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07/23/12
23 07 2012 MONDAY LESSON 676 FREE ONLINE eNālāndā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY up a levelTipitaka network … his life, his acts, his words sabbe satta bhavantu sukhi-tatta TIPITAKA TIPITAKA AND TWELVE DIVISIONS Brief historical background Sutta Pitaka Vinaya Pitaka Abhidhamma Pitaka Twelve Divisions of Buddhist Canons Nine Divisions of Buddhist Canons Sutta Piṭaka — The basket of discourses —Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta (DN 22) {excerpt} - all infobubbles— Attendance on awareness —Kāyānupassanā DhammapadaVerses 264 and 265 Hatthaka Vatthu-Verse 264. Shaven Head Alone Does Not Make A MonkVerse 265. Who Give Up Evil Is True Monk ALL ABOUT AWAKEN ONES WITH AWARENESS USA New Jersey Soshimsa • So Shim Sa Zen Center
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Posted by: @ 7:20 am
23 07 2012 MONDAY LESSON 676 FREE ONLINE  eNālāndā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY
up a levelTipitaka network … his life, his acts, his words
               
sabbe satta bhavantu sukhi-tatta

TIPITAKA
TIPITAKA   AND   TWELVE   DIVISIONS
    Brief historical background
   Sutta Pitaka
   Vinaya Pitaka
   Abhidhamma Pitaka
     Twelve Divisions of Buddhist Canons
Nine Divisions of Buddhist Canons
Sutta Piṭaka

— The basket of discourses —Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta (DN 22) {excerpt} - all infobubbles— Attendance on awareness —Kāyānupassanā

DhammapadaVerses 264 and 265 Hatthaka Vatthu-Verse 264. Shaven Head Alone Does Not Make A MonkVerse 265. Who Give Up Evil Is True Monk

ALL ABOUT AWAKEN ONES WITH AWARENESS USA
New Jersey
Soshimsa
    •    So Shim Sa Zen Center


Verse 264. Shaven Head Alone Does Not Make A Monk

By shave head no samana
if with deceit, no discipline.
Engrossed in greed and selfishness
how shall he be a samana?

Explanation: Can an individual who does not practice religion,
speaks untruth, and is filled with desire and greed, become an ascetic,
merely because he is shaven-headed?

Verse 265. Who Give Up Evil Is True Monk

All evils altogether he
subdues both fine and gross.
Having subdued al evil he
indeed is called a ‘Samana’.

Explanation: If an individual were to quell all defilements,
big and small, he is described as an ascetic - a samana.

Dhammapada Verses 264 and 265
Hatthaka Vatthu

Na mundakena samano
abbato alikam bhanam
icchalobhasamapanno
samano kim bhavissati.

Yo ca sameti papani
anumthulani sabbaso
samitatta hi papanam
“samano” ti pavuccati.

Verse 264: Not by a shaven head does a man become a samana, if he lacks
morality and austere practices and tells lies. How could he who is full of
covetousness and greed be a samana?

Verse 265: He who has totally subdued all evil, great and small, is called a
samana because he has overcome all evil.


The Story of Bhikkhu Hatthaka

While residing at the Jetavana monastery, the Buddha uttered Verses (264) and
(265) of this book, with reference to a bhikkhu named Hatthaka.

Bhikkhu Hatthaka was in the habit of challenging ascetics of non-Buddhist
faiths to meet him in a certain place to debate on religious matters. He would
then go out by himself to the self-appointed place. When nobody appeared he
would boast, “Look, those wandering ascetics dare not meet me, they have
been beaten by me!”, and such other things. The Buddha called Hatthaka to
him and said, “Bhikkhu! Why do you behave in this way? One who says such
things cannot become a samana in spite of his shaven head. Only one who has rid
himself of all evil is to be called a samana.”

Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:

Verse 264: Not by a shaven head does a man become
a samana, if he lacks morality and austere practices and tells lies.
How could he who is full of covetousness and greed be a samana?

 

Verse 265: He who has totally subdued all evil,
great and small, is called a samana because he has overcome all evil.


New Jersey
Soshimsa

    •    So Shim Sa Zen Center

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/So_Shim_Sa_Zen_Center

So Shim Sa Zen Center
Soshimsa.jpg
Information
Denomination Seon, Korean Zen
Founder(s) Il-Cho Bobsanim
Director(s) Dir. of Wellness: Ven. Mooh-Sang

Dir. of Outreach: Ven. Duhk-Song

Abbot(s) Ven. Myong-Ahn
Address 123 Morning Glory Rd
Warren, New Jersey
Country United States
Website soshimsa.org

Dharma Wheel.svg Portal:Buddhism

So Shim Sa Zen Center ( Hangul: 소심사 Hanja: 少心寺) is a Buddhist organization in New Jersey affiliated with the Taego Order of Korean Zen.[1]

Contents

  • 1 History
  • 2 So Shim Sa Buddhist Fellowship
  • 3 References
  • 4 External links
  • Buddha Hall

    The organization was founded in May 2009, and is currently a 501(c)3 non profit charitable organization.[2]
    Since 1975, when founder Ven. Il-Cho Bobsanim (일초 법사님) came to United
    States, his mission has been to develop a temple in order to foster the
    teachings of Buddhism. Today, three of Ven. Il-Cho’s disciples are the pillars that support So Shim Sa. Ven. Duhk-Song Sunim (덕성 스님)[3] has studied under Ven. Il-Cho for over three decades and serves as the director of the center’s outreach program, 1000 Hands. Elected as Director of Wellness Programs, and with a Doctorate in Clinical Psychology, Ven. Mooh-Sang Sunim (무상 스님)[3]
    coordinates education and wellness programs offered at So Shim Sa. A
    deciple of Ven. Il-Cho since 1997 and ordained as a Buddhist monk in
    2003, Ven. Myong-Ahn Sunim (명안 스님)[3] serves as the appointed Abbot.
    [2]

  • So Shim Sa Buddhist Fellowship

  • Fellowship Chapters

  • So Shim Sa Buddhist Fellowship opened its first University Chapter on campus of Rutgers University.[4] Rutgers University recognized the fellowship as a campus chaplaincy.[5]
    Ven. Myong-Ahn serves as the Chapter President. All three of So Shim
    Sa’s monks also sit on the Rutgers University’s Religious Life Council.[6] So Shim Sa Buddhist Fellowship issued its first International Charter for the Brazil Chapter in 2011.[7]

http://www.examiner.com/article/buddhist-stories-for-children-for-free

Buddhist stories for children - for free

In the world of the Jataka Tales, even a goat can  teach Buddhsit wisdom.
In the world of the Jataka Tales, even a goat can teach Buddhist wisdom.
Photo credit: 
By Bobby at Morguefile


For many people in the West, Buddhism is an intellectual pursuit that
is not very family-friendly. But, for centuries, Buddhism has anchored
families and communities, just the way other spiritual paths have.

There is a large collection of Buddhist stories that are popular with children. These stories are called the Jataka Tales (Wikipedia).

The Buddha
whom we recognize today was historically Siddhartha Gautama. According
to Buddhist teachings (which are not accepted by all Buddhists), he had
lived many lives before that one, not always as a human being. The Jataka Tales are stories about his adventures in previous lifetimes.


The Jataka Tales are characterized by a cast of fairy-tale
like characters - animals, royalty, spirits. The stories are humorous,
and, yet, they are full of moral teachings. They are popular throughout
the Buddhist world, appreciated by children as well as by the Dalai
Lama. It was with one of the Jataka Tales (which you can read here) that Bernardo Bertolucci began his film Little Buddha. You can watch that beginning online (here).

Through the wonders of the Internet, you can access and download texts and videos for free to enjoy these ancient stories and, if you feel they are appropriate, to share them with your children.

Jataka Tales on video


The Jataka Tales have inspired a range of traditional
performances: story-telling, plays, and dances. They also have inspired a
range of videos, over a hundred of which are found in a Google video search

from short cartoons of the stories to a teaching by the Dalai Lama over ninety minutes long.


Jataka Tales on line


You can find various texts of the Jataka Tales to read online.

Jataka Tales By Ellen C. Babbitt - This is a Google book of modern versions of the stories.

Jataka Tales
available at the Internet Sacred Texts Archive - These are five of the
six volumes of the stories, published from 1895 to 1905, from the
collection edited by E. B. Cowell.

Jataka Tales of the Buddha, retold by Ken & Visakha Kawasaki - These are modern retellings of stories from the Cowell edition.

Jataka Tales to download


Here are two volumes of Jataka Tales in two versions, one just
text and one with illustrations. If you have a dial-up connection, you
might choose the smaller files without illustrations. These are in the
compressed “zip” format. You probably have WinZip on your computer, but
if you do not, you can download the free 7Zip program.

Buddhist Tales for Young & Old, Volume I

Buddhist Tales for Young & Old, Volume I -  Illustrated

Buddhist Tales for Young & Old, Volume II

Buddhist Tales for Young & Old, Volume II - Illustrated

http://www.sacred-texts.com/bud/index.htm#jataka

http://books.google.com/books?id=Xpbx97xn_7gC&dq=jataka+tales&printsec=frontcover&source=bn&hl=en&ei=zXMxS-iZJsaVtgfFn-2FCQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=6&ved=0CB8Q6AEwBQ#v=onepage&q&f=false

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/kawasaki/index.html

http://www.mainlesson.com/display.php?author=babbitt&book=morejataka&story=_contents

THE GIRL MONKEY AND THE STRING OF PEARLS

[3]

O

NE day the king went for a long walk in the woods.
When he came back to his own garden, he sent for his family
to come down to the lake for a swim.

When they were all ready to go into the water,
the queen and her ladies left their jewels in charge of the servants,
and then went down into the lake.

As the queen put her string of pearls away in a box,
she was watched by a Girl Monkey who sat
in the branches of a tree near-by. This Girl Monkey
wanted to get the queen’s string of pearls,
so she sat still and watched, hoping that
the servant in charge of the pearls would go to sleep.

At first the servant kept her eyes on the jewel-box.
But by and by she began to nod, and then she fell fast asleep.

[4] As soon as the Monkey saw this,
quick as the wind she jumped down, opened the box,
picked up the string of pearls, and quick as the wind
she was up in the tree again, holding the pearls very carefully.
She put the string of pearls on, and then,
for fear the guards in the garden would see the pearls,
the Monkey hid them in a hole in the tree.
Then she sat near-by looking as if nothing had happened.

By and by the servant awoke. She looked in the box,
and finding that the string of pearls was not there, she cried,
“A man has run off with the queen’s string of pearls.”

Up ran the guards from every side.

The servant said: “I sat right here beside the box
where the queen put her string of pearls.
I did not move from the place. But the day is hot,
and I was tired. I must have fallen asleep.
The pearls were gone when I awoke.”

The guards told the king that the pearls were gone.

“Find the man who stole the pearls,” said the king.
Away went the guards looking high and low for the thief.

After the king had gone, the chief guard said to himself:

“There is something strange here. These pearls,” thought he,
“were lost in the garden. There was a strong guard at the gates,
so that no one from the outside could get into the garden.
On the other hand, there are hundreds of
[6] Monkeys here in the garden.
Perhaps one of the Girl Monkeys took the string of pearls.”

Then the chief guard thought of a trick
that would tell whether a Girl Monkey had taken the pearls.
So he bought a number of strings of bright-colored glass beads.

After dark that night the guards hung the strings of glass beads
here and there on the low bushes in the garden.
When the Monkeys saw the strings of bright-colored beads the next morning,
each Monkey ran for a string.

[Illustration]

But the Girl Monkey who had taken the queen’s string
of pearls did not come down. She sat near the hole
where she had hidden the pearls.

The other Monkeys were greatly pleased with their strings of beads.
They chattered to one another about them.
“It is too bad you did not get one,”
they said to her as she sat quietly, saying nothing.
At last she could stand it no longer.
She put on the queen’s string of pearls and came down,
saying proudly: “You have only strings of glass beads.
See my string of pearls!”

Then the chief of the guards, who had been hiding near-by,
caught the Girl Monkey. He took her at once to the king.

“It was this Girl Monkey, your Majesty, who took the pearls.”

[7] The king was glad enough to get the pearls,
but he asked the chief guard how he had found out who took them.

The chief guard told the king
that he knew no one could have come into the garden
and so he thought they must have been taken by one of the Monkeys
in the garden. Then he told the king about the trick
he had played with the beads.

“You are the right man in the right place,”
said the king, and he thanked the chief of the guards over and over again.


[Illustration]

http://www.nj.com/comics-kingdom/?feature_id=Family_Circus

  • About Family Circus

    Bil Keane’s warm, humorous portraits of
    the intimate moments in family life, based on his own real-life family
    circus, have charmed readers around the world since 1960. Today, The
    Family Circus is the most widely syndicated comic panel in the world,
    appearing in 1,500 newspapers. The daily panels are routinely drawn
    within a circle, meant to underscore the sense of closeness between the
    characters. More than 60 collections of the cartoons have been
    published, and the panel’s characters have inspired three TV specials
    and appeared in a wide variety of educational and public-service
    projects.

    While Keane’s cartoon kids have stayed the same age,
    his real kids have grown up and two followed in their father’s creative
    footsteps. Glen, who served as the model for the Billy character, is now
    a prominent animator for The Walt Disney Company. He designed and
    animated the Beast for Disney’s “Beauty and the Beast” and most recently
    did the brilliant animation on Tarzan. Jeff works as his dad’s
    assistant on the comic panel. And today, nine grandchildren provide the
    cartoonist with a whole new generation of ideas.

    Author(s)

    • Bil Keane


      Bil Keane never formally studied art, but by
      faithfully re-creating the world around him, he developed the
      phenomenally successful cartoon panel The Family Circus.

      The
      panel records the lives of an average American family, made up of Mommy
      and Daddy, and their four children: Billy, Dolly, Jeffy and PJ. Their
      two dogs, Barfy and Sam, Kittycat and grandparents round out the cast.
      The daily panels are routinely drawn within a circle, underscoring the
      sense of closeness between the characters. The panel has been embraced
      by people the world over, as The Family Circus continues to show us how
      the American family lives now. King Features Syndicate distributes the
      panel to more than 1,500 newspapers worldwide, making it the most widely
      syndicated panel in America today.

      Keane was born Oct. 5, 1922,
      in Philadelphia. He taught himself to draw while at the Northeast
      Catholic High School. Keane started out imitating the drawing styles of
      some of The New Yorker magazine cartoonists of the late 1930s, such as
      George Price, Richard Decker, Peter Arno, Robert Day and Whitney Darrow.
      After years of imitation, Keane’s own drawing style began to emerge.

      In
      the late ’30s, Keane was working with a group of friends putting out a
      satire magazine, The Saturday Evening Toast, when he decided to drop the
      second L in “Bill.” “I really did it just to be different,” he says.

      “I
      thought it was a little more distinguished and started signing my
      cartoons that way, and it stuck.” His first job after high school was as
      a messenger at the Philadelphia Bulletin. While serving in the Army,
      1942-45, he drew for Yank magazine, and he created the At Ease with the
      Japanese feature for Pacific Stars and Stripes while in Tokyo.

      After
      the war he returned to the Bulletin and got a job drawing spot cartoons
      and caricatures for the entertainment section. He did a weekly Sunday
      comic for the Bulletin called Silly Philly, which was about a Quaker
      character based on William Penn. He also edited a weekly supplement in
      the Sunday paper called “Fun Book.”

      In 1948 he married Thelma
      Carne, an Australian he had met during the war. The Keanes lived for 10
      years in Roslyn, Pa., where their real-live family circus was born.

      In
      1954 Keane launched his Channel Chuckles television humor cartoon for
      newspapers, and it was distributed by The Register and Tribune Syndicate
      of Des Moines, Iowa, for 23 years. He sold gag cartoons regularly to
      most major magazines before creating The Family Circus.

      When the
      income from Channel Chuckles and his free-lance work enabled him to
      leave the Bulletin, Keane and his family moved to Arizona. Keane quickly
      realized that one of the beautiful things about the cartoon business
      was that it allowed him to live anywhere there is a mailbox.

      “Working
      at home for the first time with our five children under foot, I
      discovered that most of the magazine cartoons I was selling had to do
      with family life and small children. I then decided to produce The
      Family Circus,” he says.

      For six months the feature was called
      The Family Circle. Then the magazine of that name objected and the “le”
      was changed to “us.”

      Through the years, Keane has made his family
      life the center of his professional world. The first Family Circus
      cartoon, in February 1960, showed Mommy surrounded by a roomful of toy
      clutter, answering the door to a survey person who asked, “Any
      children?”

      Keane does not always try to make his cartoons
      especially funny. “I would rather have the readers react with a warm
      smile, a tug at the heart or a lump in the throat as they recall doing
      the same things in their own families,” he says.

      Keane says he believes that the family is the source of a lot of happiness, a lot of love and a lot of laughs.

      “I
      like to feel that what I’m doing portrays this: a family where there is
      love between mother, father and the kids. It’s a subject that is dear
      to me,” he says. Since 1978, Keane has created three animated specials
      for television. All have been ratings successes.

      He is the author
      of more than 60 books, most recently The Family Circus, By Request,
      published by Guideposts Books in 1998. New collections of Keane’s
      cartoons have been published regularly by Fawcett Books. There are 14
      million paperbacks in print.

      The characters also appear on
      calendars and other products. More than 5,000 elementary schools in the
      United States and Canada subscribe to a series of biweekly Family Circus
      Spirit posters, which promote self-esteem, respect for teachers and
      school pride. The Family Circus regularly rates No. 1 in newspaper
      surveys and has won several awards. In 1982 Keane was named “Cartoonist
      of the Year” by the National Cartoonists Society, and he received the
      prestigious Reuben Award.

      Keane has always tried to portray the
      typical American family. His Family Circus characters are based on his
      own family: himself, Thel and his five children, Gayle, Neal, Glen,
      Christopher and Jeff.

      Glen Keane is now a prominent animator for
      Walt Disney Pictures, having created the characters of Ariel (The Little
      Mermaid), the Beast (Beauty and the Beast), “Pocahontas,” and most
      recently, “Tarzan.”

      Jeff Keane, now 41, works as his father’s
      assistant. Daughter Gayle, model for Dolly, handles the volumes of mail,
      requests from charities for originals and myriad other duties, and
      travels from her home in California to her parents’ home in Arizona, one
      week each month to do the filing and support work for their
      corporation.

      Today, nine grandchildren provide the cartoonist
      with a whole new generation of ideas. Mommy of the cartoon resembles
      Thel Keane, who acts as model, critic and editor of her husband’s work.
      Like her cartoon counterpart, Thel is involved in community affairs,
      parent-school activities and all the things important to a suburban
      family.

      Even though the Keanes live in a sunny climate, the
      cartoonist shows the family living in a typical, Middle-American
      split-level house. He uses snow scenes each winter, drawing from
      memories of his Pennsylvania boyhood.

      Rather than pinpointing any
      part of the country as the place where the family lives, he prefers to
      have readers feel The Family Circus lives right down the street from
      their home.

      The popularity of The Family Circus is found in the
      fact that the cartoon reminds people of all ages about themselves, their
      kids and their parents.

      “If The Family Circus has any social
      value,” Keane says, “it shows parents that their children are normal.
      And if there is a philosophy behind the feature, it’s this: A home
      filled with love and laughter is the happiest place in the world.”

    • Jeff Keane


      Jeff Keane was born in 1958. Two years later, his
      father Bil Keane started chasing him around every day begging that he do
      something funny, so he could incorporate it into his daily comic strip
      “The Family Circus.” As the inspiration for the Jeffy character, Keane
      now works alongside his father on the comic strip.

      Raised in
      Arizona, Keane moved to California to attend college. In 1981, he
      received a Bachelor of Fine Arts in drama from the University of
      Southern California. After graduation, Keane returned to his cartoon
      work.

      In 2007, Keane was nominated President of the National
      Cartoonists Society. Keane lives in California with his wife Melinda and
      their three children. Keane now chases his kids around begging them to
      do something funny, proving that “The Family Circus” really does come
      full circle.


Cheney may have shot that man in the face, but at least he didn’t call him an idiot.




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