Analytic Insight Net - FREE Online Tipiṭaka Research & Practice Universitu 
in
 112 CLASSICAL LANGUAGES
Paṭisambhidā Jāla-Abaddha Paripanti Tipiṭaka Anvesanā ca Paricaya Nikhilavijjālaya ca ñātibhūta Pavatti Nissāya 
http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org anto 105 Seṭṭhaganthāyatta Bhāsā
Categories:

Archives:
Meta:
June 2012
M T W T F S S
« May   Jul »
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
252627282930  
06/19/12
19 06 2012 TUESDAY LESSON 641 FREE ONLINE eNālāndā Research And Practice UNIVERSITY And THE BUDDHISTONLINE GOOD NEWS LETTER by ABHIDHAMMA RAKKHITA through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org Dhammapada: Verses and Stories 209, 210 and 211-Tayojanapabbajita Vatthu-Admiration of Self-Seekers- Not Seeing The Liked And Seeing The Unliked Are Both Painful- Not Bound By Ties Of Defilements-According to the Census data, there are 7.5 lakh families involved in manual scavenging in the country
Filed under: General
Posted by: site admin @ 10:33 am

19 06 2012 TUESDAY LESSON 642 FREE ONLINE eNālāndā Research And Practice UNIVERSITY And THE BUDDHISTONLINE GOOD NEWS LETTER by ABHIDHAMMA RAKKHITA through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org

Dhammapada: Verses and Stories 209, 210 and 211-Tayojanapabbajita Vatthu-Admiration of Self-Seekers-

Not Seeing The Liked And Seeing The Unliked Are Both Painful-

Not Bound By Ties Of Defilements

According to the Census data, there are 7.5 lakh
families involved in manual scavenging in the country.

Verse 209. Admiration of Self-Seekers

One makes an effort where none’s due
with nothing done where effort’s due,
one grasps the dear, gives up the Quest
envying those who exert themselves.

Explanation: Being devoted to what is wrong, not being devoted
to what is right, abandoning one’s welfare, one goes after pleasures
of the senses. Having done so, one envies those who develop themselves.

Verse 210. Not Seeing The Liked And Seeing The Unliked Are Both Painful

Don’t consort with dear ones
at any time, nor those not dear,
‘is dukkha not to see the dear,
‘tis dukkha seeing those not dear.

Explanation: Never associate with those whom you like, as
well as with those whom you dislike. It is painful to part company
from those whom you like. It is equally painful to be with those you
dislike.


Verse 211. Not Bound By Ties Of Defilements

Others then do not make dear
for hard’s the parting from them.
For whom there is no dear, undear
in them no bonds are found.

Explanation: Therefore, one must not have endearments; because
separation is painful. For those who are free of bonds there are no
endearments or non-endearments.

Dhammapada Verses 209, 210 and 211
Tayojanapabbajita Vatthu

Ayoge yunja’mattanam
yogasminca ayojayam
attham hit va piyaggahi
piheta’ttanuyoginam.

Ma piyehi samaganchi
appiyehi kudacanam
piyanam adassanam dukkham
appiyananca dassanam.

Tasma piyam na kayiratha
piyapayo hi papako
gantha tesam na vijjanti
yesam natthi piyappiyam.

Verse 209: He who does what should not be done and fails to do what should be
done, who forsakes the noble aim of life (i.e., Morality, Concentration and
Insight) and grasps at sensual pleasure, covets the benefits gained by those who
exert themselves (in meditation).

Verse 210: Do not associate with those who are dear, and never with those who
are not dear to you; not seeing the dear ones is painful, and seeing those who
are not dear to you is also painful.

Verse 211: Therefore, one should hold nothing dear; separation from the loved
ones is painful; there are no fetters for those who do not love or hate.



The Story of Three Ascetics

While residing at the Jetavana monastery, the Buddha uttered Verses (209),
(210) and (211) of this book, with reference to a trio, consisting of a father,
a mother and a son.

Once in Savatthi, the only son of a family first became a bhikkhu; the father
followed suit and finally, the mother also became a bhikkhuni. They were so
attached to one another that they rarely stayed apart. The family stayed in the
monastery as if they were in their own house, talking and eating together, thus
making themselves a nuisance to others. Other bhikkhus reported their behaviour
to the Buddha and he called them to his presence, and said to them, “Once
you have joined the Order, you should no longer stay together like a family. Not
seeing those who are dear, and seeing those who are not dear to one, are both
painful; so you should not hold any being or anything dear to you”.

Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:

Verse 209: He who does what should not be done and
fails to do what should be done, who forsakes the noble aim of life
(i. e., Morality, Concentration and Insight) and grasps at sensual
pleasure, covets the benefits gained by those who exert themselves (in
meditation).

 

Verse 210: Do not associate with those who are
dear, and never with those who are not dear to you; not seeing the
dear ones is painful, and seeing those who are not dear to you is also
painful.

 

Verse 211: Therefore, one should hold nothing
dear; separation from the loved ones is painful; there are no fetters
for those who do not love or hate.

VOICE OF SARVAJAN

According to the Census data, there are 7.5 lakh
families involved in manual scavenging in the country.

A book on manual scavenging, Adrishya Bharat (Invisible India: A
narrative of manual scavenging), here over the weekend was released. The book was released
by four women — Narayanamma from Andhra Pradesh, Mahjabeen from Jammu and Kashmir,
Saroj from Haryana and Maya Gautam from Uttar Pradesh — engaged in eliminating
manual scavenging.

“The Census
figures this year were shocking. It is a serious issue….but  have not been
able to discuss this in Parliament yet.”


Legislation


Problem of manual scavenging existed even in States which are otherwise
considered progressive like Kerala.


Journalist Bhasha Singh,
author of the book, said:

“The issue of manual scavenging is deeply related to
the larger issues of caste and untouchability in India. After exploring manual
scavenging being practiced in the country, I can say this practice still
continues all because of the casteist mindset of the political leaders and
policy makers”.

“It is such a shame that in
the last budget Rs.100 crore was allocated, but not even a single rupee was
spent for the rehabilitation of manual scavengers. What kind of
‘rehabilitation’ is this when their children who have stopped being one, do not
get scholarship. Do you want them to continue with the practice of carrying
human excreta?” asked Ms. Singh.


comments (0)