Analytic Insight Net - FREE Online Tipiṭaka Research and Practice University and related NEWS through 
http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org 
in
 105 CLASSICAL LANGUAGES
Paṭisambhidā Jāla-Abaddha Paripanti Tipiṭaka Anvesanā ca Paricaya Nikhilavijjālaya ca ñātibhūta Pavatti Nissāya 
http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org anto 105 Seṭṭhaganthāyatta Bhāsā
Categories:

Archives:
Meta:
October 2012
M T W T F S S
« Sep   Nov »
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031  
10/26/12
27X12 Saturday LESSON 734 திபிடக முக்கூடைகள் up a levelTIPITAKA from FREE ONLINE eNālāndā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org-Dhammapada Verse 399 Akkosakabharadvaja Vatthu-A Brahmana Is He Who Is Patient-BSP Takes on Gandhis in Rae Bareli
Filed under: General
Posted by: @ 12:47 pm

27X12 Saturday LESSON 734  திபிக  முக்கூடைள் up a levelTIPITAKA from FREE ONLINE  eNālāndā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org-Dhammapada Verse 399 Akkosakabharadvaja
Vatthu-A Brahmana Is He Who Is Patient-BSP Takes on Gandhis in Rae Bareli


Verse 399. A Brahmana Is He Who Is Patient

Who angerless endures abuse.
Beating and imprisonment,
with patience’s power, an armed might:
that one I call a Brahmin True.

Explanation: He is abused and insulted. He is tortured, imprisoned
and bound up. But he endures all these without being provoked or without
losing his temper. Such an individual who has patience as his power
and his army, I describe as a true brahmano.


Dhammapada Verse 399
Akkosakabharadvaja

Vatthu

Akkosam vadhabandhanca
aduttho yo titikkhati
khantibalam balanikam
tamaham brumi brahmanam.

Verse 399: Him I call a brahmana, who, without
anger endures abuse, beating and being bound, and to whom the strength of
patience is like the strength of an army.


The Story of the Abusive Brahmin Brothers

While residing at the Veluvana
monastery, the Buddha uttered Verse (399) of this book, with reference to the
abusive Bharadvaja brothers.

Once there was a brahmin, whose
wife was in the habit of blurting out a string of words whenever she sneezed or
when something or someone touched her unawares. One day, the brahmin invited
some of his friends to a meal and suddenly she blurted out some words. Since she
was a Sotapanna, the words “Namo tassa bhagavato arahato
sammsambhuddassa”
automatically came out of her mouth. These words of
veneration to the Buddha were very much disliked by her husband, the brahmin.
So, in anger, he went to the Buddha hoping to put some challenging questions to
the Buddha. His first question was, “What do we have to kill to be able to
live happily and peacefully?” and his second question was, “Killing of
what dhamma do you approve of?” To these questions, the Buddha replied,
” O brahmin, to be able to live happily and peacefully, one will have to
kill ill will (dosa). Killing one’s ill will is liked and praised by the Buddhas
and the arahats.”
After hearing the Buddha, the brahmin was so
impressed and satisfied with the answer that he asked to be permitted to enter
the Order. Accordingly, he entered the Order and later became an arahat.

This brahmin had a brother who
was very notorious for his abusive words and was known as Akkosaka Bharadvaja,
the abusive Bharadvaja. When Akkosaka Bharadvaja heard that his brother had
joined the Order of the bhikkhus, he was furious. He went straight away to the
monastery and abused the Buddha. The Buddha in his turn asked, “O
brahmin, let us suppose you offered some food to some guests and they left the
house without taking the food. Since the guests did not accept your food, to
whom would that food belong?”
To this question the brahmin answered
that the food would be his. On receiving that answer, the Buddha said, “In
the same way, O brahmin, since I do not accept your abuse, the abuse would only
go back to you.”
Akkosaka Bharadvaja instantly realized the sagacity of
those words and he felt a great respect for the Buddha. He also entered the
Order and in due course became an arahat.

After Akkosaka Bharadvaja had
entered the Order, his two younger brothers also came to see the Buddha with the
same intention of abusing the Buddha. They too were made to see the light by the
Buddha and they also, in their turn, entered the Order. Eventually, both of them
became arahats.

One evening, at the congregation
of the bhikkhus, the bhikkhus said to the Buddha, “O how wonderful and how
great are the virtues of the Buddha! The four brahmin brothers came here to
abuse the Buddha; instead of arguing with them, he made them see the light, and
as a result, the Buddha has become a refuge to them.” To them, the Buddha
replied, “Bhikkhus! Because I am patient and forbearing, and do no wrong
to those who do me wrong, I have become a refuge to many.”

Then the Buddha spoke in verse as
follows:

Verse 399: Him I call
a brahmana, who, without anger endures abuse, beating and being bound,
and to whom the strength of patience is like the strength of an army.


comments (0)