon’ble Chief -Kanshi Ram remembered By BSP Karnataka State
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198 LESSONS  16 03 2011 Bija Sutta Means of Propagation FREE ONLINE eNālandā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY to VOTE for BSP ELEPHANT for Social Transformation and Economic Emancipation to attain Ultimate Bliss-POLITICS is SACRED with GOOD GOVERNANCE-C.M. greets people on the birthday of BSP founder Manyawar Shri Kanshiram ji-Manyawar Shri Kanshiram Ji’s life was a perfect example of sacrifice, commitment and struggle —Hon’ble Chief -Kanshi Ram remembered By BSP Karnataka State

through

http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org


Course Programs:

LESSON 198

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/sn/sn22/sn22.054.than.html

SN 22.54 

PTS: S iii 54 

CDB i 891

Bija Sutta: Means of Propagation

translated from the Pali by

Thanissaro Bhikkhu

© 2001–2011

At Savatthi. There the Blessed One addressed the monks: “Monks.”

“Yes, lord,” the monks responded.

The Blessed One said: “Monks, there are these five means of propagation. Which five? Root-propagation, stem-propagation, joint-propagation, cutting-propagation, & seed-propagation as the fifth. And if these five means of propagation are not broken, not rotten, not damaged by wind & sun, mature, and well-buried, but there is no earth and no water, would they exhibit growth, increase, & proliferation?”

“No, lord.”

“And if these five means of propagation are broken, rotten, damaged by wind & sun, immature, and poorly-buried, but there is earth & water, would they exhibit growth, increase, & proliferation?”

“No, lord.”

“And if these five means of propagation are not broken, not rotten, not damaged by wind & sun, mature, and well-buried, and there is earth & water, would they exhibit growth, increase, & proliferation?”

“Yes, lord.”

“Like the earth property, monks, is how the four standing-spots for consciousness should be seen. Like the liquid property is how delight & passion should be seen. Like the five means of propagation is how consciousness together with its nutriment should be seen.

“Should consciousness, when taking a stance, stand attached to (a physical) form, supported by form,[1] established on form, watered with delight, it would exhibit growth, increase, & proliferation.

“Should consciousness, when taking a stance, stand attached to feeling, supported by feeling, established on feeling, watered with delight, it would exhibit growth, increase, & proliferation.

“Should consciousness, when taking a stance, stand attached to perception, supported by perception, established on perception, watered with delight, it would exhibit growth, increase, & proliferation.

“Should consciousness, when taking a stance, stand attached to fabrications, supported by fabrications, established on fabrications, watered with delight, it would exhibit growth, increase, & proliferation.

“Were someone to say, ‘I will describe a coming, a going, a passing away, an arising, a growth, an increase, or a proliferation of consciousness apart from form, from feeling, from perception, from fabrications,’ that would be impossible.

“If a monk abandons passion for the property of form…

“If a monk abandons passion for the property of feeling…

“If a monk abandons passion for the property of perception…

“If a monk abandons passion for the property of fabrications…

“If a monk abandons passion for the property of consciousness, then owing to the abandonment of passion, the support is cut off, and there is no base for consciousness. Consciousness, thus unestablished, not proliferating, not performing any function, is released. Owing to its release, it is steady. Owing to its steadiness, it is contented. Owing to its contentment, it is not agitated. Not agitated, he (the monk) is totally unbound right within. He discerns that ‘Birth is ended, the holy life fulfilled, the task done. There is nothing further for this world.’”

Notes

1.

“Supported by form”: I.e., having form as its object. Similarly for feeling, perception, and fabrications.

SN 12.38

 SN 22.53

Sn 5.7.

 MN 61

 MN 140;

 

POLITICS is SACRED with GOOD GOVERNANCE

 

Press Information Bureau

(Chief Minister’s Information Campus)

Information & Public Relations Department, U.P.

Mayawati

C.M. greets people on the birthday of BSP founder Manyawar Shri Kanshiram ji

Manyawar Shri Kanshiram Ji’s life was a perfect example of sacrifice, commitment and struggle —Hon’ble Chief Minister ji

 

Lucknow : 14 March 2011

 

The Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Ms. Mayawati ji, on the occasion of 77th

anniversary of Manyawar Shri Kanshiram ji, has extended her heartiest

greetings and good wishes to the people of the country. He was the founder of

the BAMCEF, DS-4 and Bahujan Samaj Party.

In a greetings message, Ms. Mayawati ji said that the life of Manyawar

 

Shri Kanshiram Ji was a perfect example of sacrifice, commitment and

struggle. He gave new direction and infused energy in the “Movement of

Social Change” to create awareness among the Bahujan Samaj, she added.

She said that the Bahujan Hero Manyawar Shri Kanshiram Ji waged struggle

throughout his life for the uplift of SC/STs, backwards, poor and weaker

sections suffering from injustice, exploitation and unequal social system for

centuries.

 

Ms. Mayawati ji said that after the Mahaparinibban of Dr. Bhimrao

Ambedkar, Manyawar Sri Kanshiram Ji seriously took forward the movement

of social change and gave a new direction to it. Manyawar Sri Kanshiram Ji

united SC/STs, backwards and other weaker sections of the society and taught

them to use their right to vote in an intelligent manner. His contribution in

this regard would never be forgotten, she added.

The Hon’ble Chief Minister ji said that Manyawar Sri Kanshiram ji was a

great thinker and created new consciousness among the SC/STs. He gave a new

dimension to the all round development of Sarv Samaj.

The Hon’ble Chief Minister ji called upon the people to take resolve to

realise the dreams of Manyawar Shri Kanshiram Ji, as it would be a real

tribute to him.

 

fireworks animationanimated fireworksfree fireworks animationfree fireworksfree fireworks gif clip artfireworks clipart

Saheb Kanshi Ram was the only leader in the world who covered 7states,traveled more than 4200km in 40days on bicycle to build mass movement.

Behan Mayawati speaking and Saheb Kanshi Ram Ji sitting in front row.Mayawati, extreme right with her parents Prabhu Das Dayal and Ramrati Devi and five of her seven siblings in the 1960s Below On her 40th birthday Mayawati with her mentor Saheb Kanshi Ram Ji

Bahen Mayawati receiving a bouquet from her mentor Saheb Kanshi Ram Ji in 1995

Behan Mayawati and Saheb Kanshi Ram Ji speak to Lalit Mansingh during their US visit.

Saheb Kanshi Ram Ji with Behan Mayawati

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Kanshi Ram remembered

The Bahujan Samaj Party (BSP), Karnataka State, celebrated the birth anniversary of BSP founder Kanshi Ram on Tuesday. Speaking on the occasion, Uttar Pradesh MLC Ashok Siddarth said corruption should be wiped out at the village level itself through a people’s movement. BSP State president Marasandra Muniyappa said the party’s main goal was to become a power to reckon with in the State. On the occasion, a book on Kanshi Ram titled Dadasaheb Kanshiram was released. — Staff Reporter

With best wishes of 77th Jayanthi of Kanshiramji at the Head Office of Bahujan Samaj Party Karnataka State, Ashok Kumar Siddhath Ji M.L.C. BSP (UP) Co-Ordinator - Karnataka State and Shri. Marasandra Muniappa, President BSP Karnataka State deliverd speach covering all the following points

http://newzstreet.com/lucknow/2011/03/13/lucknow-is-blue-again

Lucknow is blue again

The skyline of Lucknow is blue again. This time it is to celebrate the 77th birth anniversary of Bahujan Samaj Party founder Kanshi Ram ji on March 15. The UP government has declared March 15 as a government holiday in the state.

Last year, the party had celebrated Kanshi Ram ji’s birthday in a big way when it coincided with the silver jubilee year of the foundation of the party. The party organised a ‘Rashtriya Vishal Maharally’ at Ramabai Ambedkar ground.

This year the party has decided to hold district- level functions to commemorate the occasion and has directed all the leaders to propagate the achievements of the BSP government besides highlighting the schemes and projects on the name of the SC/ST leaders, including Kanshi Ram ji.

Cut-outs of several SC/ST leaders have been erected on the roads of the state capital while the streets near the Chief Minister’s residence are flanked by blue flags.

Last year, Kanshi Ram ji’s birthday coincided with the silver jubilee year of the foundation of the party. The party had organised a ‘Rashtriya Vishal Maharally’ at Ramabai Ambedkar ground at Lucknow.

It is expected that on March 15, Ms Mayawati will pay a floral tribute to the party’s founder and visit Kanshiram Smarak Sthal, Kansiram Eco Garden and other places.

Kanshi Ram was born on March 15, 1934, in Punjab and he laid the foundation of the Bahujan Samaj Party in 1984. He died on October 9, 2006

Shri. Gopinath General Secretary Karnataka BSP sent the following message:

“The Bahujan Samaj of India salutes withgreat respect its Messiah DadasahebKanshiram. It is he who trained the slaves to speak the language of rulers, gavethem the courage to dream bigand taught them to take responsibilityfor its realisation. It is he who showed thatnothing great can be achieved without great sacrifice. It is he who brought the Caravan of BabaSaheb Ambedkar on the right track.Let us rededicate ourselves to take ahead theCaravan to its logical end. Best wishes of 77th Jayanthiof Kanshi RamJi. Jaibheem-Gopinath

BAHUJAN SAMAJ PARTY

Karnataka State

The 77th Birth Anniversary of Manyavar Kanshi Ramji

The Messiah who instilled courage among the Bahujan Samaj of India to dream big and taught them to speak the language of winners

Date: 15.03.2011                       Time: 11.00 am              

Place: Bahujan Samaj Party State Office, Shivajinagar,  Bangalore.    

Dear Bahujan Brothers and Sisters,

Babasaheb Dr. Ambedkar  made all the provisions required for the Bahujan Samaj (SC/ST/OBC & Religious Minorities) to liberate itself from the Brahminical Social Order and lead a life of self-respect. He gave the Constitution based on the principles of Equality, Liberty and Fraternity, parliamentary democracy to implement that Constitution and finally he advised the Bahujan Samaj to form its own national party and unite under one leader. Everything was made easy for the Bahujan Samaj to become the ruling samaj. But we, the Bahujan Samaj, have remained in slavery suffering all sorts of injustice and discrimination even to this day! Why? Are we not willing to end our slavery?

Babasaheb Ambedkar has brought a revolutionary change in law and political system creating ample opportunities for us to rise. But the Bahujan Samaj was unwilling to change its mindset to avail the new opportunities in the changed circumstances. (Ofcourse, Manuvadis too have not changed their mindset and we cannot even expect them to change!) The people who have no desire to change, have no courage to dream big, have no determination to realize such dreams and not willing to take the responsibility in that direction will be destined to remain in slavery despite living amidst opportunities!

Manyawar Kanshi Ram Saheb, the Messiah of Bahujan Samaj, was the one who instilled courage to the frustrated communities to dream big, strong determination to realize that dream and made them to take responsibility for their liberation. He taught us the language of power politics and led us from the front towards  the sublime goal of liberation.

The greatness of Dadasaheb Kanshi Ramji lies in his ability to make the Bahujan Samaj speak the LANGUAGE OF WINNERS. His famous slogan “vote hamara raj tumhara, nahin chalega nahin chalega”  has been considered as one of the ten powerful slogans that changed the political face of India. When he said, “votonvale jeethega, notonvale haarega” the penniless Bahujan Samaj gathered courage and confidence to challenge the money, mafia and media forces in politics. The crafty Manuvadis were capable of keeping the Bahujan Samaj divided and instigating one against the other in independent India. But their attempts were ended in frustration when the Bahujan Samaj followed its Messiah’s advise, “ Jat chodo samaj jodo”! Today Bahujan Samaj Party (BSP), the only political party of Bahujan Samaj, is the third biggest national party for the hitherto gullible masses who have learnt to follow its Leader’s command, “Jo bahujan ki baath karega woh delhi pe raj karega”!

Kanshi Ramji, born in an ordinary farmer’s family, has joined the line of greatest leaders of the world who changed the history of mankind.

Manyavar Kanshi Ramji was born on March 15, 1934 to the Sikh Ramdasia couple  Hari Singh and Bishan Kaur in Khawaspur village of Ropar District of Punjab State. He, having obtained B.Sc. degree, joined as a Junior Scientist in Central Institute of Military Explosives (CISE). In 1964 he had to protest the management’s refusal to declare the holiday for Dr.Ambedkar Jayanti. He succeeded in getting the holiday declared for Ambedkar Jayanti and this event made him to shoulder the responsibility of running the Ambedkarite movement.  He dedicated his life to make the Bahujan Samaj into a ruling samaj as envisioned by Dr.Ambedkar. It was an uphill task demanding an extraordinary sacrifice. Kanshi Ramji did not go back from his decision. He decided not to get married, not to acquire property of his own and not go back to his native place till he fulfill the dream of Dr.Ambedkar. He went round the whole country to educate and organize the Bahujan Samaj in this direction.

Today, as a result of the incessant struggle and sacrifice of Kanshi Ramji, BSP the party he founded on April 14, 1984 is ruling Uttar Pradesh,the largely populated state of India, for the fourth time creating unforeseen socio-economic change under the leadership of Iron Lady Behen Mayawatiji.  The leadership of BSP, the fastest growing party of India, is taking every section of Bahujan Samaj into its fold  across the  caste, creed, religion, region and language barriers. Now the Manuvadis have resorted to all sorts of nataks to fool the Bahujan Samaj. But the awakened Bahujan Samaj is marching towards Delhi saying “ UP to hamari hai, ab Delhi ki bari hai”!    

Babasaheb Ambedkar got us the right to vote and Dadasaheb Kanshi Ram showed us the true power of vote!

The Bahujan Samaj of India is saluting its Messiah Kanshi Ramji for his incomparable struggle and sacrifice. His 77th birth anniversary is being celebrated as the “Bahujan Samaj Din” all over the nation. We request you to take part in this countrywide celebration to work towards building “Prabuddha Bharat”, the Awakened India. Jaibhim, Jaibharath.


 

 

MAHA BODHI SOCIETY BENGALURU, INDIA< ?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = “urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office” />

DHAMMAPADA FESTIVAL

90TH Birthday Celebration of

Venerable Acharya Buddharakkhita

12-20 March 2011

16th March 2011 Wednesday

9:00 AM to 11:00 AM and 2:0 PM to 4:00 PM

Practice of Paritta Chanting

4:00 PM Hospital Dana Service at

Indira Gandhi Institute of Child Health and

Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Chest Diseases and TB hospital

Hosur Road, Bengaluru

5:30 PM Dhamma Discourse at Maha Bodhi Society

Awakeness Practices

All 84,000 Khandas As Found in the Pali Suttas



Traditionally the are 84,000 Dharma Doors - 84,000 ways to get Awakeness. Maybe so; certainly the Buddha taught a large number of practices that lead to Awakeness. This web page attempts to catalogue those found in the Pali Suttas (DN, MN, SN, AN, Ud & Sn 1). There are 3 sections:

The discourses of Buddha are divided into 84,000, as to separate addresses. The division includes all that was spoken by Buddha.”I received from Buddha,” said Ananda, “82,000 Khandas, and  from the priests 2000; these are 84,000 Khandas maintained by me.” They are divided into 275,250, as to the stanzas of the original text, and into 361,550, as to the stanzas of the commentary. All the discourses including both those of Buddha and those of the commentator, are divided  into 2,547 banawaras, containing 737,000 stanzas, and 29,368,000 separate letters.

BUDDHA (EDUCATE)!    DHAMMA (MEDITATE)!  SANGHA (ORGANISE)!

WISDOM IS POWER

Awakened One Shows the Path to Attain Eternal Bliss

Using such an instrument

The Free ONLINE e-Nālandā Research and Practice University has been re-organized to function through the following Schools of Learning :

Buddha’s Sangha Practiced His Dhamma Free of cost, hence the Free- e-Nālandā Research and Practice University follows suit

As the Original Nālandā University did not offer any Degree, so also the Free  e-Nālandā Research and Practice University.

The teachings of Buddha are eternal, but even then Buddha did not proclaim them to be infallible. The religion of Buddha has the capacity to change according to times, a quality which no other religion can claim to have…Now what is the basis of Buddhism? If you study carefully, you will see that Buddhism is based on reason. There is an element of flexibility inherent in it, which is not found in any other religion.

Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar , Indian scholar, philosopher and architect of Constitution of India, in his writing and speeches

IKAMMA,REBIRTH,AWAKEN-NESS,BUDDHA,THUS COME ONE,DHAMMA II.ARHA ,FOUR HOLY TRUTHS,EIGHTFOLD PATH,TWELVEFOLD CONDITIONED ARISING,BODHISATTVA,PARAMITA,SIX PARAMITAS III.SIX SPIRITUAL POWERS,SIX PATHS OF REBIRTH,TEN DHARMA REALMS,FIVE SKANDHAS,EIGHTEEN REALMS,FIVE MORAL PRECEPTS IV. MEDITATION,MINDFULNESS,FOUR APPLICATIONS OF MINDFULNESS,LOTUS POSTURE,SAMADHI,CHAN SCHOOL,FOUR JHANAS,FOUR FORMLESS REALMS V. FIVE TYPES OF BUDDHIST STUDY AND PRACTICE,MAHAYANA AND HINAYANA COMPARED,PURE LAND,BUDDHA RECITATION,EIGHT CONSCIOUSNESSES,ONE HUNDRED DHARMAS,EMPTINESS VI. DEMON,LINEAGE

with

Level I: Introduction to Buddhism,Level II: Buddhist Studies,

TO ATTAIN

Level III: Stream-Enterer,Level IV: Once – Returner,Level V: Non-Returner,Level VI: Arhat

Jambudvipa, i.e, PraBuddha Bharath scientific thought in

mathematics,astronomy,alchemy,andanatomy

Philosophy and Comparative Religions;Historical Studies;International Relations and Peace Studies;Business Management in relation to Public Policy and Development Studies;Languages and Literature;and Ecology and Environmental Studies

Jambudvipa, i.e, PraBuddha Bharath scientific thought in

Mathematics

Astronomy

Alchemy

And Andanatomy

Buddhist perception of humanity

Buddhism and Information Technology

Buddhist perception of Business Management in Relation to Public Policy and Development and Ecology and Environment

Buddhist perception of Languages and Literature

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