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07/09/12
09 07 2012 MONDAY LESSON 662 FREE ONLINE eNālāndā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY Dhammapada Verse 241 Laludayi Vatthu-Causes Of Stain AWAKEN ONE WITH AWARENESS ONLINE GOOD NEWS LETTER ALL ABOUT USA- Connecticut
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09 07 2012 MONDAY LESSON 662 FREE ONLINE  eNālāndā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY


Dhammapada Verse 241 Laludayi Vatthu-Causes Of Stain



AWAKEN ONE WITH AWARENESS ONLINE GOOD NEWS LETTER

ALL ABOUT USA


Connecticut

Verse 241. Causes Of Stain

For oral tradition, non-recitation,
in household life, non-exertion,
the fair of form when slovenly,
a sentry’s sloth: all blemishes.

Explanation: For formulas that have to be memorized, non repetition
is the rust. For houses the neglect of the inmates is the rust. For
complexion non-caring is the rust. For a guard heedlessness is the
rust.

Dhammapada Verse 241
Laludayi Vatthu

Asajjhayamala manta
anutthanamala ghara
malam vanaassa kosajjam
pamado rakkhato malam.

Verse 241: Non-recitation is the taint of learning; non-maintenance is the
taint of houses; indolence is the taint of beauty; unmindfulness is the taint of
one who keeps watch.



The Story of Laludayi

While residing at the Jetavana monastery, the Buddha uttered Verse (241) of
this book, with reference to Thera Laludayi.

In Savatthi, people coming back after hearing the discourses given by Thera
Sariputta and Thera Maha Moggallana were always full of praise for the two Chief
Disciples. On one occasion, Laludayi, hearing their praises, said to those
people that they would be saying the same about him after listening to his
discourses. So Laludayi was asked to deliver a discourse; he climbed on to the
platform but he could not say anything. So he asked the audience to let another
bhikkhu take the turn first and that he would take the next turn. In this way,
he put off three times.

The audience lost patience with him and shouted, “You big fool! When we
praised the two Chief Disciples you were vainly boasting that you could preach
like them. Why don’t you preach now ?” So Laludayi ran away and the crowd
chased him. As he was frightened and was not looking where he was going, he fell
into a latrine pit.

When the Buddha was told about this incident, he said, “Laludayi had
learned very little of the Dhamma; he does not recite the religious texts
regularly; he has not memorized anything. Whatever little he has learned gets
rusty by not reciting.”

Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:

Verse 241: Non-recitation is the taint of learning;
non-maintenance is the taint of houses; indolence is the taint of
beauty; unmindfulness is the taint of one who keeps watch.

ALL ABOUT USA


Connecticut

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Beginning Your New Life

 

In
the 21st century, Buddhism has become
the fastest growing religion among Americans.
Many people these days are reading books about Buddhism, practicing
Buddhist
meditation, and applying Buddhist ideas at
work, play and with relationships. If you are one of those who is very
interested
in the dharma, you may one day decide to
formally become a disciple of Buddha and live the path of understanding,
faith and
love.
   The aim of this web page is to help you familiarize yourself
with what is needed to become a Buddhist.

 

Below
covers these topics: 1) Know the
basics, 2) Understanding is Important, 3) How
do I become a Buddhist? 4) The Affirmation and Ordination Ceremony, 5)
What is the Meaning of Taking Refuge? 6)
Taking the Bodhisattva Vows, 7) Taking the Five Precepts, 8) A Path Open
to All.

 

Buddhist Faith Fellowship of Connecticut

Know the Basics 


 

If
you would like to make
Buddhism your religion, there are
some things to consider. First, you should be familiar with the basic
tenants of Buddhism
such as karma, rebirth, Four Noble
Truths, Eightfold Path, the Five Precepts, the Nembutsu, the Pure
Land,
and Amida Buddha. It is not necessary to accept all of these concepts
in the beginning, but one should be
willing to consider them. The Buddha never asked his disciples to
believe something
because he said it. He said that one
needed to prove it true for oneself.

 


 

Understanding is Important

 

In
Buddhism,
understanding is the most important
thing and understanding takes time. So do not impulsively rush into
Buddhism. Take your
time, ask questions, consider
carefully, and then make your decision. The Buddha was not interested in
having a large number
of disciples. He was concerned that
people should follow his teachings as a result of a careful
investigation, consideration
of the facts and personal experien
ce.

 


 

How do I become a Buddhist?

 

Join
a Buddhist sangha (a
temple, church or group), support
them, be supported by them and continue to learn more about the Buddha’s
teachings. Read
about the teachings, apply them in
your life, attend services and retreats, open your heart and mind to the
working of Great
Compassion. Then, when you are
ready, you can formally become a Buddhist by undertaking the Affirmation
or Ordination
Ceremony. 

 

Affirmation and Ordination

 

The
decision to become a Buddhist
is marked by either Affirmation or
Ordination Ceremony. These two types of ceremonies are different but
share certain religious
aspects. First of all, the
Affirmation Ceremony or the Kikyoshiki
is unique to
Shin Buddhism only. It is a form of
personal religious confirmation, in which the participant publicly
acknowledges
his/her orientation and commitment
to the Pure Land
path of Shinran Shonin and the recognition of the working of Great
Compassion (Other
Power) in their lives. At the
Buddhist Faith Fellowship, one must successfully take the Discovering
Buddhism 101 Course
in order to participate in this
ceremony. We believe that one should have some background in the
Buddha’s life, teachings
and practices in order to undertake
such an important ritual.

 

As
stated above, this ceremony
is unique to Shin Buddhism, which is
a lay religious movement and not a religious order. This ceremony does
not entail the
transmission of the Three Jewels or
the Five or Ten Precepts from teacher (monk) to disciple. In Shin
Buddhism,
we are each others
teachers. Moreover, according to Shin Buddhism, the ultimate
transmission can only come from the direct
and personal experience of the
working of Great Compassion, which is called shinjin or true entrusting.
What’s more, Shin
Buddhism does not formally have lay
precepts, which can be received from human to human transmission;
instead they manifest
naturally through the shinjin
experience.

 

The
Affirmation Ceremony allows
the participant to publicly
acknowledge his/her personal faith experience in the Buddha (Amida), the
Dharma
(the teachings and the truth) and
the Sangha (those who practice the dharma and entrust themselves to the
infinite
life and light). Furthermore, the
Affirmation Ceremony may also confirm the Five Precepts as the best ways
to compassionately
live in our suffering world. Again,
this is not a transmission of the ethical code but just a reminder of
its importance. In
addition, the Affirmation Ceremony
may include the reciting of the Six Paramitas, the Bodhisattva Vows
and/or the Shin Buddhist
Affirmation as reminders of the
Buddhist path. In this ceremony, recipients are given a Buddhist name
(homyo), an Affirmation
Certificate and Shin Buddhist Okesa.
There is usually a small donation requested to cover the costs.

 

In
contrast, the Ordination Ceremony
is only conferred by a fully
ordained monk, in which the lay participant receives the human to human
or teacher to student, transmission
of the Three Jewels and the Five
Precepts and sometimes even can take the Bodhisattva Vows. The
participant is then ordained
as a lay follower or as it is know
in Sanskrit as an upasaka (ordained lay male follower) or upasika
(ordained lay female
follower). He/she then receives a
certificate and a Buddhist name. As a result, the ordainee is formally
initiated as
a lay member and linked
to a monastic order, in which he/she dedicates him/herself to the Three
Jewels and
the Five Precepts. The ordaining
monk is usually seen as the lay followers main teacher.  These ordained
lay
followers may then, in the
future, decide to intensify their practice and become fully ordained as
monks (bhikkus) or
nuns. The Ordination
Ceremony is conducted by monastic orders only. Since the BFF is a lay
congregation, it does
not conduct ordinations. If you are
interested in lay ordination please refer to a local Buddhist temple or
center with a
resident monk or nun.

 

 

          
What is the Meaning of Taking Refuge?

 

 

To publicly

take refuge in the Three Jewels is
to change the direction of ones life and make an effort to embody the
Buddha, the Dharma
and the Sangha.

 

To

take refuge in the Buddha is to take
refuge in the living source of understanding, faith and compassion,
symbolized as Amida,
the Buddha of Eternal Life and Light
and her historical human manifestation, Shakyamuni Buddha. One sees the
historical Buddha
as the greatest teacher and the
embodiment of our true human potential.

 

To
take refuge in the Dharma is to take refuge in Reality-as-it-is, the Ocean
of Oneness, the Buddhas teachings and the path of understanding, faith
and compassion.

 

To

take refuge in the Sangha is to take
refuge in the community that practices according to the Buddhist path
and strives to
manifest and embody Enlightenment
here on Earth.

 

The

Three Jewels are present in every
quarter of the universe as well as in our hearts, in every person and in
all other species
inhabiting every galaxy. By
dedicating ourselves to learn, practice and embody the Three Jewels, you
will have the proven
vehicle to nourish the ability to
love and understand within ourselves 

 

The

Affirmation ceremony is the first
step to becoming a disciple of Buddha. You begin the process to be
transformed from
within. Gradually, through the
working of Other Power, you will be made to deeply realize that each of
us is the main concern
of Great Compassion. As Shinran
Shonin said, we who are like rubble will be turned into gold. 

 

The colors of Buddha’s enlightenment
buddhistflag.gif
The official Buddhist Flag

Taking the Bodhisattva Vows

 

The
Bodhisattva Vows are the
very essence of the Mahayana
(Universal Vehicle) Buddhism. They are the torch lighting our spiritual
path. These Vows are
the great boat that carries us all
to the Other Shore, the Pure Land,
and the inspiration guiding us in
this life with the great heart of compassion and love. A Bodhisattva is a
being that devotes
him or herself to compassionate
deeds, striving to benefit all beings and seeking their Enlightenment
before his or her own.

 

By
taking refuge in the Bodhisattva
Vows, we endow our lives with
profound spiritual meaning. They allow us to embody our highest
religious aspirations, in which
we commit ourselves to deeper
understanding and love and selfless service. They have the power to
transform us into gentle
spiritual warriors with courageous
armor of patience, perseverance and mindfulness, and enduring arrows of
generosity, wisdom
and compassion.

 

These
Vows are a living promise
that we reaffirm everyday, not just
once in a lifetime. Therefore, we should strive to recite them regularly
and practice
them always.

 

Sentient Beings are numberless,

I vow to save them all.

 

Sufferings
are inexhaustible,

I
vow to end them all.

 

Dharmas are boundless,

I vow to learn them all.

 

The
Buddha Way is unsurpassable,

I
vow to embody it.


 

 

Taking the Five Precepts

 

The Fivefold
Precepts
have the capacity to protect life
and make our lives beautiful. They are not rules or commandments but are
guidelines to wholesome
and ethical living and truly witness
our commitment to live an awakened life.  Through

the compassionate working of Amida
in our lives, we are empowered to better practice them and are
encouraged to move forward
in the direction of peace, joy and
awakening. Likewise, they are the foundation for the happiness of the
individual, family
and society. These Precepts help us
avoid making mistakes and creating suffering, fear and despair but
instead bring joy,
understanding and peace into our
suffering world. 

 

The Five Precepts are
as follows:

 

 

1.         I practice the training of love, I refrain from killing.

 

2.         I practice the training of generosity, I refrain from stealing.

 

3.         I practice the training of contentment, I refrain from sexual misconduct.

                       

4.         I practice the training of mindful speech, I refrain from harmful
speech.

 

5.       
I practice the training of mindful consumption; I refrain from intoxicants  

          & harmful substances that harm myself, society
and the environment.

 

A Path for All 

 

We
are talking about going
on a wonderful path and living a new
kind of lifestyle. For 2,500 years, Buddhism has been a proven path for
millions of practitioners.
It may be now up to you to travel it
too. You must understand this is completely possible; there is no
reason at all that
you cannot travel this path.  This is the beauty of the Pure Land
teachings: it is completely available
to all whether we are saints or
sinners, ignorant or wise. Remember Great Compassion always remain with
us. She is moving,
seeking and working to liberate you
from suffering. Just stop, take notice and be grateful.

 




 

“Emancipation is promised
even while we are in Samsara.”

–Zuiken

    •    Do Ngak Kunphen Ling Tibetan Buddhist Center for Universal Peace, Redding, Connecticut

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Do_Ngak_Kunphen_Ling_Tibetan_Buddhist_Center_for_Universal_Peace

Do Ngak Kunphen Ling Tibetan Buddhist Center for Universal Peace

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Do Ngak Kunphen Ling Tibetan Buddhist Center for Universal Peace

(མདོ་སྔགས་ཀུན་ཕན་གླིང་།) (DNKL) is a Tibetan Buddhist retreat center located in Redding, Connecticut. It offers classes and meditation retreats in the Gelug spiritual tradition of His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama under the guidance of Gyumed Khensur Rinpoche Lobsang Jampa.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Do_Ngak_Kunphen_Ling_Tibetan_Buddhist_Center_for_Universal_Peace
    •    New Haven Zen Center, New Haven, Connecticut
“New Haven” redirects here. For other uses, see New Haven (disambiguation).

New Haven is the second-largest city in Connecticut and the sixth-largest in New England. With a population of 129,779 people,[1] New Haven is the principal municipality in the Greater New Haven metropolitan area, which had a total population of 571,310 in 2000.[2][3] It is located in New Haven County, on New Haven Harbor, on the northern shore of Long Island Sound.

New Haven was founded in 1638 by English puritans, and a year later eight streets were laid out in a four-by-four grid, creating what is now commonly known as the “Nine Square Plan”,[4] now recognized by the American Institute of Certified Planners as a National Historic Planning Landmark. The central common block is New Haven Green, a 16-acre (6 ha) square, now a National Historic Landmark and the center of Downtown New Haven.

New Haven is the home of the Ivy League school Yale University. The university is an integral part of the city’s economy, being New Haven’s biggest taxpayer and employer,[5] as noted in the Mayor’s 2010 State of the City address.[6]
Health care (hospitals and biotechnology), professional services
(legal, architectural, marketing, and engineering), financial services,
and retail trade also help to form an economic base for the city.

New Haven had the first public tree planting program in America, producing a canopy of mature trees (including some large elms) that gave New Haven the nickname “The Elm City”.[7]




City of New Haven
—  City  —

Skyline of Downtown New Haven


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Nickname(s): The Elm City

Location in New Haven County, Connecticut

Coordinates: 41°18′36″N 72°55′25″WCoordinates: 41°18′36″N 72°55′25″W
Country United States
State Connecticut
NECTA New Haven
Region South Central Region
Settled 1638
Incorporated (city) 1784
Consolidated 2010
Government
 • Type Mayor-board of aldermen
 • Mayor John DeStefano, Jr. (D)
Area
 • City 20.31 sq mi (52.6 km2)
 • Land 18.9 sq mi (49.0 km2)
 • Water 1.4 sq mi (3.6 km2)
 • Urban 285.3 sq mi (738.9 km2)
Elevation 59 ft (18 m)
Population (2010)[1]
 • City 129,779
 • Density 6,860/sq mi (2,648.6/km2)
 • Urban 569,000
 • Metro 846,766
 • Demonym New Havener
  Metro area refers to New Haven County
Time zone Eastern (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (UTC-4)
ZIP code 06501-06540
Area code(s) 203
FIPS code 09-52000
GNIS feature ID 0209231

Airport Tweed-New Haven Regional Airport (New Haven, CT) – HVN (County)
Website www.cityofnewhaven.com
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Hartford,_Connecticut
   
•    Dae Yen Sa, New Hartford, Connecticut
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New Hartford, Connecticut
—  Town  —

“Central Avenue, New Hartford,” a 1910 postcard


Seal

Location in Litchfield County, Connecticut

Coordinates: 41°50′29″N 73°00′15″WCoordinates: 41°50′29″N 73°00′15″W
Country United States
State Connecticut
NECTA Hartford
Region Litchfield Hills
Incorporated 1738
Government
 • Type Selectman-town meeting
 • First selectman Daniel V. Jerram
Area
 • Total 38.1 sq mi (98.7 km2)
 • Land 37.0 sq mi (95.9 km2)
 • Water 1.1 sq mi (2.9 km2)
Elevation 873 ft (266 m)
Population (2005)[1]
 • Total 6,746
 • Density 182/sq mi (70/km2)
Time zone Eastern (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (UTC-4)
ZIP code 06057
Area code(s) 860
FIPS code 09-51350
GNIS feature ID 0213470
Website www.town.new-hartford.ct.us

New Hartford is a town in Litchfield County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 6,088 at the 2000 census. The town center is also defined by the U.S. Census Bureau as a census-designated place
(CDP). The town is mainly a rural community consisting of farms, homes,
and parks. Brodie Park and Ski Sundown are located in New Hartford.

http://attractions.uptake.com/connecticut/cheap_vacations.html

Cheap Things To Do in Connecticut

http://www.ctvisit.com/

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  • Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/167018-free-kids-activities-in-ct/#ixzz2094Vpn5e

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