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09/29/10
LESSON- 43 -ARHAT PART VIII - Ariya puggala -asekha -Suddhodana -Dasaratha- 29 -09 -2010 FREE ONLINE eNālandā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY -Health is the greatest gift, contentment the greatest wealth, faithfulness the best relationship. – Buddha- EDUCATE (BUDDHA)! MEDITATE (DHAMMA)! ORGANISE (SANGHA)!-WISDOM IS POWER-Anyone Can Attain Ultimate Bliss Just Visit:http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org
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Entire people including the media have the nature of Awakened-One with awareness. They see truth as truth and untruth as untruth. For truth ultimately trimphs. they all have calm, quiet, alert, attentive and equanimity mind with a clear understanding that everything is changing.

LESSON- 43 -ARHAT PART VIII - Ariya puggala -asekha -Suddhodana -Dasaratha- 29 -09 -2010 FREE ONLINE eNālandā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY

Health is the greatest gift, contentment the greatest wealth, faithfulness the best relationship. – Buddha

EDUCATE (BUDDHA)!                     MEDITATE (DHAMMA)!       ORGANISE (SANGHA)!

WISDOM      IS    POWER

Awakened One Shows the Path to Attain Ultimate Bliss

Anyone Can Attain Ultimate Bliss Just Visit:

http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org

COMPUTER IS AN ENTERTAINMENT INSTRUMENT!

INTERNET!

IS

ENTERTAINMENT NET!

TO BE MOST APPROPRIATE!

Using such an instrument

The Free e-Nālandā Research and Practice University has been re-organized to function through the following Schools of Learning :

Buddha’s Sangha Practiced His Dhamma Free of cost, hence the Free- e-Nālandā Research and Practice University follows suit

As the Original Nālandā University did not offer any Degree, so also the Free  e-Nālandā Research and Practice University.

The teachings of Buddha are eternal, but even then Buddha did not proclaim them to be infallible. The religion of Buddha has the capacity to change according to times, a quality which no other religion can claim to have…Now what is the basis of Buddhism? If you study carefully, you will see that Buddhism is based on reason. There is an element of flexibility inherent in it, which is not found in any other religion.

§  Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar , Indian scholar, philosopher and architect of Constitution of India, in his writing and speeches

I.
KAMMA

REBIRTH

AWAKEN-NESS 

BUDDHA

THUS COME ONE

DHAMMA

II.
ARHAT

FOUR HOLY TRUTHS

EIGHTFOLD PATH

TWELVEFOLD CONDITIONED ARISING

BODHISATTVA

PARAMITA

SIX PARAMITAS

III.

SIX SPIRITUAL POWERS

SIX PATHS OF REBIRTH

TEN DHARMA REALMS

FIVE SKANDHAS

EIGHTEEN REALMS

FIVE MORAL PRECEPTS

IV.

MEDITATION

MINDFULNESS

FOUR APPLICATIONS OF MINDFULNESS

LOTUS POSTURE

SAMADHI

CHAN SCHOOL

FOUR JHANAS

FOUR FORMLESS REALMS

V.

FIVE TYPES OF BUDDHIST STUDY AND PRACTICE

MAHAYANA AND HINAYANA COMPARED

PURE LAND

BUDDHA RECITATION

EIGHT CONSCIOUSNESSES

ONE HUNDRED DHARMAS

EMPTINESS

VI.

DEMON

LINEAGE

with

Level I: Introduction to Buddhism

Level II: Buddhist Studies

TO ATTAIN

Level III: Stream-Enterer

Level IV: Once - Returner

Level V: Non-Returner
Level VI: Arhat

Jambudvipa, i.e, PraBuddha Bharath scientific thought in

mathematics,

astronomy,

alchemy,

and

anatomy

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Historical Studies;

International Relations and Peace Studies;

Business Management in relation to Public Policy and Development Studies;

Languages and Literature;

and Ecology and Environmental Studies

 Welcome to the Free Online e-Nālandā Research and Practice University

                                             Course Programs:

ARHAT

AWAKENING THE BUDDHA IN US

http://www.palikanon.com/english/pali_names/ay/arahat.htm

asekha,

Suddhodana, 

Khemā, Mahā Arittha,  Visuddhimagga, Milindapañha, Yasa, Bimbisāra, Suddhodana, Mahāvamsa, Mahā Arittha, Mahā Arittha, Kathavatthu, Milinda, Subha Sutra, Nagasena, Suddhāvāsā,  anāgāmī,Mahapajapati Gotami,Therīgāthā,Somā,Theragāthā, Mahamangala Sutta, Sutta Nipata, Sutta Nipata, Itivuttaka, Theravadins, Sabbatthivadins, Mahasanghikas, Andhakas

·         asekha

(lit.: ‘not-learner’; s. sekha), a disciple ‘perfected in training’, one beyond training, an adept.

This is a name for the Arahat, the Holy One (s. ariya-puggala), since he has reached the perfection in higher moral training, higher mind training and higher wisdom training (s. sikkhā) and needs no longer to train himself therein.

http://www.palikanon.com/english/pali_names/s/suddhodana.htm

·         Suddhodana

A Sākiyan Rājā of Kapilavatthu and father of Gotama Buddha.

He was the son of Sihahanu and Kaccānā. His brothers were Dhotodana, Sakkodana, Sukkodana and Amitodana, and his sisters were Amitā and Pamitā.

Māyā was his chief consort, and, after her death her sister Pajāpatī was raised to her position (Mhv.ii.15f.; Dpv.iii.45; J.i.15, etc.).

When soothsayers predicted that his son Gotama had two destinies awaiting him, either that of universal sovereignty or of Buddha hood, he exerted his utmost power to provide the prince with all kinds of luxuries in order to hold him fast to household life. It is said (E.g., J.i.54) that when Asita, who was his father’s chaplain and his own teacher, visited Suddhodana to see the newly born prince, and paid homage to the infant by allowing his feet to rest on his head, Suddhodana was filled with wonder and himself worshipped the child. And when, at the ploughing ceremony, Suddhodana saw how the jambu-tree under which the child had been placed kept its shadow immoveable in order to protect him, and that the child was seated cross legged in the air, he again worshipped him (J.i.57f).

Later, when, in spite of all his father’s efforts, the prince had left household life and was practising austerities, news was brought to Suddhodana that his son had died owing to the severity of his penances. But he refused to believe it, saying that his son would never die without achieving his goal (J.i.67). When this was afterwards related to the Buddha, he preached the Mahādhammapāla Jātaka and showed that in the past, too, Suddhodana had refused to believe that his son could have died even when he was shown the heap of his bones.

When news reached Suddhodana that his son had reached Enlightenment, he sent a messenger to Veluvana in Rājagaha with ten thousand others to invite the Buddha to visit Kapilavatthu. But the messenger and his companions heard the Buddha preach, entered the Order, and forgot their mission. Nine times this happened. On the tenth occasion, Suddhodana sent Kāludāyī with permission for him to enter the Order on the express condition that he gave the king’s invitation to the Buddha. Kāludāyī kept his promise and the Buddha visited Kapilavatthu, staying in the Nigrodhārāma. There, in reference to a shower of rain that fell, he preached the Vessantara Jātaka. The next day, when Suddhodana remonstrated with the Buddha because he was seen begging in the streets of Kapilavatthu, the Buddha told him that begging was the custom of all Buddhas, and Suddhodana hearing this became a sotāpanna. He invited the Buddha to his palace, where he entertained him, and at the end of the meal the Buddha preached to the king, who became a sakadāgāmī (J.i.90; cf. DhA.iii.164f). He became an anāgāmī after hearing the Mahādhammapāla Jātaka(DhA.i.99; J.iv.55), and when he was about to die, the Buddha came from Vesāli to see him and preach to him, and Suddhodana became an arahant and died as a lay arahant (ThigA.141).

Nanda was Suddhodana’s son by Mahā Pajāpati, and he had also a daughter called Sundarī Nandā. When the Buddha ordained both Rāhula and Nanda, Suddhodana was greatly distressed lest other parents should be similarly afflicted, and persuaded the Buddha to establish a rule that none should be ordained without the permission of his parents (Vin.i.82f).

Suddhodana was the Bodhisatta’s father in numerous births, but he is specially mentioned as such by name in only a few Jātakas e.g.,

Dasaratha,

http://www.palikanon.com/english/pali_names/d/dasaratha_jat_461.htm

·         Dasaratha Jātaka (No.461)

Dasaratha, king of Benares, had three children, Rāmapandita, Lakkhana and Sītā. On the death of his queen he took another queen and had by her a son, Bharata. When Bharata was seven years old his mother claimed the kingdom for him in accordance with a boon granted her by the king. The king was horrified and fearing that she would harm his elder children, sent them into the forest for twelve years, asking them to return after his death. In the forest Rāma lived the ascetic life while Lakkhana and Sītā provided him with food. Dasaratha died after nine years, and when the ministers refused to recognise Bharata as king, he went into the forest in search of Rāma. Rāma, however, refused to return until three more years had elapsed, and on Bharata refusing to occupy the throne, Rāma gave him his straw slippers to be placed on the throne in his absence. When cases were heard, if the decision given was wrong, the slippers would beat upon each other, but, if right, they would lie quiet. After three years Rāma returned and reigned from his palace of Sucandaka for sixteen thousand years, with Sītā as queen consort.

Dasaratha was Suddhodana, Bharata Ananda, Lakkhana Sāriputta, Sītā Rāhulamātā and Rāma the Bodhisatta.

The story was related to a man of Sāvatthi who greatly grieved at his father’s death and neglected all his duties. J.iv.123-30.

·         Sokyā, Sakka, Sākiyā

A tribe in North India, to which the Buddha belonged. Their capital was Kapilavatthu. Mention is also made of other Sākyan settlements - e.g., Cātumā, Khomadussa, Sāmagāma, Devadaha, Sīlavatī, Nagaraka, Medatalumpa, Sakkhara and Ulumpa (q.v.). Within the Sākyan tribe there were probably several clans, gottā. The Buddha himself belonged to the Gotamagotta. It has been suggested (E.g., Thomas, op. cit., 22) that this was a brahmin clan, claiming descent from the ancient isi Gotama. The evidence for this suggestion is, however, very meagre. Nowhere do we find the Sākyans calling themselves brahmins. On the other hand, we find various clans claiming a share of the Buddha’s relics on the ground that they, like the Buddha, were khattiyas (D.ii.165). It is stated a that the Sākyans were a haughty people. Vin.ii.183; D.i.90; J.i.88; DhA.iii.163. Hiouen Thsang, however, found them obliging and gentle in manners (Beal, op. cit., ii.14).

When the Buddha first visited them, after his Enlightenment, they refused to honour him on account of his youth. The Buddha then performed a miracle and preached the Vessantara Jātaka, and their pride was subdued. They evidently fond of sports and mention is made of a special school of archery conducted by a Sākyan family, called Vedhaññā (D.iii.117; DA.iii.905). When the prince Siddhattha Gotama (later the Buddha) wished to marry, no Sākyan would give him his daughter until he had showed his proficiency in sport (J.i.58).

The Sākyans evidently had no king. Theirs was a republican form of government, probably with a leader, elected from time to time. The administration and judicial affairs of the gotta were discussed in their Santhāgāra, or Mote Hall, at Kapilavatthu. See, e.g., D.i.91; the Sākyans had a similar Mote Hall at Cātumā (M.i.457). The Mallas of Kusinārā also had a Santhāgāra (D.ii.164); so did the Licchavis of Vesāli (Vin.i.233; M.i.228).

Ambattha (q.v.) once visited it on business; so did the envoys of Pasenadi, when he wished to marry a Sākyan maiden (see below). A new Mote Hall was built at Kapilavatthu while the Buddha was staying at the Nigrodhārāma, and he was asked to inaugurate it. This he did by a series of ethical discourses lasting through the night, delivered by himself, Ananda, and Moggallāna. M.i.353f.; S.iv.182f; the hall is described at SA.iii.63; cf. UdA.409.

The Sākyans were very jealous of the purity of their race; they belonged to the ādiccagotta, (ādiccā nāma gottena, Sākiyā nāma jātiyā, SN. vs.423) and claimed descent from Okkāka (q.v.). Their ancestors were the nine children of Okkāka, whom he banished in order to give the kingdom to Jantukumāra, his son by another queen. These nine children went towards Himavā, and, having founded Kapilavatthu (q.v. for details), lived there. To the eldest sister they gave the rank of mother, and the others married among themselves. The eldest sister, Piyā, later married Rāma, king of Benares, and their descendants became known as the Koliyans (see Koliyā for details). When Okkāka heard of this, he praised their action, saying, “Sakyā vata bho kumārā, paramasakyā vata bho rājakumāra; hence their name came to be “Sakyā.”

SNA.i.352f.; cf. DA.i.258. Okkāka had a slave girl, Disā, her offspring were the Kanhāyanas, to which gotta belonged Ambattha (q.v.). The Mhv.ii.12ff gives the history of the direct descent of the Buddha from Okkāka, and this contains a list of the Sākyan chiefs of Kapilavatthu:

From the very first there seems to have been intermarriage between the Sākyans and the Koliyans; but there was evidently a good deal of endogamy among the Sākyans, which earned for them the rebuke of the Koliyans in the quarrel between them   “like dogs, jackals, and such  like beasts, cohabiting with their own sisters. E.g., SNA.i.357; J.v.412 L; there were eighty two thousand rājās among the Koliyans and Sākyans (SNA.i.140).

A quarrel, which broke out in the Buddha’s lifetime, between the Sākyans and the Koliyans is several times referred to in the books. The longest account is found in the introductory story of the Kunāla Jātaka. The cause of the dispute was the use of the water of the River Rohinī (q.v.), which flowed between the two kingdoms. The quarrel waxed fierce, and a bloody battle was imminent, when the Buddha, arriving in the air between the two hosts, asked them, “Which is of more priceless value, water or khattiya chiefs?” He thus convinced them of their folly and made peace between them. On this occasion he preached five Jātaka stories -  the Phandana, Daddabha, Latukika, Rukkhadhamma and Vattaka (Sammodamāna) -  and the Attadanda Sutta.

To show their gratitude the Sākyans and Koliyans gave each two hundred and fifty young men from their respective families to join the Order of the Buddha. (J.v.412f.; for their history see also SNA.i.358f ) Earlier, during the Buddha’s first visit to Kapilavatthu, when he had humbled the pride of his kinsmen by a display of miracles, each Sākyan family had given one representative to enter the Order and to help their famous kinsman. The wives of these, and of other Sākyans who had joined the Order, were the first to become nuns under Pajāpatī Gotamī (q.v.) when the Buddha gave permission for women to enter the Order. Among the most eminent of the Sākyan young men, who now joined, were Anuruddha, Ananda, Bhaddiya, Kimbila, Bhagu and Devadatta. Their barber, Upāli, entered the Order at the same time; they arranged that he should be ordained first, so that he might be higher than they in seniority and thus receive their obeisance, and thereby humble their pride Vin.ii.181f.; according to DhA.i.133, eighty thousand Sākyan youths had joined the Order.

The Buddha states, in the Aggañña Sutta, that the Sākyans were vassals of King Pasenadi of Kosala. D.iii.83 (Sakyā . . . Pasenadi-Kosalassa anuyuttā bhavanti, karonti Sakyā rañño Pasenadimhi Kosale nipaccakāram abhivādanam paccupatthānam añjalikammam sāmīcikammam); cf. SN.vs 422, where the Buddha describes his country as being “Kosalesu niketino.”

Yet, when Pasenadi wished to establish connection with the Buddha’s family by marrying one of the daughters of a Sākyan chief, the Sākyans decided in their Mote Hall that it would be beneath their dignity to marry one of their daughters to the King of Kosala. But as they dared not refuse Pasenadi’s request, the Sākyan chieftain, Mahānāma, solved the difficulty by giving him Vāsabhakhattiyā (q.v.), who was his daughter by a slave girl, Nāgamundā. By her Pasenadi had a son, Vidūdabha. When Pasenadi discovered the trick, he deprived his wife and her son of all their honours, but restored them on the intervention of the Buddha. Later, when Vidūdabha, who had vowed vengeance on the Sākyans for the insult offered to his father, became king, he marched into Kapilavatthu and there massacred the Sākyans, including women and children. The Buddha felt himself powerless to save them from their fate because they had committed sin in a previous life by throwing poison into a river. Only a few escaped, and these came to be called the Nalasākiyā and the Tinasākiyā. The Mhv. Tīkā (p. 180) adds that, during this massacre, some of the Sākyans escaped to the Himālaya, where they built a city, which came to be called Moriyanagara because the spot resounded with the cries of peacocks. This was the origin of the Moriya dynasty, to which Asoka belonged (189). Thus Asoka and the Buddha were kinsmen.

Among the Sākyans who thus escaped was Pandu, son of Amitodana. He crossed the Ganges, and, on the other side of the river, founded a city. His daughter was Bhaddakaccānā (q.v.), who later married Panduvāsudeva, king of Ceylon. Thus the kings of Ceylon were connected by birth to the Sākyans. Mhv.viii.18ff. Six of her brothers also came to Ceylon, where they founded settlements: Rāma, Uruvela, Anurādha Vijita, Dīghāyu and Rohana (Mhv.ix 6ff.)

 

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