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2718 Sun 19 Aug 2018 LESSON (59) Sun 19 Aug 2007 Do Good Be Mindful - Awakened One with Awareness (AOA) Sunday 7 Hours Morning 9:30 am - 11:30 am Sutta (Discourse) Thank you for registering with the Graduate Theological Union.
Filed under: General, Vinaya Pitaka, Sutta Pitaka, Abhidhamma Pitaka, Tipiṭaka, ಅಭಿಧಮ್ಮಪಿಟಕ, ವಿನಯಪಿಟಕ, ತಿಪಿಟಕ (ಮೂಲ)
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2718 Sun 19 Aug 2018 LESSON (59) Sun 19 Aug 2007
  
Do Good Be Mindful  -  Awakened One with Awareness (AOA)

Sunday 7 Hours  Morning 9:30 am - 11:30 am Sutta (Discourse)


Thank you for registering with the Graduate Theological Union.

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Thank you for registering with the Graduate Theological Union.


Our next session of Wisdom from World Religions will be taught August 13th, 2018 – September 21st, 2018. 


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Until recently, the wisdom of the world’s many religions existed in
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Thank you for registering with the Graduate Theological Union.


Our next session of Wisdom from World Religions will be taught August 13th, 2018 – September 21st, 2018. 


You will be contacted shortly before the course launches with further instructions. Thank you! 

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WELCOME TO MAHABODHI RESEARCH CENTRE

(Affiliated to Karnataka Sanskrit University, Govt. of Karnataka, Bengaluru)

A Centre for Theravada Buddhist Studies


Diploma in Theravada Buddhist Studies P1 Pali Language and Literature

http://www.mbrc.info/
Time Table [Class Room 1]
DIPLOMA In Buddhist Studies (DBS)
(15 HOURS)



SYLLABUS
Paper -1,

Sunday 7 Hours  Morning 9:30 am - 11:30 am Sutta (Discourse)
Lunch Break
2 pm - 3 pm Life of Buddha Dr B V Rajaram
https://www.thoughtco.com/the-life-of-the-buddha-449997

The Life of the Buddha, Siddhartha Gautama

A Prince Renounces Pleasure and Founds Buddhism

Happy Buddha
Marianne Williams / Getty Images

The life of Siddhartha Gautama, the person we call the Buddha, is
shrouded in legend and myth. Although most historians believe there was
such a person, we know very little about him. The “standard” biography
appears to have evolved over time. It was largely completed by the Buddhacarita,” an epic poem written by Aśvaghoṣa in the second century CE.

Siddhartha Gautama’s Birth and Family

The future Buddha, Siddhartha Gautama, was born
in the 5th or 6th century BCE in Lumbini (in modern day Nepal).
Siddhartha is a Sanskrit name meaning “one who has accomplished a
goal” and Gautama is a family name.

His father, King Suddhodana, was the leader of a large clan called
the Shakya (or Sakya). It’s not clear from the earliest texts whether he
was a hereditary king or more of a tribal chief. It is also possible
that he was elected to this status.

Suddhodana married two sisters, Maya and Pajapati Gotami. They are
said to be princesses of another clan, the Koliya from what is northern
India today. Maya was the mother of Siddhartha and he was her only
child, dying shortly after his birth. Pajapati, who later became the first Buddhist nun, raised Siddhartha as her own.

By all accounts, Prince Siddhartha and his family were of the
Kshatriya caste of warriors and nobles.  Among Siddhartha’s more
well-known relatives was his cousin Ananda, the son of his father’s
brother. Ananda would later become the Buddha’s disciple and personal
attendant. He would have been considerably younger than Siddhartha,
however, and they didn’t know each other as children.

The Prophecy and a Young Marriage

When Prince Siddhartha was a few days old, a holy man prophesied over
the Prince (by some accounts it was nine Brahmin holy men). It was
foretold that the boy would be either a great military conqueror or a
great spiritual teacher. King Suddhodana preferred the first outcome and
prepared his son accordingly.

He raised the boy in great luxury and shielded him from knowledge of
religion and human suffering. At the age of 16, he was married to his
cousin, Yasodhara, who was also 16. This was no doubt a marriage
arranged by the families.

Yasodhara was the daughter of a Koliya chief and her mother was a sister to King Suddhodana. She was also a sister of Devadatta, who became a disciple of the Buddha and then, by some accounts, a dangerous rival.

The Four Passing Sights

The Prince reached the age of 29 with little experience of the world
outside the walls of his opulent palaces. He was oblivious to the
realities of sickness, old age, and death.

One day, overcome with curiosity, Prince Siddhartha asked a
charioteer to take him on a series of rides through the countryside. On
these journeys he was shocked by the sight of an aged man, then a sick
man, and then a corpse. The stark realities of old age, disease, and
death seized and sickened the Prince.

Finally, he saw a wandering ascetic. The charioteer explained that
the ascetic was one who had renounced the world and sought release from
the fear of death and suffering. 

These life-changing encounters would become known in Buddhism as the Four Passing Sights.

Siddhartha’s Renunciation

For a time the Prince returned to palace life, but he took no
pleasure in it. Even the news that his wife Yasodhara had given birth to
a son did not please him. The child was called Rahula, which means “fetter.”

One night he wandered the palace alone. The luxuries that had once
pleased him now seemed grotesque. Musicians and dancing girls had fallen
asleep and were sprawled about, snoring and sputtering. Prince
Siddhartha reflected on the old age, disease, and death that would
overtake them all and turn their bodies to dust.

He realized then that he could no longer be content living the life
of a prince. That very night he left the palace, shaved his head, and
changed from his royal clothes into a beggar’s robe. Renouncing all the
luxury he had known, he began his quest for enlightenment.

The Search Begins

Siddhartha started by seeking out renowned teachers. They taught him
about the many religious philosophies of his day as well as how to
meditate. After he had learned all they had to teach, his doubts and
questions remained. He and five disciples left to find enlightenment by
themselves.

The six companions attempted to find release from suffering through
physical discipline: enduring pain, holding their breath, fasting nearly
to starvation. Yet Siddhartha was still unsatisfied.

It occurred to him that in renouncing pleasure he had grasped the
opposite of pleasure, which was pain and self-mortification. Now
Siddhartha considered a Middle Way between those two extremes.

He remembered an experience from his childhood when his mind had settled into a state of deep peace. The path of liberation was through the discipline of mind.
He realized that instead of starvation, he needed nourishment to build
up his strength for the effort. When he accepted a bowl of rice milk
from a young girl, his companions assumed he had given up the quest and
abandoned him.

The Enlightenment of the Buddha

Siddhartha sat beneath a sacred fig tree (Ficus religiosa), known ever after as the Bodhi Tree (Bodhi means “awakened”). It was there that he settled into meditation.

The work of Siddhartha’s mind came to be mythologized as a great battle with Mara.
The demon’s name means “destruction” and represents the passions that
snare and delude us. Mara brought vast armies of monsters to attack
Siddhartha, who sat still and untouched. Mara’s most beautiful daughter
tried to seduce Siddhartha, but this effort also failed.

Finally, Mara claimed the seat of enlightenment rightfully belonged
to him. Mara’s spiritual accomplishments were greater than Siddhartha’s,
the demon said. Mara’s monstrous soldiers cried out together, “I am his
witness!” Mara challenged Siddhartha, Who will speak for you?

Then Siddhartha reached out his right hand to touch the earth, and the earth itself roared, “I bear you witness!” Mara disappeared. As the morning star rose in the sky, Siddhartha Gautama realized enlightenment and became a Buddha.

The Buddha as a Teacher

At first, the Buddha was reluctant to teach because what he had
realized could not be communicated in words. Only through discipline and
clarity of mind would delusions fall away and one could experience the
Great Reality. Listeners without that direct experience would be stuck
in conceptualizations and would surely misunderstand everything he said.
Compassion persuaded him to make the attempt.

After his enlightenment, he went to the Deer Park in Isipatana,
located in what is now the province of Uttar Pradesh, India. There he
found the five companions who had abandoned him and he preached his
first sermon to them.

This sermon has been preserved as the Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta and centers on the Four Noble Truths.
Instead of teaching doctrines about enlightenment, the Buddha chose to
prescribe a path of practice through which people can realize
enlightenment for themselves.

The Buddha devoted himself to teaching and attracted hundreds of
followers. Eventually, he became reconciled with his father, King
Suddhodana. His wife, the devoted Yasodhara, became a nun and disciple. Rahula, his son, became a novice monk at the age of seven and spent the rest of his life with his father.

The Last Words of the Buddha

The Buddha traveled tirelessly through all areas of northern India
and Nepal. He taught a diverse group of followers, all of whom were
seeking the truth he had to offer.

At the age of 80, the Buddha entered Parinirvana, leaving his physical body behind. In this, he abandoned the endless cycle of death and rebirth.

Before his last breath, he spoke final words to his followers:

“Behold, O monks, this is my last advice to you. All
compounded things in the world are changeable. They are not lasting.
Work hard to gain your own salvation.”

The Buddha’s body was cremated. His remains were placed in stupas—domed structures common in Buddhism—in many places, including China, Myanmar, and Sri Lanka.

The Buddha Has Inspired Millions

Some 2,500 years later, the Buddha’s teachings remain significant for
many people throughout the world. Buddhism continues to attract new
followers and is one of the fastest-growing religions, though many do not refer to it as a religion but
as a spiritual path or a philosophy. An estimated 350 to 550 million
people practice Buddhism today.
://video.search.yahoo.com/search/video?fr=tightropetb&p=featured+animated+Life+of+the+Buddha#id=1&vid=19dbeffd67991a59ac162004d9ca99ec&action=click

https://video.search.yahoo.com/search/video?fr=tightropetb&p=featured+animated+Life+of+the+Buddha#id=1&vid=19dbeffd67991a59ac162004d9ca99ec&action=click

·

Cinema ModeOff
Life Of The Buddha (Animation) [English]


“Do Good, Avoid Evil, Purify One’s Mind.” This is the teaching of all
the Buddhas. Disclaimer: This video is owned by Buddhist Research
Society.


youtube.com
“Do
Good, Avoid Evil, Purify One’s Mind.” This is the teaching of all the
Buddhas. Disclaimer: This video is owned by Buddhist Research Society.
3 pm - 4 pm Pali Language and Literature Bhikkhu Pammokkho/Bhikkhu Manissara https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rdZwH9YeILA

Learn Basic Pāli Grammar Episode 02: Pāli Vowels

The People
Published on Jun 25, 2016

Navaneetham Chandrasekharan

Just now ·
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V5W2t9tXW-Y&t=28s
Learn Basic Pāli Grammar Episode 02: Pāli Vowels
The People
Published on Jun 25, 2016
Hello,
and welcome back, in this lesson we are going to study the Pali
Pronunciation. The first thing to know about Pali is that it was an oral
language, it had no script of its own. All Theravada countries has its
own script for Pali and we shall use roman script for this course.

There
are 41 letters in Pali, 8 Vowels, and 33 consonants. For this lesson,
we will study 8 Vowels and see how to pronounce them. The eight Vowels
are: a, ā, i, ī, u, ū, e, o.

A= cut=Dhamma
Ā=Father =Dāna
I=east=Sila
Ī=Bee=Dīgha
U=oops=Sutta
Ū=Cool=Bhūpāla
E=Pay=Nare
O=Open=Putto
Category
Education

youtube.com
Pali (Pāli) is a Prakrit language
Pali
(Pāli) is a Prakrit language native to the Indian subcontinent. It is
widely studied because it is the language of many of the earliest extant
literatur…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_nGl2l1Ls7U&pbjreload=10

The People
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_nGl2l1Ls7U&pbjreload=10
PALI CONSONANTS PART 1
The People
Published on Aug 1, 2013
PALI CONSONANTS PART 1
Category
Education

youtube.com
PALI CONSONANTS PART 1
PALI CONSONANTS PART 1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rdZwH9YeILA

Learn Basic Pāli Grammar Episode 02: Pāli Vowels

The People
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rdZwH9YeILA
Learn Basic Pāli Grammar Episode 02: Pāli Vowels
The People
Published on Jun 25, 2016
Hello,
and welcome back, in this lesson we are going to study the Pali
Pronunciation. The first thing to know about Pali is that it was an oral
language, it had no script of its own. All Theravada countries has its
own script for Pali and we shall use roman script for this course.

There
are 41 letters in Pali, 8 Vowels, and 33 consonants. For this lesson,
we will study 8 Vowels and see how to pronounce them. The eight Vowels
are: a, ā, i, ī, u, ū, e, o.

A= cut=Dhamma
Ā=Father =Dāna
I=east=Sila
Ī=Bee=Dīgha
U=oops=Sutta
Ū=Cool=Bhūpāla
E=Pay=Nare
O=Open=Putto
Category
Education

youtube.com
Learn Basic Pāli Grammar Episode 02: Pāli Vowels
Hello, and welcome back, in this lesson we are going to study the Pali Pronunciation. The first thing to…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9jAPBTF9SWU
 
Dhamma Us

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9jAPBTF9SWU
How to learn Pali Language? - 1

Dhamma Us
Published on Apr 28, 2017
About UWest Pali Society:

UWest
Pali Society is committed to promoting Theravada Pali tradition both
academically and ritually. We welcome all the UWest community members to
join us and feel good with us. Individuals outside the UWest community
can be included with the invitation from the members.

The objectives of the UWest Pali Society would be:

1. Pali Sutta Reading & Translation (Free):
Here
we read & translate selected original Pali suttas and discuss the
key Pali terms leading to further discussions. We invite all those
like-minded faculty, staff and students to join us and learn research
and share the experience.

2. Pali Learning (Free):

We are
more than happy to introduce Pali language to those who are interested.
We teach Pali language from the very beginning to advanced level.

3. Online Pali Group (Free):

We have already started an online Pali teaching program. Those who are interested in joining, please contact admin@dhammausa.com

3. Guest Speeches (Free):

We
organize monthly guest speeches by eminent scholars and visiting
Buddhist monks to propagate and promote Pali Language and Literature.

Meeting Dates: Please check for updates here www.dhammausa.com
About DhammaUS:

DHAMMA
US is a non-profit, charity organization engaged in Community Care,
Spiritual Care & Pali Studies. We conduct Meditation, Yoga,
Spiritual Counselling, Healing & Therapeutic Chanting and Teaching
Pali Language. We promote peace, harmony, non-violence along with the
message of the Buddha. We are happy to share the Theravada Buddhist
Studies with any like minded individual or community. However, we
support and promote unconditionally all the other Buddhist schools
without any discrimination. We also respect all the other religions and
their teachings on humanity, world peace, non-violence, and
environmental care.

Contact:

Website: http://www.dhammausa.com/
Blog: http://dhammaus.blogspot.com
Twitter: https://twitter.com/Dhamma_Us
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dhammaus15
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6dg…
Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dhamma-us…
Google+: https://plus.google.com/1085636941523…
Email: info@dhammausa.com

Keywords:
UWest Pali Society
UWest
University of the West
Pali
Buddhism
Buddhist
Chanting
Spiritual
Religion
USA
California
Lankarama Buddhist Institute
Category
Education

youtube.com
How to learn Pali Language? - 1
About
UWest Pali Society: UWest Pali Society is committed to promoting
Theravada Pali tradition both academically and ritually. We welcome all
the…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AKKg07tv72I

How to learn Pali language? - 2

 
Dhamma Us
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AKKg07tv72I
How to learn Pali language? - 2

Dhamma Us
Published on Apr 28, 2017
About UWest Pali Society:

UWest
Pali Society is committed to promoting Theravada Pali tradition both
academically and ritually. We welcome all the UWest community members to
join us and feel good with us. Individuals outside the UWest community
can be included with the invitation from the members.

The objectives of the UWest Pali Society would be:

1. Pali Sutta Reading & Translation (Free):
Here
we read & translate selected original Pali suttas and discuss the
key Pali terms leading to further discussions. We invite all those
like-minded faculty, staff and students to join us and learn research
and share the experience.

2. Pali Learning (Free):

We are
more than happy to introduce Pali language to those who are interested.
We teach Pali language from the very beginning to advanced level.

3. Online Pali Group (Free):

We have already started an online Pali teaching program. Those who are interested in joining, please contact admin@dhammausa.com

3. Guest Speeches (Free):

We
organize monthly guest speeches by eminent scholars and visiting
Buddhist monks to propagate and promote Pali Language and Literature.

Meeting Dates: Please check for updates here www.dhammausa.com
About DhammaUS:

DHAMMA
US is a non-profit, charity organization engaged in Community Care,
Spiritual Care & Pali Studies. We conduct Meditation, Yoga,
Spiritual Counselling, Healing & Therapeutic Chanting and Teaching
Pali Language. We promote peace, harmony, non-violence along with the
message of the Buddha. We are happy to share the Theravada Buddhist
Studies with any like minded individual or community. However, we
support and promote unconditionally all the other Buddhist schools
without any discrimination. We also respect all the other religions and
their teachings on humanity, world peace, non-violence, and
environmental care.

Contact:

Website: http://www.dhammausa.com/
Blog: http://dhammaus.blogspot.com
Twitter: https://twitter.com/Dhamma_Us
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dhammaus15
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6dg…
Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dhamma-us…
Google+: https://plus.google.com/1085636941523…
Email: info@dhammausa.com

Keywords:
UWest Pali Society
UWest
University of the West
Pali
Buddhism
Buddhist
Chanting
Spiritual
Religion
USA
California
Lankarama Buddhist Institute
Category
Education

youtube.com
How to learn Pali language? - 2
About
UWest Pali Society: UWest Pali Society is committed to promoting
Theravada Pali tradition both academically and ritually. We welcome all
the…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fHuiyblfP_A&t=5s

Monk Radio: Learning Pali

 
Yuttadhammo Bhikkhu
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fHuiyblfP_A&t=5s
Monk Radio: Learning Pali

Yuttadhammo Bhikkhu
Published on Aug 8, 2012
Ask questions at our live radio session every Sunday:
http://radio.sirimangalo.org/

or via our Question and Answer Forum:

http://ask.sirimangalo.org/

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Thanks for your questions, comments and support for what I do.

May all beings be happy.

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Community Website:

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Facebook:

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Schedule:

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Audio Talks:

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Book on How To Meditate:

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Sirimangalo International (Our non-profit organization):

http://www.sirimangalo.org/

Supporting This Work:

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Category
Education

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Monk Radio: Learning Pali
Ask
questions at our live radio session every Sunday:
http://radio.sirimangalo.org/ or via our Question and Answer Forum:
http://ask.sirimangalo.org/ - - - -…


4.00 - 4.30 pm Break

4.30
pm - 5.30 pm Sutta Pitaka Bhikkhu Gandhhama/Bhikkhu Dhammaloka

https://www.dhamma.uk/tipitaka/sutta-pitaka/

*Dhamma

~ Buddha ~ Dhamma ~ Sangha ~



https://www.dhamma.uk/tipitaka/sutta-pitaka/

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Tipitaka Scripture

Tipitaka Scripture


The Sutta Pitaka is one section of the Pali Buddhist cannon called the
Tipitaka, or Three Baskets. The Tipitaka consists of three divisions:

The Vinaya Pitaka: Commentaries and regulations mainly dealing with monastic life


The Sutta Pitaka: Discourses by the Buddha to various audiences about
how to live in a peaceful manner, how to meditate, how to discern truth,
the nature of reality etc.

The Abidhamma Pitaka: is a detailed
scholastic reworking of material appearing in the Suttas containing
summaries of the Suttas and lists.

This website will be primarily
concerned with the Sutta Pitaka because that particular ‘basket’ is the
one that is most pertinent to the likes of you and me, the every day
person in the street who just wishes for a bit more tranquility between
car horns and arguments.


dhamma.uk
The Sutta Pitaka is one section of the Pali Buddhist cannon called the…
5.50 pm -
6.30 pm Vinaya Pitaka Bhikkhu Ariyavamsa/Bhikkhu Ayupala
image.png
6.30 pm -
37.30 pm Abhidhamma Pitaka Sayalay Uttamanyani/Ven Bodhicitta

https://www.youtube.com/watch…
What is Abhidhamma

256
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nobelpathfinder
Published on Feb 8, 2011
The ultimate objective in Buddhism is attained by purifying and
improving mind. However, understanding what “mind” is a quite
complicated act for any person. This is a barrier for someone who is
interested in learning Buddhism in‐depth. One of the teachings in
Buddhism which provides a comprehensive analysis on mind is
“Abhidhamma”.

The Buddhist
doctrine is categorized into three, which is known to anyone, as
“Thripitaka” namely Suthra Pitaka, Vinya Pitaka and Abhidhamma Pitaka.
Vinaya Pitaka consists rules of conduct for Sangha and Suthra Pitaka
consists of Suttas containing the central teachings of Buddhism. Suthra
Pitaka is mostly on “Conventional Teachings” (Sammuthi Dheshana) of
Buddhism. Abhidhamma Pitaka provides a theoretical framework for the
doctrine principles in Suthra Pitaka which could be used to describe
“Mind and Matter”. Hence, Abhidhamma embraces the “Ultimate Teachings”
(Paramaththa Dheshana) in Buddhism.

Abhidhamma Pitaka consists of seven treatises;

1. Dhammasangani

2. Vibhanga

3. Dhatukatha

4. Puggalapannatti

5. Kathavatthu

6. Yamaka

7. Pattthana

The term “Abhidhamma” simply means “Higher Doctrine”. It is an in‐depth
investigation to mind and matter. It answers many intricate points of
Dhamma. It analyses complex machinery of human, world, mind, thoughts,
thought‐process, mental formations and etc. Therefore it is indeed a
complex doctrine to understand. However, there are many who are
interested in learning this beautiful branch of doctrine. Amongst them
there are plenty of non‐Buddhists as well. This effort is to present
this doctrine in an “Easy to Understand” manner.

( 8th FEB 2011)
Category
Education


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The
ultimate objective in Buddhism is attained by purifying and improving
mind. However, understanding what “mind” is a quite complicated act for
any person….
lished on Feb 8, 2011





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