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07/15/12
15 07 2012 SUNDAY LESSON 668 FREE ONLINE eNālāndā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY TIPITAKA TIPITAKA AND TWELVE DIVISIONS Brief historical background Sutta Pitaka Vinaya Pitaka Abhidhamma Pitaka Twelve Divisions of Buddhist Canons Nine Divisions of Buddhist Canons Sutta Piṭaka — The basket of discourses —Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta (DN 22) {excerpt} - all infobubbles— Attendance on awareness — Dhammapada Verse 252-Mendakasetthi Vatthu-Easy To See Are The Faults Of Others ALL ABOUT USA Kentucky
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15 07 2012 SUNDAY LESSON 668 FREE ONLINE  eNālāndā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY
TIPITAKA
TIPITAKA   AND   TWELVE   DIVISIONS
    Brief historical background
   Sutta Pitaka
   Vinaya Pitaka
   Abhidhamma Pitaka
     Twelve Divisions of Buddhist Canons
Nine Divisions of Buddhist Canons
Sutta Piṭaka

— The basket of discourses —Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta (DN 22) {excerpt} - all infobubbles— Attendance on awareness —
Dhammapada Verse 252-Mendakasetthi Vatthu-Easy To See Are The Faults Of Others

ALL ABOUT USA
Kentucky

Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta

— Attendance on awareness —
[ mahā+satipaṭṭhāna ]

This sutta is widely considered as a the main reference for meditation practice.




Note: infobubbles on all Pali words


Pāḷi



Uddesa

I. Kāyānupassanā


   A. Ānāpāna Pabba
   B. Iriyāpatha Pabba
   C. Sampajāna Pabba
   D. Paṭikūlamanasikāra Pabba
   E. Dhātumanasikāra Pabba
   F. Navasivathika Pabba

II. Vedanānupassanā



English



Introduction

I. Observation of Kāya


   A. Section on ānāpāna
   B. Section on postures
   C. Section on sampajañña
   D. Section on repulsiveness
   E. Section on the Elements
   F. Section on the nine charnel grounds

II. Observation of Vedanā


Uddesa


Evaṃ me sutaṃ:

Introduction

Katame cattāro? Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī viharati ātāpī sampajāno satimā, vineyya loke abhijjhā-domanassaṃ. Vedanāsu vedanānupassī viharati ātāpī sampajāno satimā, vineyya loke abhijjhā-domanassaṃ. Citte cittānupassī viharati ātāpī sampajāno satimā, vineyya loke abhijjhā-domanassaṃ. Dhammesu dhammānupassī viharati ātāpī sampajāno satimā, vineyya loke abhijjhā-domanassaṃ.


Which four? Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya, ātāpī sampajāno, satimā, having given up abhijjhā-domanassa towards the world. He dwells observing vedanā in vedanā, ātāpī sampajāno, satimā, having given up abhijjhā-domanassa towards the world. He dwells observing citta in citta, ātāpī sampajāno, satimā, having given up abhijjhā-domanassa towards the world. He dwells observing dhamma·s in dhamma·s, ātāpī sampajāno, satimā, having given up abhijjhā-domanassa towards the world.

எந்த நான்கு?இங்கு பிக்குக்களுக்களா,ஒரு பிக்கு kāye kāyānupassī (உடலை உடல் கண்காணிப்புடன்) கவனித்து வசிக்கிரார் ātāpī sampajāno satimā,வேறு வழியில்லாமல்   பிரபஞ்சம் நோக்கி எச்சரிக்கையுடன் இருக்க ஏகாந்தமாயிருக்கிரார்.வேறு வழியில்லாமல்   பிரபஞ்சம் நோக்கி எச்சரிக்கையுடன் இருக்க ஏகாந்தமாயிருக்க  Vedanāsu vedanānupassī உறுதலுணர்ச்சி கண்காணிப்புடன் வசிக்கிரார்.வேறு வழியில்லாமல்   பிரபஞ்சம் நோக்கி எச்சரிக்கையுடன் இருக்க ஏகாந்தமாயிருக Citte cittānupassī viharati ātāpī sampajāno satimā, சித்த நலம் கருதி ண்காணிப்புடன் வசிக்கிரார். மனத்தால் இயக்கப்படுகிற அபூர்வமான வினயா(ஒழுக்கம்) காக்க வேறு வழியில்லாமல்   பிரபஞ்சம் நோக்கி எச்சரிக்கையுடன் இருக்க ஏகாந்தமாயிருக்க கண்காணிப்புடன் வசிக்கிரார்.

Watch:
http://records.photodharma.net/photos/sandamuni-pagoda-mandalay

Sandamuni Pagoda, Mandalay

Tipitaka had been carved on marble slabs at the Kuthodaw Pagoda. Right
next door at the Sandamuni Pagoda, there are slabs which contain not
just the Tipitaka, but the commentaries and sub-commentaries as well.
How it is that the former is classed as the World’s Largest Book and not
the one at the Sandamuni Pagoda is a mystery.
Overhead View of the Kuthodaw and Sandamuni Pagodas
Overhead View of the Kuthodaw and Sandamuni Pagodas

The history of the Pagoda is written up in stone in the compound and
here is a transcript (slightly corrected for spelling and diction):

Nanmyaebonthar Sannandawya Sandamuni Pagoda

1. On the full moon day of Nayon in M.E. 1229 [C.E. 1867] King Mindon
dismantled the temporary palace called Nanmyaebonthar and built a 100ft
pagoda in its place.

King Badon, the grandfather of King Mindon had a Buddhist statue cast
at Mingun. That image was made of 11,368 viss of iron and was entitled
“Sandamuni”, which means the image is graceful like the full moon.

It was moved from Amarapura and enshrined in the present [Sandamuni]
Pagoda. That’s why it is entitled Nanmyaebonthar Sannandawya Sandamuni
Pagoda meaning the pagoda as graceful as a fullmoon in the place of the
Nanmyaebonthar Palace.

2. In M.E. 1275 [C.E. 1913], in the compound of Sandamuni Pagoda,
Venerable Hermit U Khanti managed to inscribe Sutta, Vinaya and
Abhidhamma from [the] Tipitaka with [a] complete explanation (Atthakatha
and Tika) on 1772 stone slabs and a historical record was [also]
inscribed on an iron sheet and a stone slab.

3. These stone slabs are:

  • (a) Vinaya Pitaka – 395 slabs
  • (b) Sutta Pitaka – 1207 slabs
  • (c) Abhidhamma Pitaka – 170 slabs

4. In [a] seven acre … compound there are:

  • 248 pagodas housing a single slab each
  • 139 pagodas housing three slabs each
  • 72 eight-unit pagodas housing three slabs each,

which altogether contains 891 slabs, and

297 four-pillared pagodas housing three slabs each which contain 891 slabs.

All these pagodas are made of brick and called Dhammazedis. These pagodas contain records of [the] Buddha’s teachings.

Atthakatha Slabs

Atthakatha Slabs

Atthakatha Slabs

Atthakatha Slabs

Atthakatha Slab

Atthakatha Slab

Atthakatha Chedis

Atthakatha Chedis

Atthakatha Chedis

Atthakatha Chedis

Atthakatha Chedis

Atthakatha Chedis

One thing that needs to be mentioned is that both the pagodas are
littered throughout, and there seems to be no proper maintenance
programme, and it struck me that maybe it is felt that, whereas there is
great merit in building these places, there is no merit in keeping them
clean.

But it is really striking to see such wonderful works as those at the
Kuthodaw and Sandamuni Pagodas, which hold the most sacred scriptures
of the tradition standing in a pile of rubbish, along with ciggie-buts,
betel-spit and all the rest of it. When walking around the small pagodas
one has to tread gingerly, because it’s not clear what one might be
putting one’s foot down on.

Surely it cannot be beyond the wit of the authorities of the
respective temples to see that a proper cleaning programme would not
only pay respect to the Dhamma, but would also go to find employment for
those who might be otherwise unemployed, or under-employed.



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hqA7hHpIUFI&feature=plcp

Two Suns in the sunset / ORIGINAL AUG 23 2010 UK

Verse 252. Easy To See Are The Faults Of Others

Other’s faults are easy to see
yet hard it is to see one’s own,
and so one winnows just like chaff
the faults of other people, while
hiding away those of one’s own
as crafty cheat the losing throw.

Explanation: The faults of others are clearly observed. But
one’s own faults are difficult to see. A person winnows the fault
of others into prominence, like chaff. He hides his own like the bird-hunter
who conceals himself with leaves and twigs.



Dhammapada Verse 252
Mendakasetthi Vatthu

Sudassam vajjamannesam
attano pana duddsam
paresam hi so vajjani
opunati yatha bhusam
attano pana chadeti
kalimva kitava satho.
1

Verse 252: It is easy to see the faults of others, but difficult to see one’s
own. A man broadcasts the fault; of others like winnowing chaff in the wind, but
hides his own faults as a crafty fowler covers himself.


1. Satho: a cheat, a gambler. According to the Commentary, it means a crafty
fowler.


The Story of Mendaka the Rich Man

While residing near the town of Baddiya, the Buddha uttered Verse (252) of
this book with reference to the renowned rich man Mendaka and his family.

Once, during his tour of Anga and Uttara regions, the Buddha saw in his
vision that time was ripe for Mendaka, his wife, his son, his daughter-in-law,
his granddaughter and his servant, to attain Sotapatti Fruition. Seeing the
prospect of these six people attaining Sotapatti Fruition, the Buddha went to
the town of Baddiya.

Mendaka was an extremely rich man. It was said that he found a large number
of life-size golden statues of goats in his backyard. For this reason, he was
known as Mendaka (a goat) the rich man. Again, it was also said that during the
time of Vipassi Buddha he had donated a monastery for Vipassi Buddha and a
congregation hall complete with a platform for the preacher. On completion of
these buildings he made offerings of alms-food to Vipassi Buddha and the
bhikkhus for four months. Then, in yet another of his past existences, when he
was a rich man in Baranasi, there was a famine throughout the region. One day,
they had cooked a meal just enough for the members of the family when a
paccekabuddha stood at the door for alms-food. Then and there he offered all the
food. But due to his great faith and generosity, the rice pot was later found to
be miraculously filled up again; so also were his granaries.

Mendaka and his family, hearing that the Buddha was coming to Baddiya, went
to pay homage to him. After hearing the discourse given by the Buddha, Mendaka,
his wife Candapaduma, his son Danancaya, his daughter-in-law Sumanadevi, his
granddaughter Visakha and the servant Punna attained Sotapatti Fruition. Mendaka
then told the Buddha how on his way, some ascetics had spoken ill of the Buddha
and had tried to dissuade him from coming to see him. The Buddha then said, “My
disciple, it is natural for people not to see one’s own faults, and to
exaggerate other people’s faults and failings.”

Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:

Verse 252: It is easy to see the faults of others, but
difficult to see one’s own. A man broadcasts the fault; of others like
winnowing chaff in the wind, but hides his own faults as a crafty
fowler covers himself.
ALL ABOUT USA
Kentucky
    •    Furnace Mountain, Stanton
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Furnace_Mountain


Furnace Mountain
Furnace Mountain tea house.jpg
The Tea House at
Furnace Mountain. For group retreats the Tea House has sleeping
quarters, showers and bathrooms, a kitchen and eating tables.
Information
Denomination Zen Buddhism
Founded 1986
Founder(s) Dae Gak Soen Sa Nim
Seung Sahn

Soen Sa Nim
Abbot(s) Dae Gak
Address P.O. Box 545, Clay City, Kentucky 40312
Country United States
Website http://www.furnacemountain.org/fm.html

Dharma Wheel.svg Portal:Buddhism

Furnace Mountain (temple name Kwan Se Um San Ji Sah) is an American Zen Buddhist retreat center in Clay City, Kentucky, co-founded in 1986 by Seung Sahn Soen Sa Nim and Dae Gak Soen Sa Nim as part of the international Kwan Um School of Zen;
it is now unaffiliated with the school in an official capacity. In 1990
the main Meditation Hall was completed, and in 1994 the temple was
constructed and opened. Kwan Se Um San Ji Sah is modeled after a
traditional Korean Buddhist Temple—located on 850 acres (263 ha) of woods in part of The Daniel Boone National Forest (in The Red River Gorge area). It is made of timber from the surrounding area (particularly Douglas fir siding and wood flooring). The exact site of Kwan Se Um San Ji Sah was determined by the use of geomantic divination, which was intended to help foster harmony. The Abbott and guiding teacher is Dae Gak Zen Master., 106[1][2][3]









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