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12/06/18
Vipassana Fellowship Meditation 1 December - 7 December Contemplation - Day 62 Day 65 Day 66
Filed under: General, Vinaya Pitaka, Sutta Pitaka, Abhidhamma Pitaka, Tipiṭaka, ಅಭಿಧಮ್ಮಪಿಟಕ, ವಿನಯಪಿಟಕ, ತಿಪಿಟಕ (ಮೂಲ)
Posted by: site admin @ 1:06 am
Vipassana Fellowship Meditation

1 December - 7 December

Contemplation -

Day 62


Day 65


Day 66


5 Oct 2018 Vipassanā Fellowship meditation LESSON  Tue 2 Oct 2018 LESSON (103)

https://course.org/campus

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Vipassana Fellowship

Meditation Course - September 2018

Meditation Course - September 2018

This is the application form for the 10 week online meditation course from Vipassana Fellowship.

The course begins on Saturday 29th September and ends on Friday 7th December 2018.

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The Meditation Course

Application Details

Our
next available course will begin in September 2018 and registration is
now open. To ensure a place, early application is advisable. The course
runs from September 29th - December 7th, 2018.

Subscription Fees For New Course Participants

The
subscription rate for our current course is US $140. This brings 10
weeks’ tuition via Vipassana Fellowship’s Online Course Campus, personal
support for your practice (by e-mail and online discussion) from the
course teacher and includes specially recorded audio guided meditations
and chants.

Please note that anyone in genuine financial
difficulty may contact us before applying to discuss paying by
instalments over a longer term or, when necessary, a reduced
subscription fee.

Homelands Places

Our FREE subscription offer for South Asia

If
you were born and currently live in one of the traditional homelands of
early Theravada Buddhism we are able to offer a limited number of
places on each online course free of charge. This scheme applies to
those native to - and permanently resident in - India, Sri Lanka,
Thailand, Nepal, Burma, Pakistan, Cambodia and Laos. You must also be
able to access the course daily from your home country. Homelands places
are always in high demand and it is advisable to apply as soon as
possible. The special Homelands form for our September course will be
available here on August 29th. Please do not use the standard
application form below for Homelands places.

Subscriptions For Previous Participants

Concessionary rates available to all previous participants

If
you have participated in any of our earlier online courses you are
welcome to join us for the new session at a substantial discount: the
standard version for US $80 including the downloadable audio material.
Note: Our Parisa scheme is an alternative way of subscribing that
provides ongoing support, access to future courses and new monthly
material.

Registration

If you would like to register for
the forthcoming course, you will need to complete our online application
and pay the subscription to secure a place. Once we have received your
form and payment we will normally write to you within 7 days to confirm
your place.

Completion of our application form

We need to
know a little about you if we are to be able to support you during the
course. We’ll ask you for your contact details and also that you tell us
something about your experience and reason for wanting to take the
course. This provides the opportunity, if you wish, to let the course
leader know of any issues that may need to be taken into account during
the 10 weeks we will be together. Payment can be securely made through
Stripe using most Credit or Debit cards.

Please ensure you have
read the Course Description and Frequently Asked Questions. You may also
find it useful to read the Terms and Conditions that govern the use of
this site, our software, and which include our privacy and refund
policies for your protection.

Apply now for our September 2018 ten week course.
Click here to use our course.org secure server.

Vipassanā Fellowship meditation from the Theravāda tradition for the spiritual development of people of all faiths and

http://www.vipassana.com/course/
 

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Vipassana Fellowship Meditation Course

An established online course in Mindfulness Meditation as found in the Serenity and Insight traditions of early Buddhism.

Please join us for one of our 10 week courses:

June 2018 (10 week course: June 16th - August 24th)
September 2018 (10 week course: September 29th - December 7th) - Registration now available.
January 2019 (10 week course)
Vipassana
Fellowship’s online meditation courses have been offered since 1997 and
have proven helpful to meditators in many countries around the world.
The main text is based on a tried and tested format and serves as a
practical introduction to samatha (tranquility) and vipassana (insight)
techniques from the Theravada tradition of Buddhism. Intended primarily
for beginners, the 10 week course is also suitable for experienced
meditators who wish to explore different aspects of the tradition. The
emphasis is on building a sustainable and balanced meditation practice
that is compatible with lay life. The course is led by Andrew Quernmore,
a meditation teacher for over 20 years and with a personal meditation
practice of more than 35 years. Andrew trained with  teachers in Sri
Lanka and in England and has taught meditation in London colleges and at
retreats in the UK, Europe and Asia. The course is delivered wholly
online in our Course Campus.

Course Outline
Frequently Asked Questions
Application Form
Testimonials
Already enrolled? Log-in here
Parisa - Our support scheme for previous participants
Comments from participants

Participants in our earlier course wrote:

“What
a wonderful experience this has been. The course was so well organized,
easily accessible, affordable, systematic, and comprehensive. I will
always be grateful for this experience in my journey.” L, USA

“I found the course immensely useful, accessible and extremely thought-provoking.” - A, UK

“I
didn’t finish everything, but what I was able to experience was
profound. Thank you so much for the tremendous wealth of thinking and
peace contained within your course.” - N, USA

“I found it very
helpful and well structured. It helped me establish a daily practice
throughout the duration and to learn a lot” - I, Argentina

“When I
applied to join the course, I was struggling in my practice and had
lost heart. I can’t sufficiently express my appreciation and gratitude
for the wonderful resource you offer. The content was immediately
engaging, and was throughout delivered with clarity and thoughtful care.
Perhaps I can best express feedback in terms of how differently things
feel having completed the course. The words that pop up are refreshment,
reinvigorated, revival; joyful reconnection and commitment. Thank you.”
- E, UK

“Before joining this course I was doing meditation but
not with such discipline and without any structure. This course showed
me many beautiful aspects of meditation which I have read before but not
experienced. My sincere thanks to you and all people working for this
online course. This is great help to people who cannot go physically to
Ashrams to attend and practice.” S, India

“I greatly enjoyed it! And found it to be a great introduction to various meditation techniques.” - M, Hong Kong

“I
very much appreciated the structure of the course and the exercises,
which made it easy to integrate them into normal everyday life. Not
being in a retreat but living in normal circumstances while practicing
the exercises has enabled me to more and more notice phenomena arising
in particular situations and I indeed started to learn and observe how
suffering is created in everyday life situations and what suffering
feels like. (A bit like ‘training on the job.’) Also I noticed insights
arising, literally out of nowhere.” - A, Germany

“am very happy
with the offered course, and Andrew’s use of personal perspective really
helped me understand things better. Although I’ve previously used
Vipassana meditation, this course really brought it together for me.” J,
USA

“Meditations of Loving-Kindness, Compassion, Appreciative
Joy, Equanimity etc. will no doubt help to maintain an emotional balance
in the midst of discouraging vicissitudes of life. All in all the
package was complete, precise and well crafted for the development of
mind. Thank you, with your help I began the journey. And hope, will
continue till the end.” J, India

“Truly memorable experience. Am
determined more than ever to continue my practice and perpetual
exploration. Thanks for taking us through this journey.” G, India

“I
enjoyed very much the January meditation course. Although I’ve done a
few of those 10 day courses, this online course taught me new techniques
that I find helpful. I also enjoyed the readings and found Andrew’s
style of writing to be very pleasing to read. He doesn’t shove the text
down one’s throat. Instead, he imparts the information in a way which is
easy to read and leaves the reader feeling at ease - as though this is
really doable if only one approaches it with a relaxed and calm
attitude. Thanks Andrew! I hope we meet someday!” - A, USA

Recent comments:

“This course has been very helpful to me in establishing a daily practice.” - D, USA

“I have learned much and my meditation practice has benefitted greatly…” - C, Australia

“I
would like to thank you for your well structured, informative and
personal course, it helped me for 3 months in a great way and left me
determine to continue meditation practice…” - T, Qatar

“Wonderful
course. Like a guided stroll through a wondrous rainforest. Rough
terrain and stormy weather were dealt with gently but profoundly. Beauty
was to be rejoiced in. Student discussion was fun and educative. Both
my meditation practise and my Buddhism grew exponentially. Thank you
Andrew and all participants.” -S, Australia

“I enjoyed your course. I meditate each morning…” - A, USA

“Thank you very much for the Vipassana course! … I kept up, learned, and benefitted in what feels like a major way.” - M, USA

“Impermanence!
I do not like endings. Thank you so much for offering this meditation
course to the world. I was so happy to find it.” - S, Canada

“Hi,
I have just completed the course. It was fantastic, life altering. Feel
very sad that it is finished. I have now established a daily meditation
practice and will try to find a group in Sydney to further my dhamma
practice. Thank you, it really has been a remarkable experience. I will
join the Parisa and stay in touch with this organization. I have NO
complaints only gratitude. Thank you.” - K, Australia

“As we near
the end of the course I just want to say ‘thank you’ for your work on
it and share some of my thinking and experience at thsi point. Ive found
the different aproaches to meditation interesting and useful and have
appreciated your focus on practicalities. The frequently asked questions
have helped to avoid my inundating you with questions, as many people
have clearly walked the path before asking them! … I am happy that it
is a practical philosophy for living an ethical life, I like the
emphasis on acting skillfully, feel that individual responsibility for
ones actions (rather than relying on redemption) makes sense … Thank
you for a very accessible path! - J, UK

Earlier comments

Dhamma Essay:
The Five Spiritual Faculties by Bhikkhu Bodhi

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10 week ourses begin:Sat 29 Sep 2007

Do Good Be Mindful - Awakened One with Awareness (AOA)

Always
be Calm, Quiet, Alert and Attentive and have an Equanimity Mind with a
Clear Understanding that Everything is Changing - that is Vipassana
(Insight) Meditation that brings Eternal Bliss as a Final Goal.

Course Access Details for Saturday 29th September onwards

Vipassana Fellowship Meditation Course
Saturday, 29th September to Friday, 7th December 2018

Details for Saturday onwards

Dear Jagatheesan

Welcome to the September 2018 session of our 10 week meditation course.
The course takes place in our online Course Campus and you can
access our site from Saturday 29th September at the following location:

https://course.org/campus

You have been pre-registered as a participant in the September course.
To log-in, click on the ‘September 2018 Meditation Course’ link or the site
log-in at the top of the page.

Your username is:

awakenedone-s18

Your password is:

sP8481026

Please note that these are case-sensitive and must be
entered exactly as given here. (If you wish, you can change
your password by editing your profile once you are logged-in.)

New material appears on the course site every day during our
10 week course. There is usually a longer reading when a new
meditation technique is introduced and shorter pieces on other
days to help place the practices in context. There is also a
contemplative piece drawn from the Dhammapada each day.

Our main concern is that you are able to devote most of your time
to actually practising meditation. We hope that by the end of the
course you will have the tools that are necessary to build a
sustainable practice and be aware of the plentiful riches of this
living tradition.

The course audio material is incorporated into the readings as we work
through the sessions. Streaming audio files are available for most new
techniques as they are introduced and can be downloaded for personal
use on your computer, tablet or mp3 player. The audio material should
be used in conjunction with the daily texts - and please be sure to read
the instruction texts first. Guided meditations are intended only for use
in the first few sittings of a new practice and should not be relied upon in
the long-term. As soon as you feel familiar with a technique’s basic
structure try to work without the audio guide.

We hope you enjoy the course and find it productive. If you have any
meditation questions or technical queries please send them only to:

csupport@vipassana.com

This is a priority e-mail address for the course that ensures your message
will be seen in a timely way. You may find it helpful to check the “In
Practice…” database of previously asked questions first.

We will try to respond to queries as quickly as possible.
Please note that we are based in the UK and any references
to times and dates refer to Greenwich Mean Time/Universal Time.
This is exactly at the half-way point in the range of World
time zones. The course can be accessed at times to suit your
location; there is never a need to be online at a specific time.

If you change your e-mail address during the course, please update
your profile on the course website and let us know separately by
e-mail. This will ensure that we can contact you with any important
notices as the course progresses.

Remember: You will get most from the course if you visit the site
each day. There is new material displayed for each of the 70 days.
The daily material remains available to you throughout the course
and for one month after this session’s scheduled ending. You can
print or save any of the daily material for your personal use.

Enjoy the course!

With metta (loving-kindness),

Clive

Administrator,
Vipassana Fellowship Ltd.
http://www.vipassana.com

https://course.org/campus/

The September 2018 Meditation Course runs from 29th September to 7th December.

Skip available courses
Available courses
September 2018 Meditation Course
Vipassanā
Fellowshuuip’s 10 week introduction to meditation practices from the
Theravāda tradition. The course runs from Saturday 29th September to
Friday 7th December 2018.

Teacher: Andrew Quernmoreoioo

Available courses
September 2018 Meditation Course
Vipassanā
Fellowship’s 10 week introduction to meditation practices from the
Theravāda tradition. The course runs from Saturday 29th September to
Friday 7th December 2018.

Teacher: Andrew Quernmore
Parisā
Parisa
aims to be a dispersed community of meditators. It provides continued
support beyond our initial course and material to support a deepening
practice. This subscription programme also includes access to our
current 10 week course when in session.

Want to join? Already participated in a course? Learn about Parisa here.

Teacher: Andrew Quernmore

Skip Important Note for Parisa Members
Important Note for Parisa Members
You
need to reset your password on this new site. We have recently moved
servers. Your old Parisa password could not be transferred to this new
location. You can reset this easily from the following link:

Reset my Password

A
reset message will be sent to the e-mail address that we have on file
for you. If you have any difficulties, or have changed your registered
e-mail address, please contact the administrator at the usual address or
using this form.

Vipassanā Fellowship
Mindfulness meditation from the Theravāda tradition for the spiritual development of people of all faiths and none.

10 week courses begin:

29 September 2018
12 January 2019
23 March 2019
1 June 2019

Full details at:

There’s also a searchable database called “In Practice” that
has questions and replies from some earlier courses. The most frequent basic
questions are probably already featured there.

My advice for the course is to work steadily but gently. Don’t feel that everything
has to be mastered immediately; much of this is the foundation for a lifetime of
developing practice rather than a quick fix. It is hoped that the course will stretch
everyone a little whether you are new to meditation or a seasoned veteran. We
work in different ways, over the weeks, and some methods will come easier to
some people than others. You may well be surprised by the approaches that suit
you best. Try to work in an open-minded and inquisitive way - and just see what
happens. This is a process of exploration rather than a submission to particular
dogmas. We do provide enough of the doctrinal context to help you begin to see
how the various elements form part of a consistent path but there is certainly no
need to swap one cherished belief for another. Gentle but regular engagement
with your meditation practice will produce positive results and useful challenges,
over time. It is the practice that matters.

We sent the access details for the course by e-mail, earlier, and I hope they
arrived. If you don’t seem to have received them please check your spam folder
(particularly if you use one of the web mail services) and contact us if you need it
to be re-sent. We can send it to an alternative address if you prefer.

I hope the course will be of great benefit to you. I look forward to getting to know
you in the coming weeks.

(Please note that all course support requests must be sent to csupport@vipassana.com
rather than any of our other addresses. This is a priority address that ensures your
message will be seen in a timely way.)

With metta,

Andrew

Vipassanā Fellowship meditation from the Theravāda tradition for the spiritual development of people of all faiths and
10 week ourses begin:Sat 29 Sep 2007

Do Good Be Mindful - Awakened One with Awareness (AOA)

Always
be Calm, Quiet, Alert and Attentive and have an Equanimity Mind with a
Clear Understanding that Everything is Changing - that is Vipassana
(Insight) Meditation that brings Eternal Bliss as a Final Goal.

Course Access Details for Saturday 29th September onwards

Vipassana Fellowship Meditation Course
Saturday, 29th September to Friday, 7th December 2018

Details for Saturday onwards

Dear Jagatheesan

Welcome to the September 2018 session of our 10 week meditation course.
The course takes place in our online Course Campus and you can
access our site from Saturday 29th September at the following location:

https://course.org/campus

You have been pre-registered as a participant in the September course.
To log-in, click on the ‘September 2018 Meditation Course’ link or the site
log-in at the top of the page.

Your username is:

awakenedone-s18

Your password is:

sP8481026

https://youtu.be/JEg5t0WCILQ

https://youtu.be/tLojn3Jp7ow

https://youtu.be/v0EZDR5ZBzc

https://youtu.be/bNNRshWbNiw

https://youtu.be/jCqQplSpOBg

https://youtu.be/bqfqcatP-14

https://youtu.be/u3XT8TebfS8

https://youtu.be/Xc_toI7oMJY

https://course.org/campus/
course.org/campus
Vipassana Fellowship 21 years of online courses

September 2018 Meditation Course

The September 2018 Meditation Course runs from 29th September to 7th December.

Skip available courses
Available courses
September 2018 Meditation Course
Vipassanā
Fellowship’s 10 week introduction to meditation practices from the
Theravāda tradition. The course runs from Saturday 29th September to
Friday 7th December 2018.

Teacher: Andrew Quernmore
Parisā
Parisa
aims to be a dispersed community of meditators. It provides continued
support beyond our initial course and material to support a deepening
practice. This subscription programme also includes access to our
current 10 week course when in session.

Want to join? Already participated in a course? Learn about Parisa here.

Teacher: Andrew Quernmore

Skip Important Note for Parisa Members
Important Note for Parisa Members
You
need to reset your password on this new site. We have recently moved
servers. Your old Parisa password could not be transferred to this new
location. You can reset this easily from the following link:

Reset my Password

A
reset message will be sent to the e-mail address that we have on file
for you. If you have any difficulties, or have changed your registered
e-mail address, please contact the administrator at the usual address or
using this form.

Vipassanā Fellowship
Mindfulness meditation from the Theravāda tradition for the spiritual development of people of all faiths and none.

10 week courses begin:

29 September 2018
12 January 2019
23 March 2019
1 June 2019

Full details at:
vipassana.com

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Vipassana Fellowship 21 years of online courses September 2018
Meditation Course The September 2018 Meditation Course runs from 29th
September to 7th December.

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September 2018 Meditation Course
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Weekly outline
General
September 2018 Course

Announcements Forum
Welcome from Andrew Page
Introduction to Meditation and the Course Page
Daily Practice Focus Page
Glossary
“In Practice…” Searchable questions and replies URL
Contact Andrew Page
Discussion Forum

Jump to Week: 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7 - 8 - 9 - 10
This week
29 September - 5 October
In
this first week we begin to practice Mindfulness of Breathing, an
ancient technique that is found in several spiritual traditions. It
forms a solid foundation in meditative concentration and can result in
increased levels of calm and tranquillity.

Welcome (Video) Page
Saturday - Mindfulness of Breathing Book
Audio Player - Mindfulness of Breathing Page
Audio Download - Mindfulness of Breathing File
Using the Daily Contemplation Page
Contemplation - Day 1 Page
Sunday - The Breath and the Sections Book
Contemplation - Day 2 Page
Monday - No Need For Knots Book
On Mindfulness of Breathing (Video) Page
Contemplation - Day 3 Page
Tuesday - Preferences and Habits Book
Contemplation - Day 4 Page
Wednesday - Ordinary Breath, Closely Felt Book
Restricted Available from 3 October 2018
Contemplation - Day 5 Page
Restricted Available from 3 October 2018
Thursday - Results and Time Book
Restricted Available from 4 October 2018
Contemplation - Day 6 Page
Restricted Available from 4 October 2018
Friday - Distractions and Development Book
Restricted Available from 5 October 2018
Contemplation - Day 7 Page
Restricted Available from 5 October 2018
Chant Workshop 1 (optional) Page
Restricted Available from 5 October 2018
6 October - 12 October
This
week we continue our practice of Mindfulness of Breathing; look at how
to deal constructively with the hindrances that arise; and begin to
explore the ethical precepts.

Saturday - Tension and Tiredness Book
Restricted Available from 6 October 2018
Contemplation - Day 8 Page
Restricted Available from 6 October 2018
Sunday - Hindrances to Meditation Book
Restricted Available from 7 October 2018
Contemplation - Day 9 Page
Restricted Available from 7 October 2018
Monday - Ill-will, Sloth & Torpor Book
Restricted Available from 8 October 2018
Contemplation - Day 10 Page
Restricted Available from 8 October 2018
Tuesday - Restlessness, Worry & Doubt Book
Restricted Available from 9 October 2018
Contemplation - Day 11 Page
Restricted Available from 9 October 2018
Wednesday - Precepts in Meditation Training Book
Restricted Available from 10 October 2018
Contemplation - Day 12 Page
Restricted Available from 10 October 2018
Thursday - First Precept Book
Restricted Available from 11 October 2018
Contemplation - Day 13 Page
Restricted Available from 11 October 2018
Friday - Second Precept Book
Restricted Available from 12 October 2018
Contemplation - Day 14 Page
Restricted Available from 12 October 2018
Chant Workshop 2 (optional) Page
Restricted Available from 12 October 2018
13 October - 19 October
This
week we begin to explore the first of the Sublime Abode practices -
Mettā or Lovingkindness Meditation. If you are able to meditate for more
than one sitting each day, please work with Mettā in one session and
Mindfulness of Breathing in the other.

Moving to the Second Practice (Video) Page
Restricted Available from 13 October 2018
Saturday - The Boundless States Book
Restricted Available from 13 October 2018
Contemplation - Day 15 Page
Restricted Available from 13 October 2018
Sunday - Mettā: Lovingkindness Meditation Book
Restricted Available from 14 October 2018
Audio Player - Lovingkindness Meditation Page
Restricted Available from 14 October 2018
Audio Download - Lovingkindness Meditation File
Restricted Available from 14 October 2018
Contemplation - Day 16 Page
Restricted Available from 14 October 2018
Monday - The Discourse on Mettā Book
Restricted Available from 15 October 2018
Contemplation - Day 17 Page
Restricted Available from 15 October 2018
Tuesday - Expectations, Strengths, Cultivation Book
Restricted Available from 16 October 2018
Contemplation - Day 18 Page
Restricted Available from 16 October 2018
Wednesday - Connection and Extension Book
Restricted Available from 17 October 2018
Contemplation - Day 19 Page
Restricted Available from 17 October 2018
Thursday - Unconditional and Whole-hearted Book
Restricted Available from 18 October 2018
Contemplation - Day 20 Page
Restricted Available from 18 October 2018
Friday - The Third Precept Book
Restricted Available from 19 October 2018
Contemplation - Day 21 Page
Restricted Available from 19 October 2018
Chant Workshop 3 (optional) Page
Restricted Available from 19 October 2018
20 October - 26 October
In
this fourth week we continue to focus mainly on Mettā (lovingkindness)
Meditation. This is the foundation for the other 3 “sublime abode”
practices. If you are able to meditate for more than one sitting each
day, please work with Mettā in one session and Mindfulness of Breathing
in the other.

Saturday - Phrases and Images Book
Restricted Available from 20 October 2018
Contemplation - Day 22 Page
Restricted Available from 20 October 2018
Sunday - Sections and Subjects Book
Restricted Available from 21 October 2018
Contemplation - Day 23 Page
Restricted Available from 21 October 2018
Monday - Benefactor and Friend Book
Restricted Available from 22 October 2018
Contemplation - Day 24 Page
Restricted Available from 22 October 2018
Tuesday - Neutral and Difficult Book
Restricted Available from 23 October 2018
Contemplation - Day 25 Page
Restricted Available from 23 October 2018
Wednesday - All Sentient Beings Book
Restricted Available from 24 October 2018
Contemplation - Day 26 Page
Restricted Available from 24 October 2018
Thursday - When There’s No Mettā Book
Restricted Available from 25 October 2018
Contemplation - Day 27 Page
Restricted Available from 25 October 2018
Friday - The Fourth Precept Book
Restricted Available from 26 October 2018
Contemplation - Day 28 Page
Restricted Available from 26 October 2018
Chant Workshop 4 (optional) Page
Restricted Available from 26 October 2018
27 October - 2 November
For
our fifth week we introduce Karuna Meditation, the cultivation of
compassion, and begin to explore one of the central teachings of the
tradition: the Four Noble Truths.

Saturday - Karuna: Compassion Meditation Book
Restricted Available from 27 October 2018
Audio Player - Compassion Meditation Page
Restricted Available from 27 October 2018
Audio Download - Compassion Meditation File
Restricted Available from 27 October 2018
Contemplation - Day 29 Page
Restricted Available from 27 October 2018
Sunday - Empathy not Pity Book
Restricted Available from 28 October 2018
Contemplation - Day 30 Page
Restricted Available from 28 October 2018
Monday - Recognition, Response, Capacity Book
Restricted Available from 29 October 2018
Contemplation - Day 31 Page
Restricted Available from 29 October 2018
Tuesday - Four Noble Truths Book
Restricted Available from 30 October 2018
On Lovingkindness and Compassion (Video) Page
Restricted Available from 30 October 2018
Contemplation - Day 32 Page
Restricted Available from 29 October 2018, 11:00 pm
Wednesday - The Truth of Dukkha Book
Restricted Available from 30 October 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 33 Page
Restricted Available from 30 October 2018, 11:00 pm
Thursday - Dukkha’s Origin Book
Restricted Available from 31 October 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 34 Page
Restricted Available from 31 October 2018, 11:00 pm
Friday - Extinction of Dukkha Book
Restricted Available from 1 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 35 Page
Restricted Available from 1 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Chant Workshop 5 (optional) Page
Restricted Available from 1 November 2018, 11:00 pm
3 November - 9 November
In
this sixth week we explore Appreciative Joy meditation. If you are
sitting twice each day, then please pick a complementary technique from
those we have already met for your other session. Work steadily and
gently to establish your regular sittings. We’ll also briefly outline
the final brahmavihara practice (for use beyond the course) and conclude
our look at the precepts.

Saturday - Mudita: Appreciative Joy Meditation Book
Restricted Available from 2 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Audio Player - Appreciative Joy Meditation Page
Restricted Available from 3 November 2018
Download Audio - Appreciative Joy Meditation File
Restricted Available from 3 November 2018
Contemplation - Day 36 Page
Restricted Available from 2 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Sunday - Recognising Joy and Sorrow Book
Restricted Available from 3 November 2018, 11:00 pm
On Appreciative Joy (Video) Page
Restricted Available from 3 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 37 Page
Restricted Available from 3 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Monday - Envy and Fairness Book
Restricted Available from 4 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 38 Page
Restricted Available from 4 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Tuesday - Fifth Precept Book
Restricted Available from 5 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 39 Page
Restricted Available from 5 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Wednesday - Eight Precepts Book
Restricted Available from 6 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 40 Page
Restricted Available from 6 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Thursday - Introducing Equanimity Book
Restricted Available from 7 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 41 Page
Restricted Available from 7 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Friday - The Practice of Equanimity Meditation Book
Restricted Available from 8 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Audio Player - Equanimity Meditation Page
Restricted Available from 9 November 2018
Audio Download - Equanimity Meditation File
Restricted Available from 9 November 2018
Contemplation - Day 42 Page
Restricted Available from 8 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Chant Workshop 6 (optional) Page
Restricted Available from 8 November 2018, 11:00 pm
10 November - 16 November
We
begin our first vipassanā meditation practice and will be working with
vipassanā for the rest of the course. If you are sitting twice each day
please use one session for vipassanā and the other for one of the
samatha methods we have been using thus far. If meditating once each day
please always focus on the current technique.

Saturday - Vipassanā: the U Ba Khin Method Book
Restricted Available from 9 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Audio Player - Vipassanā U Ba Khin Style Page
Restricted Available from 10 November 2018
Audio Download - Vipassanā U Ba Khin Style File
Restricted Available from 10 November 2018
Contemplation - Day 43 Page
Restricted Available from 9 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Sunday - A Different Approach Book
Restricted Available from 10 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Introducing Insight (Video) Page
Restricted Available from 10 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 44 Page
Restricted Available from 10 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Monday - Pace and Observation Book
Restricted Available from 11 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 45 Page
Restricted Available from 11 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Tuesday - Honest Experience Book
Restricted Available from 12 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 46 Page
Restricted Available from 12 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Wednesday - Just What Is Present Book
Restricted Available from 13 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 47 Page
Restricted Available from 13 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Thursday - Theoretical Background Book
Restricted Available from 14 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 48 Page
Restricted Available from 14 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Friday - Impermanence As The Key Book
Restricted Available from 15 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 49 Page
Restricted Available from 15 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Chant Workshop 7 (optional) Page
Restricted Available from 15 November 2018, 11:00 pm
17 November - 23 November
We
continue, in this eighth week, with the U Ba Khin vipassanā practice
and consider our identity, its transience and the spiritual faculties
that we each can utilize.

Saturday - Effort and the Fixed View Book
Restricted Available from 16 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 50 Page
Restricted Available from 16 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Sunday - Fleeting Life and Death Book
Restricted Available from 17 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 51 Page
Restricted Available from 17 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Monday - Transience Book
Restricted Available from 18 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 52 Page
Restricted Available from 18 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Tuesday - Darts and Mustard Seeds Book
Restricted Available from 19 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 53 Page
Restricted Available from 19 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Wednesday - Grief, Attended to Book
Restricted Available from 20 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 54 Page
Restricted Available from 20 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Thursday - Five Spiritual Faculties (1) Book
Restricted Available from 21 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 55 Page
Restricted Available from 21 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Friday - Five Spiritual Faculties (2) Book
Restricted Available from 22 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 56 Page
Restricted Available from 22 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Chant Workshop 8 (optional) Page
Restricted Available from 22 November 2018, 11:00 pm
24 November - 30 November
In
this ninth week we begin Choiceless Awareness - a form of vipassanā
meditation that is fluid and unstructured, freeing us to explore all
kinds of sensory phenomena. We also explore the Noble Eightfold Path
which is an approach to life that brings freedom from suffering and
ultimately aids liberation.

Saturday - Vipassanā: Choiceless Awareness Book
Restricted Available from 23 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 57 Page
Restricted Available from 23 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Sunday - Structure and Freedom Book
Restricted Available from 24 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Beginning Choiceless Awareness (Video) Page
Restricted Available from 24 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 58 Page
Restricted Available from 24 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Monday - Physical and Mental Connection Book
Restricted Available from 25 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 59 Page
Restricted Available from 25 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Tuesday - Open, Attentive, Receptive Book
Restricted Available from 26 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 60 Page
Restricted Available from 26 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Wednesday - Noble Path: Understanding, Thought Book
Restricted Available from 27 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 61 Page
Restricted Available from 27 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Thursday - Noble Path: Speech, Action, Livelihood Book
Restricted Available from 28 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 62 Page
Restricted Available from 28 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Friday - Noble Path: Effort, Mindfulness, Concentration Book
Restricted Available from 29 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 63 Page
Restricted Available from 29 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Chant Workshop 9 (optional) Page
Restricted Available from 29 November 2018, 11:00 pm
1 December - 7 December
In
our final week we continue with Choiceless Awareness as our vipassanā
practice, explore The Perfections, and begin to think about building a
sustainable practice beyond the course.

Saturday - The Perfections (1) Book
Restricted Available from 30 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 64 Page
Restricted Available from 30 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Sunday - The Perfections (2) Book
Restricted Available from 1 December 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 65 Page
Restricted Available from 1 December 2018, 11:00 pm
Monday - Preparation and Walking Book
Restricted Available from 2 December 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 66 Page
Restricted Available from 2 December 2018, 11:00 pm
Tuesday - Mindful Activity Book
Restricted Available from 3 December 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 67 Page
Restricted Available from 3 December 2018, 11:00 pm
Wednesday - Building Sustainable Practice Book
Restricted Available from 4 December 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 68 Page
Restricted Available from 4 December 2018, 11:00 pm
Thursday - Markers and Retreats Book

Contemplation - Day 69 Page
Restricted Available from 5 December 2018, 11:00 pm
Friday - Friends and The Raft Book
Restricted Available from 6 December 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 70 Page
Restricted Available from 6 December 2018, 11:00 pm
Daily Contemplations Page
Restricted Available from 6 December 2018, 11:00 pm
A Farewell Request Page
Restricted Available from 6 December 2018, 11:00 pm
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Participants
General
29 September - 5 October
6 October - 12 October
13 October - 19 October
20 October - 26 October
27 October - 2 November
3 November - 9 November
10 November - 16 November
17 November - 23 November
24 November - 30 November
1 December - 7 December
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LESSON 2764 Wed 3 Oct 2018 (104)

Vipassanā Fellowship meditation from the Theravāda tradition for the spiritual development of people of all faiths and
10 week ourses begin:Sat 29 Sep 2007

Do Good Be Mindful - Awakened One with Awareness (AOA)

Always
be Calm, Quiet, Alert and Attentive and have an Equanimity Mind with a
Clear Understanding that Everything is Changing - that is Vipassana
(Insight) Meditation that brings Eternal Bliss as a Final Goal.

Course Access Details for Saturday 29th September onwards

Vipassana Fellowship Meditation Course
Saturday, 29th September to Friday, 7th December 2018

Details for Saturday onwards

Dear Jagatheesan

Welcome to the September 2018 session of our 10 week meditation course.
The course takes place in our online Course Campus and you can
access our site from Saturday 29th September at the following location:

https://course.org/campus

You have been pre-registered as a participant in the September course.
To log-in, click on the ‘September 2018 Meditation Course’ link or the site
log-in at the top of the page.

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Your password is:

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September 2018 Meditation Course

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Weekly outline

General

September 2018 Course

Announcements Forum
Welcome from Andrew Page
Introduction to Meditation and the Course Page
Daily Practice Focus Page
Glossary
“In Practice…” Searchable questions and replies URL
Contact Andrew Page
Discussion Forum

Jump to Week: 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7 - 8 - 9 - 10
29 September - 5 October

In
this first week we begin to practice Mindfulness of Breathing, an
ancient technique that is found in several spiritual traditions. It
forms a solid foundation in meditative concentration and can result in
increased levels of calm and tranquillity.

Welcome (Video) Page
Saturday - Mindfulness of Breathing Book
Audio Player - Mindfulness of Breathing Page
Audio Download - Mindfulness of Breathing File
Using the Daily Contemplation Page
Contemplation - Day 1 Page
Sunday - The Breath and the Sections Book
Contemplation - Day 2 Page
Monday - No Need For Knots Book
On Mindfulness of Breathing (Video) Page
Contemplation - Day 3 Page
Tuesday - Preferences and Habits Book
Contemplation - Day 4 Page
Wednesday - Ordinary Breath, Closely Felt Book
Contemplation - Day 5 Page
Thursday - Results and Time Book
Contemplation - Day 6 Page
Friday - Distractions and Development Book
Contemplation - Day 7 Page
Chant Workshop 1 (optional) Page
6 October - 12 October

This
week we continue our practice of Mindfulness of Breathing; look at how
to deal constructively with the hindrances that arise; and begin to
explore the ethical precepts.

Saturday - Tension and Tiredness Book
Contemplation - Day 8 Page
Sunday - Hindrances to Meditation Book
Contemplation - Day 9 Page
Monday - Ill-will, Sloth & Torpor Book
Contemplation - Day 10 Page
Tuesday - Restlessness, Worry & Doubt Book
Contemplation - Day 11 Page
Wednesday - Precepts in Meditation Training Book
Contemplation - Day 12 Page
Thursday - First Precept Book
Contemplation - Day 13 Page
Friday - Second Precept Book
Contemplation - Day 14 Page
Chant Workshop 2 (optional) Page
This week
13 October - 19 October

This
week we begin to explore the first of the Sublime Abode practices -
Mettā or Lovingkindness Meditation. If you are able to meditate for more
than one sitting each day, please work with Mettā in one session and
Mindfulness of Breathing in the other.

Moving to the Second Practice (Video) Page
Saturday - The Boundless States Book
Contemplation - Day 15 Page
Sunday - Mettā: Lovingkindness Meditation Book
Restricted Available from 14 October 2018
Audio Player - Lovingkindness Meditation Page
Restricted Available from 14 October 2018
Audio Download - Lovingkindness Meditation File
Restricted Available from 14 October 2018
Contemplation - Day 16 Page
Restricted Available from 14 October 2018
Monday - The Discourse on Mettā Book
Restricted Available from 15 October 2018
Contemplation - Day 17 Page
Restricted Available from 15 October 2018
Tuesday - Expectations, Strengths, Cultivation Book
Restricted Available from 16 October 2018
Contemplation - Day 18 Page
Restricted Available from 16 October 2018
Wednesday - Connection and Extension Book
Restricted Available from 17 October 2018
Contemplation - Day 19 Page
Restricted Available from 17 October 2018
Thursday - Unconditional and Whole-hearted Book
Restricted Available from 18 October 2018
Contemplation - Day 20 Page
Restricted Available from 18 October 2018
Friday - The Third Precept Book
Restricted Available from 19 October 2018
Contemplation - Day 21 Page
Restricted Available from 19 October 2018
Chant Workshop 3 (optional) Page
Restricted Available from 19 October 2018
20 October - 26 October

In
this fourth week we continue to focus mainly on Mettā (lovingkindness)
Meditation. This is the foundation for the other 3 “sublime abode”
practices. If you are able to meditate for more than one sitting each
day, please work with Mettā in one session and Mindfulness of Breathing
in the other.

Saturday - Phrases and Images Book
Restricted Available from 20 October 2018
Contemplation - Day 22 Page
Restricted Available from 20 October 2018
Sunday - Sections and Subjects Book
Restricted Available from 21 October 2018
Contemplation - Day 23 Page
Restricted Available from 21 October 2018
Monday - Benefactor and Friend Book
Restricted Available from 22 October 2018
Contemplation - Day 24 Page
Restricted Available from 22 October 2018
Tuesday - Neutral and Difficult Book
Restricted Available from 23 October 2018
Contemplation - Day 25 Page
Restricted Available from 23 October 2018
Wednesday - All Sentient Beings Book
Restricted Available from 24 October 2018
Contemplation - Day 26 Page
Restricted Available from 24 October 2018
Thursday - When There’s No Mettā Book
Restricted Available from 25 October 2018
Contemplation - Day 27 Page
Restricted Available from 25 October 2018
Friday - The Fourth Precept Book
Restricted Available from 26 October 2018
Contemplation - Day 28 Page
Restricted Available from 26 October 2018
Chant Workshop 4 (optional) Page
Restricted Available from 26 October 2018
27 October - 2 November

For
our fifth week we introduce Karuna Meditation, the cultivation of
compassion, and begin to explore one of the central teachings of the
tradition: the Four Noble Truths.

Saturday - Karuna: Compassion Meditation Book
Restricted Available from 27 October 2018
Audio Player - Compassion Meditation Page
Restricted Available from 27 October 2018
Audio Download - Compassion Meditation File
Restricted Available from 27 October 2018
Contemplation - Day 29 Page
Restricted Available from 27 October 2018
Sunday - Empathy not Pity Book
Restricted Available from 28 October 2018
Contemplation - Day 30 Page
Restricted Available from 28 October 2018
Monday - Recognition, Response, Capacity Book
Restricted Available from 29 October 2018
Contemplation - Day 31 Page
Restricted Available from 29 October 2018
Tuesday - Four Noble Truths Book
Restricted Available from 30 October 2018
On Lovingkindness and Compassion (Video) Page
Restricted Available from 30 October 2018
Contemplation - Day 32 Page
Restricted Available from 29 October 2018, 11:00 pm
Wednesday - The Truth of Dukkha Book
Restricted Available from 30 October 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 33 Page
Restricted Available from 30 October 2018, 11:00 pm
Thursday - Dukkha’s Origin Book
Restricted Available from 31 October 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 34 Page
Restricted Available from 31 October 2018, 11:00 pm
Friday - Extinction of Dukkha Book
Restricted Available from 1 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 35 Page
Restricted Available from 1 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Chant Workshop 5 (optional) Page
Restricted Available from 1 November 2018, 11:00 pm
3 November - 9 November

In
this sixth week we explore Appreciative Joy meditation. If you are
sitting twice each day, then please pick a complementary technique from
those we have already met for your other session. Work steadily and
gently to establish your regular sittings. We’ll also briefly outline
the final brahmavihara practice (for use beyond the course) and conclude
our look at the precepts.

Saturday - Mudita: Appreciative Joy Meditation Book
Restricted Available from 2 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Audio Player - Appreciative Joy Meditation Page
Restricted Available from 3 November 2018
Download Audio - Appreciative Joy Meditation File
Restricted Available from 3 November 2018
Contemplation - Day 36 Page
Restricted Available from 2 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Sunday - Recognising Joy and Sorrow Book
Restricted Available from 3 November 2018, 11:00 pm
On Appreciative Joy (Video) Page
Restricted Available from 3 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 37 Page
Restricted Available from 3 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Monday - Envy and Fairness Book
Restricted Available from 4 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 38 Page
Restricted Available from 4 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Tuesday - Fifth Precept Book
Restricted Available from 5 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 39 Page
Restricted Available from 5 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Wednesday - Eight Precepts Book
Restricted Available from 6 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 40 Page
Restricted Available from 6 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Thursday - Introducing Equanimity Book
Restricted Available from 7 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 41 Page
Restricted Available from 7 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Friday - The Practice of Equanimity Meditation Book
Restricted Available from 8 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Audio Player - Equanimity Meditation Page
Restricted Available from 9 November 2018
Audio Download - Equanimity Meditation File
Restricted Available from 9 November 2018
Contemplation - Day 42 Page
Restricted Available from 8 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Chant Workshop 6 (optional) Page
Restricted Available from 8 November 2018, 11:00 pm
10 November - 16 November

We
begin our first vipassanā meditation practice and will be working with
vipassanā for the rest of the course. If you are sitting twice each day
please use one session for vipassanā and the other for one of the
samatha methods we have been using thus far. If meditating once each day
please always focus on the current technique.

Saturday - Vipassanā: the U Ba Khin Method Book
Restricted Available from 9 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Audio Player - Vipassanā U Ba Khin Style Page
Restricted Available from 10 November 2018
Audio Download - Vipassanā U Ba Khin Style File
Restricted Available from 10 November 2018
Contemplation - Day 43 Page
Restricted Available from 9 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Sunday - A Different Approach Book
Restricted Available from 10 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Introducing Insight (Video) Page
Restricted Available from 10 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 44 Page
Restricted Available from 10 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Monday - Pace and Observation Book
Restricted Available from 11 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 45 Page
Restricted Available from 11 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Tuesday - Honest Experience Book
Restricted Available from 12 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 46 Page
Restricted Available from 12 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Wednesday - Just What Is Present Book
Restricted Available from 13 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 47 Page
Restricted Available from 13 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Thursday - Theoretical Background Book
Restricted Available from 14 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 48 Page
Restricted Available from 14 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Friday - Impermanence As The Key Book
Restricted Available from 15 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 49 Page
Restricted Available from 15 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Chant Workshop 7 (optional) Page
Restricted Available from 15 November 2018, 11:00 pm
17 November - 23 November

We
continue, in this eighth week, with the U Ba Khin vipassanā practice
and consider our identity, its transience and the spiritual faculties
that we each can utilize.

Saturday - Effort and the Fixed View Book
Restricted Available from 16 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 50 Page
Restricted Available from 16 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Sunday - Fleeting Life and Death Book
Restricted Available from 17 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 51 Page
Restricted Available from 17 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Monday - Transience Book
Restricted Available from 18 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 52 Page
Restricted Available from 18 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Tuesday - Darts and Mustard Seeds Book
Restricted Available from 19 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 53 Page
Restricted Available from 19 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Wednesday - Grief, Attended to Book
Restricted Available from 20 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 54 Page
Restricted Available from 20 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Thursday - Five Spiritual Faculties (1) Book
Restricted Available from 21 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 55 Page
Restricted Available from 21 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Friday - Five Spiritual Faculties (2) Book
Restricted Available from 22 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 56 Page
Restricted Available from 22 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Chant Workshop 8 (optional) Page
Restricted Available from 22 November 2018, 11:00 pm
24 November - 30 November

In
this ninth week we begin Choiceless Awareness - a form of vipassanā
meditation that is fluid and unstructured, freeing us to explore all
kinds of sensory phenomena. We also explore the Noble Eightfold Path
which is an approach to life that brings freedom from suffering and
ultimately aids liberation.

Saturday - Vipassanā: Choiceless Awareness Book
Restricted Available from 23 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 57 Page
Restricted Available from 23 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Sunday - Structure and Freedom Book
Restricted Available from 24 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Beginning Choiceless Awareness (Video) Page
Restricted Available from 24 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 58 Page
Restricted Available from 24 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Monday - Physical and Mental Connection Book
Restricted Available from 25 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 59 Page
Restricted Available from 25 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Tuesday - Open, Attentive, Receptive Book
Restricted Available from 26 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 60 Page
Restricted Available from 26 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Wednesday - Noble Path: Understanding, Thought Book
Restricted Available from 27 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 61 Page
Restricted Available from 27 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Thursday - Noble Path: Speech, Action, Livelihood Book
Restricted Available from 28 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 62 Page
Restricted Available from 28 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Friday - Noble Path: Effort, Mindfulness, Concentration Book
Restricted Available from 29 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 63 Page
Restricted Available from 29 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Chant Workshop 9 (optional) Page
Restricted Available from 29 November 2018, 11:00 pm
1 December - 7 December

In
our final week we continue with Choiceless Awareness as our vipassanā
practice, explore The Perfections, and begin to think about building a
sustainable practice beyond the course.

Saturday - The Perfections (1) Book
Restricted Available from 30 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 64 Page
Restricted Available from 30 November 2018, 11:00 pm
Sunday - The Perfections (2) Book
Restricted Available from 1 December 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 65 Page
Restricted Available from 1 December 2018, 11:00 pm
Monday - Preparation and Walking Book
Restricted Available from 2 December 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 66 Page
Restricted Available from 2 December 2018, 11:00 pm
Tuesday - Mindful Activity Book
Restricted Available from 3 December 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 67 Page
Restricted Available from 3 December 2018, 11:00 pm
Wednesday - Building Sustainable Practice Book
Restricted Available from 4 December 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 68 Page
Restricted Available from 4 December 2018, 11:00 pm
Thursday - Markers and Retreats Book
Restricted Available from 5 December 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 69 Page
Restricted Available from 5 December 2018, 11:00 pm
Friday - Friends and The Raft Book
Restricted Available from 6 December 2018, 11:00 pm
Contemplation - Day 70 Page
Restricted Available from 6 December 2018, 11:00 pm
Daily Contemplations Page
Restricted Available from 6 December 2018, 11:00 pm
A Farewell Request Page
Restricted Available from 6 December 2018, 11:00 pm

mc201809
Participants
General
29 September - 5 October
6 October - 12 October
13 October - 19 October
20 October - 26 October
27 October - 2 November
3 November - 9 November
10 November - 16 November
17 November - 23 November
24 November - 30 November
1 December - 7 December
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General
September 2018 Meditation Course

Welcome from Andrew
Welcome from Andrew

AndrewWelcome

I’m very glad that you’ve decided to join me for this 10 week course.

This
Vipassanā Fellowship course is a practical guide to Buddhist meditation
that I hope will be useful to those who are new to meditation and to
established meditators wishing to further explore a rich and vital
tradition. The course is intended for those of all religious traditions
(and none) but aims for clarity by keeping the descriptive and
explanatory material in the context from which it grew. Our beliefs,
cultures and circumstances may be very different but it is often
fruitful to have a window into another framework so that our habitual
patterns can be re-examined in the light of the challenge. The emphasis
is on dedicated practice: it is hoped that you will absorb a little of 
the material and then apply it in daily meditation sessions over an
extended period. These closely related meditation techniques are rooted
in the earliest Buddhist texts and have the capacity to transform both
heart and mind, and serve any meditator well for a lifetime of fruitful,
and often joyous, practice.

Meditation is by no means the
whole of the Buddhist Path; but for those who would seek enlightenment
it is certainly central to it. My aim is to clearly explain the method
of practice, the practical difficulties that may be encountered and to
explore strategies for overcoming them. Each practice is placed in
context so that you will come to appreciate why a particular route has
been suggested and its relationship to the Buddha’s teaching. Rather
than choosing to separate meditation from a tradition that can sustain
it, or presenting a single technique as a panacea, I have tried to
advocate a balanced and consistent approach to Buddhist practice
cognizant of the conditions that the Buddha deemed necessary for an
awakening to be possible.

Each of the techniques is a
meditation practice that can stand alone, but there is a logical
progression in the way that they are introduced. Although it may be
tempting to select the technique that one is most drawn to at the
outset, I’d recommend that you work with each technique in the order in
which it is given. Mastery of any practice will take many years, but a
few weeks of introductory work with each of the techniques offered in
this course will enable you to become aware of the correspondence and
differences between the techniques and will, in a sense, bring them into
your repertoire for further use throughout your meditating life. It
will also give an indication of the range of skills that need to be
developed and the areas where particular work may be needed.

New
material is presented to you each day in this Course Campus. The text
ranges from detailed instructions on each new technique, to short
practical notes and brief theoretical sketches. Over the 10 weeks you
should gain an appreciation of the broader picture and will have an
understanding of the breadth of Buddhist forms of meditation and ethical
practice. There is also a selection of verses from our version of the
Dhammapada: one of the best-loved collections in the Canon offered for
reflection. These thematically-arranged stanzas offer an accessible
introduction to major aspects of the Buddhist path and an experience of
Affective Reading.

You should try to visit the Course Campus
on a regular basis. The web site will be updated regularly throughout
the course in response to the practice questions raised by your fellow
participants. There is a database of past questions (just follow the “In
Practice” link) and the opportunity to engage in Dhamma discussion for
those who find this type of activity fruitful. You can also contact me
directly with your meditation queries and related questions by using one
of the Contact links.

There are downloadable audio guided
meditations when new techniques are introduced in the text, a series of
chant workshops with accompanying audio files and a glossary of Pali
terms. The recordings become available on the site for instant streaming
or individual download as the course progresses.

How long should I meditate?

If
you are a beginner you should try to incorporate at least one session
into each day, lasting for about 20-30 minutes. This time may be
increased gradually and another daily session can be added when you feel
ready.

For those with previous meditation experience, I
recommend two sessions per day lasting from 30 minutes to one hour each
(or longer). If you have additional time, perhaps at weekends, then
additional sessions can be incorporated.

The audio guided
meditation files become available to you as new techniques are
introduced. They are intended to as illustrative material, so that you
can become familiar with how to construct your own meditation sitting.
It is not a good idea to use any guided meditation recordings on a
long-term basis.

Try not to mix different meditation
techniques into the same sitting, unless this is suggested in the text.
If you are able only to incorporate one session into your day give
priority to familiarizing yourself with the fundamentals of the newest
technique.

What is the chanting about?

The audio
chants included in the course are supplementary, and their use is
entirely optional. These are presented as a Chant Workshop, each Friday,
for the first part of our course session. The whole sequence can be
downloaded in the final Workshop. Some people find traditional Buddhist
ritual helps them to settle into their meditation practice; for others
it is a hindrance. Please use these, or other, Buddhist chants to frame
your meditation sittings if you wish. Translations are given for each of
the Pāli chants.

Approaching this path

These
are not dry academic exercises, mental gymnastics or philosophical
debates: meditation can bring real wisdom and unparalleled states of
calmness and bliss. The danger is to expect these results immediately.
It will take some time and in the early stages all of us will experience
doubt about the validity of working in this way. The lokiya - or
mundane - benefits will start to become apparent quite soon if we
practise with commitment and determined effort. It is important that we
don’t settle for these, of course, but such glimpses of the positive
outcome of our work may inspire a certain degree of confidence or saddhā
in the value of meditation and the Path.

There are hundreds
of methods of meditation, several varieties of Buddhism and many varied
spiritual paths. Many offer something of value; but to be of use any
valid path or method will require commitment. No technique will prove
effective unless followed with discipline and effort. It is recommended
that whilst working with this course you follow the outline as it is
given rather than trying to accommodate different approaches from other
traditions within the same sittings. There is always the desire to
experiment and see if anyone else has got a different handle on the
challenges we face, but why not make best use of this current
experience? Try to work with any difficulties that are encountered
rather than substituting unrelated alternatives. Many of the challenges
we face during meditation are effective pointers to those areas
requiring most attention, and if we simply shift ground every time
something seems difficult we will learn very little from the experience
and our progress, if any, will be slow. We must become aware of our
hunger for novelty: the constant seeking of newer, better, faster, is
still craving whether we are talking about a new car or a new meditation
technique. Craving, as we shall see, is at the root of the suffering we
experience.

So, take it gently but seriously. Apply the
practices with commitment and, in time, you will become convinced of
their efficacy. Please remember that I am available to help where I can
and that you can contact me whenever you have questions about the
practices we are using. I look forward to getting to know you better
over the coming days.

I would like to offer any merits of
this course to the teachers who have blessed me with advice and
encouragement over the past decades - and especially to those from Sri
Lanka. May they and all beings attain peace.

With mettā,

Andrew

Last modified: Wednesday, 11 January 2017, 7:43 pm
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Introduction to Meditation and the Course
Introduction to Meditation and the Course

Introduction to Meditation and the Course

The
Buddha taught a path of liberation that is open to all. His main
concern was not for our temporary happiness, nor that our relationships
and communities be harmonious, nor even that we live long and healthy
lives. These, and many other beneficial things, may indeed happen as we
apply the Buddha’s teaching; but they are not its purpose. Territorial
disputes, environmental crises and social inequality are all burning
issues of our time; but whilst our response may be aided by acting on
Buddhist principles, they are not what his teaching is about.

The
Buddha’s only concern was that we should open our eyes and see the
reality of existence for ourselves so that we may, like him, take the
steps that are necessary to be released from all forms of suffering,
forever. Meditation is a way to begin this process of awakening.

 

“I teach not only the fact of Suffering,

but also the deliverance from it.

……

Mind is the originator of (unhappy) states.

Mind is chief; they are mind made.

If one speaks or acts with a wicked mind,

then suffering follows one,

like the wheel follows the hoof of the draught-ox.

Mind is the originator of (happy) states.

Mind is chief; they are mind made.

If one speaks or acts with a pure mind,

then happiness follows one,

like one’s own shadow that never leaves.”

- The Buddha

Meditation
is a method of training the mind. Much of our life is conducted
unconsciously, thoughtlessly. We operate on automatic pilot most of the
time, behaving in ways to which we have become accustomed; without much
regard for the current situation, our motivation, or the outcome of our
actions. This unconscious way of living brings suffering,
unsatisfactoriness and stress into our own lives and to the
relationships we have with others. Through our ignorance and selfishness
we engineer our suffering and deny ourselves the possibility of greater
happiness.

This careless way of living brings us much grief: not
only are our relationships often tainted by anger, hurt and jealousy,
but even our self-view is distorted through clouded perceptions and
muddled thinking. Living consciously is a way of changing our
relationship to the world around us, and beginning a journey into
discovering its (and our) true nature.

Meditation is a tool to
help us develop greater awareness, and this awareness allows us to
develop insight into the nature of reality. Why do we behave the way we
do? Who are we anyway? Why do so many things ultimately seem so
disappointing and unsatisfactory? Why do beings suffer so much? Is there
an end to suffering? The experience of meditation allows us for the
first time to develop the clarity that can facilitate a dramatic change
in our perceptions. We can begin to live in a way that is mindful. Life
can be transformed by this new awareness and the insights it brings; it
can become kinder, more compassionate, joyful, and balanced.

Meditation
has been a feature of the major religious traditions for millennia but
somewhere along the way most of us have become separated from it and no
longer use it in our daily lives. Maybe we had a problem with the
particular belief system with which the contemplative experience was
associated, or perhaps the practice of meditation had been deemed the
special preserve of the professionally religious within that tradition.
Whatever the reason, many of us reach a stage at which we realize that
we need to reintroduce a measure of contemplation into our lives - we
need to slow down, take time to consider, to live consciously. Often we
are drawn to those traditions that have kept the meditative experience
as a core teaching and this may lead us to explore what Buddhism has to
offer. We may not be looking to take up a different religion but
recognise that some spiritual traditions have useful and practical
methods of supporting our spiritual development and awakening regardless
of the religious framework we maintain.

In this course, and on
our cushions, we shall be exploring techniques derived from the Buddha’s
teaching as contained in the suttas of the Pāli Canon. These teachings
from 2500 years ago were given by the Buddha and his close disciples in
India, and were preserved by oral recitation until they found written
expression in the Pāli language in Sri Lanka. Buddhism may seem very
foreign to some of us but, fear not, this course - and indeed Buddhism
itself - does not ask anyone to adopt any beliefs that are not confirmed
by their own experience.

Until faith arises, through direct
evidence of the efficacy of a particular teaching, it can be difficult
to determine the path we should follow. The Buddha gave some solid
advice to non-Buddhists as to how they should most profitably judge the
validity of the myriad competing theories and belief systems:

“Do
not be led by reports, tradition or hearsay. Do not be led by the
authority of religious texts, nor by mere logic or speculation, nor by
considering appearances, nor by delighting in speculative views, nor by
seeming possibilities, nor by the idea: ‘this is our teacher’. But …
when you know for yourselves that certain things are unwholesome, wrong
and bad, then give them up … And when you know for yourselves that
certain things are wholesome and good, then accept them and follow
them.”

Try to keep this in mind as you work through the units of
this course. Accept nothing simply because it is written down here or
even because it is contained in a particular discourse. We will be using
techniques that have stood the test of time and that others have found
helpful. All that is required at this preliminary stage is that we have a
degree of confidence that because these techniques have proven
beneficial to others there is a reasonable likelihood that they may also
be of value in our lives.

We should remain aware that the
practices introduced in the course are derived from a living tradition.
The explanations given will be consistent with this tradition, but are
couched in modern language. In the interest of clarity we will try to
avoid references to other spiritual traditions and western psychology.
Buddhism based on the texts of the Pāli Canon has valuable teachings
beyond the scope of what can be covered here, and you are warmly
encouraged to explore it further.

The Path Of Meditation And Action

Buddhist
meditation styles can be divided into two groups: there are forms of
meditation that are undertaken with the objective of acquiring a greater
degree of calmness, tranquillity or serenity through concentration on a
single object (usually called samatha meditation), and other forms that
aim at gaining insight into the nature of existence (usually called
vipassanā meditation). It is probably more helpful to see samatha and
vipassanā as the beneficial results of a developed meditation practice
rather than a strict division referring to types of techniques as they
can co-exist in harmony. The Buddhist path has a single goal, and
engagement with any of these practices may help us to work towards it.

Venerable
Nyanatiloka, a Western monk of the last century, summed up the
complementary nature of the two categories very well: he wrote that
samatha or tranquillity is “an unperturbed, peaceful and lucid state of
mind attained by strong mental concentration. Though as a distinct way
of practice, it aims at the attainment of the meditative Absorptions
(jhāna), a high degree of tranquil concentration … is indispensable
for Insight too. Tranquillity frees the mind from impurities and inner
obstacles, and gives it greater penetrative strength.” In contrast,
vipassanā or insight “is the penetrative understanding by direct
meditative experience, of the impermanency, unsatisfactoriness and
impersonality of all material and mental phenomena of existence. It is
Insight that leads to entrance into the supermundane states of Holiness
and to final liberation”.

You will notice how prominent are the
words ‘act’ and ‘action’ in these pages; and you may find this
surprising for a text on Buddhist meditation. Meditation is not just
about sitting on cushions. There is certainly merit in taking timeout
for concentration and mindfulness but it is also part of a broader path
to the complete cessation of all suffering, and this can only be viable
if our every action is informed by our practice and by wholesome ethical
considerations. One of the best measures we have of the effectiveness
of our meditation sittings is in the actions that result from the time
we spend on the cushion. If they are more skilful then they would
otherwise be, then this is an indication that our time has not been
wasted. Volitional actions - those actions of body, speech and mind that
we intentionally commit - are what shape our lives. This kamma is the
major determinant of the degree of happiness and sorrow we will
experience. Through working with gentle determination on this path of
bhāvanā, or development, we will be better able to ensure that the
fruits of those actions are wholesome and that we create the conditions
where liberation may be possible.

Although it should never be
seen as its primary purpose, Buddhist meditation can be very effective
in improving our everyday lives and the happiness of others. By the
changes wrought in our own minds, through the meditative process, our
understanding of behaviour improves immeasurably. This allows us to
bring kindness, respect and compassion to all our interactions in a way
that was perhaps absent or compromised before. Our actions are informed
by the mindfulness we bring to our daily activities, and become more
balanced and appropriate to the reality of the situations we meet.

The Route Of Serenity And Bliss

Samatha
meditation, and the sorts of mental states achieved through it, are
common to many religious traditions but take distinctive forms in the
Buddhist tradition and are central to it. To see samatha as only a
preparation for vipassanā would be erroneous as the samatha approach
forms an authentic and deep training and one for which many people are
most suited. The jhānas, the highly developed mental states that arise
from samatha practice, can offer the potential of a more joyful path
than could be expected through vipassanā practice alone. The
descriptions of the jhānas that we find in the Pāli Canon are replete
with beautiful terms like joy, happiness, bliss, rapture, the
abandonment of pain and grief. Whilst complete liberation within a
single lifetime is a goal for some, and that would require insight,
others take the longer view and choose to work methodically to create
the optimum conditions for achieving that final liberation in a later
birth. For these people samatha meditation may continue to provide the
sustenance and development that they seek.

The first technique
that we will use as a samatha practice is Mindfulness of Breathing or
ānāpānasati and this will form the foundation for the rest of our work.
Through training the mind by fixing our attention on a simple object
such as the breathing we develop a skill that is needed in all other
forms of meditation: the ability to hone in precisely on an object and
to be completely with it for a sustained period. Besides acquiring this
necessary skill, the practice of itself brings greater calm and
serenity.

From ānāpānasati we begin to work with a series of
interrelated techniques that are perhaps a little less abstract. Still
part of the samatha grouping, the cultivation of the brahmavihāras or
sublime abiding works primarily on an emotional level to bring about
positive mental states. The method used could be summarised as empathy,
and we approach each of four qualities in a methodical way; gradually
building our skills by focusing on them in turn and working in distinct
sections for the purpose of training.

The practical result of
working with these four techniques is that we open our hearts to what is
wholesome and nurturing and cease to be capable of acting in ways that
are hostile and destructive. We open to lovingkindness - working to
include every sentient being. If we fully develop lovingkindness we
become considerate and caring in relationships with others. Through the
application of lovingkindness, our actions are incapable of being
influenced by ill will.

From lovingkindness we move on to work
with compassion; feeling with people who suffer. When we understand the
universality of suffering then at the deepest level we can begin to act
in ways that minimise our contribution to the pain that the world
endures. Again, this works on a personal level - we act to reduce our
own suffering - and also in relation to every being with which we are
connected. Through the application of compassion, our actions are
incapable of being influenced by cruelty.

When we come to the
third brahmavihāra, appreciative joy, we consider what is glorious in
the lives around us. This is celebratory and distinctly unselfish. We
develop an awareness of the beauty that exists even in the lives of
people who usually present us with difficulties; fully aware that in
some cases it may be us who fit this category. By developing the ability
to “enjoy the joy”, wherever it is found, we reinforce our
understanding of commonality and our resolution to work to extend
happiness through our actions. Through the application of appreciative
joy, our actions are incapable of being influenced by apathy or
discontent.

The fourth practice is on equanimity and is the
culmination of all that has gone before. We will only touch on it
briefly during the course as it requires a firm foundation in the other
sublime abodes; but the method is outlined so that it can be used beyond
the course. With Equanimity we work very deeply to see the patterns
that usually allow us to be partial. We normally selectively give and
selectively withhold throughout our interactions with others. We like,
we dislike; we favour, we act with prejudice. The other three
brahmavihāra practices have shown us, and developed in us, an
understanding of how non-separate we really are from others: we seek
happiness and freedom from suffering just like everyone else; we engage
in destructive activities just like others. Once that commonality is
acknowledged at the deepest level, through our meditation practice, we
come to a realisation that the respect we show for any other being can
be no different from that which we ourselves would wish to enjoy.
Through this practice we work at balancing and overcoming partiality.
Through the application of equanimity, our actions are incapable of
being influenced by resentment or aversion.

As a process of
training, we will work methodically through various sections and take a
person-centred approach with each of the brahmavihāras; but the
canonical goal is of an all-encompassing, universal application of these
qualities. Once we have acquired the ability to freely share each of
the brahmavihāra in a strong and equanimous way, then we can move
forward to impartial, fully inclusive and boundless application of all
four qualities. By being exposed to the different brahmavihāra
techniques the subtle differences between the different qualities will
become more readily apparent. Without this approach it is common for
meditators to lack precision during their sittings: all positive
emotions are classed as lovingkindness, for example, rather than
carefully ascertaining how lovingkindness differs from compassion. Until
we have this clarity it is difficult to optimally develop these
positive states; we descend instead into generalised pleasant thoughts
rather than creating an environment in which serious work can happen and
transformation of the heart may occur.

That is the theory. It
may all at this stage seem a little far-fetched (and some of it may seem
undesirable or even unwise) but very soon the value of working in this
way will become apparent. We begin to notice it first in small ways
through our improved everyday communications with others. By opening to,
and developing, what is already there - lovingkindness, compassion,
appreciative joy, and equanimity - we can ensure that we are well
equipped to cause least harm and greatest help to ourselves and others.
Whatever destructive patterns we may currently employ, or have engaged
in previously, the effort expended on working with the brahmavihāras
will be entirely beneficial. It is a gradual path but the opening of the
heart and the effect that this has on our behaviour is tangible, even
after a relatively short period of sustained application.

The Route Of Insight

Vipassanā
is often regarded as a specifically Buddhist form of meditation;
different from anything presented elsewhere. What is distinctive about
vipassanā - literally ’special seeing’ or ‘clear vision’ - is that
through one’s own effort it brings an understanding of things as they
are: impermanent (anicca), inherently unsatisfactory (dukkha), and
not-Self (anattā). With the arising of insight, we no longer need rely
on scriptural accounts, or on what others have told us, because we know
for ourselves.

The modern favouring of vipassanā meditation,
particularly in the West, stems from a belief that one cannot attain
complete liberation through the jhānas (the attainments of samatha
practice). Whilst this is technically correct, most of us have quite a
way to go before such lofty concerns present us with any such obstacle.
One should not forget that the results of samatha meditation are of
value in themselves as well as in the essential preparation they
represent as we begin vipassanā practice. In these days of instant
gratification vipassanā is sometimes presented as the form of meditation
with “go faster stripes” and, for some, samatha practice is seen as
second best; but this is an immature assessment as there are no short
cuts to liberation. It is also a misreading of the texts and a denial of
the practical requirement for engagement with at least some form of
samatha meditation to develop the degree of concentration and precision
required if we are to succeed with vipassanā.

The later part of
the course introduces two techniques drawn from those usually classified
as vipassanā bhāvanā (the cultivation of insight), and shows how these
relate to the samatha practices that we have already met. One of the
techniques focuses on clearly seeing the arising and ceasing of physical
and mental feelings by observation of the body. The other technique
moves beyond structure to bring the same precision and mindfulness to
all the phenomena of which we are aware.

The Conjoined Route

Traditionally,
most Buddhist meditation teachers would advocate the practice of
samatha meditation before embarking on vipassanā meditation and this is
the approach that we will pursue. In the Pāli Canon we read, “when one
practices samatha followed by vipassanā the path arises”. It is not
necessary to specialise only in the samatha form of meditation or only
vipassanā meditation, as the Buddha’s own example shows us the value of
working with both. This approach is known as yuganaddha; the yoking
together of distinct elements in a congruent and harmonious way so that
no area of our development is neglected. Our work on samatha will not be
eclipsed when we come to consider vipassanā but will instead continue
to accompany and enrich it until we reach the final goal. The first part
of this course is devoted to techniques normally considered samatha
meditation and beyond that we work mainly with two forms of vipassanā
meditation.

We will also look at bringing a meditative approach
to daily life, through the practice of mindfulness, and the importance
of bringing awareness to the teachings that life can show us in some of
the major mileposts we encounter.

Meditation enables us to see
things from different perspectives. The Buddha emphasised the critical
importance of right understanding as essential for our development. We
shall look at three cardinal concepts of the Buddhist path: dukkha
(suffering or unsatisfactoriness), anicca (impermanence) and anattā
(not-self, egolessness). From an intellectual grasp of these ideas we
can, through meditation, gain a real understanding of the nature of the
conditioned world, and realise our place within it. Armed with this
understanding we can act in skilful ways to benefit the lives of those
with whom we come into contact. This ethical behaviour produces
harmonious conditions for further meditation. The results are cumulative
and significant, and both the meditator and those with whom he or she
interacts will feel the impact.

“When tranquillity is
developed, the mind is developed and lust is abandoned; when insight is
developed, right understanding is developed and ignorance is abandoned.
The mind defiled with lust is not liberated; when there is defilement
through ignorance, right understanding is not developed… ” - Anguttara
Nikāya

Last modified: Wednesday, 11 January 2017, 8:01 pm
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Daily Practice Focus

Practice Focus

You
should aim to incorporate at least one meditation sitting each day for
the 10 weeks of the course. If you are able to manage two separate
sessions daily, so much the better.

The broad focus for each
of the days is as follows. In any second sitting please review one of
the techniques we met earlier in the course.

Week 1 and 2 - Mindfulness of Breathing (anapanasati)
Week 3 and 4 - Lovingkindness Meditation (metta)
Week 5 - Compassion Meditation (karuna)
Week 6 - Appreciative Joy Meditation (mudita) plus a brief overview of Equanimity (upekkha)
Week 7 and 8 - Vipassana Meditation (U Ba Khin style)
Week 9 and 10 - Vipassana Meditation (Choiceless Awareness)

There
is an optional chant tutorial each Friday for the first 9 weeks of the
course. This builds to a puja sequence that some may find helpful in
rededicating their practice from time to time.

Last modified: Friday, 13 January 2017, 12:58 pm
◀︎ Introduction to Meditation and the Course
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29 September - 5 October
6 October - 12 October
13 October - 19 October
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10 November - 16 November
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LESSON 2774  Sat 13 Oct 2018
PRACTICE BUDDHA VACANA for PEACE (PBVP)
DO GOOD BE MINDFUL (DGBM)

Vipassana Fellowship from September to December 2018 Meditation Course

Daily Practice Focus

I. Observation of Kāya
   A. Section on ānāpāna

In Clssical Pali, English, 93) Classical Tamil-செம்மொழி தமிழ், 94) Classical Telugu- క్లాసికల్ తెలుగు

sarvajan.ambedkar.org/blog_admin/wp-admin/post.php
Daily Practice Focus

Practice Focus

You
should aim to incorporate at least one meditation sitting each day for
the 10 weeks of the course. If you are able to manage two separate
sessions daily, so much the better.

The broad focus for
each of the days is as follows. In any second sitting please review one
of the techniques we met earlier in the course.

Week 1 and 2 - Mindfulness of Breathing (anapanasati)
Week 3 and 4 - Lovingkindness Meditation (metta)
Week 5 - Compassion Meditation (karuna)
Week 6 - Appreciative Joy Meditation (mudita) plus a brief overview of Equanimity (upekkha)
Week 7 and 8 - Vipassana Meditation (U Ba Khin style)
Week 9 and 10 - Vipassana Meditation (Choiceless Awareness)

There
is an optional chant tutorial each Friday for the first 9 weeks of the
course. This builds to a puja sequence that some may find helpful in
rededicating their practice from time to time.

Last modified: Friday, 13 January 2017, 12:58 pm


https://course.org/campus/course/view.php?id=3

24 November - 30 November

In
this ninth week we begin Choiceless Awareness - a form of vipassanā
meditation that is fluid and unstructured, freeing us to explore all
kinds of sensory phenomena. We also explore the Noble Eightfold Path
which is an approach to life that brings freedom from suffering and
ultimately aids liberation.


https://course.org/campus/mod/book/view.php?id=196


Thursday - Noble Path: Speech, Action, Livelihood

1. Noble Path: Speech, Action, Livelihood

RIGHT SPEECH

sammā vācā


Right
Speech as we have seen is the outcome of the Fourth Precept where we
commit to a rule of training undertaking to refrain from false speech:


musāvādā veramani sikkhāpadam samādiyāmi


Four
kinds of wrong speech are highlighted in the texts and we should
consciously try to adopt the principle of: abstaining from falsehood,
abstaining from slander, abstaining from harsh speech, and abstaining
from idle chatter.


The Buddha also expressed this in a positive form:


“Giving
up slander… one lives reconciling those at variance, and
strengthening those who are friendly, delighting and rejoicing in
concord one speaks words conducive to reconciliation. Giving up harsh
speech, one says what is gentle, pleasing to the ear, affectionate …

Giving up idle chatter, one speaks at the right time in accordance with
facts, to the purpose, in agreement with the Dhamma and discipline,
words worthy of treasuring (in the heart), seasonable, appropriate,
discriminating and to the point.”


RIGHT ACTION

sammā kammanta


“A fool is known by his actions and so is a sage.

By conduct is knowledge made bright.”


- The Buddha (Anguttara Nikāya)




Right Action is determined by adherence to three of the Precepts:


Abstaining from intentionally killing sentient beings


“Herein
someone avoids the taking of life and abstains from it. Without stick
or sword, conscientious, full of sympathy, he is desirous of the welfare
of all sentient beings.”


Abstaining from intentionally taking the not given


“He
avoids taking what is not given and abstains from it; what another
person possesses of goods and chattel in the village or in the wood,
that he does not take away with thievish intent.”


Abstaining from sexual misconduct


“He
avoids sexual misconduct and abstains from it. He has no intercourse
with such persons as are still under the protection of father, mother,
brother, sister, or relatives, nor with married women, nor with female
convicts, nor lastly, with betrothed girls.”


(- Anguttara Nikāya, 10:176)


RIGHT LIVELIHOOD

sammā ājiva


“When
the noble disciple, avoiding a wrong way of living, gets his livelihood
by a right way of living, this is called Right Livelihood.” - Digha
Nikāya 22


Right
Livelihood is about choosing to support our practice by behaving
ethically in our work. It is also about enabling others to overcome
suffering where possible. The Buddha named five specific occupations
which always constituted Wrong Livelihood - work which is damaging and
should be avoided:

dealing in arms and lethal weapons, in animals for
slaughter, in human beings, dealing in intoxicating drinks, or in
poison. In the Majjhima Nikāya it is also indicated that occupations
that involve one in practising deceit, treachery, soothsaying, trickery,
and usury are also Wrong Livelihood.


It
is in the interest of all beings that we try to behave in a
consistently skilful manner. Practising meditation as an isolated
activity will have very limited impact if we are unable to underpin this
by behaving ethically in the other spheres of our lives.

How tranquil
and concentrated can we really become if we choose to work in situations
where we are required to behave harmfully and unethically to others?

What value is there in trying to radiate mettā to an individual we
habitually treat unfairly in the course of our work? If we are seeking
the end of suffering for others and ourselves why do we choose to
indulge in activities that harm?


The
Buddha made few direct stipulations about the kinds of professions that
are unsuitable for a lay follower. He spoke of the need to earn a
living to support oneself and family; to be respectable in the eyes of
one’s community;

and of the duty to be charitable rather than hoarding
excess money. The main guidance for all the actions of a layperson,
whether related to work or not, comes from the Precepts.


We have already
seen that they can be implemented at different levels dependent on our
deepening commitment to practice. The Five Precepts are generally
regarded as being the ethical norm for a layperson who wishes to follow
the Buddha’s path to awakening.

Any employment that directly contradicts
these teachings is deemed to be unskilful and should be avoided where
possible. Thus any job that, for example, involved lying and cheating
would be unacceptable.


In
addition to the precepts the Buddha named five professions which always
constituted wrong livelihood and as such were incompatible with the
Buddhist Path.

These were dealing in weapons, dealing in living beings
(human or animal), dealing in meat, dealing in intoxicants, dealing in
poison.

The idea behind these stipulations is that even were someone to
be trying to follow the Five Precepts in his or her daily life the
outcome of the occupation would have unwholesome consequences for other
beings.


In
reality we do not always have a wide selection of jobs to choose from
and this can make things difficult. We can ease the restrictions of such
a situation by setting goals and gaining new skills that will allow us,
over time, to move from one profession to another.

There may be
occasions when one feels that a particular job is so damaging that it
must be given up immediately - but remember that the Buddha also
stressed the duties of lay people to their associates.

It would be
unethical for the laity to become a burden on others, by choice, if they
are currently capable of being self-supporting. It is far better, in
most situations, to train in new skills or ease oneself gradually into
new areas that present fewer difficulties.


None
of us lives in ideal circumstances and the Truth of the inherent Dukkha
in all situations soon becomes apparent as we walk this way. The Buddha
is not saying that people who engage in the listed occupations are
beyond the pale -

simply that those occupations will be spiritually
unhelpful to them. The occupation we take up is but one aspect of our
lives and it certainly does not preclude us from spiritual development
if, in the other areas, we are working to do good and refrain from harm.


Even within the listed occupations there is an opportunity to minimise
our own unskilful actions. Decisions can be taken in almost every
situation that are based on ethical thinking.

In time it may be
important to find alternative employment; but this will be your own
decision not something arrived at because a particular book or a teacher
tells you so.


Amongst
Westerners attracted to Buddhism there is sometimes a missionary zeal
that, whilst well intentioned, is often based on partial understanding
and seeing what they themselves would like to see within Buddhism
(rather than what is there).

There is often an automatic assumption that
Buddhism champions all kinds of environmental, social and political
causes and that deviation from these is tantamount to “not being a good
Buddhist”.

A closer reading of the texts, and experience of interacting
with seasoned and sincere Dhamma practitioners, conveys a more complex
picture than many nouveau Buddhists are aware of or are prepared to
acknowledge.


There
is not a simple answer to any moral dilemma. Part of the work we have
to do is to understand the complexity of the circumstances we have
created and to strive diligently from this moment forth to try to harm
less and help more.

There is sometimes a fine balancing act between the
apparent consequences of an act (as viewed by a third party) and the
full consequences as understood by the participants in that act. Skilful
action dismisses neither of these.


I
have related before how important motivation is in each large or small
action we decide to perform. Even in the midst of terrible conditions we
can choose to act kindly or compassionately.

On a simple level we can,
for example, treat our colleagues and associates properly. We can
minimise suffering. If the intention is to behave as well as possible
then that is of itself a valuable contribution to spiritual progress.


The
converse is also true. At times I have worked in the charitable sector;
where one would expect that ethical behaviour and common standards of
kindness and compassion would prevail.

Regrettably this is not always
the case, and sometimes in the headlong rush for the organisation’s
noble goal (or even sometimes for personal advancement) the
interpersonal relationships end up in a very bad way.

The intoxication
of “What Is Right!” blinds us to the fallout of our own actions. We may
forget in our struggle to prove how righteous we are, and our passion
for a cause, that we can inflict suffering on others simply by our lack
of consideration for their needs.

https://course.org/campus/mod/page/view.php?id=197

Contemplation - Day 62


370. Cut
off five, abandon five, cultivate five.


The
bhikkhu who transcends five fetters


is
called a flood-crosser.



371. Meditate,
O bhikkhu! Be not heedless.


Guard
the mind from sense pleasure’s whirl.


Be
not careless and swallow that ball of lead;


lest
you cry “This is pain” as it burns.



372. Meditative
absorption is not present without wisdom,


nor
wisdom in one who lacks absorption.


One
balanced in absorption and wisdom


is
indeed close to Nibbana.



373. Retiring
to a solitary abode,


that
bhikkhu who has calmed his mind,


and
clearly comprehends the Dhamma,


exceeds
all human joys.



374. Witnessing
the aggregates in rise and fall,


one
experiences happiness;


to
those who see with insight,


this
is the Deathless.



375. Sense
restraint, contentment,


discipline
according to the rules,


association
with noble friends -


energetic
and of pure conduct:


This
is the foundation for a wise bhikkhu.



Last modified: Thursday, 12 January 2017, 7:04 pm

https://course.org/campus/course/view.php?id=3

Friday - Noble Path: Effort, Mindfulness, Concentration

1. Noble Path: Effort, Mindfulness, Concentration

RIGHT EFFORT

sammā vāyāma

“The effort of Avoiding, Overcoming,

Of Developing and Maintaining:

These four great efforts have been shown

By him, the scion of the sun.

And he who firmly clings to them,

May put an end to suffering.”

- Anguttara Nikāya

The Four Great Efforts:

1. The Effort to Avoid

Here
we avoid the arising of unwholesome things that have not yet arisen.
This would include guarding the sense doors in order that we are not
drawn to craving.

2. The Effort to Overcome

Here
we overcome the unwholesome things that have arisen. If sense desire
has arisen strong effort is required to abandon it. We would also work
to overcome thoughts of ill will and harm.

3. The Effort to Develop

Here
we encourage the development of wholesome things that have not yet
arisen: one “develops the Factors of Enlightenment based on seclusion,

on dispassion, on
cessation that ends in deliverance, namely: Mindfulness, Investigation
of the Dhamma, Energy, Rapturous Joy, Calm,
Concentration and Equanimity.”

4. The Effort to Maintain

Here
we maintain the wholesome things that have arisen and allow them to
grow and mature. It particularly refers to the ability to keep in the
mind a favourable object of concentration in order that it can grow in
stability and strength until we gain realisation.

RIGHT MINDFULNESS

sammā sati

“The
only way that leads to the attainment of purity, to the overcoming of
sorrow and lamentation, to the end of pain and grief, to the entering
upon the right path and the realization of Nibbāna, is by the ‘Four
Foundations of Mindfulness’. And which are these four?

Herein the
disciple dwells in contemplation of the Body, in contemplation of
Feeling, in contemplation of the Mind, in contemplation of the
Mind-Objects; ardent, clearly comprehending them and mindful, after
putting away worldly greed and grief.” - Digha Nikāya 22

The Four Foundations of Mindfulness:

1. Contemplation of the Body

This
can take many forms. We have already begun to practise ànàpànasati, the
Mindfulness of Breathing, which falls into this category.

It would also
include: Mindfulness of the Four Postures (”I go, I stand, I sit, I lie
down”); Clear Comprehension of Actions (In everything we do we are
aware of our intention, of our advantage, of our duty and of the true
nature of our action.);

Contemplation of the Four Elements (Seeing the
body and its actions as consisting of the Solid Element, the Liquid
Element, the Heat Element, the Vibrating Element.); and Meditation on
Death (Traditionally known as cemetery meditations, where we observe the
decay of the body.).

2. Contemplation of the Feelings

Here
we are wholly conscious of feelings as they arise, whether they are
agreeable, disagreeable or neutral.

We see them for what they are
without attaching to them, merely watching them arise, change and pass.
We begin to realize they are simply feelings and that there is
ultimately no fixed experiencer of them - no Ego. They arise and pass
because that is their nature.

3. Contemplation of the Mind

“Herein
the disciple knows the greedy mind as greedy, and the not greedy mind
as not greedy; knows the hating mind as deluded and the undeluded mind
as undeluded. He knows the cramped mind as cramped,

and the scattered
mind as scattered; knows the developed mind as developed, and the
underdeveloped mind as undeveloped… Thus he dwells in contemplation of
the mind, either with regard to his own person, or to other persons, or
to both.

He beholds how consciousness arises; beholds how it passes
away; beholds the arising and passing away of consciousness.

‘Mind is
there’; this clear awareness is present in him, to the extent necessary
for knowledge and mindfulness; and he lives independent, unattached to
anything in the world. Thus does the disciple dwell in contemplation of
the mind.” - Digha Nikāya 22

4. Contemplation of the Mind-Objects

In
this form of meditation we choose to systematically contemplate a
number of different concepts in relation to the way things are:

The Five Hindrances ( nivarana )

Sense desire, ill will, sloth and torpor, restlessness and worry, sceptical doubt

The Five Aggregates ( khandha )

Material form, feeling, perception, mental formations, consciousness

The Six Sense Bases ( āyatana )

Eye and visible form, ear and sounds, nose and smells, tongue and flavour, body and touch, mind and mind-objects

The Seven Factors of Enlightenment ( bojjhanga )

Mindfulness, investigation of dhammas, energy, rapture, calm, concentration, equanimity

The Four Noble Truths ( ariya sacca )

Suffering, the arising of suffering, the cessation of suffering, the path leading to the cessation of suffering

RIGHT CONCENTRATION

sammā samādhi

Right
Concentration means the development of wholesome one-pointedness. We
centre our minds upon an object and develop our ability to focus
entirely upon it.

The Buddha listed forty subjects for such meditation
and we have begun to work with several of these. Both ānāpānasati and
the brahmavihāra meditations are included within this category.

Concentration
is usually seen as aiming at the jhānas - the absorptions. It develops
first through the jhānas factor of (1) initial application of mind, then
(2) sustained application, (3) rapture, (4) happiness, and finally (5)
one-pointedness.

These factors counteract the Five Hindrances that we
discussed earlier. The practice of Right Concentration is a gradual
purification, moving from coarser sensations and objects to ever more
subtle ones until we attain the fourth jhāna and then the four
immaterial states (which are further refinements):

First Jhāna

This is made up of the five absorption factors listed above.

Second Jhāna

This
consists of rapture, happiness and one-pointedness (the cruder elements
of initial and sustained application having subsided).

Third Jhāna

Only happiness and one-pointedness remain because rapture, a less-refined state given to excitement, has been overcome.

Fourth Jhāna

Realising
the comparatively coarse nature of happiness (when compared with
neutrality), the fourth jhāna consists only of one-pointedness and
neutrality.

https://course.org/campus/mod/page/view.php?id=197&forceview=1

Contemplation - Day 62

370. Cut
off five, abandon five, cultivate five.

The
bhikkhu who transcends five fetters

is
called a flood-crosser.

371. Meditate,
O bhikkhu! Be not heedless.

Guard
the mind from sense pleasure’s whirl.

Be
not careless and swallow that ball of lead;

lest
you cry “This is pain” as it burns.

372. Meditative
absorption is not present without wisdom,

nor
wisdom in one who lacks absorption.

One
balanced in absorption and wisdom

is
indeed close to Nibbana.

373. Retiring
to a solitary abode,

that
bhikkhu who has calmed his mind,

and
clearly comprehends the Dhamma,

exceeds
all human joys.

374. Witnessing
the aggregates in rise and fall,

one
experiences happiness;

to
those who see with insight,

this
is the Deathless.

375. Sense
restraint, contentment,

discipline
according to the rules,

association
with noble friends -

energetic
and of pure conduct:

This
is the foundation for a wise bhikkhu.

Last modified: Thursday, 12 January 2017, 7:04 pm

https://course.org/campus/mod/page/view.php?id=224

Chant Workshop 9 (optional)

The
meditation practices we are using are drawn from the Theravāda
tradition which bases its teachings on the words of the Buddha and his
early followers as recorded in the Pāli Canon.

Pāli is a written
liturgical language and is often also used for traditional chants that
many meditators find helpful as part of their spiritual practice. During
the course we will introduce a small number of these chants in Pāli or
in translated English form.

Over
the weeks the individual chants build to form the text for a puja, or
dedication ceremony, that some practitioners may wish to use as a way of
periodically rededicating their meditation practice. Please use the
chants if you find them helpful; please ignore them if you prefer.

The Complete Puja Chant

The
eight components that we’ve introduced over the past weeks comprise a
traditional puja. The complete text is linked below for you to use if
you wish. Please feel free to incorporate other texts that have meaning
for you.

This tradition has no place for meaningless ritual - but plenty
of space for meaningful ritual. The main thing is that whatever you use
is supportive of your meditation practice and further spiritual
development.

Download the PDF of the complete text here (Text ONLY, 45KB)

Download the PDF and all mp3 audio files here for personal use (9MB approx)

(1) CHANT 1: Vandana & Tisarana

 

-1:42

(2) CHANT 2: Panca Sila

 

-0:44

 

(3) CHANT 3: Iti Pi So

 

-1:38

(4) CHANT 4: The Metta Sutta

 

-2:59

(5) CHANT 5: The Sublime Abodes

 

-3:13

(6) CHANT 6: Frequent Recollections

 

-1:08

(7) CHANT 7: Blessings

 

-3:37

(8) CHANT 8: Ending the Puja

 

-1:10

 

Last modified: Thursday, 13 September 2018, 5:25 pm

Vipassana Meditation 1-12-2018
1 December - 7 December

In our final week we continue with Choiceless Awareness as our
vipassanā practice, explore The Perfections, and begin to think about
building a sustainable practice beyond the course.

    Saturday - The Perfections (1) Book
    Contemplation - Day 64https://course.org/campus/mod/book/view.php?id=200

Saturday - The Perfections (1)
1. The Perfections (1)

THE PERFECTIONS

(or pārami )

The pārami or perfections are qualities to be developed in our daily
lives for the benefit of all beings. In the early texts of the Pāli
Canon they are spoken of only generally, but the commentarial tradition
has elucidated each of the qualities and settled on the figure of ten as
being their number. The Perfections, in this form, are influential in
popular Buddhist practise and one can see their links to both the
brahmavihāra qualities and to the Five Spiritual Faculties that we have
just met. Their practical use may be as a check-list of aspirations
against which we may compare the attitude and approach that we are
bringing to the spiritual life. This excerpt from the Visuddhimagga
explains how we should behave to others if we aspire to the status of
‘Great Beings’ and is composed of the ten pārami :

“For the Great Beings’ minds retain their balance by giving
preference to beings’ welfare, by dislike of beings’ suffering, by
desire for the various successes achieved by beings to last, and by
impartiality towards all beings. And to all beings they give gifts,
which are a source of pleasure, without discriminating thus: ‘It must be
given to this one, it must not be given to this one’. And in order to
avoid doing harm to beings they undertake the precepts of virtue. They
practise renunciation for the purpose of perfecting their virtue. They
cleanse their understanding for the purpose of non-confusion about what
is good and bad for beings. They constantly arouse energy, having
beings’ welfare and happiness at heart. When they have acquired heroic
fortitude through supreme energy, they become patient with beings’ many
kinds of faults. They do not deceive when promising ‘We shall give you
this; we shall do this for you’. They are unshakeably resolute upon
beings’ welfare and happiness. Through unshakeable lovingkindness they
place them first (before themselves). Through equanimity they expect no
reward.”

GENEROSITY

We can make it a priority in our interactions with others regardless
of whether it is reciprocated. Giving selflessly, without thought of
reward. If we cannot give material sustenance to others then we can
generously provide spiritual and emotional sustenance. Being helpful,
being approachable, lending a hand. The important thing is that our
intent is pure. The size of the gift or the magnitude of the assistance
we render is measured in relation to the wholesomeness of our intention.
Giving simply to give is a noble act. One aspect of dāna or generosity
is the support of the Sangha - the Buddhist monks and nuns - who are
reliant on this generosity for their basic requisites. If we are able to
give in this way then it is a valuable contribution to the survival of
the Buddha’s teachings.

VIRTUE

For lay people the key to behaving with morality and to our
spiritual development is observance of the Five Precepts. We can choose
to observe them in their most basic form - not intentionally killing,
not stealing, not engaging in sexual misconduct, not lying or
slandering, not drinking alcohol. We can also further develop our
understanding of the precepts so that we act more skilfully in every
aspect of our lives. Following the Buddha’s exhortation: “Do good,
refrain from doing evil, and purify the mind.” If we behave ethically,
then both we, and the people with whom we interact, will suffer less. We
will also behave in a way that is encouraging of other people’s
development. S‹la can be looked upon as getting the conditions right. We
do this for our own sake and that of others.

RENUNCIATION

Being without selfishness and indulgence. Able to willingly
sacrifice our pleasures. Simplifying. Prioritising what is important.
Avoiding the trivial and unskilful. Freeing ourselves from lust and
craving. Guarding the sense doors.

“When the spirit of renunciation is alive within us it is not
unpleasant to give up things that we want - it begins to feel like a
blessing that we have this encouragement to do so. We feel grateful that
we have a form that sustains long-term effort of body, speech and mind
to go against the deep, strong flow of self-seeking passions. We know
how without it we mightn’t have held the tension long enough for a
letting-go to happen. When letting-go does happen we discover tremendous
energy - all the energy that was previously locked into maintaining the
rigidity. Each time we rediscover this precious reservoir of energy our
aspirations are refreshed and reaffirmed.” - Ajahn Munindo

WISDOM

May we develop in Wisdom in order that we may see things as they
are. May we see the light of truth and share it with others. May we walk
on with Wisdom towards enlightenment.

“Drinking deep the Dhamma,

One lives happily, with tranquil mind.

The wise ever delight in the Dhamma,

revealed by the noble ones.”

https://course.org/campus/mod/page/view.php?id=201

Contemplation - Day 64

383. Having striven, brahmin,

cut the stream;

discard sense desires.

Knowing the destruction

of conditioned things, brahmin,

you know the Uncreated.

384. When in two states the brahmin

crosses beyond,

from ‘One Who Knows’

all fetters fall away.

385. In whom there exists

neither this shore,

nor the far shore,

nor yet both;

free from cares and fetters,

him I call a brahmin.

386. Meditative, stainless and secluded,

with duty done and free of taints,

having attained the Supreme Goal -

him I call a brahmin.

Last modified: Thursday, 12 January 2017, 7:08 pm

Vipassana Meditation 2-12-2018

1 December - 7 December
https://course.org/campus/mod/book/view.php?id=202


Sunday - The Perfections (2)

1. The Perfections (2)

ENERGY

“Energy
needs single-minded, one-pointed direction in order to get any results.
To meditate takes a surprising amount of mental energy: the only energy
in this universe. Everything physical is an outcome of mental energy.

When meditation becomes skilful the expended mental energy is no longer a
strain. On the contrary, the opposite happens. New energy is absorbed
through meditation.” - Ayya Khema

PATIENCE

Impatience
is heavily connected with Ego. We want things to happen now, instantly,
regardless of the fact that this may have implications for others.

Impatience is really about craving and grasping after things whose time
has not yet come. With patience we realize that plans can be made at any
time but that we understand that a myriad of things may interfere with
their fruition.

There is an acceptance of change. We do not cause more
suffering to others and ourselves by being disappointed and stressed at
the slow progress our plans are making.

Patience needs to be directed at
us and toward others. It is quite different from complacency. With
patience we remain aware of the work to be done and resolve to do it -
for the benefit of all sentient beings.

Along the way we work with
compassion and equanimity when things do not happen quite as we hoped
they would. This is particularly necessary when considering our
meditation practice.


TRUTHFULNESS

Seeing the validity of the Four Noble Truths. Truthfulness
refers not only to observance of the Fourth Precept - speaking
truthfully - but also to establishing inner honesty.

Not allowing  ourselves to be deceived by the games we all habitually play. It also  means seeing what is true -

being totally honest about the nature of all
phenomena. Not ’sweetening’ things by always looking on the bright
side. Not becoming cynical and depressed by failing to see the joy and
happiness that are also aspects of life. Being accurate in our
assessment of situations.


DETERMINATION

Without
determination we accomplish nothing. The development of a meditation
practice and a spiritual life is a slow process. There will be rocky
patches that we will need determination to overcome. Determination grows
out of an understanding of the validity and importance of the
buddha-dhamma and the unsatisfactoriness of living unskilfully. If we
are determined to work in a balanced but rigorous way we will succeed.


LOVINGKINDNESS

We
have worked with mettā as a brahmavihāra meditation. When we look at it
as one of the Perfections we expand its effect into every aspect of our
interactions with others.

Every transaction in which we participate can
be informed by unconditional lovingkindness.

The love that we are talking about here is selfless - it can be shared  with all. It expects nothing in return. 

Our meditation practice
will help us develop this but we can also make a conscious decision to
act with kindness to all we meet. We can also exercise lovingkindness
for ourselves - giving credit where it is due, recognising our needs.


EQUANIMITY

Equanimity
is also the final Perfection. We can work to extend this quality to all
with whom we interact in our lives. Treating everyone with balance. Not
choosing one over another. Seeing them for what they are. Seeing their
non-separate nature -

the interconnections between all beings. Just
as… So too… in all aspects of our lives. Living considerately, with
fairness and maintaining objectivity. Bringing the qualities we value
into our relationships with others unconditionally.

https://course.org/campus/mod/page/view.php?id=203

Contemplation - Day 65


387. Sun
shines by day;


the
moon by night.


The
warlord shines in armour;


meditating
the brahmin shines.


But
the Buddha shines resplendent


for
all of every day and night.



388. Having
discarded evil,


he
is a brahmin;


living
in peace,


he
is a samana;


abandoning
impurity,


he
is a renunciate.



389. One
should not strike a brahmin,


nor
should a brahmin retaliate when struck.


Shame
on one who strikes a brahmin;


greater
shame on one who retaliates.



390. Nothing
is better in a brahmin


than
that he weans his mind from what is dear.


Suffering
subsides


when
the will to harm ends.



391. Not
doing evil through


body,
speech and mind;


restrained
in these three ways,


him
I call a brahmin.



Last modified: Thursday, 12 January 2017, 7:10 pm


In our
final week we continue with Choiceless Awareness as our vipassanā
practice, explore The Perfections, and begin to think about building a
sustainable practice beyond the course.
https://course.org/campus/course/view.php?id=3
Posted by: site admin @ 8:47 am
Vipassana Meditation
https://course.org/campus/mod/book/view.php?id=204

Monday - Preparation and Walking

1. Preparation and Walking

The
time we set aside for formal meditation practice is precious. We know
that by committing to regular sessions our concentration and
tranquillity will increase and that this will bring benefits far beyond
the actual time engaged in the activity of meditation.


Being
careful to bring consistency to the time and place in which we have
chosen to meditate can strengthen our commitment. The mind initially
settles more easily if we are familiar with our surroundings and the
conditions we have created. If our character tends toward the visual and
devotional, it can be helpful to set up a small shrine that becomes the
focus for our regular sittings. The shrine could contain things which
are important to us, and which reinforce the values we are bringing to
our meditation practice. If we consider ourselves Buddhists then a small
statue or image of the Buddha may reconnect us with the gratitude we
feel for His teachings. Traditional accoutrements such as incense,
candles, flowers, and offerings may help us to acknowledge how very
special is the opportunity to learn about and practise the Dhamma. If we
are of a different spiritual tradition then items which evoke similar
themes and feelings may be more appropriate.


If
we are of a more sceptical or analytical bent then a cleared area free
from visual stimuli may help us to settle more quickly. Some find that
facing a blank wall for a few moments before closing their eyes helps to
quieten the mind. Whatever the style of the place we choose, using it
regularly will enable us to reduce the external distractions to our
practice. Obviously if we are away from home we must use whatever space
exists.


Many
find it useful to rededicate their meditation practice each day by
engaging in some sort of small ceremony or puja. This usually consists
of words of gratitude and homage followed by verses of aspiration and an
undertaking to follow the precepts. It can be a very useful way of
beginning each day anew with a dedication to living it with integrity.
If you would like to incorporate something like this into your practice
guidance can be given on request. Whilst beneficial for many it is not
required by others: some may even find such cultural accretions to be a
barrier.


Another
way in which we can rededicate our practice is to use the common tactic
of setting aside one day each week on which we will make an extra
special effort. This is common to many religions and Buddhism
traditionally uses the four phases of the lunar cycle to calculate these
days. The uposatha (or observance) days fall on different days of the
week because of the moon’s cycle. The full moon day is deemed
particularly auspicious and is usually a time when particular incidents
(e.g. in the Buddha’s life) are remembered. The details of the
commemorations vary depending on which Theravada sect and country one is
associated. If you are based in a Western country you may wish to use
Sundays as a day of dedicated practice instead. Take the time on your
observance day to practice and read about the Dhamma.



Walking


If
you find that you are doing a lot of sitting meditation, perhaps
several consecutive sessions for example, it can be useful to have an
alternative activity that will allow you to maintain a high degree of
mindfulness between these sittings. Walking meditation is recommended in
the Pāli Canon and can be a beautiful complement to the sitting
practices.


There
are, broadly speaking, two methods of walking meditation. What is
popularly known as the Burmese method involves slowing down the pace of
walking in order that concentration can be maximised. The Thai approach
is to walk at normal pace thus facilitating easier integration with the
concept of mindfulness in daily life.


Rather
than focusing on a particular meditation object, in both methods the
idea is to be wholly mindful of the activity of walking. Noting each
aspect of the movement of the foot as it lifts, stretches, is placed,
and lifts again. Normally one marks a path several metres long and walk
it, turn mindfully, and walk back. This is repeated for the duration of
the session. It is useful to use the same pathway regularly so that you
are free from the novelty of visual distraction. The path you choose can
be either indoors or outdoors. Your eyes should look at the ground a
few paces ahead and be lightly focused. Be totally with the process of
walking. When used in this way the meditation would be a samatha
practice. If instead we focused on whatever arose whilst walking rather
than one-pointedness upon the mechanics of the movement it would be
possible to practice this as a vipassanā technique. Walking meditation
can be an excellent way in which to break up long periods of sitting
meditation. It is often alternated with the sitting forms of meditation
on retreats. Standing meditation is another variant that can prove
useful respite from long periods of sitting.

https://course.org/campus/mod/page/view.php?id=205

Contemplation - Day 66


392. One
should devoutly revere a person


from
whom one learned the Dhamma,


as
taught by the Fully Enlightened One;


as
a brahmin reveres the sacrificial fire.



393. Not
by matted hair, lineage or birth


does
one become a brahmin.


In
whom exists truth and righteousness -


he
is pure, he a brahmin.



394. What
use your matted hair, O witless one?


What
use your antelope skin clothes?


Within,
you are entangled;


Yet,
without, you appear groomed.



395. Wearing
rag-cloth robes


-
lean, with veins protruding -


meditating
alone in the forest,


him,
I call a brahmin.



396. I
do not call him a brahmin


because
he is born of a womb


or
delivered from his mother.


He
is just a commoner if still defiled.


One
free from defilements and clinging,


him,
I call a brahmin.




Last modified: Thursday, 12 January 2017, 7:11 pm

https://course.org/campus/course/view.php?id=3

1 December - 7 December

In
our final week we continue with Choiceless Awareness as our vipassanā
practice, explore The Perfections, and begin to think about building a
sustainable practice beyond the course.



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