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Free Online FOOD for MIND & HUNGER - DO GOOD 😊 PURIFY MIND.To live like free birds 🐦 🦢 🦅 grow fruits 🍍 🍊 🥑 🥭 🍇 🍌 🍎 🍉 🍒 🍑 🥝 vegetables 🥦 🥕 🥗 🥬 🥔 🍆 🥜 🎃 🫑 🍅🍜 🧅 🍄 🍝 🥗 🥒 🌽 🍏 🫑 🌳 🍓 🍊 🥥 🌵 🍈 🌰 🇧🇧 🫐 🍅 🍐 🫒Plants 🌱in pots 🪴 & Attain NIBBĀNA the Eternal Bliss.
Free Online FOOD for MIND & HUNGER - DO GOOD 😊 PURIFY MIND.To live like free birds 🐦 🦢 🦅 grow fruits 🍍 🍊 🥑 🥭 🍇 🍌 🍎 🍉 🍒 🍑 🥝 vegetables 🥦 🥕 🥗 🥬 🥔 🍆 🥜 🎃 🫑 🍅🍜 🧅 🍄 🍝 🥗 🥒 🌽 🍏 🫑 🌳 🍓 🍊 🥥 🌵 🍈 🌰 🇧🇧 🫐 🍅 🍐 🫒Plants 🌱in pots 🪴 & Attain NIBBĀNA the Eternal Bliss.
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LESSON 4528 Thu 18 Aug 2022 MISSION BENEVOLENT UNIVERSE WE WERE BENEVOLENT AWAKENED ONES WE ARE BENEVOLENT AWAKENED ONES WE CONTINUE TO BE BENEVOLENT AWAKENED ONES Always for Freedom, Democracy, Liberty, Equality, Fraternity Dr Ambedkar thundered “I will make this country Prabuddha Bharat “ All Aboriginal Awakened Societies Thunder “we will make entire Universe Benevolent Awakened One Universe! May all sentient and non sentient beings be ever happy, well and secure! May all live long at least for 150 years with NAD pills and following Benevolent Awakened One’s teachings! May all have calm, quiet, alert, attentive and equanimity mind with a clear understanding that everything is changing!!! How to Grow Cucumbers in Pots
Filed under: General, Theravada Tipitaka , Plant raw Vegan Broccoli, peppers, cucumbers, carrots
Posted by: site admin @ 2:35 am

LESSON 4528 Thu 18 Aug 2022

MISSION BENEVOLENT UNIVERSE

WE WERE BENEVOLENT AWAKENED ONES
WE ARE BENEVOLENT AWAKENED ONES
WE CONTINUE TO BE BENEVOLENT AWAKENED ONES

Always for
Freedom, Democracy, Liberty, Equality, Fraternity

Dr Ambedkar thundered “I will make this country Prabuddha Bharat “
All Aboriginal Awakened Societies Thunder “we will make entire Universe Benevolent Awakened One Universe!
May all sentient and non sentient beings be ever happy, well and secure!
May all live long at least for 150 years with NAD pills and following Benevolent Awakened One’s teachings!
May all have calm, quiet, alert, attentive and equanimity mind with a clear understanding that everything is changing!!!
Vegetables Veggie GIF by Aya Murata
https://www.wikihow.com/Grow-Cucumbers-in-Pots

How to Grow Cucumbers in Pots


Download Article


Cucumbers can be tricky to grow in pots since they require a lot of
vertical space. It can be done, however, if you select a bush variety
instead of a climbing variety or you provide room for the cucumber to
spread out by adding a stake or trellis. Use well-draining, nutritional
soil and keep it moist throughout the growing season to help your potted
cucumber plant grow.

Part 1

Getting the Pot Ready


1

Choose a bush variety of cucumber for containers. In
general, bush varieties are easier to grow in pots than vine varieties,
which need a trellis to climb and spread out on. Picking a variety
suited to a container will give you a higher chance of success.[1]

  • Varieties that are well-suited for container growing include the
    Salad Bush Hybrid, Bush Champion, Spacemaster, Hybrid Bush Crop, Baby
    Bush, Bush Pickle, and Potluck.
2
Select a pot that is 10 in (25 cm) wide for your cucumbers.
Your pot should be at least this wide in diameter, as well as that
deep, too. If you want to grow more than 1 plant in a single pot, try a
container that is at least 20 inches (51 cm) in diameter and holds 5
gallons (19 L).[2]

  • When using a container outdoors, go for a larger container if you can. It will retain moisture more effectively.[3]
  • You can even use a rectangular planter box if you add a trellis for the cucumbers to grow on.



  1. 1
    Choose a bush variety of cucumber for containers. In
    general, bush varieties are easier to grow in pots than vine varieties,
    which need a trellis to climb and spread out on. Picking a variety
    suited to a container will give you a higher chance of success.[1]

    • Varieties that are well-suited for container growing include the
      Salad Bush Hybrid, Bush Champion, Spacemaster, Hybrid Bush Crop, Baby
      Bush, Bush Pickle, and Potluck.

  2. 2
    Select a pot that is 10 in (25 cm) wide for your cucumbers.
    Your pot should be at least this wide in diameter, as well as that
    deep, too. If you want to grow more than 1 plant in a single pot, try a
    container that is at least 20 inches (51 cm) in diameter and holds 5
    gallons (19 L).[2]

    • When using a container outdoors, go for a larger container if you can. It will retain moisture more effectively.[3]
    • You can even use a rectangular planter box if you add a trellis for the cucumbers to grow on.

  3. 3
    Add holes if your container doesn’t have them. While
    cucumbers love water, standing water can cause root damage. Look for a
    pot that already has drainage holes, if possible. Just flip it over to
    see if it has holes in the bottom.[4]

    • If your pot doesn’t have drainage holes, use a drill to make holes.
      Choose a masonry drill bit for soft, unfinished terra cotta or a tile
      and glass drill bit for glazed surfaces. Pick a
      14 to 12 in (6.4 to 12.7 mm) bit.
    • Place painter’s tape over the bottom of the pot where you want to
      drill holes. Painter’s tape helps steady the bit. Press the bit lightly
      into the tape, and turn the drill on at a slow speed. Slowly and
      steadily apply light pressure to the taped area until the drill goes
      through the pot. Repeat for at least 1 other hole.
    • If you press too hard or try to drill too fast, you may break the pot.[5]
    4
    Clean your pot thoroughly with hot water and soap.
    Pots can contain bacteria that may cause your plant to rot. If you’ve
    used the pot for another plant, it may have hidden insect eggs that will
    hatch and attack your cucumbers.
    • Scrub it down thoroughly with a rag or dish brush and soapy
      water. Rinse it out several times to make sure you get all the soap out.
6
Fill the pot with a well-draining soil mix. If you
want to mix your own soil, try mixing 1 part sand with 1 part compost
and 1 part peat moss or coco coir. Otherwise, you can choose a pre-mixed
potting soil designed for growing vegetables.[6]

  • Pack the mix into the pot, carefully patting it in around the stake.
    Do not make it too compact, however, since your cucumber plant’s roots
    need loose soil to grow in. Leave approximately 1 inch (2.5 centimeters)
    of empty space between the surface of the soil and the rim of the pot.
  • Check the stake. Try to wiggle it around in the pot. If it still
    moves around a lot, pack more potting mix in the pot to stabilize the
    stake.
  • Find potting soil mixes and the ingredients for potting soil at your local garden store.
  • Do not use garden soil, which may be contaminated by bacteria and pests.


7
Boost nutrition by mixing a good fertilizer into the soil.
Use either a 5-10-5 fertilizer or a 14-14-14 slow release formula. Mix
it into the soil in the proportions suggested on the label directions,
as fertilizers vary widely by brand and type.[7]

  • Alternatively, use a potting soil that already has fertilizer mixed in.
  • The numbers on a bag of fertilizer indicate how much nitrogen,
    phosphorus, and potassium the fertilizer contains, respectively. Each
    element nourishes a different part of the plant.
  • A 5-10-5 fertilizer gives your cucumbers a mild dose that focuses on
    improved vegetable yield. A 14-14-14 fertilizer, on the other hand,
    keeps the health of your plant balanced, making it safer to give your
    cucumbers the slightly higher concentration.
  • Choose an organic fertilizer for an environmentally safe alternative.

Part 2

Planting Seeds and Seedlings


1
Sow your seeds once the weather warms up to 70 °F (21 °C).
Cucumbers need the soil to reach at least 70 °F (21 °C) in order to
grow. In many areas, you can start a crop in July and expect a harvest
in September. If you live in a warmer area, you may be able to start
earlier. Wait until at least 2 weeks after the last frost.[8]

  • If you’re planting inside, you can begin the seeds whenever you want.
2
Poke a 12 in (1.3 cm) hole into the center of the soil. Make the hole about equal in depth and width. You can create it by using your pinky finger or the rounded end of a pencil.[9]

  • If you have a larger planter, place the holes evenly around the
    edge of a circular planter or evenly across a rectangular planter,
    depending on the size and shape.

3
Plant 5-8 seeds in the hole about 12 in (13 mm) deep.
Plant more seeds than necessary so that you guarantee success. Planting
this many seeds may mean you need to thin once the plants come up, but
you’re more likely to end up with as many plants as you want.[10]

  • Cucumber seedlings don’t like being taken out of a container or
    handled. Choosing seedlings with organic containers, such as coco coir
    or peat, allows you to plant them in the soil, container and all,
    without handling the seedlings too much. The roots will grow through the
    organic container.

4
Cover the hole with more of your soil mix. Loosely
drop soil over the seeds. Do not squish the soil into the hole, since
doing so may damage the seeds. You can gently pat it down when you’re
done.
  • If you’re using a seedling, fill in the hole around the container, and pat it down from the top.


5
Use an old water bottle as plastic collar. If it’s
still cool outside, you can protect your plants by creating collars for
each one. Cut the tops and bottoms off of large plastic bottles. Wash
them thoroughly with hot soap and water. Place one around each sprouting
plant. Press it into the ground so it doesn’t blow away.[11]

  • These collars provide warmth and wind protection. They may also protect against some pests.

6
Water the seeds or seedlings directly after planting them.
The soil should be thoroughly and noticeably moist after you water the
seeds or seedlings. Do not supersaturate the soil, however, since
puddles of water may end up scattering the seeds.
  • Use a fine sprayer so you don’t stir up the seeds.

7
Spread peat moss or straw over the soil after watering.
Lightly apply a thin layer of peat moss or mulch over the seeds or
seedlings and soil. The mulch helps prevent the soil from drying out too
quickly so the seeds and seedlings have a chance to grow.

8
Place your pot in a bright location with at least 8 hours of sunlight.
Cucumbers thrive in warm conditions, and the extra sunlight will keep
the soil nice and warm. More than 6 hours of sunlight is even better.[12]

  • If you are growing cucumbers indoors, make sure they are in a sunny
    room where they get plenty of light. If you don’t have a sunny corner,
    you can buy a grow light instead. Place it above the plant, and keep it
    on at least 6 hours a day.
  • Placing your pot near the side of your house or by a fence can
    minimize potential wind damage. A little wind is fine, but strong wind
    can be damaging.

Part 3

Caring for Your Cucumbers


1
Thin your cucumbers out once the seedlings sprout 2 sets of true leaves.
Identify the 2 tallest seedlings from each grouping to keep. Snip the
other seedlings down to the surface of the soil. Do not yank the other
seedlings out, since doing so will disturb the soil and may cause damage
to the seedlings you’re leaving in the ground.[13]

  • Use garden shears or scissors to snip the extra seedlings off at the soil.


2
Thin to 1 plant per hole once the plants reach 8 to 10 inches (20 to 25 cm).
Examine the plants in each group, and look for the tallest one. It
should also have the most leaves and look the healthiest. Snip the other
one down to the soil.
  • Now you should have 1 plant growing in each grouping you’ve made
    in the pot. In some cases, that may mean you have just a single plant,
    if you used a small container.

3

Water your cucumbers daily. If the surface of the
soil seems dry, it’s time for re-watering. Give mature plants enough
water so that a little extra drains out from the drainage holes at the
bottom of the pot. Never allow the soil to dry out, since dry soil will
inhibit growth and lead to a bitter crop.[14]

  • To check the soil, stick your finger in it. If it’s dry, it’s time to water.
  • Lift the pot up to see how heavy it is. The heavier the pot, the
    more saturated the soil is with water. Check the pot throughout the day
    to get a feeling for how heavy or light the pot gets when you water.
  • Adding mulch around your plant will help it retain more water.
  • If your area is especially dry or hot, you may need to water twice a day.[15]


4
Add a balanced fertilizer once a week. Drench the
soil first before adding the fertilizer. Adding the fertilizer when the
plants are dry may create problems. Use a water-soluble fertilizer, and
apply as much as the label directs you to use. Fertilizers vary widely
by brand and type, so always read the label.[16]

  • Pick a 5-10-5 or 14-14-14 fertilizer.

5

Eliminate garden pests with neem oil or other organic pesticides. Aphids, pickle worms, mites, and cucumber beetles will all target your cucumber plant. You can make your own organic pesticide with neem oil:

  • To make a spray with neem oil, mix 1 to 1.5 cups (240 to 350 mL) of
    water with a few drops of dishwashing soap and about 10-20 drops of neem
    oil.[17]
  • With pests like cucumber beetles, you can simply pick them off by
    hand using gloves covered in petroleum jelly. Drop them into a bucket of
    water with a few drops of dishwashing liquid.
  • You can also use a bug vacuum designed for the purpose of sucking insects off plants.[18]
6

Use an anti-mildew spray on fungal diseases. Mildew
and bacterial wilt are especially common. Many anti-fungal products will
rid your plants of mildew, but bacterial diseases are more difficult to
get rid of. In fact, if your plants develop bacterial wilt, which can
be carried by cucumber beetles, the plants will likely die. Fungal
infections are often characterized by a white, powdery substance on the
leaves.

  • Bacterial wilt starts with the leaves turning dull, wilting in the
    day, and recovering at night. Eventually, the leaves will turn yellow
    and die.
  • To make an anti-mildew spray, try mixing 1 tablespoon (14 grams) of
    baking soda into 1 gallon (3.8 L) of water. Add a dash of dishwashing
    liquid, and shake it up. Spray it on the plant once a week if you notice
    a white, powdery mildew on the leaves.[19]

7
Harvest your cucumbers about 55 days after planting.
Bigger cucumbers are more bitter, so harvest cucumbers when they’re
young. Snip the stem about 1/2-inch (1.27 centimeters) above the
cucumber. If the cucumber has reached the yellowing stage, it’s probably
too mature to eat.[20]

  • Most cucumbers are ready to harvest 55 to 70 days after planting.

  • The 35 Easiest Container and Pot Friendly Fruits, Vegetables and Herbs
    JULY 7, 2014 BY VANESSA BEATY 25 COMMENTS
    With
    spring and summer often comes the desire to plant things. If you are
    someone who enjoys growing and preserving your own food but you’re also
    someone who just doesn’t have the outdoor garden space that you need,
    we’ve got a great collection of projects for you.
    The 35 Easiest Container and Pot Friendly Fruits, Vegetables and Herbs
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    See More
    We’ve
    found 35 fruits and vegetables that you can grow in containers. These
    range from bananas and citrus fruits to tomatoes, cucumbers, and just
    about anything else that you would normally plant in a larger garden.
    The
    difference is, you can grow these on the deck or porch or wherever you
    have room because they’re all in some sort of container. Plus, these
    foods grow very well in containers so there are no worries of getting
    smaller than average tomatoes. If you want a huge beefsteak tomato in a
    container, that’s just what you’ll get.
    So
    whether you have a huge gardening space or not, if you want to grow
    your own foods, you can and we’ve got the perfect foods for you to grow
    in those containers. Take a look, pick out your favorites, and DIY your
    way to more homegrown food on the table all year long.
    Table of Contents
    Tomatoes
    Tomatoes
    It’s
    not surprise that tomatoes grow well in containers. After all, they do
    sell them in those upside down growing containers, right? If you love
    fresh tomatoes throughout the year, you can easily grow them in just
    about any sized container, depending on the variety of tomato that you
    want to grow. You will want to be sure that the container is large
    enough to handle the plant and you can begin with seeds or starter
    plants, whichever you prefer. Also, add a cage to the outside of the
    container for extra support as the plant gets taller.
    How to Grow Tomatoes in Containers
    Growing Tomatoes in Containers
    5 Tips for Growing Tomatoes in Containers
    Basil
    Basil
    You
    can grow basil indoors or out and it’s great for adding to soups and
    other recipes. Even if you don’t have an all-out herb garden, you can
    grow a bit of basil for your favorite dishes. You’ll need a six inch
    planter, some fresh potting soil, and of course, the basil. Keep in mind
    that when you water basil, you need to avoid getting the leaves and
    stem wet. It’s best to pour water directly onto the soil. You also need
    to provide it with a bit of direct sunlight every day so if you are
    planning to grow it indoors, make sure that you use containers that you
    can easily move to the deck during the sunniest part of the day.
    How to Grow Sweet Basil in a Pot
    Growing and Using Basil
    Container Gardening : How to Plant Basil in Containers
    Zucchini and Summer Squash
    Zucchini and Summer Squash
    All
    types of squash grow well in containers, particularly summer squash.
    Squash will actually grow just about anywhere you plan it. It’s a very
    hardy and versatile plant so if you want to add fresh summer squash to
    your dinner table, grab a few containers and plant those seeds. Keep in
    mind that you will need to harvest the squash regularly when it begins
    to grow so that the plants don’t get bogged down. You should be able to
    get about three squashes each week when they start growing so be sure to
    get them off the plant to make room for new growth.
    Parsley
    Parsley
    Parsley
    grows very well in containers so if you love adding fresh parsley to
    your dishes, this is the perfect herb to grow on the balcony or porch.
    Parsley grows well in small containers and only requires partial
    sunlight so it’s the perfect food to grow in apartments or other tight
    spaces. You will need to keep the soil moist for the best results and
    take care that you don’t overwater your plants. It grows best in
    temperatures between 40 and 80 degrees which makes it perfect for winter
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    Strawberries
    Strawberries
    Strawberries
    actually thrive in containers despite being known as a plant that needs
    plenty of room to grow. They are actually one of the best plants to
    grow in pots and they thrive even indoors so you can grow your own fresh
    strawberries all year long. You need to choose a sunny spot and this
    can be by a window. Strawberries can also be supplemented with
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    need to choose a container large enough to handle them and make sure
    that you harvest them regularly when they begin to produce to make room
    for additional growth.
    How to Plant and Grow Strawberries in Containers
    Growing Strawberries in a Strawberry Pot
    Pineapple
    Pineapple
    You
    can enjoy pineapple any time during the year by growing it yourself,
    even if you don’t live in a tropical area. Start with a fresh pineapple
    and cut off the crown, leaving a bit of fruit at the top. You’ll want to
    soak the crown for a day or so in water to allow it to soak up moisture
    and then plant in a gallon sized plastic container. You will want to
    choose a warm, sunny spot for your pineapple which makes it a great
    choice for balconies and decks. If you are growing during the winter, be
    sure to bring the plant in at night.
    How to grow pineapples in pots or containers and enjoy the tropical fruit at home
    How to: Grow Pineapples at home
    Cantaloupe
    Cantaloupe
    Yes,
    you can grow cantaloupe in a container. If you love this sweet melon
    and you don’t really have a garden spot to grow your own, just pick up a
    couple of rather large containers and you can grow enough to last you
    all summer. Any variety of cantaloupe can be grown in containers and you
    can let the vines spill over the side or support them with sticks.
    Smaller plants which produce smaller melons are the best choice for
    container gardening because they have more room to grow but you can do
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    you are going to use bean poles or other support.
    How to Grow Cantaloupe
    Oregano
    Oregano
    Oregano
    is a very popular choice for container herbs and it grows very well in
    any sort of container. In fact, growing oregano in a container helps to
    prevent spreading so if you want to keep your oregano under control,
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    need a small container for each plant and a bit of potting soil. Oregano
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    trouble getting it to grow well. Choose a sunny spot to put your oregano
    during the day and then bring it in at night, especially if you are
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    Vegetable & Herb Gardening » How to Grow » Growing Oregano
    Rosemary
    Rosemary
    Having
    an herb garden doesn’t actually mean having a large garden space. You
    can grow many herbs in containers and rosemary is one that does very
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    minimum of peat moss. Rosemary prefers alkaline pH so the acid is great
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    Peppers
    Peppers
    Sweet
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    without a garden space. Choosing the right size container is important
    here. You want the peppers to have room to grow and not be squashed.
    Smaller peppers will require at least a 2 gallon container while larger
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    Growing peppers in containers
    How to Grow Chili Peppers Indoors
    Chives
    Chives
    Chives
    are without a doubt, one of the hardiest herbs that you can plant. They
    grow very well in containers or just about anywhere else you want to
    plant them. Chives are great for adding flavor to soups, dips, and of
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    Bananas
    Bananas
    If
    you love bananas and even if you don’t live in the tropics, you can
    grow a banana plant inside the house, even during the cold winter
    months. Dwarf banana plants grow perfectly inside and they are
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    How To Grow Bananas Indoors
    Spinach
    Spinach
    Spinach
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    Thyme
    Thyme
    Thyme
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    Sage
    Sage
    Get
    ready for those turkey dinners by growing your own sage. Sage is an
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    out. Sage does prefer sunlight so if you don’t have a big enough window
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    Cucumbers
    Cucumbers
    Cucumbers
    are very easy to grow in containers and you can keep them growing all
    winter long in most cases. You can also grow them vertically to maximize
    the space that you have available. Just let them vine up your deck
    railing or even the side of your house if you are putting the containers
    outdoors. Salad bush hybrids, midget picklets and spacemasters are the
    best varieties of cucumbers for container gardening although any type
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    space for the vines and harvest regularly once they begin producing so
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    Kale
    Kale
    Kale
    is great for container gardening and really doesn’t need much space.
    You can grow about five kale plants in a 20 inch pot and growing in
    containers allows you to move them about into the shade or inside out of
    the cold during the winter months. It is relatively easy to grow and
    allows you to have a fresh supply of kale all year long. You can begin
    your kale containers with transplants or direct seeds, whichever you
    prefer. Don’t let them get too dry but don’t overwater, either and make
    sure that you allow a bit of indirect sunlight every day.
    How to Grow Kale in Pots and Containers
    Kale: An Easy Beginner’s Guide to Growing
    Lettuce
    Lettuce
    Lettuce
    is one of the easiest of all plants to grow in containers. You can sit
    the containers out on the balcony or deck for sunlight and you can begin
    your own seedlings at the end of winter for the next planting season.
    Just sow your lettuce seeds directly into potting soil inside a large
    container. You can plant lettuce with other greens such as cilantro or
    arugula if you need to save space. You may need to transplant into a
    larger container when the plants begin to grow but keep the containers
    small enough so that you can easily move them inside and out for
    sunlight.
    Lettuce Growing Guide
    How To Grow Lettuce – Growing your own lettuce is easy!
    Radishes
    Radishes
    Radishes
    add great flavor to salads and other dishes and can be grown easily in
    containers. Short, red radishes can be grown in just about any container
    that you have on hand. Longer, white radishes thrive very well in paint
    buckets or similar containers. Radishes are actually a recommended
    vegetable for first time gardeners because they grow so well. You are
    sure to get a great harvest from your radish containers. Just make sure
    that you water them every few days and sit them beside a window or out
    on the patio for a bit of sunlight a couple of hours each day.
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    Radish Container Care: How To Grow Radishes In Containers
    How to Grow Radish
    Quinoa
    Quinoa
    Quinoa
    is a whole grain that is packed full of nutrients and it’s a food that
    you can easily grow in a container. It’s actually a very hardy plant
    that is not terribly picky about where it grows, which makes it perfect
    for growing indoors or on patios. Plant the seeds directly into potting
    soil in a rather large container. Quinoa plants grown in containers only
    reach about two feet in height so they won’t take up much room and you
    can begin harvesting them in the fall. They are very hardy plants and
    very low maintenance which makes them perfect for container gardening.
    Unexpected Container Gardening: Quinoa
    Collard Greens
    Collard Greens
    Collard
    greens do very well in containers as long as you place the container in
    full sunlight during the day. Plan to give them at least six hours of
    sunlight during the spring and fall months. If planting during summer,
    you will need to move the containers from indoors to somewhere slightly
    shaded during the afternoon hours. During fall and spring however, you
    will need to give them direct sunlight. You can actually grow collard
    greens during every season but winter, unless of course you want to
    provide it with artificial sunlight during the colder months.
    How to grow collard greens in containers
    Potatoes
    Potatoes
    Believe
    it or not, potatoes actually thrive in containers. In fact, you can
    keep your potatoes growing all year long and never have to buy them in
    the store again. They do very well in five gallon buckets and the
    containers are perfect for moving in and out of the sunlight. Make sure
    that you drill a few holes into the bottom of the bucket before planting
    so that your potatoes don’t get overwatered. You can expect to get
    between one and two pounds of potatoes per bucket so depending on how
    many you go through each week, you may only need to plant a couple of
    buckets per growing season.
    How to Grow 100 Pounds of Potatoes in 4 Square Feet
    Carrots
    Carrots
    Carrots,
    like many other root foots, can be grown in containers and they will
    actually thrive throughout the year when cared for properly. Sow the
    seeds thinly because they will really take off. Be sure to provide
    adequate water but don’t overwater. Growing them in containers is about
    the same as growing them in the garden. Make sure that your containers
    have holes for drainage and you should see some growth after about seven
    days or so. You’ll be able to enjoy carrots all year long provided you
    can give them a bit of sunlight or even artificial light if you are
    growing during the winter and live in a really snowy area.
    How to Grow Carrots in Pots
    How to Grow Carrots in Containers
    Watermelon
    Watermelon
    You
    can grow watermelons indoors or on the balcony. If you have a deck or
    porch rail, allow the vines to travel up the trellis or rail, which
    gives them more room and will yield you more fruit. Watermelon is really
    easy to grow in containers and can even thrive indoors during the
    winter months in most cases. A self-watering container is perfect for
    growing watermelon in containers because after all, they do need plenty
    of water. You also want to be sure to give them a bit of sunlight every
    day and this can be direct, artificial, or through a window if you have a
    large enough one.
    How to Plant Watermelons in a Container
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    Beets
    Beets
    Beets
    can be grown easily in containers. Whether you love cooked beets or you
    prefer to pickle them, you can grow them indoors during most seasons
    and have an endless supply right at your fingertips. You don’t have to
    germinate in one container and then transfer into another. In fact,
    beets prefer to grow undisturbed so choose an adequately sized container
    before you plant. Sow the seeds thinly but still be prepared to need to
    weed them out after a couple of weeks. Beets grow fairly well in any
    condition so you should have no problem getting enough for a great
    harvest.
    How to Grow Beets in a Pot
    Cauliflower
    Cauliflower
    Cauliflower,
    broccoli, cabbage, and other cole crops will grow very well in
    containers. These are actually among the easiest of all vegetables to
    grow in post although you should try to avoid planting a lot of
    different types in one container. Choose a container for each cole crop
    so that they will thrive. You do need to choose a container that is at
    least eight inches deep and about eighteen inches wide in order for
    cauliflower to thrive. Be sure that you allow for adequate drainage and
    give your cole crops plenty of sunlight every day.
    Solve the Mystery of Growing Cauliflower
    Growing cauliflowers in pots, difficult but not impossible
    Pole Beans
    Pole Beans
    Imagine
    having a great supply of fresh green beans and from a container garden.
    Pole beans actually do very well in containers so whether you are
    planting an entire container garden plot or just adding a few plants to
    your deck or balcony, if you love fresh beans then by all means, plant
    some in a large container. You need at least a twelve inch container for
    best results and you’ll need a pole of some sort to allow the bean to
    travel up once it begins growing well. This also makes it much easier to
    pick off those beans when they are ready to harvest.
    How To Grow Green Beans In Containers
    Sugar Snap Peas
    Sugar Snap Peas
    Sugar
    snap peas are delicious in stir fry or just by themselves. You can grow
    these pretty easily in planters so even if you don’t have room for a
    traditional garden, you can still enjoy fresh sugar snap peas from time
    to time without spending a fortune on them when they aren’t in season.
    You do want to provide some sort of climbing ability so a trellis or
    porch rail may be necessary when the plants begin to grow fairly well.
    They also thrive much better outdoors than inside so grow them on your
    balcony or patio during the spring/summer growing season for best
    results.
    How To Grow Peas in Container Gardens
    Onions
    Onions
    Onions,
    especially green onions, have been known to grow very well in
    containers, provided you get them adequate space. Choose a planter that
    is at least five inches deep, which allows the onion to grow to full
    bulb size. Just plant the onion sets in potting soil in your chosen
    container and you should be able to get several in a container, allowing
    an inch or so between for growth. Green onion tops are great for adding
    flavor to salads and soups and the bulbs can be left until they reach a
    pretty good size.
    How to grow onions in pots and containers
    Mushrooms
    Mushrooms
    Grow
    your own mushrooms for adding extra flavor to all of your favorite
    dishes and you can do it in a container. If you have never grown
    mushrooms before, don’t fret. This is one of the easiest of all foods to
    grow in a container and you can keep the planter on the porch or
    balcony or even in a windowsill planter if you want. There are many
    different types of mushrooms that will thrive in containers so whether
    you like one or like them all, you can add fresh mushrooms to your
    dishes without having to drive to the store and pick them up.
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    Growing Gourmet Mushrooms at Home from Waste Coffee Grounds
    Eggplant
    Eggplant
    Growing
    eggplant in a container is really easy and depending on the size of
    your planter, you can get a couple of seeds in each one. You should
    choose containers that are at least five inches deep so that you don’t
    crowd the eggplant as it grows. Clay pots are excellent for eggplants
    because they allow heat in to the plant although you can use gallon
    buckets if that’s what you have on hand. You will want to keep the
    plants relatively warm so no setting them outdoors during winter and as
    they begin to grow, you may want to add a bean pole or something similar
    for support.
    10 tips to growing eggplant in a pot or container
    Turnips
    Turnips
    Turnips
    thrive very well in containers. Root plants, turnips are great for
    growing indoors and out and you can grow several containers on the
    balcony or deck. Make sure that your planters are at least eight inches
    deep to allow room for the roots to grow. You also want to ensure that
    there are enough holes in the bottom of the container for adequate
    drainage. Overwatering will cause the plants not to thrive and could
    kill them so plan to drill at least three or four drainage holes and add
    gravel to the bottom of the planter to help with drainage as well.
    Turnips container gardening howto
    Asparagus
    Asparagus
    If
    you love asparagus but don’t love paying high prices for it, grow it
    yourself and you can do so easily in containers. Asparagus is a really
    hardy plant and one that doesn’t require a lot of attention or care.
    Just make sure that your container is large enough to accommodate the
    plant as it grows, which will be up as opposed to root plants. You can
    use a shallow planter but make sure that the diameter is relatively
    large. These do very well indoors so if you don’t have any room outside,
    you can still grow it and just sit the planters out on the balcony for a
    little sunlight every day.
    Growing Asparagus in a container. Little baby homegrown stalks!
    Artichokes
    Artichokes
    Artichoke
    hearts are an acquired taste and a somewhat expensive one at that.
    Instead of paying out high dollars for those in the store, just grab a
    planter and grow your own. Artichokes grow very well in containers and
    aren’t really something that you have to mess with often. They are
    relatively low maintenance and because they take a bit longer to
    germinate, you can plant them in the fall and have them ready to eat by
    spring. Give them just a little water and sunlight regularly and they
    should really thrive.
    How to Grow Artichokes in Pots and Containers
    Parsnips
    Parsnips
    If
    you like adding parsnips to your dishes but have a difficult time
    finding them, especially out of season, you can grow them in containers
    and they do very well. Keep in mind that you’ll need a relatively deep
    container for planting parsnips because they tend to get pretty long. A
    five gallon bucket is a great choice but you have to remember to cut or
    drill holes in the bottom to allow for drainage. You can get several
    seeds in each container provided the planter is wide enough to allow
    them room to grow without crowding them. Note that you will need to weed
    them out after a couple of weeks if you plant a lot in one container.
    How to Grow Parsnips in Containers
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    Comments
    CHARLES BELLIA says
    June 3, 2017 at 8:48 am
    I DO LIKE YOUR
    Reply
    Emily says
    July 3, 2017 at 1:24 am
    Hi Vanessa. A great guide for container gardening 🙂 Our readers will love this! Have included it in our Crafty Like Granny weekly Craft roundup. https://craftylikegranny.com/3ps-for-craft/ 🙂 Cheers Emily
    Reply
    Eileen Hailstone says
    July 22, 2017 at 7:40 pm
    Some
    really good ideas liked very much can any one tell me why my blueberry
    bush has very few fruits this year when I usually have loads also a lot
    of the leaves where brown Eileen Hailstone
    Reply
    Ann Sanders says
    July 24, 2017 at 2:26 pm
    My
    father grows sweet peppers in a container and he gives it to me as a
    present! It looks very cute just like the photo above! I’m gonna grow
    some strawberry and chives. I love them a lot!
    Reply
    wade says
    October 31, 2017 at 3:04 am
    we sell gartden bag, tree bagm, flower pot, plant.
    Reply
    Lona Rouse says
    May 7, 2019 at 8:54 am
    Very informative. I now have many ideas for my new found hobby. Thanks
    Reply
    Barbara Naylor says
    December 27, 2019 at 6:52 am
    I
    don’t seem to have fruit on anything,like chilli,great foilage but no
    chilli or the same for tomatoes.Should I prepare the soil with
    something.i can’t have anything smelly because it’s on my balcony.please
    help.
    Oh
    I grew Zucchini and it had loads of flowers but no fruit.Someone said I
    needed male and female.but nobody knew where to get males
    Reply
    Wilson says
    February 4, 2020 at 12:16 pm
    Nice very. Informatime and it hepls alot
    Reply
    Norman Weiss says
    April 17, 2020 at 8:01 pm
    How do I order vegetable seeds etc.?
    Reply
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The 35 Easiest Container and Pot Friendly Fruits, Vegetables and Herbs
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