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Paṭisambhidā Jāla-Abaddha Paripanti Tipiṭaka Anvesanā ca Paricaya Nikhilavijjālaya ca ñātibhūta Pavatti Nissāya 
http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org anto 105 Seṭṭhaganthāyatta Bhāsā
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1009 LESSON 13-08-2013 TUESDAY FREE ONLINE eNālāndā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY run through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org [Flag of the Federation of Russia] Russian Koleso Dhammy (”Wheel of Dhamma”) 3) School of Information Sciences and Technology; Latest information on Integrated Product Design and Manufacture Development of components Tipitaka Encyclopedia
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1009 LESSON 13-08-2013 TUESDAY 

FREE ONLINE  eNālāndā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY 
run through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org 

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Koleso Dhammy (”Wheel of Dhamma”)

3)  School of Information Sciences and
Technology;

Latest information on Integrated Product Design and Manufacture Development of components

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7o_EjR2EERg

Buddhism in Russia


Uploaded on Aug 9, 2008

by Zinaida Vrublevska through
Professor Rev. Dr. James Kenneth Powell II, opensourcebuddhism.org This
piece very artistically articulates the connections the Russians have
had with Buddhism. Not only Tsar Peter the Great with the world’s first
vernacular Tibetan - Russian Dictionary but Nicholas too was viewed as
leader of the Shambhala warriors who would lead embattled Buddhists to
victory. More importantly, the Mongol Kalmuck Buddhist Madame
Blavatsky, credited with starting the so-called “New Age” had rather
deep ties with Buddhism.



http://www.isr.umd.edu/Labs/CIM/ttm/research.html

Integrating Product Design and Production: Designing for Time-to-Market


 

Abstract: This paper presents a methodology that incorporates
production concerns at an early product design stage to reduce its time-to-market. The
dependencies between the product and the production system have been explored, and methods
to improve the fit between the two are being developed using design theory, manufacturing
knowledge, queuing theory and trade-off analysis. This methodology would provide the
design team with tools to estimate the production time of a new product and to indicate
appropriate changes to the design and production system early in the product realization
process.


Introduction: The 1990s have seen the emergence of the customer as
the dominant factor in the manufacturing enterprise. With ever decreasing product life
cycles the time-to-market has gained equal importance with the cost of the product. The
ability to integrate a new product into an existing manufacturing system is a major factor
in determining the time-to-market. The main factors influencing the production time are
the production quantity, the available capacity of the production system and the selection
of appropriate materials and processes for the various components of the product. To
reduce a product’s manufacturing and assembly times, these aspects must be considered
in the early design stage, when it can have the maximum impact on the product cost and
time-to-market. The design for time-to-market (DFTTM) methodology considers the expected
state of the production system at the time of new product’s introduction in the
selection of materials, manufacturing and assembly processes at the early design stage.

When the design team has a preliminary product structure and rough
sketches of its parts, candidate materials, manufacturing and assembly processes must be
selected. These selections should be made such that the materials and processes for the
different parts and subassemblies are compatible with each other and satisfy the design
requirements [1]. Since the design is still at its conceptual stage, detailed engineering
drawings are not available. Thus a tool is needed that would utilize the high level design
information available at this stage to estimate the product’s time-to-market. The
tool should be able to capture the design information with minimal effort on the part of
the design team, provide them with reasonable estimates of the time-to-market and indicate
where improvements to the design can be made to reduce its manufacturing and assembly
times.

Research Objectives:

The DFTTM methodology enables the product realization team to answer
the following questions in the initial stages of the product development process: Can we
make it on time? What can we do to make it faster?

The methodology is being implemented in a system that allows the design
team to:

System Architecture: The software system shown in Figure 1 includes
the following three subsystems:

Figure 1. System architecture

References:

  1. E. B. Magrab. Integrated Product and Process Design and Development, CRC Press,
    Boca Raton, FL, 1997.
  2. N.P. Suh. Principles of Design, Oxford University Press, New York, 1990.

Tipitaka

Encyclopedia


The complete Tipitaka is 40 volumes long
The complete Tipitaka is 40 volumes long

Tipitaka  is the name given to the Buddhist
sacred scriptures and is made up of two words; ti meaning ‘three’ and
pitaka meaning ‘basket.’ The word basket was given to these writings
because they were orally transmitted for some centuries (from about 483
BCE), the way a basket of earth at a construction site might be relayed
from the head of one worker to another. It was written on palm leaves in
the Pali language around 100 BCE. The three parts of the Tipitaka are
the Sutta Pitaka, the Vinaya Pitaka and the Abhidhamma Pitaka. The Tipitaka was composed in the Pali
language and takes up more than forty volumes in an English
translation, roughly about 20,000 pages. It is the largest sacred book
of any of the great world religions.

It is also known as the Pali Canon since the language is in Pali and to better differentiate it from the Mahayana Tripitaka (only one letter difference).

Contents


Sutta Pitaka

Khuddakapatha
Dhammapada
Udana
Itivuttaka
Sutta Nipata
Vimanavatthu
Petavatthu
Theragatha
Therigatha
Jataka
Niddesa
Patisambhidamagga
Apadana
Buddhavamsa
Cariyapitaka
Nettippakarana (Burmese edition)
Petakopadesa (Burmese edition)
Milindapanha (Burmese edition)


Vinaya Pitaka

A. Mahavagga
in addition to rules of conduct and etiquette for the Sangha, this
section contains several important sutta-like texts, including an
account of the period immediately following the Buddha’s Awakening, his
first sermons to the group of five monks, and stories of how some of his
great disciples joined the Sangha and themselves attained Awakening.
B. Cullavagga
an elaboration of the bhikkhus’ etiquette and duties, as well as the
rules and procedures for addressing offences that may be committed
within the Sangha.


Abhidhamma Pitaka

Please watch:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=asR1PN2o1ic


Pāḷi Tipiṭaka Chanting & Recitation in Various Languages

Uploaded on Mar 15, 2008

Pāḷi Tipiṭaka Chanting & Recitation in Various Languages since 2008.

In
2008 the World Tipiṭaka in Roman script (Recitation version) was
presented as a royal gift from the late Princess Patron to Maha Bodhi
Society of India to be used for the annual Tipiṭaka recitation
activities.

The Roman-script World Tipiṭaka edition was also used for the 2009 Tipiṭaka Recitation at Buddhagaya.

Digital Archives from Dhamma Society’s World Tipiṭaka Project in Roman Script, 1999-2009.

Let’s translate Pāḷi text from the World Tipiṭaka by using eTipiṭaka Quotation…
Description
The
World Tipiṭaka Translations Page provides a Dhamma Venue for patrons to
post their favorite translations in all languages from the World
Tipiṭaka Edition in Roman Script.

Patrons are encouraged to also post the Pāḷi text from the Tipiṭaka Quotation for friendly peer reviews.

If possible, the translated Pāḷi words should be provided in parenthesis to honour the original concept of Dhamma p reserved in the Pāḷi Tipiṭaka. (See example below).

Ex.

Pāḷi text from the World Tipiṭaka in roman Script :
Sīlaṃ pākārakaṃ tattha,

Proposed Style of the New Tipiṭaka Translation :
Morality (sīla) is the surrounding wall,

http://studies.worldtipitaka.org/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sixth_Buddhist_council

Sixth Buddhist council


Jump to: navigation, search

The Sixth Buddhist Council (Pali: Chaṭṭha Saṅgāyana; Burmese: ဆဋ္ဌမသံဃာရတနာတင်ပွဲ or ဆဋ္ဌသင်္ဂါယနာ) was a general council of Theravada Buddhism, held in a specially built cave and pagoda complex at Kaba Aye Pagoda in Yangon, Burma. The council was attended by 2,500 monastics from eight Theravada Buddhist countries. The Council lasted from Vesak 1954 to Vesak 1956, its completion coinciding with the traditional 2,500th anniversary the Buddha’s Parinibbāna. In the tradition of past Buddhist councils,
a major purpose of the Sixth Council was to preserve the Buddha’s
teachings and practices as understood in the Theravada tradition.

Over the two-year period, monks (sangīti-kāraka) from different countries recited from their existing redaction of the Pali Canon and the associated post-canonical literature. As a result, the Council synthesized a new redaction of the Pali texts ultimately transcribed into several native scripts.

Timing and participants


Convening of the Sixth Buddhist council at the Great Cave.

The Council was convened 83 years after the Burmese Fifth Buddhist council was held in Mandalay.
The Council commenced proceedings on Vesak, 17 May 1954, in order to
allow sufficient time to conclude its work on Vesak, 24 May 1956, the
day marking the 2,500-year Jayanti celebration of the Lord Buddha’s Parinibbāna, according to the traditional Theravada dating.

The Sixth Council was sponsored by the Burmese Government led by the Prime Minister, the Honorable U Nu. He authorized the construction of the Kaba Aye Pagoda and the Maha Passana Guha, or “Great Cave”, in which the work of the council took place. This venue was designed to be like the cave in which the First Buddhist Council was held.

As in the preceding councils, the Sixth Council’s aim was to affirm and preserve the genuine Dhamma and Vinaya. The 2,500 participating Theravadan Elders came from eight different countries, being Myanmar, Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam, Sri Lanka, India, and Nepal. A temple in Japan also sent delegates. The only Western monks to participate were German-born, Sri-Lanka-residing Ven. Nyanatiloka and Ven. Nyanaponika.[1]

The late Ven. Mahasi Sayadaw was appointed to ask the required questions about the Dhamma to the Ven. Bhadanta Vicittasarabhivamsa, who answered them.

Resultant texts

By the time this council met all the participating countries had had
the Pali Tipitaka rendered into their native scripts, with the exception
of India. During the two years that the Council met, the Tipitaka
and its allied literature in all scripts were painstakingly examined
with their differences noted down, the necessary corrections made, and
collated. Not much difference was found in the content of any of the
texts. Finally, after the Council had officially approved the texts, all
of the books of the Tipitaka and their commentaries were prepared for
printing on modern presses. This notable achievement was made possible
through the dedicated efforts of the 2,500 monks and numerous lay
people. Their work came to an end with the rise of the full moon on the
evening of 24 May 1956, the 2,500th anniversary of the Buddha’s Parinibbāna, according to the traditional Theravada dating.

This Council’s work was a unique achievement in Buddhist history.
After the scriptures had been examined thoroughly several times, they
were put into print, covering 52 treatises in 40 volumes. At the end of
this Council, all the participating countries had the Pali Tipitaka rendered into their native scripts, with the exception of India.

Dhamma Society Fund 6th Buddhist Council Tipitaka Edition

Since the year 1999, the Dhamma Society Fund in Thailand has been revising the 1958 Sixth Council Edition with other editions to remove all printing and editorial errors. [1] [2]
This romanized version in 40 volumes, known as the World Tipitaka
Edition, was completed in 2005. The 40-volume Tipitaka Studies Reference
appeared in 2007.

The Dhamma Society Fund is currently printing the World Tipitaka
Edition in Roman Script based on the B.E. 2500 Great International
Tipitaka Council Resolution (1958 Sixth Buddhist Council) with
sponsorship from the Royal Matriarch of Thailand, Tipitaka patrons and
leaders of business community, for distribution as a gift of Dhamma
worldwide, with a priority for the libraries and institutes around the
world which had received the Siam-script Tipitaka as a royal gift from
King Chulalongkorn Chulachomklao of Siam over a century ago.



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buddhism_by_country

By Country

Buddhism by Country
Country/Territory Population (July 2013)[40]  % Buddhist Buddhist total
Afghanistan Afghanistan 31,108,077 N/A N/A
 American Samoa 54,719 0.3%[41] - 0.7%[42] 164 - 383
Argentina Argentina 42,610,981 0.1%[43][41] 42,611
 Aruba 109,153 0.1%[41] - 0.3%[44] 109 - 327
Australia Australia 22,262,501 2.5%[45] 556,563
Austria Austria 8,221,646 0.1%[46] - 0.2%[41] 8,222 - 16,444
Bahrain Bahrain 1,281,332 0.2%[47] - 2.5%[41] 2,563 - 32,033
Bangladesh Bangladesh 163,654,860 0.5%[41] - 0.7%[48] 818,274 - 1,145,584
 Barbados 288,725 unknown[49] 50[50]
 Belarus 9,625,888 unknown[51] unknown
Belgium Belgium 10,444,268 0.3%[41][52] - 1%[53] 31,332 - 104,443
Belize Belize 334,297 0.5%[41][54] 1,671
 Bermuda 69,467 0.5%[41] - 0.7% [55] 347 - 486
Bhutan Bhutan 725,296 75%[56][41] - 84%[57] 543,972 - 609,249
 Bolivia 10,461,053 unknown[58][59] unknown
 Bosnia and Herzegovina 3,875,723 N/A N/A
 Botswana 2,127,825 unknown[60] unknown
Brazil Brazil 201,009,622 0.130%[61] - 0.5%[62] 261,313 - 1,005,048
Brunei Brunei 415,717 8.6%[41] - 13%[63] - 16.8%[64] 35,752 - 54,043 - 69,840
Bulgaria Bulgaria 6,981,642 unknown[65] unknown
 Burkina Faso 17,812,961 unknown[66] unknown
Myanmar Burma (Myanmar) 55,167,330 80%[41] - 90%[67][68] 44,133,864 - 49,650,597
Cambodia Cambodia 15,205,539 93%[69] - 97%[70][41] 14,141,151 - 14,749,373
 Cameroon 20,549,221 unknown[71] unknown
Canada Canada 34,568,211 1.1%[72] - 3.5%[73] 380,250 - 1,209,887
 Chile 17,216,945 0.1%[74][41][75] 17,217
China China 1,349,585,838 20%[76][41] - 50%[77][78] 269,917,168 - 674,792,919
 Christmas Island 1,513 36%[79] - 55%[80] - 75%[81] 545 - 832 - 1135
 Colombia 45,745,783 0.02%[82][83][84] 9,149
Costa Rica Costa Rica 4,695,942 2.2%[85] 103,311
 Cote d’Ivoire 22,400,835 0.01%[86][87] 2,240
Croatia Croatia 4,475,611 0.03%[88][41] 1,343
 Cuba 11,394,043 0.04%[89] - 0.2%[90] 4,558 - 22,788
 Curaçao 146,836 0.5%[91] 734
 Cyprus 1,155,403 0.2%[41] - 0.6%[92] 2,311 - 6,932
Czech Republic Czech Republic 10,162,921 0.1%[93][41] - 0.3%[94][95] 10,163 – 30,489
 Democratic Republic of the Congo 75,507,308 unknown[96] unknown
Denmark Denmark 5,556,452 0.2%[41] - 0.5%[97][98] 11,113 - 27,782
 Dominica 73,286 0.1%[99][41] 73
 Dominican Republic 10,219,630 0.1%[100][41][101] 10,220
 East Timor 1,172,390 0.1%[102] - 0.4%[103] 1,172 - 4,690
 Ecuador 15,439,429 0.1%[104][41][105] 15,439
El Salvador El Salvador 6,108,590 0.1%[41][106][107] 6,108
 Estonia 1,266,375 0.1%[41][108][109] 1,266
Falkland Islands Falkland Islands (Islas Malvinas) 3,140 0.2%[110][41] 6
 Federated States of Micronesia 106,104 0.4%[41] - 0.7%[111] 424 - 743
 Fiji 896,758 0.2%[112][113] 1,794
Finland Finland 5,266,114 0.1%[114][41][115] 5,266
France France 65,951,611 1.2%[116][53][117] - 1.5%[118] 791,419 - 1,002,464
 French Guiana 239,450 3.6%[119] 8,620
 French Polynesia 277,293 0.5%[120][121] 20,922
Germany Germany 81,147,265 0.35% [122] - 1.1%[116] 284,015 - 892,620
 Ghana 22,931,299 0.01%[123][124][125][126] 2,293
Greece Greece 10,772,967 0.1%[127][41][128] 10,773
 Guam 160,378 1.1%[41] - 2.2%[129] - 3%[130] 1,764 – 3,528 – 4,811
Guatemala Guatemala 14,373,472 0.1%[131][132][133] 14,372
 Guinea 11,176,026 0.01%[134][135] 1,118
 Guyana 739,903 0.5%[136][137] 3,700
Honduras Honduras 8,448,465 0.1%[138][41] 8,448
Hong Kong Hong Kong 7,182,724 15%[41][139] - 90%[140][141] 1,077,409 - 6,464,452
 Hungary 9,939,470 0.1%[41][142][143] 9,939
Iceland Iceland 315,281 0.2% [144] - 0.4%[41] 631 - 1,261
India India 1,220,800,359 0.8%[145] - 3%[146][116] 9,766,403 – 36,624,011
Indonesia Indonesia 251,160,124 0.72%[147][41] - 1.7%[148] 1,808,353 - 4,269,722
Iran Iran 72,212,000 N/A N/A
 Ireland 4,775,982 0.2%[41][149] 9,552
Israel Israel 7,707,042 0.3%[41][150][151] 23,121
Italy Italy 61,482,297 0.2%[41][152][153] 122,965
 Jamaica 2,909,714 0.1%[154][155] - 0.3%[156] 2,910 - 8,729
Japan Japan 127,253,075 36%[157][41] - 70%[158] - 96%[159][116] 45,811,107 - 89,077,153 - 122,162,952
Jordan Jordan 6,482,081 0.4%[41] 25,928
Kazakhstan Kazakhstan 17,736,896 0.2%[41][160] 35,474
 Kenya 44,037,656 0.01%[41][161][162] 4,404
North Korea North Korea 24,720,407 1.5%[41] - 4.5%[163] - 13.8%[164][165] 370,806 - 1,112,418 - 3,411,416
South Korea South Korea 48,955,203 23%[41][166] - 50%[167][168] 11,259,697 - 24,477,602
Kuwait Kuwait 2,695,316 2.8%[41] - 3.8%[169] 75,469 - 102,422
Kyrgyzstan Kyrgyzstan 5,548,042 0.35%[170] - 0.5% [171] 19,418 - 27,740
Laos Laos 6,695,166 67%[172][41][173] 4,485,761
 Latvia 2,178,443 0.01%[174][41][175] 2,178
Lebanon Lebanon 4,131,583 0.1%[176] - 2.1%[177][178] 4,132 - 86,763
 Lesotho 1,936,181 unknown[179] unknown
 Liberia 3,989,703 unknown[180] unknown
Libya Libya 6,002,347 0.3%[41][181] 18,007
Liechtenstein Liechtenstein 37,009 0.3%[182] 111
 Lithuania 3,515,858 unknown[41][183][184] unknown
 Luxembourg 514,862 unknown[185] unknown
Macau Macau 583,003 17%[41][186] - 50%[187] - 80%[188] 99,111 - 291,502 - 466,402
 Macedonia 2,087,171 unknown[189] unknown
 Madagascar 22,599,098 0.1% [190][191] 22,599
 Malawi 16,777,547 unknown[192][193] unknown
Malaysia Malaysia 29,628,392 18%[41][194] - 21%[195] 5,333,111 - 6,221,962
Maldives Maldives 393,988 0.6%[41][196] 2,364
 Mali 15,968,882 unknown[197] unknown
 Malta 411,277 unknown[198][199] unknown
 Mauritius 1,322,238 0.4% [200] - 1.5%[201] - 2%[202] 5,289 - 19,834 - 26,445
Mexico Mexico 116,220,947 0.016%[203][204] 18,595
Mongolia Mongolia 3,226,516 53%[205] - 72%[206] - 93%[38][207] 1,710,053 - 2,323,092 - 3,000,660
 Montenegro 653,474 unknown[208] unknown
 Morocco 32,649,130 unknown[209] unknown
 Namibia 2,182,852 unknown[210] unknown
 Nauru 9,434 1.1%[41] - 8%[211] - 11.9%[212] 104 – 755 – 1,123
Nepal Nepal 30,430,267 9%[213] - 11%[214][41][215] 2,738,724 - 3,347,329
Netherlands Netherlands 16,805,037 0.1%[216] - 0.2%[41] - 1.2%[53][217] 17,000 - 33,610 – 201,660
 New Caledonia 264,022 0.6%[41][218] 1,584
 New Zealand 4,365,113 1.5%[41][219] - 2.5%[220] - 5%[221] 65,477 - 109,128 - 218,256
Nicaragua Nicaragua 5,788,531 0.1%[41][222] 5,789
 Nigeria 174,507,539 unknown[223][224] unknown
 Northern Mariana Islands 51,170 10.6%[41] - 15.6%[225] 5,424 - 7,983
Norway Norway 4,722,701 0.7%[41][226] - 1%[53] 33,059 - 47,227
Oman Oman 3,154,134 0.8%[41][227] 25,233
Pakistan Pakistan 193,238,868 unknown[228] 1,492[229]
 Palau 21,108 0.8%[41] - 1%[230] 169 - 211
 Palestine 4,293,313 unknown[231] unknown
Panama Panama 3,559,408 0.5%[232] - 0.9%[233] - 2.1%[234] 17,797 - 32,035 - 74,748
 Papua New Guinea 6,431,902 0.2%[235] - 0.3%[236] 12,864 - 19,296
 Paraguay 6,623,252 0.2%[237][238] 13,257
 Peru 29,849,303 0.2%[41] - 0.3%[239][240] 59,699 - 89,548
Philippines Philippines 105,720,644 0.1%[41][241] 105,721
Poland Poland 38,383,809 0.1%[41][242][243] 38,384
 Portugal 10,799,270 0.6% - 0.8%[41][244] 64,796 - 86,394
 Puerto Rico 3,674,209 0.1%[245] - 0.3%[41] 3,674 - 11,023
Qatar Qatar 2,042,444 1.9%[246] - 3.1%[41] - 6%[247] 38,806 - 63,316 - 122,547
Réunion Réunion 839,500 0.2%[41][248] 1,679
 Romania 21,790,479 0.01%[249][250] 2,179
Russia Russia 142,500,482 0.7%[251] - 1.05%[252] - 1.4%[253] 1,000,000 – 1,500,000 – 2,000,000
Saudi Arabia Saudi Arabia 26,939,583 0.3%[41][254] 70,000[255] - 80,819
Senegal Senegal 12,521,851 unknown[256][257] unknown
 Serbia 10,150,265 unknown[258][259] unknown
 Seychelles 90,846 0.1%[260][261] 91
 Sierra Leone 5,612,685 unknown[262][263] unknown
Singapore Singapore 5,460,302 33%[264] - 44%[265] - 51%[266] 1,801,900 - 2,402,533 - 2,784,754
Slovakia Slovakia 5,488,339 0.1%[267][268] 5,488
Slovenia Slovenia 1,992,690 unknown[269] unknown
 Solomon Islands 597,248 0.3%[41][270] 1,792
South Africa South Africa 48,601,098 0.2%[41] - 0.3%[271] 97,202 - 145,803
 Spain 47,370,542 0.1%[41][272] - 0.4% - 0.7% 47,370 - 200,000 - 300,000[273]
Sri Lanka Sri Lanka 21,675,648 70%[274][275] 15,172,954
 Suriname 566,846 0.6%[41] - 0.9%[276] 3,401 – 5,102
 Swaziland 1,403,362 unknown[277] unknown
Sweden Sweden 9,119,423 0.4%[41][278] - 1%[53] 36,478 - 91,194
Switzerland Switzerland 7,996,026 0.3%[279] - 0.4%[41] - 1%[53] 23,988 - 31,984 - 79,960
Taiwan Taiwan 23,299,716 35%[280] – 80%[281] – 93%[282] 8,154,901 - 18,639,773 - 21,668,736
Tajikistan Tajikistan 7,910,041 unknown[283] unknown
 Tanzania 48,261,942 unknown[284] unknown
Thailand Thailand 67,448,120 93%[285] - 95%[286] 62,726,752 - 64,075,714
 Togo 7,154,237 unknown[287][288] unknown
 Tonga 106,322 0.1%[289] 106
 Trinidad and Tobago 1,225,225 0.3%[41] - 0.7%[290] 3,676 - 8,577
Turkey Turkey 80,694,485 unknown[291] unknown
Turkmenistan Turkmenistan 5,113,040 N/A N/A
 Tuvalu 10,698 0.1%[292] 11
 Uganda 34,758,809 unknown[293][294] unknown
Ukraine Ukraine 44,573,205 0.1%[41][295] 44,573
United Arab Emirates United Arab Emirates 5,473,972 2%[41][296] - 4%[297] 109,479 - 218,959
United Kingdom United Kingdom 63,395,574 0.4%[41][298] - 1.2%[116][53] 253,582 - 760,747
United States United States 316,668,567 0.7%[299] - 1.3%[41][300] - 2%[301] 2,216,680 - 4,116,691 - 6,333,371
 Uruguay 3,324,460 0.1%[302][303] 3,324
United States Virgin Islands US Virgin Islands 104,737 unknown[304] unknown
Uzbekistan Uzbekistan 28,661,637 0.1%[305] - 0.2%[306] - 0.3%[307] 28,662 – 57,323 – 85,985
 Vanuatu 261,565 0.2%[308] - 0.3%[309] 523 - 785
Venezuela Venezuela 28,459,085 0.1%[310] - 0.2%[311] 28,459 - 56,918
Vietnam Vietnam 92,477,857 10%[312] - 55%[313] - 75%[314] 9,247,786 - 46,238,929 - 69,358,393
 Zambia 14,222,233 unknown 90[315]
 Zimbabwe 13,182,908 0.01%[316][317][318] 1,318
TOTAL 7,095,217,980 7.13%[319] - 16.15% 506,079,682 - 1,146,042,210[116][320][321]

Top 20 countries

Top 20 by practicing Buddhists on the left (lowest numbers) and by cultural/nominal adherents whom are strongly influenced by Buddhist practices with folk religions on the right (highest numbers) as of 2013.

Top 20 Buddhist countries/territories (by population)
Top 20 (lowest) Top 20 (highest)
Rank Country Practicing Buddhists Country Cultural Buddhists
1  China 269,917,168  China 674,792,919
2  Thailand 62,726,752  Japan 122,162,952
3  Japan 45,811,107  Vietnam 69,358,393
4 Burma Burma/Myanmar 44,133,864  Thailand 64,075,714
5  Sri Lanka 15,172,954 Burma Burma/Myanmar 49,650,597
6  Cambodia 14,141,151  India 36,624,011
7  South Korea 11,259,697  South Korea 24,477,602
8  India 9,766,403  Taiwan 21,668,736
9  Vietnam 9,247,786  Sri Lanka 15,172,954
10  Taiwan 8,154,901  Cambodia 14,749,373
11  Malaysia 5,333,111  Hong Kong 6,464,452
12    Nepal 2,738,724  United States 6,333,371
13  United States 2,216,680  Malaysia 6,221,962
14  Indonesia 1,808,353  Laos 4,485,761
15  Singapore 1,801,900  Indonesia 4,269,722
16  Mongolia 1,710,053  North Korea 3,411,416
17  Hong Kong 1,077,409    Nepal 3,347,329
18  Russia 1,000,000  Mongolia 3,000,660
19  Bangladesh 818,274  Singapore 2,784,754
20  France 791,419  Russia 2,000,000
Top 20 Buddhist countries/territories (by percentage)
Top 20 (lowest) Top 20 (highest)
Rank Country  % Practicing Buddhists Country  % Cultural Buddhists
1  Cambodia 93%  Cambodia 97%
2  Thailand 93%  Japan 96%
3 Burma Burma/Myanmar 80%  Thailand 95%
4  Bhutan 75%  Taiwan 93%
5  Sri Lanka 70%  Mongolia 93%
6  Laos 67% Burma Burma/Myanmar 90%
7  Mongolia 53%  Hong Kong 90%
8  Japan 36%  Bhutan 84%
9  Christmas Island 36%  Macau 80%
10  Taiwan 35%  Vietnam 75%
11  Singapore 33%  Christmas Island 75%
12  South Korea 23%  Sri Lanka 70%
13  China 20%  Laos 67%
14  Malaysia 18%  Singapore 51%
15  Macau 17%  China 50%
16  Hong Kong 15%  South Korea 50%
17  Northern Mariana Islands 10.6%  Malaysia 21%
18  Vietnam 10%  Brunei 16.8%
19    Nepal 9%  Northern Mariana Islands 15.6%
20  Brunei 8.6%  North Korea 13.8%

Remarks: Lower numbers/percentages are practicing adherents,
or who those who have taken the Refuge. Higher numbers/percentages
represent nominal or cultural Buddhists and practitioners of Buddhism
alongside related faiths such as Confucianism, Taoism, Shinto, etc., as
well as those who subscribe to Buddhism and its philosophies but stop
short of any ceremonial or formal practice. Note that communist
governments in China, North Korea, and Vietnam officially discourage
religion, and lower estimates reflect those who have registered to
state-sponsored Buddhist institutions.



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