Discovery of Metteyya the Awakened One with Awareness Universe(FOAINDMAOAU)
From Analytic Insight Net - FREE Online Tipiṭaka Law Research & Practice University in
 116 CLASSICAL LANGUAGES in BUDDHA'S own Words through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.orgat 668, 5A main Road, 8th Cross, HAL 3rd Stage, Punya Bhumi Bengaluru- Magadhi Karnataka State -PRABUDDHA BHARAT
Categories:

Archives:
Meta:
January 2015
M T W T F S S
« Dec   Feb »
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031  
01/04/15
1376 LESSON 5115 MONDAY FREE ONLINE E-Nālanda Research and Practice UNIVERSITY run by http:sarvajan.ambedkar.org chandrasekhara.tipitaka@gmail.com Please render exact translation in your mother tounge and all other languages you know for this Google translation practice and spread and become a Sota panna (Stream Enterer) to reach Eternal Bliss as Final Goal. SELF AWAKEN ONE’S WITH AWARENESS PRACTICE IN A NUT SHELL BUDDHISM IN A NUTSHELL ! DO NO EVIL ! ALWAYS DO GOOD BE MINDFUL ! - EASY FOR A 7 YEARS OLD BOY TO UNDERSTAND BUT DIFFICULT FOR A 70 YEARS OLD MAN TO PRACTICE ! TIPITAKA is of 3 Baskets - 1) Basket of Discipline (Vinaya), 2) of Discourses (Sutta) & 3) of Ultimate Doctrine (Abhidhamma) Pitakas. TIPITAKA Encyclopedia The complete Tipitaka is 40 volumes long The complete Tipitaka is 40 volumes long BEST PHYSICIANS DR. DIET ! DR. QUIET !! DR. MERRY AWAKEN ONE WITH AWARENESS THE MIGHT !!! Course Program 1. Kamma-Araha.m Sutta: The Arahant - Araha.m Sutta: The Arahant in Classical English,
Filed under: General
Posted by: site admin @ 8:42 pm
Jai Hind!


Dove-02-june.gif (38556 bytes)




Best animated graphics







1376 LESSON 5115 MONDAY
FREE ONLINE E-Nālanda Research and Practice UNIVERSITY

run by

http:sarvajan.ambedkar.org


chandrasekhara.tipitaka@gmail.com
Please
render exact translation in your mother tounge and all other languages
you know for this Google translation practice and spread and become a
Sota panna (Stream Enterer) to reach Eternal Bliss as Final Goal.



SELF AWAKEN ONE’S WITH AWARENESS PRACTICE IN A NUT SHELL


BUDDHISM IN A NUTSHELL !


DO NO EVIL !


ALWAYS DO GOOD


BE MINDFUL !


- EASY FOR A 7 YEARS OLD BOY TO UNDERSTAND


BUT DIFFICULT FOR A 70 YEARS OLD MAN TO PRACTICE !


TIPITAKA is of 3 Baskets - 1) Basket of Discipline (Vinaya), 2) of Discourses (Sutta) & 3) of Ultimate Doctrine (Abhidhamma) Pitakas

TIPITAKA

Encyclopedia

The complete Tipitaka is 40 volumes long

The complete Tipitaka is 40 volumes long




BEST PHYSICIANS

DR. DIET !
DR. QUIET !!
DR. MERRY AWAKEN ONE WITH AWARENESS THE MIGHT !!!

Course Program 1. Kamma-Araha.m Sutta: The Arahant -
Araha.m Sutta: The Arahant in Classical English,


Discrimination against SC/ST/OBCs in giving Bharat Ratna, says BSP Chief Mayawati



  • BSP Supremo Mayawati
    File Photo


BSP supremo Mayawati charged the NDA government on Saturday with discriminating against SC/ST/OBCs icons like Kanshi Ram while awarding Bharat Ratna
to Atal Bihari Vajpayee and Madan Mohan Malviya. She also attacked the
Narendra Modi government for adopting the “ordinance route” on key
issues.


“Just like the previous Congress-led UPA government, the NDA
government is adopting the same discriminatory attitude while honouring
two persons of the same caste - Vajpayee and Malviya - with the Bharat
Ratna recently,” she told a press conference here.


“Kanshi Ram should have been honoured keeping in mind his sacrifices
and contribution. Similarly, Jyotiba Phule, who belonged to a backward
caste, should have been given the award for his work in the field of
education and efforts to establish equality in society,” she said.


“Many other deserving persons have been ignored,” she rued.


Taking exception to the Modi government adopting the ordinance route,
Mayawati said this was not in keeping with the spirit of the
Constitution. Her remarks came against the backdrop of ordinance
amending the Land Acquisition Act
envisaging procuring land for industrial corridors, rural
infrastructure, defence and housing, and insurance ordinance raising
foreign investment limit in the sector to 49% from 26%, besides an
ordinance to push coal auction.


On the land acquisition ordinance, she said it was against the
interest of farmers. “I do not find it right…the amendments could have
been brought in the next session of Parliament.” 


Alleging that the Modi government appeared to be “failing on all
fronts”, she said interests of capitalists were being safeguarded for
which, the BSP leader said, changes were being made in laws, flouting
the spirit of the Constitution.


“The Modi government is playing in the hands of capitalists and now
they are out to help them as BJP won the elections with their monetary
help and by adopting all wrong tactics,” she alleged. Mayawati also
criticised the organisations affiliated to BJP, saying they were
hatching a conspiracy to spoil the atmosphere by raising the issue of
conversion and promising a ‘Hindu Rashtra’.


Slamming the Modi government, she said even after being in office for
seven months, the NDA was not interested in solving the problems of
poor and weaker sections.


“They have also shelved various welfare schemes of the previous
governments,” she said and warned that this “drama” was not going to
last long, especially in Uttar Pradesh. Mayawati also alleged that as
per a conspiracy, the quota for SC/STs and backwards was being
neutralised by allocating major works to the private sector.


To a question on replacing Planning Commission by a new think-tank,
NITI Aayog (National Institution for Transforming India), she said
government should concentrate on solving problems of the poor and
unemployed. “Changing names will not usher in any change in the
country,” she said.






Avatar


awakenmedia

a few seconds ago

Only Ms Mayawati has the guts to talk about the worst governance of
Murderers of democratic institutions (Modi).Just like the previous
Congress-led UPA government, the NDA government is adopting the same
discriminatory attitude while honouring same caste -Statues and Bharat
Ratna while Ms Mayawati wanted to honour Kanshiram, Jotiba Phule and
installed their statues of SC/ST/OBCs. Statues and temples are being
planned for naturam godse a chitpawan brahmin and a murderer who was
hanged by the court. This worst governance allowed this mad man to be
treated as god (se) by his chitpawan devotees, instead of punishing
them for contempt of court.

Totally against the spirit of
Constitution the Murderers of democratic institutions (Modi) government
is following the ordinance route for amending the Land Acquisition Act
envisaging procuring land for industrial corridors, rural
infrastructure, defense and housing, and insurance ordinance raising
foreign investment limit in the sector to 49% from 26%, besides an
ordinance
to push coal auction. While Ms Mayawati wanted all un-utilised
government lands to be distributed to the landless poor tillers and
others.

The whole world is aware “drama” was not going to last long

she said it was against the interest of farmers. “I do not find it
right…the amendments could have been brought in the next session of
Parliament.”

The
worst Murderers of democratic institutions (Modi) governance is
playing in the hands of capitalists and now they are out to help them as
BJP won the elections with their monetary help and by adopting all
wrong tactics, including tampering the fraud EVMs without replacing with
fool proof voting system adopted by the other 80 democracies of the
world.The ex CJI sadasivam committed an error of judgement by allowing
the fraud EVMs to be replaced in phases as suggested by the CEC Sampath
because of the cost of Rs 1600 crore involved to replace them thus
murdering these important democratic institutions. As a result of
snatching the MASTER KEY by adopting all wrong tactics, organisations
affiliated to RSS’s BJP, were hatching a conspiracy to spoil the
atmosphere by raising the issue of
conversion and promising a ‘Hindu
Rashtra’ to replace the Constitution with manu smriti which is the
athma (soul) of inequality. which was not interested in solving the
problems of poor and weaker sections as enshrined in the Constitution by
distributing the wealth of the country equally among all societies
including SC/STs/OBCs/Minorities and the poor brahmins baniyas. The
quota for SC/STs and backwards was being neutralised by allocating major
works to the private sector.

The whole world in now aware of the
incompetent and worst governance of the Murderers of democratic
institutions which snatched power by wrong tactics which is not going to
last long.




awakenmedia


a few seconds ago

The 1% chitpawans are dreaming to wipe out all chiristians, muslims,
by 2021 through ghar vapsi program. Ghar means house which is haunted by
different creatures including 1st rate athmas (souls) the brahmins and
othe 2nd, 3rd, 4th rate souls and the panchamas, the untouchables
declared as having no souls as per manu so that they could be
terrorised. But the Buddha never believed in any soul. He said all are
equal. That is why Dr. Ambedkar returned back to the original home with
lot of compassion and loving kindness along with lakhs of his followers
from the rented haunted house, the hindutva for self respect and escaped
from slavery. This 1% chitpawans are doing this because of their
traditional fear,hatred, anger, intolerance and delusion towards 99%
non-chitpawan because of their dominating attitude considering them as
the discarded hairs in a baraber shop. This is nothing but a mental
disease which require treatment in a mental hospital. An independent
nation with mental hospitals have to be created for them as a good
solution till they recover from their traditional madness.


Prostration (Buddhism)

A prostration (Pali: panipāta)
is a gesture used in Buddhist practice to show reverence to the Triple Gem (comprising the Buddha, Dhamma (his teachings), and the Sangha (spiritual community) and other objects of veneration.

Among Buddhists prostration is believed to be beneficial for practitioners for several reasons, including:

In contemporary Western Buddhism, some teachers use prostrations as a practice unto itself,while other teachers relegate prostrations to customary liturgical ritual, ancillary to meditation.

Prostrations may also be subsumed within sadhana repetitions of various vinyasa forms of yogic discipline, such as Trul Khor, e.g. Importantly, vinyasa forms were directly influenced from Buddhist ‘impermanence’ (anitya) as was the language of Patanjali’s Yoga Suttas informed by Buddhist discourse.

In the Pali canon, laypersons prostrating before the then-living Buddha is mentioned in several suttas In Theravada Buddhism, as part of daily practice, one typically prostrates before and after chanting and meditation. On these occasions, one does typically prostrates three times: once to the Buddha, once to the Dhamma, and once to the Sangha. More generally, one can also prostrate before “any sacred object of veneration.”

Theravada Buddhists execute a type of prostration that is known as “five-point veneration” (Pali: patitthitapanca) or the “five-limbed prostration” (Pali: pañc’anga-vandana) where the two palms and elbows, two sets of toes and knees, and the forehead are placed on the floor. More specifically:

… In the kneeling position, one’s hand in añjali [palms together,
fingers flat out and pointed upward] are raised to the forehead and then
lowered to the floor so that the whole forearm to the elbow is on the
ground, the elbow touching the knee. The hands, palm down, are four to
six inches apart with just enough room for the forehead to be brought to
the ground between them. Feet are still as for the kneeling position
and the knees are about a foot apart….

In Thailand, traditionally, each of the three aforementioned prostrations are accompanied by the following Pali verses:

First Prostration Araham samma-sambuddho bhagava
Buddham bhagavantam abhivademi.
The Noble One, the fully Awakened One with Awareness, the Exalted One,
I bow low before the Exalted Buddha.
Second Prostration Svakkhato bhagavata dhammo
Dhammam namassami.
The Exalted One’s well-expounded Dhamma
I bow low before the Dhamma.
Third Prostration Supatipanno bhagavato savakasangho
sangham namami.
The Exalted One’s Sangha of well-practiced disciples
I bow low before the Sangha.

In Theravadin countries such as Sri Lanka, when one goes before one’s
teacher, in order to “open one’s mind up to receive instructions,” one
bows and recites the phrase, “Okāsa ahaṃ bhante vandāmi” (”I pay homage
to you venerable sir”).

http://www.religioustolerance.org/buddhism1.htm

!!!!!!!! Search error!  If the URL ends something like .htm/  or .htm# delete the character(s) after .htm and hit return.

Buddhism

Buddhism’s core beliefs

Core beliefs of Buddhism:

Buddhism, like most of the great religions of the world, is divided into a
number of different traditions. However, most traditions share a common set of
fundamental beliefs.

One fundamental belief of Buddhism is often referred to as reincarnation —
the concept that people are reborn after dying. In fact, most individuals go
through many cycles of birth, living, death and rebirth. A practicing Buddhist
differentiates between the concepts of rebirth and reincarnation. In
reincarnation, the individual may recur repeatedly. In rebirth, a person does
not necessarily return to Earth as the same entity ever again. He compares it to
a leaf growing on a tree. When the withering leaf falls off, a new leaf will
eventually replace it. It is similar to the old leaf, but it is not identical to
the original leaf.

After many such cycles,
if a person releases their attachment to desire and the self, they can attain
Nirvana. This is a state of liberation and freedom from suffering.

The Three Trainings or Practices:

These three consist of:

  1. Sila: Virtue, good conduct, morality. This is based on two fundamental principles:
     
    bullet The principle of equality: that all living entities are equal.
     
    bullet The principle of reciprocity: This is the “Golden Rule” in
    Christianity — to do onto others as you would wish them to do
    onto you. It is found in all major religions.
     
  2. Samadhi: Concentration, meditation, mental development. Developing one’s mind is the path to wisdom which in turn leads to
    personal freedom. Mental development also strengthens and controls our mind; this helps us maintain good conduct.
     
  3. Prajna: Discernment, insight, wisdom, enlightenment. This is the real heart of Buddhism. Wisdom will emerge if your mind is pure and
    calm.

The first two paths listed in the Eightfold Path, described below, refer to discernment; the last three belong to concentration;
the middle three are related to virtue.

The Four Noble Truths:

The Buddha’s Four Noble Truths explore human suffering. They may be described (somewhat simplistically) as:

  1. Dukkha: Suffering exists: (Suffering is real and almost universal.
    Suffering has many causes: loss, sickness, pain, failure, the
    impermanence of pleasure.)
     
  2. Samudaya: There is a cause for suffering. (It is the desire to have and control things. It can take many forms: craving of
    sensual pleasures; the desire for fame; the desire to avoid unpleasant sensations, like fear, anger or jealousy.)
     
  3. Nirodha: There is an end to suffering. (Suffering ceases with the final liberation of Nirvana (a.k.a. Nibbana). The mind experiences
    complete freedom, liberation and non-attachment. It lets go of any desire or craving.)
     
  4. Magga: In order to end suffering, you must follow the Eightfold Path.

The Five Precepts:

These are rules to live by. They are somewhat analogous to the second half of the
Ten Commandments in Judaism and Christianity —
that part of the Decalogue which describes behaviors to avoid. However, they are
recommendations, not commandments. Believers are expected to use their own
intelligence in deciding exactly how to apply these rules.

  1. Do not kill. This is sometimes translated as “not harming” or an
    absence of violence.
     
  2. Do not steal. This is generally interpreted as including the avoidance
    of fraud and economic exploitation.
     
  3. Do not lie. This is sometimes interpreted as including name calling,
    gossip, etc.
     
  4. Do not misuse sex. For monks and nuns, this means any departure from
    complete celibacy. For the laity, adultery is forbidden, along with any
    sexual harassment or exploitation, including that within marriage. The
    Buddha did not discuss consensual premarital sex within a committed
    relationship; Thus, Buddhist traditions differ on this. Most Buddhists, probably
    influenced by their local cultures, condemn same-sex
    sexual activity
    regardless of the nature of the relationship between the
    people involved.
     
  5. Do not consume alcohol or other drugs. The main concern here is that
    intoxicants cloud the mind. Some have included as a drug other methods
    of divorcing ourselves from reality — e.g. movies, television, the
    Internet. 1

Those preparing for monastic life or who are not
within a family are expected to avoid an additional five activities:

 6.  Taking untimely meals.
 7.  Dancing, singing, music, watching grotesque mime.
 8.  Use of garlands, perfumes and personal adornment.
 9.  Use of high seats.
10. Accepting gold or silver.

There is also a series of eight precepts which are
composed of the first seven listed above, followed by the eighth and ninth
combined as one. “Ordained Theravada monks promise to follow 227 precepts!”
3

The Eightfold Path:

The Buddha’s Eightfold Path consists of:

bullet Panna: Discernment, wisdom:
bullet 1) Samma ditthi Right Understanding of the Four Noble Truths
bullet 2) Samma sankappa: Right thinking; following the right path
in life

bullet Sila: Virtue, morality:
bullet 3) Samma vaca: Right speech: no lying, criticism, condemning,
gossip, harsh language
bullet 4) Samma kammanta Right conduct by following the Five
Precepts
bullet 5) Samma ajiva: Right livelihood; support yourself without
harming others

bullet Samadhi: Concentration, meditation:
bullet 6) Samma vayama Right Effort: promote good thoughts; conquer
evil thoughts
bullet 7) Samma sati Right Mindfulness: Become aware of your body,
mind and feelings
bullet 8) Samma samadhi Right Concentration: Meditate to achieve a
higher state of consciousness

Back to list

Good Friends

“People affect each other in subtle and complex
ways, and it is important to develop the ability to discern the nature
of that influence. According to Buddhism, ‘bad’ friends are those who
encourage our weaknesses. A truly good friend is someone with the
compassion and courage to tell us even those things we would prefer not
to hear, which we must confront if we are to develop and grow in our
lives.”

Good Friends

Ananda,
one of Shakyamuni Buddha’s closest disciples, once asked him: “It seems
to me that by having good friends and advancing together with them, one
has already halfway attained the Buddha way. Is this way of thinking
correct?”

Shakyamuni replied, “Ananda, this way of thinking is not correct.
Having good friends and advancing together with them is not half the
Buddhist way but all the Buddhist way.”

This may seem surprising, as Buddhism is often viewed as a solitary
discipline in which other people might be seen as more of a hindrance
than a help. However, to polish and improve our lives ultimately means
to develop the quality of our interpersonal relationships–a far more
challenging task than any solitary discipline. Our practice of Buddhism
only finds meaning within the context of these relationships.

From another perspective, given that Buddhist practice of polishing
and aiming to improve our lives from within is a constant challenge and a
difficult process, it is only natural that we need support from others
also dedicated to walking a correct path in life, trying also to create
value in their lives.

SGI President Daisaku Ikeda has written, “Having good friends is like
being equipped with a powerful auxiliary engine. When we encounter a
steep hill or an obstacle, we can encourage each other and find the
strength to keep pressing forward.” And as Nichiren (1222–1282) wrote:
“Even a feeble person will not stumble if those supporting him are
strong, but a person of considerable strength, when alone, may lose his
footing on an uneven path…”

In Nichiren Buddhism, good friends are known as zenchishiki or good influences, while akuchishiki
refers to bad influences. People affect each other in subtle and
complex ways, and it is important to develop the ability to discern the
nature of that influence. According to Buddhism, “bad” friends are those
who encourage our weaknesses. In Nichiren’s words: “Evil friends are
those who, speaking sweetly, deceiving, flattering and making skillful
use of words, win the hearts of the ignorant and destroy their goodness
of mind.”

Even when intentions are good, the degree of our positive influence
on each other will vary. Tsunesaburo Makiguchi, founder of the Soka
Gakkai, used the following illustration. Say you have a friend who needs
a certain amount of money. Giving your friend the money they need is an
act of small good, while helping them find a job is an act of medium
good. However, if your friend is really suffering because of a basic
tendency toward laziness, then constantly helping him or her out may
only perpetuate negative habits. In this case, true friendship is
helping that person change the lazy nature that is the deep cause of
their suffering.

A truly good friend is someone with the compassion and courage to
tell us even those things we would prefer not to hear, which we must
confront if we are to develop and grow in our lives.

Ultimately, however, whether people are good or evil influences in
our lives is up to us. In Buddhist terms, the best kind of zenchishiki
is one who leads us to strengthen our own faith and practice in order to
thoroughly transform our karma. To quote Nichiren again, “the best way
to attain Buddhahood is to encounter a zenchishiki, or good friend.”
Further, Nichiren comments that Devadatta, the cousin of Shakyamuni who
tried to kill him and divide the Buddhist order, was “the foremost good
friend to Thus Come One Shakyamuni. In this age as well, it is not one’s
allies, but one’s powerful enemies who assist one’s progress.”

This expresses a key concept in Buddhism. Due to the immense
transformative powers of Buddhist practice, even “bad” friends can have a
good influence if we make our relationships with them into
opportunities to examine, reform and strengthen our lives. The ideal is
ultimately to develop the kind of all-encompassing compassion expressed
by Nichiren when he wrote that his first desire was to lead to
enlightenment the sovereign who had persecuted him, repeatedly exiling
and even attempting to behead him.

[Courtesy January 2004 SGI Quarterly]


www.PBS.org
http://www.pbs.org/wnet/religionandethics/week445/cover.html






Press
meet held at Lord Buddha TV, Nagpur with regard to the 2 day Buddhist
seminar to be held on 25th & 26th January 2015 at Buddha Nagri,
Wardha Road, Asola village Nagur on the following 3 topics:
1
For Mahabodhi Vihara BuddhaGaya management hand over to Buddhist only.
2.Against the formation of Secular Nation Bharat that is India into
Hindu Rashtra and
3. Against the Meddling with the Indian Constitution.
All Buddhists are Welcome to the Seminar on 25th & 26th Jan. 2015.
comments (0)