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LESSON 2858 Mon 31 Dec 2018 Do Good Be Mindful - Awakened One with Awareness (AOA) Assignment - Diploma in Buddhist Studies (DTBS) FUNDAMENTAL ABHIDHAMMA
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LESSON
2858  Mon 31 Dec 2018

Do Good Be Mindful - Awakened One with Awareness (AOA)

Assignment - Diploma in Buddhist Studies (DTBS)

FUNDAMENTAL ABHIDHAMMA


http://www.abhidhamma.com/txt_fundamentalabhidhamma_03.html
Nandamālābhivaṃsa Mahāthera. FUNDAMENTAL ABHIDHAMMA

I. Chapter 1: Citta
1. Citta: Consciousness…


I. Chapter 1: Citta

1. Citta: Consciousness

2. Definition and classification – 89/121

3. Kāmāvacara – 54

4. Akusala – 12

5. Lobhamūla – 8

6. Dosamūla – 2

7. Mohamūla –2

8. Ahetuka – 18

9. Akusala vipāka – 7

10. Kusala vipāka – 8

11. Kriya – 3

12. Kāma-sobhana – 24

13. Kusala – 8

14. Vipāka – 8

15. Kriya – 8

16. Classification of kāmāvacara citta

17. Rūpāvacara – 15

18. Nivaraṇa – 5

19. Arūpāvacara – 12

20. Object – 4

21. Lokuttara – 8/40

22. Four types of magga

23. Magga and Saṃyojanas (Fetters)

24. Phala (Fruition)

25. Lokuttara jhāna

26. Jhāna citta

1. Citta: Consciousness

2. Definition and classification – 89/121

CHAPTER 1 Citta:

Consciousness Definition and classification Citta, consciousness, is
awareness of object. It is conscious (aware) of object, so it is called
citta. All types of consciousness are the same according to the nature
of being conscious of the object. But, it can be classified into 89 or
121 through the plane where it arises, type, associated dhamma,
promptitude, jhāna, object that receives and magga (the constitution of
the Eight Noble Paths).

Citta 89/121


Kāmāvacara = 54 akusala = 12 lobhamūla = 8
dosamūla = 2
mohamūla = 2
ahetuka = 18 akusala vipāka = 7
kusala vipāka = 8
kriya = 3
kāma sobhana = 24 kusala = 8
vipāka = 8
kriya = 8
Rūpāvacara = 15 kusala = 5
vipāka = 5
kriya = 5
Arūpāvacara = 12 kusala = 4
vipāka = 4
kriya = 4
Lokuttara = 8/ 40 magga = 4/20
phala = 4/20

3. Kāmāvacara – 54

Cittas that frequent kāma plane are called “kāmāvacara”
(consciousness that frequents the plane of sensual pleasure). The
kāmāvacara citta is first classified into three, namely, akusala,
ahetuka and sobhana.

4. Akusala – 12

meritorious, wholesome or moral. So akusala is demeritorious,
unwholesome or immoral. All types of akusala are with fault and bring
about ill (bad) results. Akusala consciousness is classified into three
types by means of its root, namely:


1. Lobhamūla     Attachment-rooted consciousness
2. Dosamūla Hatred-rooted consciousness
3. Mohamūla Delusion-rooted consciousness


Note: Attachment, hatred and delusion are mental concomitants, and they are the root of all types of akusala.

5. Lobhamūla – 8

The consciousness that is rooted in attachment is “lobhamūla”. All
types of lobhamūla are the same in the nature of craving. But it is
divided into eight according to feeling, association and promptitude.
The lobhamūla consciousness is twofold by means of feeling: pleasant
feeling and neutral feeling. Each one is twofold by means of
association: with wrong view and without wrong view. So lobhamūla is
four types. Again each of them is divided twofold by means of
promptitude: with promptitude and without promptitude. Thus lobha-mūla
is classified into eight.

The following is how lobhamūla can be divided into eight types:


Feeling Association Promptitude
With pleasant    With wrong view Without
With neutral Without wrong view With


The meaning of Pāḷi terms:
Somanassa-sahagata       = accompanied by pleasure
Upekkhā-sahagata = accompanied by indifference
Diṭṭhigata-sampayutta = connected with wrong view
Diṭṭhigata-vippayutta = disconnected from wrong view
Asaṅkhārika = without promptitude
Sasaṅkhārika = with promptitude  

6. Dosamūla – 2

The consciousness that is rooted in hatred is “dosamūla”. All types
of dosamūla are the same in feeling and association. But it is
classified into two by means of promptitude: with promptitude and
without promptitude.

The following is how dosamūla can be divided into two types:


Feeling    Association    Promptitude   
With displeasure With ill will Without
With


Pāḷi terms and their meanings:
Domanassa-sahagata     = accompanied by displeasure
Paṭīgha-sampayutta = connected with ill will 

7. Mohamūla –2

The consciousness that is rooted in delusion is “mohamūla”. All
types of mohamūla are the same in feeling, indifference. It is
classified into two according to association. But it cannot be divided
as “with promptitude and without promptitude”.

How mohamūla can be divided into two types:


Feeling Association
Indifference Connected with doubt
Connected with restlessness


Pāḷi terms and their meanings:
Upekkhā-sahagata     = accompanied by indifference
Vicikicchā-sampayutta = connected with doubt
Uddhacca-sampayutta = connected with restlessness 

8. Ahetuka – 18

In Abhidhamma treatise, the six types of mental states, lobha =
attachment, dosa = hatred, moha = delusion, alobha = non-attach-ment,
adosa = non-hatred, and amoha = non-delusion, are described as “hetu”,
meaning conditions that fortify effects concerned like the root of a
tree.

The consciousness that dissociates from such a “hetu” is called
“ahetuka”. It means a consciousness that is absent from “hetu”. Ahetuka
citta is divided into three according to “types”, namely,

1. Akusala vipāka = result of akusala

2. Kusala vipāka = result of kusala, and

3. Kriya / kiriya = functional consciousness

9. Akusala vipāka – 7

The consciousness that is the result of akusala is called “akusala
vipāka”. The akusala vipāka citta is classified into seven according to
base where mind arises and function that mind performs.

Note: The base where mind arises is six-fold; the function mind performs is 14. They will be explained later.

How akusala vipāka is classified into seven:

A. According to base:

1. Eye-consciousness accompanied by indifference, and so are

2. Ear-consciousness

3. Nose-consciousness

4. Tongue-consciousness

5. Body-consciousness accompanied by pain

B. According to function:

6. Receiving consciousness accompanied by indifference

7. Investigating consciousness accompanied by indifference


Pāḷi terms and their meanings:
Upekkhā-sahagata = accompanied by indifference
Dukkha-sahagata = accompanied by pain
Cakkhu-viññāṇa = eye-consciousness
Sota-viññāṇa = ear-consciousness
Ghāna-viññāṇa = nose-consciousness
Jivhā-viññāṇa = tongue-consciousness
Kāya-viññāṇa = body-consciousness
Sampaṭicchana = receiving
Santīraṇa = investigating  

10. Kusala vipāka – 8

The consciousness that is the result of kusala is called “kusala
vipāka”. The kusala vipāka citta is classified into eight according to
base where mind arises and function that mind performs. How kusala
vipāka is classified into eight:

A. According to base:

1. Eye-consciousness accompanied by indifference, and so are

2. Ear-consciousness

3. Nose-consciousness

4. Tongue-consciousness

5. Body-consciousness accompanied by happiness

B. According to function:

6. Receiving consciousness accompanied by indifference

7. Investigating consciousness accompanied by indifference

8. Investigating consciousness accompanied by pleasure


Pāḷi terms and their meanings:
Upekkhā-sahagata = accompanied by indifference
Sukha-sahagata = accompanied by happiness 

11. Kriya – 3

The consciousness that acts, but does not produce an effect (as
kamma does) is called “kriya”. The kriya citta is classified into three
according to function. How kriya is classified into three types:

1. Adverting consciousness in Five-door accompanied by indifference

2. Adverting consciousness in Mind-door accompanied by indifference

3. Smile-producing consciousness accompanied by pleasure


Pāḷi terms and their meanings:
Pañca-dvāra-āvajjana = altering consciousness in Five-door
Mano-dvāra-āvajjana = altering consciousness in Mind-door
Hasituppāda = smile-producing consciousness 

12. Kāma-sobhana – 24

Among the kamāvacara cittas, 24 types of consciousness are called
“sobhana” because they are magnificent due to being good qualities and
producing good effects.

The kāma-sobhana citta is classified into three types, namely, kusala, vipāka and kriya.

13. Kusala – 8

Kusala is so-called because it eradicates evil. All types of kusala are naturally free from fault and bring about happiness.

Kusala citta is classified into eight, according to feeling,
association and promptitude. The following is how kusala can be divided
into eight types:


Feeling Association Promptitude
With pleasant With knowledge Without
With neutral Without knowledge With


When kusala citta arises, it feels pleasant or indifferent. Each of
them is two-fold: with knowledge and without knowledge. So kusala is
four. Four multiplied by the two promptitudes, without or with, gives
eight.


The meaning of Pāḷi terms:
Ñāṇa-sampayutta = connected with knowledge
Ñāṇa-vippayutta = disconnected from knowledge 

14. Vipāka – 8

The consciousness that is the result of kusala is called “vipāka”.
The vipāka citta is classified in the same way as kusala that is its
cause. Thus, vipāka is classified into eight types similar to kusala.

15. Kriya – 8

Kriya means mere action. It is, although similar to kusala, not
operative. Nor does it bear the result of kusala. It arises within
arahantas who are devoid of mental defilements and do not come to be
reborn in the next life. Kriya is classified into eight types in the
same way.

16. Classification of kāmāvacara citta


1. According to feeling:
Citta associated with pleasure 18
Citta associated with happiness  1
Citta associated with displeasure  2
Citta associated with pain  1
Citta associated with neutral feeling    32
Total
54
2. According to type:
Kusala  8
Akusala 12
Vipāka 23
Kriya 11
Total
54 

17. Rūpāvacara – 15

The consciousness that arises mostly in the “rūpa brahma” world is
called “rūpāvacara”. The rūpāvacara citta is basically classified into
five according to the five jhāna stages. Then five multiplied by the
three types, kusala, vipāka and kriya, comes to 15.

The constitution of jhānas

  1. The first jhāna that is constituted by vitakka, vicāra, pīti, sukha and ekaggatā.

  2. The second jhāna that is constituted by vicāra, pīti, sukha and ekaggatā.

  3. The third jhāna that is constituted by pīti, sukha and ekaggatā.

  4. The fourth jhāna that is constituted by sukha and ekaggatā.

  5. The fifth jhāna that is constituted by upekkhā and ekaggatā.

The meaning of Pāḷi terms:


Jhāna = Jhāna is so called because it concentrates firmly on an object. The word jhāna is used for the unity of jhāna factors.
Jhānaṅga = There are 5 jhāna factors, namely, vitakka, vicara, etc.
Vitakka = Initial application
Vicāra = Sustained application
Pīti = Joy
Sukha = Happiness
Upekkhā = Neutral feeling
Ekaggatā = One-pointedness of the object


Paṭhamajhāna is the constitution of five jhāna factors, and it is
the first stage that is attained. Dutiya jhāna is the constitution of
four jhāna factors, and it is the second stage that is attained. Tatiya
jhāna is the constitutions of three jhāna factors, and is the third
stage attained. Catuttha jhāna is the constitution of two jhāna factors,
and it is the fourth stage that is attained. Pañcama jhāna is the
constitution of two jhāna factors, and it is the fifth stage that is
attained.


Jhānaṅgas Jhānas
V V P S E 1st

V P S E 2nd


P S E 3nd

S E 4th

U E 5th


The meaning of jhāna:

In another way, jhāna is so-called because it temporarily burns those adverse mental states. They are termed nivaraṇa in Pāḷi. 

18. Nivaraṇa – 5

The Pāḷi word, nivaraṇa, is equivalent to the English word
“hindrance”. Nivaraṇa is the hindrance of merit. There are five types of
mental states:


1. Kāmacchanda = sensual desire
2. Byāpāda = ill will
3. Thīna-middha = sloth and torpor
4. Uddhacca-kukkucca = restlessness and remorse
5. Vicikicchā = doubt

Those five hindrances are burnt by the five jhāna factors each:


1. Thīna-middha by vitakka
2. Vicikicchā by vicāra
3. Byāpāda by pīti
4. Uddhacca-kukkucca by sukha
5. Kāmacchanda by ekaggatā

How rūpāvacara citta is classified into 15:


Jhāna Kusala Vipāka Kriya
First jhāna = 3 1 1 1
Second jhāna = 3 1 1 1
Third jhāna = 3 1 1 1
Fourth jhāna = 3 1 1 1
Fifth jhāna = 3 1 1 1
Total 15 = 5+ 5+

19. Arūpāvacara – 12

The consciousness that mostly arises in the arūpa brahma world is
called “arūpāvacara”. Arūpāvacara citta is basically classified into 4
types, according to object. Then, 4 multiplied by 3 types, namely,
kusala, vipāka and kriya, comes to 12.

20. Object – 4

The 4 objects are divided into two: Passing over and receiving.


The passed-over objects The receiving objects
Kasiṇa device Infinite space
Infinite space First viññāṇa
First viññāṇa Nothingness
Nothingness Third viññāṇa

The meaning of terms:


Kasiṇa = Entirety of device. The ten kinds of entirety of device are used as an object of rūpa jhāna.
Infinite space = A space that is known by removing the entirety of device.
First viññāṇa = The consciousness that occurs depending on infinite space. It is only the first type of arūpa cittas.
Nothingness = It is the non-existence of the first viññāṇa of arūpa citta.
Third viññāṇa = The consciousness that occurs depending on the non-existence of the first viññāṇa.

How arūpāvacara citta is classified into 12:


Object   Kusala Vipāka Kriya
Ākāsānañca āyatana = 3 1 1 1
Viññāṇañca āyatana = 3 1 1 1
Ākiñcañña āyatana = 3 1 1 1
Nevasaññā-nāsaññā āyatana = 3 1 1 1
Total 12 = 4 + 4 + 4

The meaning of Pāḷi terms:


Ākāsānañcāyatana = The consciousness that has the “infinite space” as its object.
Viññāṇañcāyatana = The consciousness that has the “infinite viññāṇa” as its object.
Ākiñcaññāyatana = The consciousness that has “non- existence of the first viññāṇa” as its object.
Nevasaññā-nāsaññāyatana = The consciousness that has neither perception nor non-perception based on its object.


Note: All types of arūpa jhāna belong to the fifth jhāna, the constitution of upekkhā and ekaggatā. 

21. Lokuttara – 8/40

These three types of worlds, kāma, rūpa and arūpa, are called
“loka”, meaning “mundane”. The consciousness that goes out from “loka”
or is higher than loka is called “lokuttara”, meaning “supra-mundane”.

Magga, the constitution of the Eightfold Noble Path, is classified
into four. So, lokuttara citta is classified into four according to
magga.

Phala, the effect of magga, is also four, according to magga that is its cause.

The meaning of Pāḷi terms:


Magga = By removing mental defilements, it attains Nibbāna, so it is called magga
Maggaṅga = The eight factors that compose magga: they are described as the “Eightfold Noble Path.”
Sammā-diṭṭhi = Right understanding
Sammā-saṅkappa = Right thought
Sammā-vācā = Right speech
Sammā-kammanta = Right action
Sammā-ājīva = Right livelihood
Sammā-vāyāma = Right effort
Sammā-sati = Right mindfulness
Sammā-samādhi = Right concentration 

22. Four types of magga

Magga, the constitution of the Eightfold Noble Path, is classified into four:


1. Sotāpatti = Magga that enters the stream to Nibbāna
2. Sakadāgāmi = Magga of once-returner to the kāma world
3. Anāgāmi = Magga of non-returner to the kāma world
4. Arahatta = Magga that is the cause of arahatta fruition 

23. Magga and Saṃyojanas (Fetters)

The magga of sotāpatti completely eradicates the two fetters, wrong
view and doubt. The magga of sakadāgāmi causes reduction of sensual
desire and hatred. The magga of anāgāmi completely eradicates the two
fetters, sensual desire and hatred. The magga of arahatta completely
eradicates the five fetters, desire for rūpa jhāna, desire for arūpa
jhāna, conceit, mental restlessness, and ignorance.

24. Phala (Fruition)

Phala is that which is the effect of magga. It belongs to vipāka citta. But “phala” is a special term for the effect of magga.

25. Lokuttara jhāna

Lokuttara is divided twofold: without jhāna and with jhāna. If it
arises without jhāna, lokuttara citta is divided into 8. If it arises
with jhāna, lokuttara citta is divided into 40. The 5 jhānas multiplied
by the 4 maggas make 20. The 5 jhānas multiplied by the 4 phalas is 20.
Thus, 20 plus 20 becomes 40.

26. Jhāna citta 67

The jhāna cittas, mundane and supramundane, total 67.



Mundane Supramundane Total
First jhāna 3 8 = 11
Second jhāna 3 8 = 11
Third jhāna 3 8 = 11
Fourth jhāna 3 8 = 11
Fifth jhāna 15 8 = 23
Total

= 67 
9. List and explain kamavacara ahetuka kusala vipaka cittas (10 M)

11. List and explain kamavacara sobana vipaka citta (10 M)
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13. List and explain kamavacara sobana kiria citta (10M)

More images for kamavacara sobana kiria citta

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14. List and explain Rupavacara kusala citta (10 M)

Images for kamavacara sobana kiria citta

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15. List and explain Rupavacara vipaka citta (10 M)



rupavacara citta



There are 15 rupavacara citta (consciousness mostly experienced in
rupa-loka).

They are divided into three classes in the same
way as the kamavacara – sobhana citta are equally divided into
kusala, vipaka and kiriya citta.

1.rupavacara kusala citta (5)
= rupa-jhana moral consciousness

2.rupavacara vipaka citta (5)
= rupa-jhana resultant consciousness

3.rupavacara kiriya citta
(5) = rupa-jhana functional consciousness

Rupavacara-kusala
citta and rupavacara-kiriya citta are experienced in the sense sphere
as well as in the fine-material sphere whereas rupavacara-vipaka
citta are experienced only in the fine material sphere.

jhana
= a state of wilful concentration or absorption on an object. It is a
combination of factors of absorption (jhanaranga). These factors
number five in total. They are:

(1)vitakka = initial
application that directs the mind toward the object
(2)vicara =
sustained application that examines the object again and
again
(3)piti = joy or pleasurable interests in the
object
(4)vedana = feeling, sensation (two kinds of vedana that
occur in jhana are:
(a)sukha = pleasant or agreeable
feeling
(b)upekkha = neutral feeling, equaniminity
(5)ekaggata
= one-pointedness, samadhi (concentration)

Vitakka, vicara,
piti, sukha or upekkha, and ekaggata cetasika can influence the mind
to be fixed on an object. They can be developed and strengthened by
samatha – bhavana which is actually a form of mental
training.

Our mind is normally not tranquil or calm. It is
constantly agitated by five hindrances (nivaranas); namely sensuous
desire (kamacchanda), illwill (vyapada), sloth and torpor
(thina-middha), restlessness and remorse (uddhacca-kukkucca) and
sceptical doubt (vicikiccha).

These hindrances can be overcome
and temporarily dismissed by tranquillity-meditation
(samatha-bhavana).

In the first jhana, all the five
jhana-factors are present. Then by meditating on the
patibhaga-nimitta of pathavi-kasina further eliminating the lower
jhana – factors one by one, a person can attain the higher
jhanas. He or she attains the second jhana when vitakka is
eliminated, the third jhana when vicara is further eliminated, the
fourth jhana when piti is also eliminated, and finally the fifth
jhana when sukha is replaced by upekkha.



rupavacara kusala
citta
(Fine-material Sphere Moral Consciousness)



tak

ca

pi

su/up

ek

+

+

+

+

-

pa

du

ta

ca

pan

+ means sukha which is the same as
somanassa
- means upekkha

1.vitakka, vicara, piti,
sukh’ekaggata sahitam pathamajjhana kusala-cittam
2.vicara,
piti, sukh’ekaggata sahitam dutiyajjhana kusala-cittam
3.piti,
sukh’ekaggata sahitam tatiyajjhana kusala-cittam
4.sukh’ekaggata
sahitam catutthajjhana kusala-cittam
5.upekkh’ekaggata
sahitam pancamajjhana kusala-cittam

Meanings

1.First
jhana moral consciousness together with initial application,
sustained application, joy, bliss and one-pointedness.
2.Second
jhana moral consciousness together with sustained application, joy,
bliss and one-pointedness.
3.Third jhana moral consciousness
together with joy, bliss and one-pointedness.
4.Fourth jhana moral
consciousness together with bliss and one-pointedness.
5.Fifth
jhana moral consciousness together with equanimity and
one-pointedness.



rupavacara vipaka citta
(Fine-material
Sphere Resultant Consciosness)



tak

ca

pi

su/up

ek

+

+

+

+

-

pa

du

ta

ca

pan

In naming the rupavacara vipaka
citta, just change kusala (moral) in the names of the rupavacara
kusala citta into vipaka (resultant).



arupavacara
citta
(consciousness mostly experienced in arupa-loka)



There
are 12 arupavacara citta which are equally divided into three groups
of kusala, vipaka and kiriya citta.

1.arupavacara kusala citta
= arupa-jhana moral consciousness (4)
2.arupavacara vipaka citta =
arupa-jhana resultant consciousness (4)
3.arupavacara kiriya citta
= arupa-jhana functional consciousness (4)

The four
arupavacara kusala citta may be acquired by persons who are not yet
arahats whereas the four arupavacara kiriya citta can arise only in
arahats. These two types of arupavacara citta are experienced in the
sense sphere as well as in the immaterial sphere.

The four
arupavacara vipaka citta are experienced in the immaterial-sphere
only. They are the kamma-resultants of arupavacara kusala citta. A
person who acquires arupa-jhana and maintains it till his or her
death will be reborn in the immaterial sphere.



arupa
jhanas



The person who has developed the five rupa-jhanas
may go up the ladder of concentration to arupa-jhanas. In doing so he
or she uses the concentration associated with the fifth rupa-jhana as
his or her base.

All the four arupa-jhanas belong to the
category of the fifth jhana because they are based on the fifth
rupa-jhana. They all have only two jhana-factors, namely upekkha and
ekaggata.

It should be noted that the five rupa-jhanas differ
from one another in the number of jhana-factors whereas the four
arupa-jhanas differ from one another in the objects of
meditation.



arupavacara kusala citta
(Immaterial Sphere
Moral Consciousness)



aka

vinna

akin

n’eva

-

-

-

-


1.upekk’ekagga sahitam
akasanancayatana-kusala-cittam
2.upekkh’ekaggata sahitam
vinnanancayatana-kusala-cittam
3.upekkh’ekaggata sahitam
akincannayatana-kusala-cittam
4.upekkh’ekaggata sahitam
n’eva– sanna-
n’sannayatana-kusala-cittam

Meanings

1.akasanancayatana
moral consciousness together with equanimity and
one-pointedness.
2.vinnanancayatana moral consciousness together
with equanimity and one-pointedness.
3.akicnannayatana moral
consciousness together with equanimity and
one-pointedness.
4.n’eva-sanna n’sannayatana moral
consciousness together with equanimity and
one-pointedness



arupavacara vipaka citta
(Immaterial
Sphere Resultant Consciousness)

The four arupavacara
vipaka citta are designated by the same symbols as the four
arupavacara kusala citta. The names are also similar, the only change
necessary is to put vipaka (resultant) in place of kusala
(moral).



arupavacara kiriya citta
(Immaterial Sphere
Functional Consciousness)

Again the symbols are the same
and the names are similar, the only change necessary is to put kiriya
(functional) in place of kusala (moral).

16. List and explain Rupavacara kiria citta (10 M)

17. List and explain Arupavacara kusala citta (10 M)

Arupavacara Citta; 1 Definition(s)

Part of Lokiya Cittas.

There are 12 arupavacara cittas. They can be divided into three groups according to their origin or jati. They are

  • 4 arupakusala cittas,
  • 4 arupavipaka cittas, and
  • 4 arupakiriya cittas.

4 arupakusala cittas are cittas that arise when arupa jhana are being
practised. The practice of arupa jhana is bhavana kusala. So at the
time of arupa jhana, arupakusala cittas arise.
Where the practitioner is an arahat, then the arising arupa jhana are
called arupakiriya cittas. Kiriya citta does not give rise to kammic
force or seed effect. Kusala citta gives vipaka or resultant cittas. The
practice of arupa jhana may give rise to rebirth in arupa brahma bhumi.
4 arupavipaka cittas are resultant cittas due to respective arupakusala
citta. These 4 cittas arise only in arupa brahma. Because they all are
patisandhi citta, bhavanga citta, and cuti citta of arupa brahma. So
they cannot arise in other planes of existence.

These 12 cittas arise mostly in arupa brahma bhumi. So they are
called arupavacara cittas. Arupa here means arupa brahma bhumi or arupa
brahma realm or formless realm.

(Source): Journey to Nibbana: Patthana DhamaAbhidhamma book covercontext information

Abhidhamma (अभिधम्म) usually refers to the last section (piṭaka)
of the Pali canon and includes schematic classifications of scholastic
literature dealing with Theravāda Buddhism. Primary topics include
psychology, philosophy, methodology and metaphysics which are rendered
into exhaustive enumerations and commentaries.

Discover the meaning of arupavacara citta in the context of Abhidhamma from relevant books on Exotic India

Relevant definitions


Search found 649 related definition(s) that might help you understand
this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:




Citta
Citta (चित्त, “mind”) or Cittavaśitā refers to the “mastery of mind” and represents one of the …
Arupavacara
arūpāvacara : (adj.) belonging to the realm of arūpins.
Cittanupassana

Cittānupassanā:—the critique of heart, adj. °ânupassin D.II, 299; III, 221, 281; …
Bodhicitta

Bodhichitta Skt., lit., “awakened mind”; the mind of enlightenment, one of the central no&sh…
Cittagara

Cittāgāra—a painted house, i.e. furnished with pictures; a picture gallery Vin.IV, 29…
Cittakara

Cittakāra—a painter, a decorator (cp. rajaka) S.II, 101=III, 152; Th.2, 256; J.VI, 3…
Cittakkhepa

Cittakkhepa—derangement of the mind, madness Vin.V, 189=193 (ummāda+); A.III, 219 (um…
Cittakathika

Cittakathika—=°kathin A.I, 24; Th.2, 449 (+bahussuta), expld at ThA.281 by cittad…
Cittapatali

Cittapāṭalī—Name of a plant (the “pied” trumpet-flower) in the world of Asuras J.I, 20…
Cittapassaddhi

Cittapassaddhi—calm of h., serenity of mind (cp. kāya°) S.V, 66; Dhs.62;
Cittakamma

Cittakamma—decoration, ornamentation, painting J.IV, 408; VI, 333; Miln.278; Vism.3…
Citta Ja Citta Samutthana Rupa
‘mind-produced corporeality’; s. samutthāna.
Cittasantapa

Cittasantāpa—“heart-burn, ” sorrow PvA.18 (=soka);  
Cittavikkhepa

Cittavikkhepa—(cp. °kkhepa) madness S.I, 126 (+ummāda); Nett 27; Vism.34;  …
Cittasala

Cittasālā—a painted room or picture gallery DA.I, 253;  



18. List and explain Arupavacara vipaka citta (10 M)

19. List and explain Arupavacara kiria citta (10 M)
20. List and explain Lokutara magga citta (10 M)
21. List and explain Lokutara phala citta (10 M)
22. What is Jhana ? List and explain Jhana factors and nivaranaas (10 M)



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http://www.buddhanet.net/higher.htm

Guide to Tipitaka

WHAT IS THE ABHIDHAMMA PITAKA?

Abhidhamma, the Higher Teaching of the Buddha.
Abhidhamma is the third great division of the Pi¥aka. It is a huge
collection of systematically arranged, tabulated and classified
doctrines of the Buddha, representing the quintessence of his Teaching.
Abhidhamma means Higher Teaching or Special Teaching; it is unique in
its abstruseness, analytical approach, immensity of scope and
conduciveness to one’s liberation.

The Buddha dhamma has only one taste, the taste of liberation.

But in
Suttanta discourses, the Buddha takes into consideration the
intellectual level of his audience, and their attainments in pæramø. He
therefore teaches the dhamma in conventional terms (vohæra vacana),
making references to persons and objects as I, we, he, she, man, woman,
cow, tree, etc. But in Abhidhamma the Buddha makes no such concessions;
he treats the dhamma entirely in terms of the ultimate reality
(Paramattha sacca). He analyses every phenomenon into its ultimate
constituents. All relative concepts such as man, mountain, etc. are
reduced to their ultimate elements which are then precisely defined,
classified and systematically arranged.

Thus in Abhidhamma everything is expressed in terms of khandhas, five
aggregates of existence; æyatanas, five sensory organs and mind, and
their respective sense objects; dhætu, elements; indriya, faculties;
sacca, fundamental truths; and so on. Relative conceptual objects such
as man, woman, etc. are resolved into ultimate components of khandhas,
æyatanas, etc. and viewed as an impersonal psycho-physical phenomenon,
which is conditioned by various factors and is impermanent (anicca),
suffering (dukkha) and is without a permanent entity (anatta).

Having resolved all phenomena into ultimate components analytically (as
in Dhammasa³ga¼ø and Vibha³ga) it aims at synthesis by defining
inter-relations (paccaya) between the various constituent factors (as in
Pa¥¥hæna). Thus Abhidhamma forms a gigantic edifice of knowledge
relating to the ultimate realities which, in its immensity of scope,
grandeur, subtlety, and profundity, properly belongs only to the
intellectual domain of the Buddha.


https://alwell.gitbooks.io/introduction-to-abhidhamma/content/the_seven_books_of_the_abhidhamma/index.html

The Seven Books of the Abhidhamma
Introduction

The Abhidhamma consists of the following seven books:

The Seven Books of the Abhidhamma
Introduction

The Abhidhamma consists of the following seven books:

Dhammasangaṇī (translated as “Buddhist Psychological Ethics”, P.T.S. and
also translated by U Kyaw, Myanmar.)

Vibhaṅga (translated as “ Book of Analysis”, P.T.S.)
Dhātukathā (Translated as “Discourse on Elements”, P.T.S.)
Puggalapaññatti (Translated as “A Designation of Human Types”, P.T.S.)
Kathā vatthu (Translated as “Points of Controversy”, P.T.S.)
Yamaka (the Book of Pairs, not translated into English)
Paṭṭhāna (Translated in part as “Conditional Relations”, P.T.S. )
A summary of the contents of these seven books has been given by Ven.
Nyanatiloka in his “Guide through the Abhidhamma Piṭaka” (B.P.S. Kandy,
1971) and also by U Kyaw Khine in the introduction to his translation of
the Dhammasaṅ ganī.

Therefore, I will render only some salient features
of each book with the purpose to show that the classifications found in
the Abhidhamma are not mere lists to be read and memorized. They all
point to the investigation of the realities of our daily life. In this
way the paññā is developed that sees realities as they are, as
impermanent, dukkha and anattā. This kind of paññā leads to the
eradication of defilements.

The commentary to the Dhammasaṅganī, the
first book, is the “Atthasālinī”, edited by the venerable Buddhaghosa
and translated as “Expositor”.

The Dhammasaṅganī begins with the Mātika,
a table of contents or matrix, which is an introduction. It is more
extensive than a table of contents.

This mā tikā has been arranged by
way of triads and dyads. It is a survey of the contents of the first
book and can even serve as an introduction to all seven books. Different
groups of defilements have been listed, such as the intoxicants
(āsavas), fetters, ties, floods, yokes, hindrances.

After the Abhidhamma
matrix there is a Suttanta matrix, explaining sutta terms.

The Atthas
ālinī, the commentary to the Dhammasaṅganī, dedicates a whole chapter to
explain the notions of the Mātika.

The Mātikā begins with: kusala
dhammā, akusala dhammā, avyā kata dhammā.

In these three terms all that
is real has been contained. In avyākata dhammā, indeterminate dhammas,
are included all realities that are not kusala or akusala, namely:
vipākacittas, kiriyacittas, rū pas and nibbāna.

The whole Tipiṭaka is
directed towards the liberation from the cycle of birth and death
through insight.

This appears also in the Mātika, where we read
(1013-1015):

“Dhammas going to building up; going to pulling down; going to neither.”


The Atthasālinī elaborates: “… ’accumulation’ means that which is
accumulated by kamma and corruptions. It is a name for the processes of
rebirth and decease. ’Leading to accumulation’ are ’those causes which
by being accomplished to go to, lead a man, in whom they arise, to that
round of rebirth’. It is a name for co-intoxicant moral or immoral
states. Nibbāna being free from ’cumulation’, which is another word for
’accumulation’, is called dispersion. ’Leading to dispersion’ is ’going
towards that dispersion which he has made his object.’ It is a name for
the Ariyan Paths. Or, ’leading to accumulation’ are those states which
go about severally arranging (births and deaths in) a round of destiny
like a bricklayer who arranges bricks, layer by layer, in a wall.’

’Leading to dispersion’ are those states which go about destroying that
very round, like a man who continually removes the bricks as they are
laid by the mason.”


3. What is Mind ? Define Mind according to philosophy, science and
Abhidhamma view (10 M)

Cetasikas seem to imply an externalist view (citta comes into contact
with something, they also rise and disappear with citta together)
because according to externalism, for a mind content to arise, it is necessary to be related to the environment in the right way.

Citta itself seems to be an intrinsic property though, as far as
every agent is capable of knowing something. This strongly implies an
internalist viewpoint (there are intrinsic and unique properties of
agents that mental contents supervene upon), as our contents are individuated by the properties of our bodies.

4. Explain Lobha ( 5 M)
5.Expliain Dosa (5M)
6. Explain Moha (5M)
The action (kamma) that is done out of greed, hatred and delusion
(lobha, dosa, moha), that springs from them, has its source and origin
in them: this action ripens wherever one is reborn, and wherever this
action ripens there one experiences the fruits of this action, be it in
this life, or the next life, or in some future life.




https://www.budsas.org/ebud/word-of-buddha/wob4nt06.htm

Rebirth-Producing Kamma

M. 43

Truly, because beings, obstructed by ignorance (avijjaa) and ensnared by
craving (tanhaa) seek ever fresh delight, now here, now there,
therefore fresh rebirth continually comes to be.

A. III. 33

And the action (kamma) that is done out of greed, hatred and delusion
(lobha, dosa, moha), that springs from them, has its source and origin
in them: this action ripens wherever one is reborn, and wherever this
action ripens there one experiences the fruits of this action, be it in
this life, or the next life, or in some future life.


Cessation of Kamma

M. 43


However, through the fading away of ignorance, through the arising of
wisdom, through the extinction of craving, no future rebirth takes place
again.

A. III. 33

For the actions which are not done out of greed, hatred and delusion,
which have not sprung from them, which have not their source and origin
in them: such actions, through the absence of greed, hatred and
delusion, are abandoned, rooted out, like a palm-tree torn out of the
soil, destroyed, and not able to spring up again.

A. VIII. 12

In this respect one may rightly say of me: that I teach annihilation,
that I propound my doctrine for the purpose of annihilation, and that I
herein train my disciples; for certainly I do teach annihilation-the
annihilation, namely, of greed, hatred and delusion, as well as of the
manifold evil and unwholesome things.

The Pa.ticca Samuppaada, lit, the Dependent Origination, is the doctrine
of the conditionality of all physical and mental phenomena, a doctrine
which, together with that of Impersonality (anattaa), forms the
indispensable condition for the real understanding and realization of
the Buddha’s teaching. It shows that the various physical and mental
life-processes, conventionally called personality, man, animal, etc.,
are not a mere play of blind chance, but the outcome of causes and
conditions. Above all, the Pa.ticca-Samuppaada explains how the arising
of rebirth and suffering is dependent upon conditions; and, in its
second part, it shows how, through the removal of these conditions, all
suffering must disappear. Hence, the Pa.ticca-Samuppaada serves to
elucidate the second and the third Noble Truths, by explaining them from
their very foundations upwards, and giving them a fixed philosophical
form.

The following diagram shows at a glance how the twelve links of the
formula extend over three consecutive existences, past, present, and
future:

Past Existence 1. Ignorance (avijjaa) Karma Process (kamma-bhava) 5
causes: 1, 2, 8, 9, 10
2. Karma-Formations (sankhaaraa)
Present Existence 3. Consciousness (vi~n~naa.na) Rebirth-Process
(upapatti-bhava) 5 results: 3-7
4. Mental and Physical Existence (naamaruupa)
5. 6 Sense Organs (sa.l-aayatana)
6. Sense-Impression (phassa)
7. Feeling (vedanaa)
8. Craving (ta.nha) Karma Process (kamma-bhava) 5 causes: 1, 2, 8, 9, 10
9. Clinging (upaadaana)
10. Process of Existence (bhava)
Future Existence 11. Rebirth (jaati) Rebirth-Process (upapatti-bhava) 5
results: 3-7
12. Decay and Death (jaraa-marana)
The links 1-2, together with 8-10, represent the Karma-Process,
containing the five karmic causes of rebirth.

The links 3-7, together with 11-12, represent the Rebirth-Process,
containing the five Karma-Results.

Accordingly it is said in the Patisambhidaa-Magga:

Five causes were there in past,
Five fruits we find in present life.
Five causes do we now produce,
Five fruits we reap in future life.
(Quoted in Vis. Magga XVII)

For a full explanation see Fund. III and B. Dict.



https://archive.org/details/FundamentalAbidhamma

Fundamental Abhidhamma,


Part 1, Dr. Nandamalabhivamsa, 2005

Dhammasangani (”Enumeration of Phenomena”).


This book enumerates all the
paramattha dhamma (ultimate realities) to be found in the world.
According to one such enumeration these amount to:
52 cetasikas (mental factors), which, arising together in various
combination, give rise to any one of…
…89 different possible cittas (states of consciousness)
4 primary physical elements, and 23 physical phenomena derived from them
Nibbana

7. List and explain kamavacara ( Kāmāvacara: ’sense-sphere’
)akusala lobbamula,dosamula, mohamula
cittas (10M )
8. List and explain kamavacara ahetuka akusala vipaka cittas (10 M)
9. List and explain kamavacara ahetuka kusala vipaka cittas (10 M)
10. List and explain kamavacara sobnakusala citta (10M)
11. List and explain kamavacara sobana vipaka citta (10 M)
12.
13. List and explain kamavacara sobana kiria citta (10M)
14. List and explain Rupavacara kusala citta (10 M)
15. List and explain Rupavacara vipaka citta (10 M)
List and explain Rupavacara kusala citta (10 M)
16. List and explain Rupavacara kiria citta (10 M)
17. List and explain Arupavacara kusala citta (10 M)
List and explain Rupavacara kiria citta (10 M)
18. List and explain Arupavacara vipaka citta (10 M)
19. List and explain Arupavacara kiria citta (10 M)
20. List and explain Lokutara magga citta (10 M)
21. List and explain Lokutara phala citta (10 M)

Part of Lokiya Cittas.


Kamavacara cittas are


  • 30 asobhana cittas or non beautiful consciousness, and
  • 24 sobhana cittas or beautiful cittas.

In summary, kamavacara cittas are 54.


  • 30 are asobhana cittas or non beautiful consciousness.
    (12 are akusala cittas and they are ugly cittas.18 ahetuka cittas are not beautiful because they lack beautiful cetasika.)
  • And 24 cittas are kamasobhana cittas.


cittas of the sense-sphere;


In the case of the kamavacara cittas, piti arises with the cittas which are accompanied by pleasant feeling (somanassa).

Relevant definitions


Search found 37 related definition(s) that might help you understand
this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:




Kamavacara Citta

cittas of the sense-sphere;

In the case of the kamavacara cittas, piti arises with the c…

Kamavacaradeva
Kāmāvacaradeva (कामावचरदेव) refers to the “six gods of the sensual-realms” as defined in the Dh…
Kamavacara Rupa
Rupas that are where kama tanha always visits and attaches are called kamavacara rupas.
Kama
kama (कम).—a Less, wanting, short of.— OR — kāma (काम).—n An action. A work. Use. Need of. …
Citta
Citta (चित्त, “mind”) or Cittavaśitā refers to the “mastery of mind” and represents one of the …
Deva
Deva (देव, “gods”) or Devānusmṛti refers to one of the “six recollections” (anusmṛti) as define…
Loka
Loka (लोक).—A term used in the Mahābhāșya in contrast with the term वेद (veda), signifying comm…
Sagara
Sāgara (सागर) or Saptasāgara refers to the “seven oceans” as defined in the Dharma-saṃgraha (se…
Bhumi
Bhūmi (भूमि) or Daśahūmi refers to the “ten stages (of the Bodhisattva)” as defined in the Dhar…
Avacara
Avacara, (-°) (n. -adj.) (ava + car, also BSk. avacara in same sense, e.g. antaḥpurâvacarā the …
Kushala
1) Kuśala (कुशल) or Daśakuśala refers to the “ten unwholesome things” as defined in the Dharma-…
Mara
Māra (मार) refers to the “four destroyers” as defined in the Dharma-saṃgraha (section 80):

Dhamma

1) Dhamma, 3 (adj.) (Sk. dhanvan) having a bow: see daḷha°; also as dhammin in daḷha&de…
Javana
Javana (जवन).—a. (-nī f.) [जु भावे ल्युट् (ju bhāve lyuṭ)] Quick, swift, fleet; R.9.56.-naḥ 1 A…
Khandha
Khandha, (Sk. skandha) — I. Crude meaning: bulk, massiveness (gross) substance. A. esp. used (a…
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