Discovery of Metteyya the Awakened One with Awareness Universe(FOAINDMAOAU)
From Analytic Insight Net - FREE Online Tipiṭaka Law Research & Practice University in
 116 CLASSICAL LANGUAGES in BUDDHA'S own Words through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.orgat 668, 5A main Road, 8th Cross, HAL 3rd Stage, Punya Bhumi Bengaluru- Magadhi Karnataka State -PRABUDDHA BHARAT
Categories:

Archives:
Meta:
06/19/20
3 RAJADHAMMA CONFRONTS LEVIATHAN
Filed under: General, Vinaya Pitaka, Sutta Pitaka, Abhidhamma Pitaka, Tipiṭaka
Posted by: site admin @ 6:23 pm

3

RAJADHAMMA CONFRONTS
LEVIATHAN

Burmese political theory
in the 1870s
1

Andrew Huxley

In 1885 Upper Burma was invaded and its political and legal institutions
destroyed. What possibilities thereby became lost to the world? The Indian
civil servant who had lobbied most intensely for the invasion of Mandalay
came to regret what he had done:
It was a pity they would have learnt in
time.
2 If Burma had avoided being annexed to British India, what might it
have become? Thailand
s recent history offers some kind of clue. The consti-
tutional monarch of Thailand has made himself astonishingly popular over
the last sixty years. If Britain had chosen to rule Burma through a client king,
then a newly independent Burma in 1948 would have inherited at least one
of its traditional political institutions. In this alternative universe, might
Burma
s political and legal institutions of the 1870s have embraced demo-
cratic and rule-of-law virtues by the 1970s? What might Burmese modernism
have looked like, under a less destructive form of British imperialism?
Although such hypothetical questions don
t lead to any determinate answer,
we can only evaluate Burmese legal and political theory by imagining
an answer.

Few would dispute the centrality of law to Burmese culture. This is evi-
denced by Burma
s having: (1) a voluminous legal literature, the three
best-known genres of which were
dhammathat, rajathat and pyatton; (2) a
homegrown legal profession (the
shene); and (3) a home-grown legal history
(the
dhammathat book-lists). Burmas political theory is less visible. Some-
times it is found in the
dhammathats, mixed with rules on divorce and agri-
cultural credit. Sometimes a whole text is devoted to it. One such political
genre is the Royal Order, wherein the king can give his own account of how
politics works. Others are the
myittasa and rajovada genres, in which monks
and ex-monks expound
dhamma to the king. It was in the 1870s that
Burmese thinkers
first broke out of these genres.

My chapter focuses on the first Burmese account of politics to appear in
print, and on the
first to be written as the policy statement of a coup d’état.
Hence the reference in my title to the 1870s.
Leviathan is the epithet J. S.
Furnivall gave to the Anglo-Burmese colonial state (Furnivall 1939).
Rajad-
hamma
denotes that part of the Pali Buddhist tradition dealing with the
ethics and practice of kingship.
Dhamma covers a spectrum of meanings
from
lawto necessary conditionsto things as they should be, but raja can
only mean one thing. For the rest of this chapter I shall translate
rajad-
hamma
as king-law. In the 1870s, my title suggests, Burmese political theor-
ists had to tweak the tradition of king-law so as to better confront political
theory and practice in British Burma.

I look at two Burmese politicians, one in British Burma, faithfully serving
Victoria, Empress of India, and one in Mandalay, faithfully serving King
Mindon of Mandalay (1853
78). U Kyaw Htun, from Arakan, got his first
job with the British a year before the Second Anglo-Burmese War. He joined
the British troops on their way to invade Rangoon, and was never to return
home. His
Essay on the Sources and Origins of Buddhist Law won the Judicial
Commissioner
s Prize in early 1876 and was published in 1877.3 Its contents
include a short analysis of Burmese political theory. U Hpo Hlaing
s Rajad-
hammasangaha
(written in 1879) is a work of political theory addressed to a
monarch on his taking the throne.
4 Its title can be translated as Com-
pendium of King-Law
. Kyaw Htun and Hpo Hlaing were political activists
as well as political theorists. For the three months that his coup lasted, Hpo
Hlaing was the most powerful man in Upper Burma. A few years earlier,
Kyaw Htun had very nearly become the most powerful Burmese in Lower
Burma, but was suddenly disgraced and sacked. The lives of political theor-
ists illuminate their work. What Cicero did as a member of the triumvirate
helps us understand his
De re publica. That Hobbes tutored the Stuart pre-
tender in France helps us understand his
Leviathan. Kyaw Htun and Hpo
Hlaing led lives as dangerous, and lived in times as interesting, as Cicero and
Hobbes. Though my focus is on their work, I shall have to say a good deal
about their lives.

King-law, the Pali Buddhist political tradition, was well over two thousand
years old by the time Kyaw Htun and Hpo Hlaing wrote about it. I haven
t
the space to give a comprehensive history of its development,
5 but I need to
describe three of the salient characteristics this body of knowledge had
acquired in Burma by the 1870s. First, how it distinguished data from theory.
Second, how it used lists and combinations of lists to preserve its theory. (We
Europeans are so unfamiliar with organising knowledge this way that I must
o
ffer a tutorial in listology, illustrated by several examples.) Third, the who
whom?
issues: who taught this discipline to which students under what condi-
tions? What was its seat-in-life, its sociology of knowledge? I deal with these
points in the rest of my introduction. I then devote a section each to Kyaw
Htun and Hpo Hlaing, before drawing some conclusions.

How does king-law distinguish between data and theory? I had better
de
fine my terms. By data, I mean the history of everything that has hap-
pened in the world. By
theory, I mean suggestions as to how the data may
be shaped and structured, so as to inspire answers to current problems. The
canonical data-bank is largely made up of the collection of 547
Ja ̄taka,
many of which tell stories about kings, queens, ministers, usurpers, and
princes. We normally think of the
Ja ̄takas as narratives, but they are more
than that: they are exemplary narratives or, as lawyers put it, precedents. A
monk or courtier, let us say, has to advise a king who plans such grandiose
acts of merit that the country will be bankrupted.
Dont be like Vessantara
in
Ja ̄taka No. 547the king will be told: When Vessantara gave more away
than his people could stand, they threw him out.
This is no different from
how European politicians use history:
Dont be like Charles I in the 1630s.
When Charles I took more tax from his people than they could stand, they
threw him out.
The Burmese chronicles draw no line between the kings and
queens described in the
Ja ̄taka, and the kings and queens who actually
ruled Burmese cities. They belonged, after all, to one super-dynasty: o
ff-
spring of Maha
̄sammata, the original and the exemplary king of this cycle
of ages. Maha
̄sammatas history is told in the Aggañña sutta (Sermon
on Origins), one of the two great allegories on the rise and fall of the state
which are prominent within the king-law data-bank. Theory, the shaping
mechanism, consists of the various
king-lawlists with which this chapter is
concerned. Such a list is designed to be memorised verbatim in Pali.
6 Pali
grammar and morphology allow complex ideas to be expressed in a couple
of words. Here, by way of example, is the
4 solidarities list as generations of
Buddhist students have committed it to memory:
assamedham purisamedham
/ samma
̄pa ̄sam vajapeyyam // We shall see later that a great deal of information
is packed within these words.

A political theory that relied on a single king-law list would be like a
cookbook that contained only
fish recipes: we know were going to need
other cookbooks. The
4 solidarities solve some political problems, but there
are others on the menu. Each list specialises in a di
fferent range of problems,
and my particular ambition in this chapter is to translate these ranges into
the political terminology (
rule of law, bureaucratisation, fiscal accountability,
etc.) that my morning paper uses. Burmese political theorists expressed their
individuality in choosing which lists to emphasise, just as these days our
political theorists choose which topics they will cover: John Rawls said a lot
about how politics should handle risk, but little about subsidiarity.
7 Pope
John Paul II said a lot about subsidiarity, but little about risk. Each time a
political theorist picks some lists and arranges them into a bouquet, she
makes a statement about which problems are most important to her. Before I
analyse the statements that Kyaw Htun and Hpo Hlaing made, I must o
ffer a
tutorial in the mathematics of the bouquet of lists, or
list-of-lists, as I shall
henceforth call it.

Buddhists combine lists in different ways. In his work on the Abhid-
hamma, Rupert Gethin (1992) describes matrix-like combinations where a
row of 3 combines with a rank of 7 to generate 21 new possibilities. King-law
uses a simpler arithmetic. The most common combinatorial device is the list-
of-lists, which is based on addition. Imagine I
m a Burmese monk. Tomor-
row a 10-year-old boy will join the monastery for the
first time, and I have to
deliver a sermon at his
shin-pyu ceremony. To generate my sermon, I shall
choose three relevant lists (but ones that have never been put together in this
particular way before). As a list-of-lists, my sermon could be presented in
this form:

1
2
3

12 kinds of children
4 noble truths
4 o
ffences of defeat
3 lists of 20 items
checksum

If I ever published my sermon, I could title it the 20 things a novice should
be told at their shin-pyu ceremony
, following the useful naming convention of
what I call the
checksum(the total of items contained in all the lists). Now
let
s turn to some canonical and post-canonical examples, starting with two
that Gethin has discussed. At A.i.295
7 the middle way is defined as:

  1. 1  4 applications of mindfulness

  2. 2  4 right endeavours

  3. 3  4 bases of success

  4. 4  5 faculties

  5. 5  5 powers

  6. 6  7 awakening factors

    6 lists of 29 items checksum

    Checksum 29 has its own set of numerical associations. In the science of

lists, these are what give 29 its own personality. There are approximately 29
days in the moon
s cycle, so 29 is appropriate for those occasions which stress
the calendrical or the lunar. The next personality number, 37, has spatial
connotations.
8 To convert the 29 definitions of the middle way into a check-
sum of 37, the list-combiners needed to add any list of eight. They chose the
Noble Eightfold Path. Gethin rates the resulting 37 Elements of Enlighten-
ment
as one of the most important Pali list-of-lists (Gethin 1992: 156). This
process need never stop. The
Golden Pali Text is Burmas earliest Pali docu-
ment, and the earliest Pali text to have survived from anywhere in the world.
It incorporates the
37 Elements of Enlightenment into 7 lists of 88 items
checksum. Im not sure what personality was attributed to the number 88 by
the king and queen who dedicated this o
ffering. It must have meant some-
thing, because after it was discovered at the last minute that two items had

been omitted from the 14 kinds of knowledge possessed by the Buddha, the
two items were written in abbreviated form on the rim of the silver reliquary.
Janice Stargardt comments that
These defects were made good . . . The
ritual completeness of the deposit was thus assured
(Stargardt 1995: 2078).
I
ll give a final example from nineteenth-century Siam to show the list-of-
lists operating in a king-law context; a work called
24 Forms of Princely
Knowledge
(Gray 1886: 40). Its title derived from its checksum:

1
2
3
4

Third, and briefly, I turn to the seat-in-life issues. Who taught king-law to
whom in what educational institutions? Occasionally, a
Ja ̄taka hints at how
princes were educated. There is mention of an
atthadhammanusakamacco
(an officer who advises the king on dhamma and artha) (Gokhale 1966: 18,
citing J ii 30). Elsewhere there
s a list of five disciplines, which could be the
syllabus he taught from:
artha (knowledge of the conditions and causal rela-
tions),
dharma (norms, standards of behaviour), matra (due measure in pun-
ishment and taxation),
kala (knowledge of the daily timetable of a king) and
parisad (how to treat the various classes of society).9 As to Burma, heres a
description of the syllabus of princely education in the fourteenth century,
from a work written in 1780:

After he had received the lordship of Pyinsei, Mingaung sought an
education like that of other princes, in elephant and horse manage-
ment, in handling a shield, in the use of bows and spears, and some
instruction in the chronicles of the country and the customs and
precedents in use in it, and their distinctions.

(Bagshawe 1981: 51)

Prince Charles, heir apparent to the Windsor dynasty, received a not dis-
similar education. Charles has learned to hunt on horseback. He spent a year
at school in the Australian outback at the age of 16, so he can probably
manage a kangaroo, if not an elephant. For
bows and spears, substitute five
years in the navy, latterly in command of his own ship. And for the academic
stage (
the chronicles of the country and its customs and precedents), compare
Charles
s bespoke degree course at Trinity, Cambridge, in British history,
constitutional law, archaeology and anthropology. Imagine a Burmese tutor
taking a bunch of princes through the
Ja ̄taka and the king-law lists. Imagine

4 crafts
5 arts
8 merits
7 means of action
4 lists of 24 items
checksum

I
Hlaing.

shall apply this kind of listological analysis to Kyaw Htun and Hpo

him writing up some of his better lectures for publication. Imagine some
of these texts spreading through Burma
s manuscript tradition. Such is the
seat-in-life of the
rajovada and myittasa genres.

Kyaw Htun of Lower Burma

Kyaw Htun entered the British records on 18 December 1851 (under the
name
Moung Kyaw Doon) when he was appointed a clerk in the Akyab
o
ffice of Arthur Phayre, the Commissioner of Arakan. I know only two
things about his life before 1851: that his parents were
lineal descendants of
the ancient Arakanese Royal Family
,10 and that he acquired perfect copper-
plate handwriting for both Burmese and English. I infer that he spent some
years at an English-run school (perhaps a mission school) in Akyab. I don
t
know his age, but I
ll assume that he was about 17 when he started work
for the British commissioner, meaning that he was born around 1834. When
the Second Anglo-Burmese War started, the British troop-ships, provision-
ing in Akyab, were on the lookout for trustworthy interpreters. Phayre
recommended Kyaw Htun, who had been in his o
ffice a year, to Lt Col.
Anstruther:

I know his family, also that they are respectable. He has learnt English,
and I think you will
find him useful as a Burmese interpreter. I think
Rs. 35 would be a fair amount of wages for him.
11

He enlisted on 18 December 1852 under General Steele as a guide and inter-
preter to the British forces
, and fought at Martaban and Beeling. After the
war was won, Kyaw Htun moved back from the army to the Civil Service. He
became clerk to J. S. Baird, the Assistant Commissioner of Prome, and spent
the next decade at Prome, working his way up from Burmese writer, to assist-
ant clerk, to treasurer, to record keeper. In September 1866, he was promoted
to Extra Assistant Commissioner (EAC), 1st class, 1st grade (earning Rs.400
per month) and moved from Prome to Danubyu,
12 the fortified river port
upstream from Rangoon. He was to spend the next seven years as EAC of
Danubyu. Subject only to sporadic supervision by his British superiors, his
word in Danubyu, and for twenty miles up and down the river, was law. The
Reverend John Marks
13 records how Kyaw Htun helped out in a crisis. The
premises Marks had bought at Henzada for his mission school were
flooded
overnight by a rise in the river.

While waiting anxiously, and thinking what we should do, my friend
Moung Kyaw Doon, the Extra Assistant Commissioner, came along,
and at once solved the problem by putting a very suitable house (his
own property) at our disposal, free of rent, for half a year.

(Marks 1917: 114)

In 1871 and 1872, as Kyaw Htun neared the age of 40, his career prospects
shone bright. Just before Albert Fytche retired as Chief Commissioner, he
had agreed with Colonel Plant to propose promoting Kyaw Htun beyond the
glass ceiling to Assistant Commissioner. Had it happened he would have
been the
first non-European in Burma to reach this level.14 In 1872, the Chief
Commissioner endorsed him to the newly appointed Judicial Commissioner
as
one of the most intelligent native officials in Burma.15 When the Viceroy
of India came to Rangoon that year, Kyaw Htun was singled out to meet
him: the Earl of Mayo awarded him a gold watch and medal. Perhaps it
was a bad omen that the Viceroy was assassinated a few days later in the
Andaman Islands. Within a year of hitting these peaks, Kyaw Htun
s career
came abruptly to an end.

The year 1873 proved to be Kyaw Htuns climacteric. He started the year
well by publishing
Pakinnaka dipani kyam (Explanatory Treatise on Miscel-
laneous Topics
), a book summarising Burmese culture and history, and con-
trasting it with British history and institutions (Kyaw Htun 1873). He is the
first modern Burmese editor of a printed work. Other Burmese publishers
over the previous four years had moved text straight from one manuscript to
one book. Kyaw Htun extracted and compiled the various texts he printed
by
myself
.16 On 19 April 1873, a month before publication, Kyaw Htun received
unexpected visitors
Kinwun Mingyi (one of the senior ministers to the
Peacock throne) and his entourage on their way back to Mandalay from their
embassy to London. Htin Aung summarises Kinwun Mingyi
s diary entry:

At 8pm the steamer stopped at Danubyu to take on firewood.
Maung Kyaw Tun, the township o
fficer, was acquainted with Major
McMahon, who sent him a letter. At 7 pm he arrived and presented
to the Royal secretary a copy of the ms. of a book which was being
printed. The book was a comparative study of English and Burmese
terms and phrases relating to history, law and taxation. He left the
steamer at midnight.

(Htin Aung 1974: 138)

The ambassadors took this copy of Pakinnaka dipani back to Mandalay,
where Hpo Hlaing would have been able to consult it.
17 The British paid little
attention to their prot
gé’s work. The only review of it that I have seen in
English came eleven years after publication.
18

Meanwhile, events in Danubyu were unravelling. Six months after publica-
tion, the Judicial Commissioner (Kyaw Htun
s ultimate boss) announced:

The Judicial staff this year lost Moung Kyaw Doon, an intelligent
and learned judge, but who unfortunately allowed himself to engage
in speculations of trade and to adjudicate upon matters in which it
was considered that he had a pecuniary interest.
19

During the Viceroys visit the previous year, an anonymous petition had been
handed to him alleging dirty deeds in Danubyu. The petition was shunted
leisurely down the system, to lodge with Kyaw Htun
s immediate superior
William DeCourcy Ireland, Deputy Commissioner at Henzada. Ireland
spent the next nine months surreptitiously investigating a
ffairs in Danubyu.
Ireland accused Kyaw Htun of having become a rich man, worth 2
1⁄2 lakhs of
rupees, by skimming o
ff the profits of Danubyus fishing and river trade. He
alleged speci
fic instances of Kyaw Htuns involvement in robbery, sexual
misconduct, and perversion of justice. An investigation by Ireland
s superior,
who admitted to having
a high opinion of [Kyaw Htun]s character,20
acquitted him of the wilder charges, but found him guilty on count two:
Trading, and deciding suits brought on these trading transactions in his own
court in his own favour.
Kyaw Htun escaped jail by submitting his resigna-
tion on 15 November on grounds of ill-health.
21 The archives reveal that
Ireland ran a one-man campaign to destroy Kyaw Htun
s career, but they do
not reveal his motives. Undoubtedly, the disgrace of Kyaw Htun was a sig-
ni
ficant event in British Burma. It taught Burmese onlookers that the British
treated their courtiers just as capriciously as had the Burmese kings. Why
endure the uncertainties of working for the British as EAC, when one could
earn more money, have more independence, and enjoy higher status as a
barrister or doctor?

Strange, then, that so soon after Kyaw Htuns disgrace, his second publica-
tion should be funded by the British government. In 1874, the Judicial
Commissioner announced a prize of Rs.1,000 for the best essay in English
on the sources and history of Buddhist law. In early 1876, he awarded the
prize to Kyaw Htun and arranged for its publication as a twenty-page
pamphlet in 1877. This is Kyaw Htun
s Essay on the Sources and Origins
of Buddhist Law
(hereon his Prize Essay). It is a thoughtful summary of
Burmese tradition, discussing the di
fferent ways in which one might speak of
the sourcesof law. It contains a mixture of lists and stories taken from both
the canon and the
dhammathats. I shall concentrate on what Kyaw Htun tells
us in the
Prize Essay about king-law. He presents a list of king-law lists, with
checksum 28:

The Laws binding on a King or Ruler, numbering twenty-eight in
all, are the [
4 solidarities] (sangahavatthu) . . . the [3 coronations]
(
abhiseka).

(Kyaw Htun 1877: 3)

Kyaw Htun set these lists within his telling of the Maha ̄sammata story, mak-
ing it far more explicitly a social contract than it was in the
Aggañña sutta
(see Huxley 1996: 407; Collins 1996: 42). Kyaw Htuns small print reads:
everyone except Maha
̄sammata must obey the 5 wheel-turning precepts, while
Maha
̄sammata alone must obey the 28 duties incumbent on the king. Mention

of coronations leads Kyaw Htun to continue the Aggañña Sutta story, and by
the time he
finished it, he had lost his thread. He forgot to give the remaining
lists, and left us with a puzzle: How shall we complete the equation 4 + 3 + n
+ p . . . = 28? I
ll propose a solution based on three comparable texts written
earlier in the Konbaung dynasty (1752
1885). The first is a lecture by a
Regius Professor, addressed to foreign royalty while conducting a diplomatic
mission. The lecture was delivered in the
fifteenth century, but this account
of it was written in 1780. The second is a classical poem written in the
1810s in praise of King Badon (1781
1819). The third is King Bagyidaws
(1819
38) appeal, in a Royal Order of 1824, for supernatural aide to dislodge
the British from Rangoon. Let
s look at these three from the list-of-lists
angle.

In 1780, the year before the coup and counter-coup that put Badon on the
throne, Shin Sandalinka wrote his
Maniyadanabon, his edition of the wise
counsels given by the courtier Minyaza to the kings of Ava in the early 1400s.
How far this work can be used as a source for
fifteenth-century Burma is
debatable, but it is certainly a useful source on Konbaung Burma in the
eighteenth century. One passage reproduces an address on king-law that
Minyaza was invited to give before the King of Monland:

1
2
3

O King, who are lord of all your people, if you wish to attain great
honour and reputation in this present life, and if you hope to become
lord of all men in the course of your successive lives in this world,
you must act so as to perfect the rule of religion in your knowledge,
charity, patience, enthusiasm, piety, kindness and fortitude; also you
must act so as ful
fil the ten royal duties of almsgiving, piety, liberal-
ity, uprightness, gentleness, austerity, self-control, mercy, patience,
and consistency; you must also act so as to ful
fil the four ways of
helping other men, almsgiving, wise conduct, kind words and treat-
ing others like oneself. In acting thus you will win much bene
fit in
your present and your future lives.

(Bagshawe 1981: 96)
Schematically, as a list-of-lists, this lecture can be represented as:

7 virtues
10 king-law virtues

4 solidarities

3 lists with 21 items checksum

The Rajadhiraja Vilasini (Manifestation of the King of Kings) is a
panegyric on King Badon written by the 1st Maungdaung
sayadaw in Pali
(with Burmese commentary). The
Uddesa (prcis) summarises chapter two,
which describes Badon
s patronage of the worldin terms of king-law lists:

1
2
3
4

4 solidarities
10 king-law virtues

7 ways not to make things worse
5 wheel-turning precepts
4 lists with 26 items
checksum

1
2
3
4

4 solidarities
10 king-law virtues

3 coronations (implied)
7 ways not to make things worse
4 lists with 24 items
checksum

RAJADHAMMA CONFRONTS LEVIATHAN

He took a constant delight in the observance of hereditary precepts,
such as [the
4 solidarities, the 7 ways not to make things worse and the
10 king-law virtues] and so forth.

(Maung Tin 1914: 16)

The Niddesa (the chapter itself) leaves out the 7 ways not to make things
worse
, describing instead the 5 precepts preached by the Wheel-turning
Emperor in the
Cakkavattis ̄ıhana ̄da Sutta (Discourse on the Lions Roar
of the Wheel-turning King). Mixing together the
Uddesa and Niddesa yields
the following list-of-lists:

My third example comes from Bagyidaws order in 1824. It was addressed
to Burma
s protective spirits and asked for their help in kicking the British
out of Rangoon. King Bagyidaw deserves this help because:

Like the forefathers beginning with Maha ̄sammata . . . the King
observes the
4 ways of a leader, and the 10 rules of a king so as
to ameliorate the lot of the ruled. For the same reason, he had
the
muddha abhiseka coronation just like Ashoka. He made the
appropriate o
fferings to the nats, as directed in the [7 ways not to
make things worse
] rules . . .22

Which yields the following list-of-lists:

Lets return to the problem Kyaw Htun has set us. How would he have
completed his equation 4 + 3 + n + p . . . = 28? Here
s my reconstruction in
italics:

1
2
3
4
5

4 solidarities
3 coronations
4 roads not to take

10 king-law virtues
7 ways not to make things worse
5 lists with 28 items checksum

sassamedha:
purisamedha:
sammapasa:
vacapeyya:

income, expressed as share-of-rice
outgoings, for the government and army
outgoings, for farmers and merchants
respect, to be shown by the rulers to the ruled

ANDREW HUXLEY

All of these lists occur in Richardsons bilingual edition of Manugye dham-
mathat
.23 Kyaw Htun must have regarded his copy of Richardson (with its
Burmese text on the left hand of each spread and its English translation on
the right) as his Rosetta stone. Writing a twenty-page essay in English is a
sharp test of one
s language skills, and Kyaw Htun must have been relieved
to have Richardson
s translations from Burmese into English available.
There are, however, many other king-law lists to be found in
Manugye. I
think that Kyaw Htun chose these particular
five lists as representative of the
Burmese political tradition.

I have offered a reconstruction of Kyaw Htuns list-of-lists based on three
Konbaung texts. I shall use other Konbaung texts to explain the current
interpretation of each of the lists. I start with Kyaw Htun
s account of the 4
solidarities
:

  1. (1.)  Thatha Maida, meaning that he should not receive more than a
    tithe of the produce of the country.

  2. (2.)  Pooreetha Maida, by which he binds himself to pay his servants
    and Army once every six months.

  3. (3.)  Thamapatha, by which he is bound to assist his subjects with
    money, and to receive payment of it three years after, without
    charging interest.

  4. (4.)  Wahtsapayah, or the use of courteous and fitting language;
    according to the age and position in life of the person addressed.
    (Kyaw Htun 1877: 3)

When he wrote this, Kyaw Htun had few predecessors in the Romanisation
of Pali. These days (unless we fussed over diacritics), we would transliterate
his four terms as
Sassamedha, Purisamedha, Samapasa and Vacapeyya. Kyaw
Htun
s Burmese text (whatever in the quote above is not in italics) is a close
translation from the Commentaries [Mp iv 69; Spk i 144]. This Commentar-
ies passage has been translated and discussed in most of the languages of
mainland Southeast Asia. Evidently Southeast Asian Buddhists found it
good-to-think. I suspect that this was because the list implies a balance-sheet
between ruler and ruled:

The ruler is entitled to his tax share of the rice crop. The ruled are entitled
to a redistribution of all this tax, either as wages or as loans. Everything
o
ff-balance-sheet is summed up in the word respect. The ruler should use

sweet language, because the ruled would like to retain some, at least, of their
dignity. But why the two di
fferent categories of outgoings?

Purisamedha is the rulers wage bill. It is the budget through which he pays
his bureaucrats and soldiers. In Burmese terms, these soldiers are
ahmudan
(the higher-status villagers on the irrigation systems nearest the capital city,
who were expected to form themselves into army units during the campaign-
ing season, and could muster for self-defence at fairly short notice at other
times of year). They are under a separate bureaucracy to the
athi (the free
non-servicemen who lived in villages beyond the nuclear zone, sometimes in
villages that lacked an irrigation system). King Badon gives us a glimpse of
how the
ahmudan finances were organised. Soon after his accession, he
ordered:

King Alaung-hpaya, following the [4 solidarities], made loans from
the Royal Treasury to certain Saw-bwas, Myo-zas, Thagyis, Kalans
and to other o
fficials and commoners. Some part of the principal
amounts of these loans is still outstanding . . . There are also moneys
that remain to be collected, from the time of my brother Sin-gu-min,
from various Princes, Ministers and commoners, arising out of
criminal suits brought, according to their
kamma, against various
Princes, Ministers and commoners.
24

When the king advances money to a military commander or local ruler
under his
purisamedha budget, the recipient was under an obligation to
account. In other words, he faced criminal charges
according to his kamma
if the money was spent otherwise than as the king intended. The sammapasa
section of the balance-sheet describes the king as merchant banker, and as
bank of agricultural credit. Wet rice cultivation requires money or credit up
front. Just to get started each year, you need to invest in compost, seed rice,
and a week
s hire of labour and heavy equipment. But if your crop failed last
year, your credit is no good this year. The 1750s edition of
Manugye dham-
mathat
, associated with Alaungpaya, founder of the Konbaung dynasty,
says that:

If a person has incurred debts beyond his means of paying, and his
family are unable to assist him . . . he shall make a petition to the
king, who will say
On conditions, give him an advance . . . In three
years the king may take back the advances. This he may do in
accordance with the [
4 solidarities].

It is in this role as lender of last resort that the Burmese king won the
hearts of his
athi population. But Badon talks as if there were a means
test:

Kings observe the [4 solidarities], of which sammapasa means that
loans are advanced to the poor for three years without taking inter-
est on them. As for loans made by other people, they might take
interest on them as it is already a recognised usage.

Which I read as meaning Thats just poor people I help, you understand. I can
charge normal rates to my middle class subjects
. E Maung argues that
language like this is the language of entitlement. The Burmese jurists had
moved from
moral exhortations to legal obligations binding on the ruler
(Maung 1951: 6). The Konbaung dynasty, in E Maungs view, had developed
this particular king-law list into constitutional law. His view is plausible: the
idea of a balance-sheet between ruler and ruled does suggest an entitlement
on each of the parties doing business together. From the balance-sheet it is a
short step to thinking that the ruler and the ruled owe correlative rights and
duties to each other under a social contract. However, I haven
t yet found a
Burmese text that stresses correlativity as strongly as did the early modern
European theorists.

Kyaw Htuns second list is the 3 coronations, which he works into his
account of Maha
̄sammata. Once the Great Elect had accepted the invitation
to rule over them:

the people poured on him the three kinds of Beet-theik, viz:- (1.)
Yazza Beet-theik consecrating him King. (2.) Manda Beet-theik
marrying him to a Queen. (3.) Thenga Beet-theik, confirmation or
renewal of his engagement to abide by all the laws . . .

(Kyaw Htun 1877: 3)

It is the third item (a Burmanisation of the Pali phrase meaning solidarity
anointment
) that connects the coronation ceremony with constitutional law.
Ryuji Okudaira, in his study of the nineteenth-century Burmese sources on
coronations, sees the ceremony as something like a referendum: the king asks
the people to endorse the fact that he rules according to the ten royal virtues
and the four solidarities (Okudaira 1994: 7, 9). Coronation European-style is
an on-o
ff validity switch at the start of a monarchs reign. But Burmese
kings are encouraged to
renew their vowsmid-reign, which gives a hitherto
bad king the chance to turn over a new leaf. By choosing to undergo the
sangaha abhiseka, a king could relaunch his career by declaring, in effect,
Now that my throne is secure thanks to my adhammic acts against potential
rivals, I choose henceforth to rule according to dhamma
. The form in which he
declared this was an oath to the people
s representatives to rule according to
dhamma. As Badon explained, Coronation means a promise on the part of
the king to rule with benevolence and justice . . . placing a curse on him if he
fails to do so.
27 Mindon underwent such a coronation in 1874, twenty-two
years after becoming king.

A king thus constrained by his oath is, in European terminology, a prin-
ceps legibus non solutus
(Prince not freed from obedience to the laws). This
terminology goes back to Ulpian (the
first European lawyer to have clearly
distinguished between public and private law) as cited in D.1.3.31.
29 It is one
of the oldest themes to survive in contemporary western discourse on polit-
ics and public law. It is, to use a single word derived from Ulpian
s Latin, the
absolutism theme.30 Some European political theorists Robert Filmer,
Joseph de Maistre
explain that absolutism is the most rational political
structure we can adopt, given the way the world really is. There were
no Filmers or de Maistres in Burma under the
first nine Konbaung kings.
Until King Mindon (1852
78) no-one argued that kings need the freedom to
act adhammically (that is, to transgress or revoke any of the traditional
understandings of the king-law lists). In Part two I shall describe how
Mindon systematically dismantled the
4 solidarities section of the Burmese
constitutional settlement.

At this point in his exposition, Kyaw Htun gets diverted. In my reconstruc-
tion, the next list is the
4 roads not to take (partiality, hate, illusion and fear).
In the canon these are presented as part of the causal chain that leads to
su
ffering [D.iii.182]. It is Ja ̄taka No. 22 that firmly links the list with gov-
ernment. The Buddha-to-be, born as the leader of a pack of wild cemetery
dogs, and unjustly accused of criminal damage, exhorts a king that partiality,
hate, illusion and fear are the four ways to misjudge a case. These
4 roads not
to take
itemise aspects of the kings duty, when acting as a judge, to act fairly.
In Europe we think of
due process and fair procedure as judicial values. The
4 roads not to take cover much the same ethical territory.

Next come the 10 king-law virtues (generosity, morality, liberality, honesty,
mildness, religious practice, non-anger, non-violence, patience and non-
o
ffensiveness), first mentioned in the canonical Ja ̄taka verses [J.iii.274].
This list seems too much concerned with personal morality to be part of
political theory as we understand the term. But the Burmese aren
t embar-
rassed to admit ethics into constitutional law. This list reminds us that a
Buddhist king is duty-bound to be a good king. How, then, could a tutor to
the royal princes bring this list alive? I suspect that it was by linking each of
the ten virtues to episodes in the
10 last Ja ̄taka (No. 538547 of the Pali
recension). The Burmese princes, I surmise, were taught ten di
fferent ways to
be good, illustrated to them by precedents from the Stories of the Buddha
s
Former Births. The
10 virtues allow some rudimentary analysis and com-
parison of the precedents, along the lines of
In this episode the king displayed
great respect for morality, but very little for non-violence
. My aim in this
article (to understand Burmese politics in European terms) becomes impos-
sible with the
10 virtues. I know nothing in the European tradition that
speci
fies the particular virtues that each monarch should display. The 10-
year-old princess, later to become Queen Victoria, declared simply and
generically:
I will be good.31

Finally, the 7 ways not to make things worse,32 which appears at the begin-
ning of the
Great Discourse of the Final Nirvana [D.ii.75]. The special 1781
edition of
Manugye, written in connection with Badons accession to the
throne, translates the Pali into Burmese thus:

The king should: [1] Hold meetings and consult with his royal coun-
sellors three times a day, [2] Tackle a
ffairs with the application of
consistent rules, [3] Only collect taxes and impose punishments
which tradition allows, [4] Respect and cherish the elderly, [5] Govern
his subjects paternalistically, without oppression, [6] Make the usual
o
fferings to the Nats who watch over the capital city and the rest of
the kingdom, (7) Provide for the monastic community.

(Okudaira and Huxley 2001: 252)

The Konbaung authors treated items [1] and [2] as determinative of
the list
s character. They invoked it in relation to good governance,
e
fficient decision-making and better bureaucracy. In 1786 King Badon
proclaimed:

It is right that the affairs of the Kingdom should not evade the [Law
of
not making things worse] . . . In accordance with the [7 ways not to
make things worse
], which rules the actions of Kings, and in accord-
ance with ancient custom, those Ministers and o
fficers who attend
. . . the law courts will go to their proper place [therein] . . . at the
first
hour of the day and they will deal with whatever matters need to be
dealt with for the true administration of the law . . . The Ministers
. . . and petitioning lawyers will all take their places at a moderate
distance from the Heir and make their reports upon whatever needs
to be reported, about crime, about the a
ffairs of the country in
general and about the Religion.

This seems to be what Tim Murphy, in the English context, calls adjudica-
tion as the mode of government
(Murphy 1991: 194). Part of this lists
meaning is to reinforce a preference for presenting policy issues in the guise
of legal issues. And part of it (since king-law is a subset of ethics) implies a
counsel of perfection: kings should keep on searching for ever more e
fficient
ways to govern.

At worst Ive given my own summary of Konbaung political theory as it
was about 1870. At best I
ve reconstructed Kyaw Htuns summing up of
it. I
ll end this first part by summarising my comparisons with European
political theory in tabular form:

Table 1 Konbaung political theory as Kyaw Htun saw it, with English equivalents

4 solidarities
3 coronations
4 roads not to take

10 king-law virtues
7 ways not to make things worse

balance-sheet between ruler and ruled
absolutism unacceptable
due process; fair procedure
[no equivalent]

rule of law

Hpo Hlaing of Upper Burma

Hpo Hlaing was born in 1830 to a family that had served the Konbaung kings as staff officers for more than fifty years. His father, Yindaw Wungyi, had a reputation as a scholar and as a friend to the Europeans in the Burmese capital. However, Yindaw Wungyi was murdered by King Tharrawaddy (183846) in 1845. The details are disputed: either he had been complicit in a plot against the king, or he was an innocent victim of one of the kings periodic insane rages. Hpo Hlaing advanced socially after his fathers death: he was adopted by two of Tharrawaddys sons, Mindon and Kanaung, and thenceforward received a princes education. He attended the leading teaching monasteries of the
capital as a novice, and then as a monk. By December 1852, the loss of
the Second Anglo-Burmese War had made King Pagan (1846
52) unpopular:

Mindon and Kanaung were talked of as replacements. Pagan sent men to arrest his brothers, but they escaped to raise a revolt. He also tried to arrest Hpo Hlaing but, so the story goes, the troops who went to his monastic cell missed him, because he was up all night reciting the Pattha ̄na in the ordination hall. That homage to the Abhidhamma was his last act as a monk: at dawn, he
put on lay clothes and made his way to join Mindon and Kanaung. Because he
gave the crucial advice that secured their victory, for the next twenty-seven
years, as long as King Mindon ruled, Hpo Hlaing was a protected person. For
most of that time, he served the king as minister, but occasionally he was too
blunt in his criticisms and had to go into exile for a year or two. In 1871, he was
exiled for maintaining that the consumption of beer in moderate quantities did
not breach the precepts. In 1873, there was a more serious row, when he criti-
cised the king to his face for giving favours to those o
fficials who pandered
their daughters to him. Mindon snatched down from the wall the very spear
with which his father had killed Hpo Hlaing
s father:

King Mindon:
Hpo Hlaing:

Who was executed with this spear?
My father the Yindaw Wungyi was executed with that

spear, your Majesty.
Do you also want to be executed by the same spear?

King Mindon:
Hpo Hlaing (projecting his chest towards the king): Please execute me, your Majesty.

An adopted son criticises his fathers predatory sexual appetites: perhaps this
is as much to do with the Oedipus complex as with the good government
agenda. At any rate, Mindon backed down and left the room. When the
other courtiers remonstrated with Hpo Hlaing, he replied:

If he had struck me with that spear and I were killed, that would
have been worthwhile. If kings are to order what they feel like at any
point, the country will be lost because of the ill deeds that will be
done. If I leave that behind me as my reputation, my death will be of
little bene
fit. It is right to be afraid of that kind of foul smell sticking
in the noses of all the peoples … Have your say … That is what
ministers are for.

In 1879, Hpo Hlaing showed that he was prepared to risk his life in order to
prevent the country being lost.

When King Mindon died, Hpo Hlaing was co-leader36 of the coup for
constitutional monarchy
, and wrote Rajadhammasangaha to instruct the
new king in the cabinet arrangements that would now bind him. The plotters
kept control of Mandalay for three months, running the country from their
headquarters in the Southern Royal Gardens, having installed one of the
weakest of Mindon
s children, the 20-year-old Thibaw Prince, onto the
throne.
37 They drafted an oath of office for him to swear that invoked three
of the king-law lists and the
sassamedha taxs upper limit of 10 per cent,
before saying:

There is the oath of allegiance twice administered to ministers
and o
fficers. They shall meet and talk and decide rules that would
stand the test of time and remain good for several generations to
come. Once they had decided the rules, people should abide by
them.

Thibaw was being asked, as I understand it, to cede legislative sovereignty to
his Council so that they could draw up a formal constitution. As far as we
know, Thibaw took the oath without demur (and, perhaps, without under-
standing). All government functions were reorganised into fourteen minis-
tries. Hpo Hlaing headed the new
Sassamedha department, which gave him
sole authority to authorise payment from the Treasury. By controlling
all government expenditure, he, in e
ffect, controlled the government,
though Kinwun Mingyi was the oldest and most prominent of the ministers
involved.

The coup was defeated when Thibaw managed to win the support of an
army commander. On 13 February 1879, units of the Household Guard
under the Yanaung Myoza
s command arrested Hpo Hlaing and two of the
other coup leaders. Hpo Hlaing was sacked from court, but escaped death or
imprisonment. He used his retirement to add to his reputation as an author.
Previously he had translated Amp
res textbook on chemistry from French
to Burmese (
Pyinthit Dat kyan), and developed a Morse Code for the Burmese
alphabet to use on Kanaung
s newly installed telegraph line. Between 1879
and his death in 1883, he wrote his popular book on medicine and health
Udobhojana Sangaha, and wrote Mahasu Ja ̄taka, a Burmese summary
of Sanskrit works on divination. With the possible exception of the Ledi
sayadaw, Hpo Hlaing was the most prolific Burmese author of the late
nineteenth century. It is his
Rajadhammasangaha (Compendium of
King-Law
) that concerns us. U Htin Fatt produced his revised scholarly
edition of the
Compendium of King-Law in 1978. His seventy-six-page
introduction describes and discusses all the known textual and epigraphic
evidence of Hpo Hlaing
s career. I have drawn heavily on Htin Fatts
work, and owe an equally large debt to Euan Bagshawe, who has
made his translation of the Htin Fatt edition of 1978 available to all
for free.

Hpo Hlaing had divided the ninety-four pages of Compendium of King-
Law
into three parts, respectively thirty-one pages, thirty-eight pages, and
sixteen pages long. At the end of each part he summarised its content in
traditional Burmese deadpan style. Part 1 ends:

In this section the [7 ways not to make things worse
and other rules that are to be followed by kings and their ministers
the book named
Rajadhammasangaha sets out.

His three summaries reveal nothing of his authorial intentions. That, I
take it, was the point. The longer it took Thibaw to discover what was going
on, the easier for the conspirators to prosper. Hpo Hlaing has, I think, writ-
ten a muddled book when he was quite capable of writing a clear book.
He did so by slavishly following Burmese genre conventions. The closer
Compendium of King-Law resembled earlier works in the myittasa and
rajovada genres, the better the chance that the young Thibaw king would
skim through it without realising its revolutionary import. The plotters
needed all the help they could get, and Hpo Hlaing
s hide it in the small
print
strategy might have bought them a few extra weeks. As a result, Hpo
Hlaing emerges as Burma
s first ironist. He wrote the Compendium of
King-Law
entirely within Burmese genre constraints, but did so ironically,
that is, in full appreciation of the muddying e
ffect that strict adherence to
genre could have.

Lets examine the structure by way of its Parts and Sections:

Table 2 The structure of Hpo Hlaings Compendium of King-Law

Part 1:
(1
6) 7 ways not to make things worse (as the People of the West);
(8
13) 4 solidarities (as the People of the West)
(14
15) 3 motives leading down (Burmas population decline),
(16
18) 2 motives leading up (leading to a 2×2 Burmese deontology)
(19
24) 4 rules for here and beyond (as the People of the West),
(25
6) 5 winning arguments and 4 ways for people to do what theyre told

Part 2:
(1
7) Three Birds Ja ̄taka (the West on implementation)
(8
10) 10 royal virtues (plus sticks and carrots debate)
(11
18) 7 ways to beat an enemy
(1922) six more random lists
(23
27) Art of War sections
(28
36) five more random lists, interspersed with:

(32) another Art of War section
(31, 33, 36) the revolutionary manifesto

Part 3:
(1
6) Singalovada sutta
(7) 7 types of wife
(812) Singalovada sutta

Coda: Hpo Hlaings autobiography in Pali verse, followed by an auto-commentary in
Burmese

If one omits the last two sections from Part 1 (the 5 winning arguments
from Narada sutta and the 4 rules for defeating inferiors from the Dham-
mapada
), Part 1 makes much better sense. From beginning to end, the argu-
ment would become a sociological and political comparison between Burma
and
the people of the western countries. The first six sections contain his
revolutionary theory, and the last
five his Weberian analysis of the motiv-
ation behind western capitalism. Perhaps Hpo Hlaing tacked on the two
lists of s25
6 to ensure that, despite its strong start, Part 1 ended on an
anticlimax?
40 Or perhaps he was making up the numbers? If the list-of-lists
analysis in
fluenced him (and nowhere does he even hint that it does), then the
extra two lists might have arithmetical signi
ficance. Heres the schema:

Part 1: 8 lists contain 34 items
Part 2: 16 lists contain 116 items
Part 3: 13 lists contain 65 items
37 lists of 215 items checksum

I am not aware of any special personality attached to the number 215. But 37,
as we have seen, connects with space, with protection, and with the 37 nats,
who may be invoked for protection against most threats. The
Compendium of
King-Law
is a book about how Burma may be protected from Britain.

What are we to make of the books tripartite structure? Why are the 37
lists divided into three parts? Htin Fatt gives an answer that is of considerable
jurisprudential interest:

. . . after dealing very elegantly with the question of rights in the first
part of the book, in the second and third parts he went on to demon-
strate the duties mutually incumbent upon the rulers and those who
accept their rule.

Hpo Hlaing, in Htin Fatts reading, understood the social contract between
ruler and ruled in terms of correlative rights and duties, and used this
relationship to provide the structure of his book. I remain agnostic. To
my eyes, the contents of Hpo Hlaing
s three parts are distinguishable as
follows:

Part 1: Morality for kings


Part 2: Techniques of governance
Part 3: Rules for the Buddhist laity

The first two parts concern the ruler; the third addresses the ruled. Part 1
deals in moral generalisations; Part 2 in institutional particulars.

How do we know which of the 37 king-law lists in Compendium of King-
Law
Hpo Hlaing thought most important? That the book is, fundamentally,
a comparison between Britain and Burma suggests a likely answer. He
explicitly singles out four areas (three lists and one theme) as being the
areas in which the British have worked out a political ethics superior to the
Burmese. The
first two of the lists are old friends:

Because . . . they give the greatest importance to the [4 solidarities]
. . . the peoples of the West stand out for their prosperity . . . Since
the [
7 ways not to make things worse] have been observed, the
peoples of the western countries are at present the most advanced of
all lands.

The third list, which I call 4 rules for here and beyond, has not, as far
as I am aware, previously appeared in any Burmese work of king-law. It is
from the
Alavaka sutta [S.i.213] wherein the Buddha answers ten questions
put by the earth-destroying demon Alavaka. Alavaka asked him
What strat-
egies hold good both in relation to this world and the next?
The Buddha
answered with this list:
[1] sacca truth, [2] dhamma learning, [3] dhiti pur-
poseful energy, [4]
ca ̄ga charity.I think that Hpo Hlaing has searched the
vast repertoire of canonical lists for one that best expressed his understand-
ing of what had prodded Europe into modernity. That which Max Weber
identi
fied as a certain combination of Puritan attitudes, Hpo Hlaing identifies as the 4 rules for here and beyond. Of these four, it is dhiti that most
interests him. We can have all the technological knowledge in the world,
he says, but unless we exert ourselves, nothing will get made.
43 Part of
the western mindset that encourages purposeful energy is a
fixation with
time-keeping:

Thus the peoples of the West, recognising . . . that failing to keep
properly to time brings loss, and punctuality brings pro
fit, do
not go beyond a promised time and, so that work may be done
quickly, make use of telegraph lines, steam ships and steam trains . . .
Everybody
women, men, important and unimportant people, all
carry watches so as not to miss an appointment.

These are the three lists in which Burma lags behind Britain. Fourth comes a
theme: that Burma
s government institutions are weaker than the British, in
that Burma is unable to get its policy intiatives enforced at lower levels of the
bureaucracy. In Burma, though government tells its minions what the new
policy is, they
find ways to delay its implementation:

If in a major project you speak without meaning it, you will get
much blame . . . The peoples of the western countries know that
speaking the truth and keeping faith bring great bene
fits, while
untruth is a great fault . . . Whatever they have agreed in joint
consultation to enact into law cannot be begged o
ff, there are no
exceptions and the law is so enacted
.

Since he talks in terms of promise-keeping, it is possible to read this passage
as extolling the virtues of sticking to agreements. But in context, I think he is
talking about bureaucrats who agree the king
s new policy to his face, but
subvert it behind his back. This is one of two explanations o
ffered by Hpo
Hlaing as to why the Burmese state is weaker than the British state. The
other explanation is that the mid-levels of the bureaucracy travel the
4
ways not to go
: since a bias might be introduced by bribes or presents and by
the status of people involved in the action.
46 Government by king-in-cabinet
will automatically put an end to such di
fficulties:

What one man does not know another will; when one man has feel-
ings of hate, another will not; when one is angry, another will be
calm. When people have agreed in a meeting and preserve their soli-
darity, there will be no need for fear . . . [When] people conduct their
business in an assembly there is no way in which the [
4 ways not to go]
can be followed.

The checks and balances involved in cabinet government will cancel out each individuals bias, duress or ignorance. These are the final words of the
Compendium of King-Law, and they sound like an anticipation of Jrgen
Habermas. The Burmese minister and the German professor both believe in
the disinfectant powers of decision-making by committee. But they di
ffer
over democracy: Habermas is in favour, and Hpo Hlaing was not. Hpo Hla-
ing wanted to move Burma from absolute monarchy to rule by an oligarchy
of courtiers and generals. He belongs with the barons at Runnymede, not
with the conventioneers at Philadelphia. If his two explanations overlap, we
may substitute the
4 ways not to go for the weak statetheme, in order to
present Hpo Hlaing
s analysis of how the people of the western countries
excel as a list-of-lists:

  1. 1  4 solidarities

  2. 2  7 ways not to make things worse

  3. 3  4 rules for here and beyond

  4. 4  4 ways not to go

    4 lists of 19 items checksum

I dont attach any significance to the checksum: I believe that here, at the
heart of what Hpo Hlaing had to say, he was no longer guided by numero-
logical considerations. These four lists happen to be what the data (the com-
parison between Britain and Burma) threw up. Hpo Hlaing
s analysis of
modernity is itself modern.

It remains to interpret what Hpo Hlaing says about these four lists. The
4 solidarities would cause difficulty to anyone writing about it in the 1870s.
Mindon had systematically dismantled that whole chapter of Burma
s con-
stitutional understandings whose heading was the
4 solidarities. Kyaw Htun,
observing Upper Burma from down-river in Danubyu, put it thus:

Since [Maha ̄sammatas time], up to about 12 years ago, the several
Kings and Rulers contented themselves with one tenth of the
revenues of the country, but the present Sovereign of Burmah intro-
duced a system of paying his servants, and abolished the tithe
system.

(Kyaw Htun 1877: 2)

King Mindon changed the currency of the tax system from rice to cash. In
1857, he imposed a poll tax, named the
sassamedha tax, at three kyat per
household. It rose to
five, and then to ten kyat per household after 1866.
Thant Myint-U has calculated that this
vast change in the working of polit-
ical power
imposed a severe drag on the most dynamic parts of Upper
Burma
s economy (Myint-U 2001: 115, 124). In respect of the 4 solidarities,
it was Mindon who was the revolutionary. Hpo Hlaing, inaugurating the
post-Mindon era, had to decide whether this bit of the tradition has been
solidarities ways not to make things worse
4 rules for here and beyond 4 roads not to take
budget under cabinet control
institutional cabinet government
motivation of western modernity
epistemological cabinet government

Conclusion

ANDREW HUXLEY

irretrievably ruined, or whether it could be reconfigured to present needs. His
attempt at recon
figuration was to shift the name sassamedha from the tax to
the central treasury department that he headed. As to the
7 ways not to make
things worse
, Hpo Hlaing merely added some detail. Like his predecessors, he
thinks of the list in terms of optimising the daily procedures for cabinet
government. He adds four checkpoints for successful meetings:

  1. 1  The time and place of meeting to be circulated in advance

  2. 2  An unfinished meeting to adjourn to a fixed date

  3. 3  Follow the agenda. Let everyone have their say.

  4. 4  The final decision should be made public, and should pursue consensus.

These help us achieve discussion, leaving out individual prejudices, aiming for
agreement
.49 Finally the 4 roads not to take concentrate on the institutional
advantages that comes with well-conducted cabinet government:

As has been said on the [7 ways not to make things worse], if a
number of people get together for any sort of action, there can be no
question of following the [
roads not to take] way.50

As I did with Kyaw Htun, I shall try to summarise Hpo Hlaings core
message in tabular form, with European equivalents:

Table 3 Konbaung political theory, as Hpo Hlaing saw it, with English translation

Two of Hpo Hlaings Burmese readers differ as to the extent of his debt to
western thinking. Tin Ohn reads
Compendium of King-Law as showing that:
Burmese intellectuals were fully aware of the world outside their own coun-
try and were quick enough to appreciate the new ideas.
51 Htin Fatt concedes
that Hpo Hlaing was enthusiastic about some of the political ideas arriving
from western countries. However:

We cannot say that it follows from this that it is only a book that
copies western ideas; in it the author compares the past with the
present, the old with the new, western notions with eastern, in his
search for objectivity.

If youre a Burmese proponent of cabinet government, as Hpo Hlaing was,
does that make you un-Burmese? If you covet the strong government that
westerners have achieved, are you thereby betraying your eastern roots? Did
the
Compendium of King-Law so revolutionise the Burmese political trad-
ition as to catapult itself outside that tradition as Kyaw Htun and his con-
temporaries understood it? We are now in a better position to assess the
di
fferent emphases of Tin Ohn and Htin Fatt. In relation to Table 3s
first, second and fourth lists, we can make a direct comparison between
Burmese king-law as presented by Kyaw Htun and by Hpo Hlaing. Mindon
s
monetarisation of the tax system had destroyed a long-entrenched part of
the Burmese constitutional settlement. Certainly, Hpo Hlaing
s treatment of
the
4 solidarities is a new approach to the theme, but the old approach was
already dead. In this respect Hpo Hlaing was a revivalist rather than a revo-
lutionary. In respect of the
7 ways not to make things worse Hpo Hlaing was a
traditionalist: the details he added were well within the parameters set down
by Burmese tradition. In respect of the
4 roads not to take, he gave an epi-
stemological twist to the Buddhist analysis of natural justice. Decisions
reached after full discussion by a well-briefed cabinet were likely to be better
(meaning purged of more of the
4 roads not to take) than decisions reached
in other ways. This does introduce something new into the previous Burmese
discourse on the
4 roads. In relation to this list and this list only, Hpo Hlaing
does choose to bend the tradition he inherited into something new.

There were two big might-have-beens in relation to Upper Burmas
governance. Hpo Hlaing
s coup of 187980 might have succeeded, and
Compendium of King-Law become the official ideology of Mandalays con-
stitutional monarchy. Or Viscount Du
fferin and Randolph Churchill might
have accepted Kinwun Mingyi
s proposals of 1886 and installed a consti-
tutional monarchy in Mandalay. In the
first case, Upper Burma might have
been able to evolve through the twentieth century as a nominally independ-
ent state, like Thailand. In the second case, Upper Burma might have been
subject to indirect colonial rule, as were the northern Malay states. I concede
that we cannot know whether these might-have-beens would have brought a
better future for the Burmese. But looking at Burma as it actually was in
1948, and as it is in 2007, it is hard to imagine that things could have turned
out worse.

Notes

  1. 1  My thanks to Patricia Herbert, Euan Bagshawe, Michael Charney and John Okell,
    for their help in researching Kyaw Htun and Hpo Hlaing.

  2. 2  Charles Crosthwaite, cited in Harvey (1932: 439).

  3. 3  Kyaw Htun (1877).

  4. 4  Hpo Hlaing (1979). Euan Bagshawes translation (2004) of the whole text is avail-

    able at http://www.ibiblio.org/obl/docs/The_Rajadhammasangaha-print.pdf

  5. 5  For an excellent guide to the first millenium of its history, see Steven Collins

    (1998).

  1. 6  Note the interesting ambiguity in the Pali word ma ̄tika ̄. It can refer to each
    item in a list:
    Monks, there are these eight ma ̄tika ̄ for the removal of robe-
    privileges …
    [V.i.255]. And it can also refer to the list as a whole: the
    Pa ̄timokkha, which is a list-of-lists comprising 227 items, is commonly referred
    to as the
    ma ̄tika ̄ of the second half of the Vinaya. If you know the list, its
    because you have learned all its items by heart, and can reproduce each one
    verbatim.

  2. 7  Subsidiaritymeaning which levels of government are appropriate to handle
    which problems.

  3. 8  That is, 32 quarters of the compass + 4 options in the third dimension + the point
    where the observer sits.

  4. 9  The five Pali nouns are in A.iii.151. The information in brackets is from the
    Commentary [Mn P.iii.283]. See Gokhale (1953: 162).

  5. 10  India Office Library Records [henceforth IOLR], P4/36 November, citing Col. W.
    Plant
    s letter to Albert Fytche, June 1871.

  6. 11  IOLR, P4/36 November.

  7. 12  Kyaw Htun spelled it Donabyooon the front of his Pakinnaka Dipani Kyam.

  8. 13  Born into the Jewish faith in Londons East End. Spent most of his life as an

    Anglican missionary in British Burma. For a few eventful years, he ran an Anglican

    church and school in Mandalay.

  9. 14  IOLR, P4/36 November, Plant to Fytche, June 1871.

  10. 15  IOLR, P3/37, 18 March 1872.

  11. 16  John Okells translation of a manuscript letter (Kyaw Htun to Col. Ardagh)

    bound into the SOAS library copy of Pakinnaka Dipani Kyan.

  12. 17  Though I have not yet found conclusive proof that he did.

  13. 18  Emil Forchhammer, Rangoons Professor of Pali, said that it recommends itself

    for the fair judgment which the author displays in the selection and arrangement
    of the material, and in the omission of all, or, nearly all, that a European critic
    would condemn as emanating from national idiosyncrasies
    (Maung Tet Pyo
    (1884), General remarks by Dr E. Forchhammer, Professor of Pali and Govern-
    ment Archaeologist, British Burma: 1
    2).

  14. 19  IOLR, V/24/2233: Judicial Commissioners Report for 1873: 49.

  15. 20  IOLR, P4/36 November.

  16. 21  IOLR, P4/35 November, inclosing a medical certificate dated 14 November from J.

    Lamprey, Surgeon-Major HM 67th Regiment, Rangoon, attesting to Kyaw

    Htuns impaired vision.

  17. 22  ROB 2451824. Than Tun justifies this date (the manuscript has 1571817) at:

    Than Tun 198490: VII:10910.

  18. 23  The 10 royal duties, 4 solidarities and the 7 ways not to make things worse all appear in a single passage offering reasons why the king should not be a sexual predator
    (Richardson 1896: 181). The
    4 roads not to take are enumerated (without their
    collective name) as characteristic of the seven types of incompetent judge (Rich-
    ardson 1896: 157). The
    3 kinds of coronation are given their collective name in the
    book
    s opening pages (Richardson 1896: 7). Richardson adds an enumeration
    taken from a named manuscript source (
    Benga Rheos Book, letter su.).
    Unfortunately, we do not know who Benga R
    heo was. If Manugye was indeed
    Kyaw Htun
    s source for the 3 coronations, he has used it critically. Manugyes
    thaga
    becomes thenga in the Prize Essay, with the implication that this kind of
    coronation connects with the
    thenga taya leba (the 4 solidarities).

  19. 24  Badons ROB of second waning day of Kahson 1144, quoted in U Tin (2001: 304).

  20. 25  Richardson (1896: 109).

  21. 26  ROB 2811795 s.56.

  1. 27  ROB 1831796, Than Tuns English summary.

  2. 28  Htin Fatt, Introduction, trs. Bagshawe (2004: 58ff) (see Hpo Hlaing 1979). This

    ceremony was designed by Hpo Hlaing, along lines indicated in his Decisions of

    King Mahasammata, written two years before. Htin Fatt was unable to find a copy.

  3. 29  Ulpianus libro 13 ad legem Iuliam et Papiam: Princeps legibus solutus est: Augusta
    autem licet legibus soluta non est, principes tamen eadem illi privilegia tribuunt, quae

    ipsi habent.

  4. 30  See, as representative of a much larger literature: Esmein (1913), Daube (1954),

    Simon (1984).

  5. 31  http://www.royal.gov.uk/output/Page1699.asp.

  6. 32  Pali apariha ̄niya, literally meaning connected with whatever causes non-decay.

    Buddhists believe that things will naturally get worse. What deserves special atten-

    tion are the few things that can reverse the downward trend.

  7. 33  RoB 14th waxing day of Tazaung-hmon, 1148, quoted in U Tin (2001: 314).

  8. 34  My paraphrase of Htin Fatt, Introduction, trs. Bagshawe (2004: 56) (see Hpo

    Hlaing 1979).

  9. 35  Htin Fatt, Introduction, citing the Hmawbi Sayadaw Theingyi, trs. Bagshawe

    (2004: 56) (see Hpo Hlaing 1979).

  10. 36  Kinwun Mingyi, Hkanbat Wungyi, and Yeinangyaung Wungyi were the other

    important figures in the coup.

  11. 37  On one account, they would have preferred to enthrone the Nyaungyan Prince,

    but he had taken sanctuary inside the British Residency, which refused the
    Kinwun Mingyi
    s formal demand for their delivery. See: Aung San Suu Kyi (1990:
    43). Thibaw Prince had learned English and cricket at Rev. Mark
    s Anglican
    school in Mandalay, before shifting to a more traditional education at the Bagaya
    kyaung.

  12. 38  ROB 12101878, Than Tuns summary of the Burmese text.

  13. 39  Rajadhammasangaha, trs. Bagshawe (2004: 119) (see Hpo Hlaing 1979).

  14. 40  There seems to be more obfuscation in Part 2. The agenda for the institutional

    implementation of the coup is to be found in s31, 33, and 36. But these sections are
    hidden within a deliberate muddle of lists from a military manual, along with a
    random handful of king-law lists.

  15. 41  Htin Fatt, Introduction, trs. Bagshawe (2004: 75) (see Hpo Hlaing 1979).

  16. 42  Rajadhammasangaha, trs. Bagshawe (2004: 103), 94 (see Hpo Hlaing 1979).

  17. 43  Ibid.: 117.

  18. 44  Ibid.: 123.

  19. 45  Ibid.: 122.

  20. 46  Ibid.: 92.

  21. 47  Ibid.: 174.

  22. 48  Ibid.: 92.

  23. 49  Ibid.: 89.

  24. 50  Ibid.: 174.

  25. 51  Tin Ohn (1963: 90).

  26. 52  Htin Fatt, Introduction, trs. Bagshawe (2004: 70) (see Hpo Hlaing 1979).

in 01) Classical Magahi Magadhi,
02) Classical Chandaso language,

03)Magadhi Prakrit,



04) Classical Hela Basa (Hela Language),


05) Classical Pāḷi

06) Classical Devanagari,Classical Hindi-Devanagari- शास्त्रीय हिंदी,
07) Classical Cyrillic
08) Classical Afrikaans– Klassieke Afrikaans

09) Classical Albanian-Shqiptare klasike,
10) Classical Amharic-አንጋፋዊ አማርኛ,
11) Classical Arabic-اللغة العربية الفصحى
12) Classical Armenian-դասական հայերեն,
13) Classical Azerbaijani- Klassik Azərbaycan,
14) Classical Basque- Euskal klasikoa,
15) Classical Belarusian-Класічная беларуская,
16) Classical Bengali-ক্লাসিক্যাল বাংলা,
17) Classical  Bosnian-Klasični bosanski,
18) Classical Bulgaria- Класически българск,
19) Classical  Catalan-Català clàssic
20) Classical Cebuano-Klase sa Sugbo,

21) Classical Chichewa-Chikale cha Chichewa,

22) Classical Chinese (Simplified)-古典中文(简体),

23) Classical Chinese (Traditional)-古典中文(繁體),

24) Classical Corsican-C
orsa Corsicana,

25) Classical  Croatian-Klasična hrvatska,
26) Classical  Czech-Klasická čeština,
27) Classical  Danish-Klassisk dansk,Klassisk dansk,

28) Classical  Dutch- Klassiek Nederlands,
29) Classical English,Roman
30) Classical Esperanto-Klasika Esperanto,

31) Classical Estonian- klassikaline eesti keel,

32) Classical Filipino klassikaline filipiinlane,
33) Classical Finnish- Klassinen suomalainen,

34) Classical French- Français classique,

35) Classical Frisian- Klassike Frysk,

36) Classical Galician-Clásico galego,
37) Classical Georgian-კლასიკური ქართული,
38) Classical German- Klassisches Deutsch,
39) Classical Greek-Κλασσικά Ελληνικά,
40) Classical Gujarati-ક્લાસિકલ ગુજરાતી,
41) Classical Haitian Creole-Klasik kreyòl,

42) Classical Hausa-Hausa Hausa,
43) Classical Hawaiian-Hawaiian Hawaiian,

44) Classical Hebrew- עברית קלאסית
45) Classical Hmong- Lus Hmoob,

46) Classical Hungarian-Klasszikus magyar,

47) Classical Icelandic-Klassísk íslensku,
48) Classical Igbo,Klassískt Igbo,

49) Classical Indonesian-Bahasa Indonesia Klasik,

50) Classical Irish-Indinéisis Clasaiceach,
51) Classical Italian-Italiano classico,
52) Classical Japanese-古典的なイタリア語,
53) Classical Javanese-Klasik Jawa,
54) Classical Kannada- ಶಾಸ್ತ್ರೀಯ ಕನ್ನಡ,
55) Classical Kazakh-Классикалық қазақ,

56) Classical Khmer- ខ្មែរបុរាណ,

57) Classical Kinyarwanda
58) Classical Korean-고전 한국어,
59) Classical Kurdish (Kurmanji)-Kurdî (Kurmancî),

60) Classical Kyrgyz-Классикалык Кыргыз,
61) Classical Lao-ຄລາສສິກລາວ,
62) Classical Latin-LXII) Classical Latin,

63) Classical Latvian-Klasiskā latviešu valoda,

64) Classical Lithuanian-Klasikinė lietuvių kalba,
65) Classical Luxembourgish-Klassesch Lëtzebuergesch,

66) Classical Macedonian-Класичен македонски,
67) Classical Malagasy,класичен малгашки,
68) Classical Malay-Melayu Klasik,
69) Classical Malayalam-ക്ലാസിക്കൽ മലയാളം,

70) Classical Maltese-Klassiku Malti,
71) Classical Maori-Maori Maori,
72) Classical Marathi-क्लासिकल माओरी,
73) Classical Mongolian-Сонгодог Монгол,

74) Classical Myanmar (Burmese)-Classical မြန်မာ (ဗမာ),

75) Classical Nepali-शास्त्रीय म्यांमार (बर्मा),
76) Classical Norwegian-Klassisk norsk,
77) Classical Odia (Oriya)
78) Classical Pashto- ټولګی پښتو
79) Classical Persian-کلاسیک فارسی
80) Classical Polish-Język klasyczny polski,
81) Classical Portuguese-Português Clássico,
82) Classical Punjabi-ਕਲਾਸੀਕਲ ਪੰਜਾਬੀ,
83) Classical Romanian-Clasic românesc,
84) Classical Russian-Классический русский,

85) Classical Samoan-Samoan Samoa,

86) Classical Sanskrit छ्लस्सिचल् षन्स्क्रित्

87) Classical Scots Gaelic-Gàidhlig Albannach Clasaigeach,
88) Classical Serbian-Класични српски,
89) Classical Sesotho-Seserbia ea boholo-holo,

90) Classical Shona-Shona Shona,
91) Classical Sindhi,
92) Classical Sinhala-සම්භාව්ය සිංහල,
93) Classical Slovak-Klasický slovenský,

94) Classical Slovenian-Klasična slovenska,

95) Classical Somali-Soomaali qowmiyadeed,
96) Classical Spanish-Español clásico,
97) Classical Sundanese-Sunda Klasik,
98) Classical Swahili,Kiswahili cha Classical,

99) Classical Swedish-Klassisk svensk,
100) Classical Tajik-тоҷикӣ классикӣ,
101) Classical Tamil-பாரம்பரிய இசைத்தமிழ் செம்மொழி,
102) Classical Tatar
103) Classical Telugu- క్లాసికల్ తెలుగు,
104) Classical Thai-ภาษาไทยคลาสสิก,
105) Classical Turkish-Klasik Türk,
106) Classical Turkmen
107) Classical Ukrainian-Класичний український,
108) Classical Urdu- کلاسیکی اردو
109) Classical Uyghur
110) Classical Uzbek-Klassik o’z
111) Classical Vietnamese-Tiếng Việ

112) Classical Welsh-Cymraeg Clasurol,
113) Classical Xhosa-IsiXhosa zesiXhosa,

114) Classical Yiddish- קלאסישע ייִדיש

115) Classical Yoruba-Yoruba Yoruba,


116) Classical Zulu-I-Classical Zulu




comments (0)
LESSON 3359 Sat 20 Jun 2020 Free Hi Tech Radio Free Animation Clipart Online Analytical Insight Net for Discovery of Metteyya Awakened One with Awareness Universe (FOAINDMAOAU) For The Welfare, Happiness, Peace of All Sentient and Non-Sentient Beings and for them to Attain Eternal Peace as Final Goal. From KUSHINARA NIBBANA BHUMI PAGODA in 116 CLASSICAL LANGUAGES Through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org At WHITE HOME 668, 5A main Road, 8th Cross, HAL III Stage, Prabuddha Bharat Puniya Bhumi Bengaluru Magadhi Karnataka State PRABUDDHA BHARAT DO GOOD PURIFY MIND AND ENVIRONMENT Words of the Metteyya Awakened One with Awareness from Free Online step by step creation of Virtual tour in 3D Circle-Vision 360° for Kushinara Nibbana Bhumi Pagoda up a level தமிழில் திரபிடக மூன்று தொகுப்புகள்TIPITAKA-ஸுத்தபிடக-Section-C-
Filed under: General, Vinaya Pitaka, Sutta Pitaka, Abhidhamma Pitaka, Tipiṭaka
Posted by: site admin @ 3:09 am


LESSON 3359 Sat 20 Jun  2020


Free

Hi Tech Radio Free Animation Clipart


Online Analytical Insight Net for Discovery of Metteyya Awakened One with Awareness Universe (FOAINDMAOAU)

For
The Welfare, Happiness, Peace of All Sentient and Non-Sentient Beings and for them to Attain Eternal Peace as Final Goal.
From
KUSHINARA NIBBANA BHUMI PAGODA
in 116 CLASSICAL LANGUAGES
Through

At

WHITE HOME
668, 5A main Road, 8th Cross, HAL III Stage,
Prabuddha Bharat Puniya Bhumi Bengaluru

Magadhi Karnataka State

PRABUDDHA BHARAT


DO GOOD PURIFY MIND AND ENVIRONMENT

Words of the Metteyya Awakened One with Awareness

from

Free Online step by step creation of Virtual tour in 3D Circle-Vision 360° for Kushinara Nibbana Bhumi Pagoda

up a level
மிழில் திபி  மூன்று தொகுப்புள்TIPITAKA-ஸுத்தபிடக-Section-C-



http://buddhadharmaobfinternational.files.wordpress.com/2011/01/ctmwelcome_e0.gif


TO






GIF pics
GIF picsVipassana Gif
Way of Bodhi






Friends


Buddha Song,புத்தரின் பாடல் ,Buddham Saranam நீயே உனக்கு ஒளியாக இரு - Prakash Trichy
Zooming Tv
புத்தரின் பாடல் ,Buddha Songநீயே உனக்கு ஒளியாக இரு - Prakash Trichy
Buddham Saranam
License
Creative Commons Attribution license (reuse allowed)

youtube.com

Buddha Song,புத்தரின் பாடல் ,Buddham Saranam நீயே உனக்கு ஒளியாக இரு - Prakash Trichy



Friends

gaj bahadur gurung
8.76K subscribers
BUDDHA BORN IN NEPAL

up a level
மிழில் திபி  மூன்று தொகுப்புள்TIPITAKA-ஸுத்தபிடக-Section-C-
from FREE ONLINE  eNālāndā Research and
Practice UNIVERSITY through http://sarvajan.ambedkar.org


இந்த  நூட்கள் வெளியீடு
காட்சிமுறை உருவரைக்குறிப்பு தேவனாகரி எழுத்துப் பிரதியில் திபிடக 
முக்கூடைகளின் சஹ்ஹுவ ஸாக்யன (ஆறாவது மன்றம்) பதிப்பு.



This outline displays the publication of books in the Devan±gari-script edition of the
Chaμμha Saag±yana (Sixth Council) Tipiμaka. The names of the volumes are displayed
in italics with the suffix “-p±1⁄4i” indicating
the volume is part of the root Tipiμaka, rather than commentarial literature. This outline lists the root volumes only.
Please note: These books are in P±li only, in Devan±gari script, and are not for sale.

No set of English translations is available. For further information please see: www.tipitaka.org

விநய பியுயக Vinaya Piμaka
(மூன்று மண்டலங்கள், 5 நூட்களாக அச்சடிக்கப்பட்டது)

(Three divisions, printed in 5 books)

1.ஸுத்த விபாக(ஒரு சர  மண்டலம்) [பிக்குக்கள் மற்றும் பிக்குனிகளுக்கான தன்னகம் கொண்ட
விதிகளின் இரண்டு நூட்கள்]

Sutta Vibhaaga [two books containing rules for the bhikkhus and
bhikkhunis, outlining eight classes of offences]


திபிடக  முக்கூடைகள்

Tipiμaka (three “baskets”)

ஸுத்த பியுயக

( ஐந்து திரட்டுகள்)

Sutta Piμaka

(Five nik±yas, or collections)

The
Sutta Piṭaka contains the essence of the Buddha’s teaching regarding
the Dhamma. It contains more than ten thousand suttas. It is divided in
five collections called Nikāyas (A multitude, assemblage; a collection; a
class, order, group; an association, fraternity, congregation; a house,
dwelling).

நெறி முறைக் கட்டளை ஆணைக் கூடை தம்மா பற்றி புத்தர்
கற்பித்த மெய்ம்மை சாறு நிரம்பியது.  அது பதினாயிரம் விஞ்சி மிகுதியாக நெறி
முறைக் கட்டளை ஆணை நிரம்பியது. அது நிகாய ( ஒரு பேரெண்ணிக்கை,
ஒன்றுகூடுதல் ஒரு வகை, வரிசைமுறை, குவியல், ஓர் கூட்டமைப்பு,
பொதுநோக்கங்கள் கொண்ட, ஒருங்கு கூட்டுதல், ஒரு குடும்பமரபுக் குழு,
கருத்தூன்றி நீடித்த ) என அழைக்கப்படும் ஐந்து திரட்டுகளாக பிரிந்துள்ளது.

Dīgha Nikāya
[dīgha:
long] The Dīgha Nikāya gathers 34 of the longest discourses given by
the Buddha. There are various hints that many of them are late additions
to the original corpus and of questionable authenticity.

நீளமான நிகாய (திரட்டுகள்)
புத்தரால் கொடுக்கப்பட்ட 34 நீளமான போதனையுரைகள் கொய்சகமாக்கப்பட்டது.

Majjhima Nikāya
[majjhima:
medium] The Majjhima Nikāya gathers 152 discourses of the Buddha of
intermediate length, dealing with diverse matters.

 மத்திம (நடுத்தரமான) நிகாய (திரட்டுகள்)

புத்தரால்
கொடுக்கப்பட்ட 152 மத்திம ( நடுத்தரமான நீட்சி ) பல்வேறு வகைப்பட்ட
விஷயங்கள் செயல் தொடர்பு உடன் போதனையுரைகள் கொய்சகமாக்கப்பட்டது.

Saṃyutta Nikāya
[samyutta:
group] The Saṃyutta Nikāya gathers the suttas according to their
subject in 56 sub-groups called saṃyuttas. It contains more than three
thousand discourses of variable length, but generally relatively short.

குவியல் நிகாய (திரட்டுகள்)

குவியல்
நிகாய (திரட்டுகள்) என அழைக்கப்படும் நெறி முறைக் கட்டளை ஆணை அவற்றினுடைய
பொருளுக்கு ஏற்ப 56 பங்குவரி குவியலாக கொய்சகமாக்கப்பட்டது. அது மூவாயிரம்
விஞ்சி மிகுதியாக மாறும் தன்மையுள்ள நீளம் ஆனால் பெரும்பாலும் ஒப்பு
நோக்காக சுருக்கமான நெறி முறைக் கட்டளை ஆணை நிரம்பியது.

Aṅguttara Nikāya
[aṅg:
factor | uttara: additionnal] The Aṅguttara Nikāya is subdivized in
eleven sub-groups called nipātas, each of them gathering discourses
consisting of enumerations of one additional factor versus those of the
precedent nipāta. It contains thousands of suttas which are generally
short.

கூடுதல் அங்கமான (ஆக்கக்கூறு) நிகாய (திரட்டுகள்)

இறங்குதல்
காரணி, கருத்தைக் கவர்கிற, கீழ் நோக்கி அல்லது ஏறத்தாழ தற்போதைக்கு
உதவுகிற என அழைக்கப்படும் பதினொன்று பங்குவரி, ஒவ்வொன்று
கொய்சகமாக்கப்பட்டது நெறி முறைக் கட்டளை ஆணை கணக்கிடல் ஆக்கை ஒரு
குறிப்பிட்ட கூடுதல் ஆக்கக் கூறு எதிராக அவை முன்னோடி மாதிரி இறங்குதல்
காரணி. அது ஆயிரக்கணக்கான பெரும்பாலும் சுருக்கமான நெறி முறைக் கட்டளை ஆணை
நிரம்பியது. தன்னகம் கொண்டிரு

Khuddaka Nikāya
[khuddha: short,
small] The Khuddhaka Nikāya short texts and is considered as been
composed of two stratas: Dhammapada, Udāna, Itivuttaka, Sutta Nipāta,
Theragāthā-Therīgāthā and Jātaka form the ancient strata, while other
books are late additions and their authenticity is more questionable.

சுருக்கமான, சிறிய நிகாய (திரட்டுகள்)

சுருக்கமான,
சிறிய நிகாய (திரட்டுகள்) வாசகம் மற்றும் ஆலோசனை மிக்க மாதிரி தணிந்த
இரண்டு படுகைகள் : தம்மபத (ஒரு சமய சம்பந்தமான முற்றுத் தொடர் வாக்கியம் ,
மூன்று கூடைகள் நூட்கள்  ஒன்றின் பெயர் , தம்மாவின் உடற்பகுதி அல்லது
பாகம்), உதான (வார்த்தைகளால்,
மேல்நோக்கிய பேரார்வம், ஆவல் கொண்ட அல்லது
மகிழ்ச்சி கூற்று, சொற்றொடர் , உணர்ச்சிமிக்க உறுதலுணர்ச்சி, மகிழ்ச்சி
அல்லது மனத்துயரம் இரண்டனுள் ஒன்று), இதிவுத்தக ( இது குத்தகனிகாய நான்காம்
புத்தகம் பெயர்), ஸுத்த ( ஒரு சரம், இழை ,: புத்தசமயம், சவுகதநூல் ஒரு
பாகம்; ஒரு விதி, நீதி வாக்கியம் இறங்குதல் காரணி),தேரகாத-தேரிகாத(
தேராக்களுக்கு உரியதானது), மற்றும் ஒரு சரடு ஜாதக ( பிறப்பு , பிறப்பிடம் ,
ஒரு பிறப்பு அல்லது : புத்தசமயம் விவேகம் வாழ்தல் , ஒரு ஜாதக, அல்லது
புத்தரின் முந்திய பிறப்பு கதைளில் ஒன்று.)

Sutta Piμaka

(Five nik±yas, or collections)

1. D2gha-nik±ya [34 suttas; 3 vaggas, or chapters (each a book)]
(1) S2lakkhandavagga-p±1⁄4i (13 suttas)
(2) Mah±vagga-p±1⁄4i
(10 suttas)
(3) P±μikavagga-p±1⁄4i
(11 suttas)

2. Majjhima-nik±ya [152 suttas;15 vaggas; divided in 3 books,
5
vaggas each, known as paoo±sa (‘fifty’)]

(1) M3lapaoo±ssa-p±1⁄4i (the ‘root’ fifty)
1. M3lapariy±yavagga (10
suttas)
2. S2han±davagga (10 suttas)
3. Tatiyavagga (10 suttas)

4. Mah±yamakavagga (10 suttas)

5. C31⁄4ayamakavagga (10 suttas)
(2) Majjhimapaoo±sa-p±1⁄4i
(the ‘middle’ fifty)

6. Gahapati-vagga (10 suttas)
7. Bhikkhu-vagga (10 suttas)
8. Paribb±jaka-vagga (10 suttas)
9. R±ja-vagga (10 suttas)

10. Br±hmana-vagga (10 suttas)
(3) Uparipaoo±sa-p±1⁄4i
(means ‘more than fifty’)

11. Devadaha-vagga (10 suttas)
12. Anupada-vagga (10 suttas)
13. Suññata-vagga (10 suttas)
14. Vibhaaga-vagga (12 suttas)
15. Sa1⁄4±yatana-vagga (10 suttas)

3. Sa1⁄2yutta-nik±ya [2,904 (7,762) suttas; 56 sa1⁄2yuttas; 5 vaggas; divided
into 6 books]

(1) Sag±thavagga-sa1⁄2yutta-p±1⁄4i (11 sa1⁄2yuttas)
(2) Nid±navagga-sa1⁄2yutta-p±1⁄4i
(10 sa1⁄2yuttas)
(3) Khandavagga-sa1⁄2yutta-p±1⁄4i
(13 sa1⁄2yuttas)
(4) Sa1⁄4±yatanavagga-sa1⁄2yutta-p±1⁄4i
(10 sa1⁄2yuttas)
(5) Mah±vagga-sa1⁄2yutta-p±1⁄4i
Vol I ( 6 sa1⁄2yuttas)
(6) Mah±vagga-sa1⁄2yutta-p±1⁄4i
Vol II ( 6 sa1⁄2yuttas)

4. Aaguttara-nik±ya [9,557 suttas; in11 nip±tas, or groups, arranged purely
numerically; each
nip±ta has several vaggas; 10 or more suttas in
each
vagga; 6 books]

(1) Eka-Duka-Tika-nipata-p±1⁄4i (ones, twos, threes)
(2) Catukka-nipata-p±1⁄4i (fours)
(3) Pañcaka-nipata-p±1⁄4i (fives)
(4) Chakka-Sattaka-nipata-p±1⁄4i (sixes, sevens)

(5) Aμμhaka-Navaka-nipata-p±1⁄4i (eights, nines)
(6) Dasaka-Ekadasaka-nipata-p±1⁄4i (tens, elevens)

5. Khuddaka-nik±ya [the collection of small books, a miscellaneous gather-
ing of works in 18 main sections; it includes
suttas, compilations of
doctrinal notes, histories, verses, and commentarial literature that has
been incorporated into the Tipiμaka itself.; 12 books]

(1) Kuddhakap±tha,Dhammapada & Ud±na-p±1⁄4i

1. Kuddhakap±tha (nine short formulae and suttas, used as a training manual for
novice bhikkhus)
2. Dhammapada (most famous of all the books of the Tipiμaka; a collection of 423
verses in 26
vaggas)

3. Ud±na (in 8 vaggas, 80 joyful utterances of the Buddha, mostly in verses, with

some prose accounts of the circumstances that elicited the utterance)

(2) Itivuttaka, Suttanip±ta-p±1⁄4i
4. Itivuttaka (4 nip±tas, 112 suttas, each beginning, “iti vutta1⁄2 bhagavata” [thus was
said by the Buddha])
5. Suttanip±ta (5 vaggas; 71 suttas, mostly in verse; contains many of the best
known, most popular
suttas of the Buddha

(3) Vim±navatthu, Petavatthu, Therag±th± & Therig±th±-p±1⁄4i
6. Vim±navatthu (Vim±na means mansion; 85 poems in 7 vaggas about acts of
merit and rebirth in heavenly realms)
7. Petavatthu (4 vaggas, 51 poems describing the miserable beings [petas] born in
unhappy states due to their demeritorious acts)
8. Therag±th± (verses of joy and delight after the attainment of arahatship from 264
elder bhikkhus; 107 poems, 1,279
g±thas)
9. Therig±th± (same as above, from 73 elder nuns; 73 poems, 522 g±thas)

(4) J±taka-p±1⁄4i, Vol. I
(5) J±taka-p±1⁄4i, Vol II

10. J±taka (birth stories of the Bodisatta prior to his birth as Gotama Buddha; 547
stories in verses, divided into
nip±ta according to the number of verses required to
tell the story. The full J±taka stories are actually in the J±taka commentaries that
explain the story behind the verses.

(6) Mah±nidessa-p±1⁄4i
(7) C31⁄4anidessa-p±1⁄4i

11. Nidessa (commentary on two sections of Suttanip±ta)
Mah±nidessa: commentary on the 4th
vagga
C31⁄4anidessa: commentary on the 5th vagga and

the Khaggavis±oa sutta of the 1st vagga
(8) Paμisambhid±magga-p±1⁄4i

12. Paμisambhid±magga (an abhidhamma-style detailed analysis of the Buddha’s
teaching, drawn from all portions of the Vin±ya and Sutta Piμakas; three
vaggas,
each containing ten topics [kath±])

(9) Apad±na-p±1⁄4i, Vol. I
13. Apad±na (tales in verses of the former lives of 550 bhikkhus and 40 bhikkhunis)

(10) Apad±na, Buddhava1⁄2sa & Cariy±piμaka-p±1⁄4i

14. Buddhava1⁄2sa (the history of the Buddhas in which the Buddha, in answer to a
question from Ven. Sariputta, tells the story of the ascetic Sumedha and D2paakara
Buddha and the succeeding 24 Buddhas, including Gotama Buddha.)
15. Cariy±piμaka (35 stories from the J±taka arranged to illustrate the ten p±ram2)

(11) Nettippakarana, Peμakopadesa-p±1⁄4i

16. Nettippakarana (small treatise setting out methods for interpreting and explain-
ing canonical texts)
17. Peμakopadesa (treatise setting out methods for explaining and expanding the
teaching of the Buddha)

(12) Milindapañha-p±1⁄4i

18. Milinda-pañha (a record of the questions posed by King Milinda and the
answers by Ven. Nagasena; this debate took place ca. 500 years after the
mah±parinibb±na of the Buddha)

Abhidhamma Piμaka

[Seven sections of systematic, abstract exposition of all dhammas; printed in
12 books]

1. Dhammasaagao2
(enumeration of the
dhammas)

(1) Dhammasaagao2-p±1⁄4i

2. Vibhaaga-p±1⁄42
(distinction or analysis of
dhammas)

(2) Vibhaaga-p±1⁄42

3. Dh±tukath±
(discussion of elements; these 1st three sections form a trilogy that
must be digested as a basis for understanding Abhidhamma)

4. Puggalapaññatti
(designation of individuals; ten chapters: the 1st dealing with single
individuals, the 2nd with pairs, the 3rd with groups of three, etc.

(3) Dh±tukath±-Puggalapaññatti-p±1⁄42

5. Kath±vatthu-p±1⁄42
(points of controversy or wrong view; discusses the points raised and
settled at the 3rd council, held at the time of Aœoka’s reign, at Patna)

(4) Kath±vatthu-p±1⁄42

6. Yamaka-p±1⁄42
(book of pairs; a use of paired, opposing questions to resolve ambi-
guities and define precise usage of technical terms)

(5) Yamaka-p±1⁄42, Vol I
(6) Yamaka-p±1⁄42, Vol II
(7) Yamaka-p±1⁄42, Vol III

7. Paμμh±na
(book of relations; the elaboration of a scheme of 24 conditional
relations [paccaya] that forms a complete system for understanding
the mechanics of the entire universe of Dhamma)

(8) Paμμh±na-p±1⁄4i, Vol I
(9) Paμμh±na-p±1⁄4i, Vol II
(10) Paμμh±na-p±1⁄4i, Vol III
(11) Paμμh±na-p±1⁄4i, Vol IV
(12) Paμμh±na-p±1⁄4i, Vol V

(1) P±r±jika-p±1⁄4i Bhikku
p±r±jik±
(expulsion) 4
saaghadises± (meetings of the Sangha) 13
aniyat± (indeterminate) 2
nissagiy± p±cittiy± (expiation with forfeiture) 30

(2) P±cittiya-p±1⁄4i
suddha p±cittiy±
(ordinary expiation) 92
p±tidesaniy± (confession re: alms food) 4
sekhiya (concerning etiquette & decorum) 75
adhikaraoasamath± (legal process) 7

(concludes with bhikkuni vinaya rules) ______
227

Bhikkhuni

8
17
0
30

166
8
75
7
______
311

2. Khandaka [two books of rules and procedures]
(3) Mah±vagga-p±1⁄4i (10 sections [khandhakas]; begins with historical accounts of the

Buddha’s enlightenment, the first discourses and the early growth of the Sangha;
outlines the following rules governing the actions of the Sangha:
1. rules for admission to the order (upasampad±)
2. the
uposatha meeting and recital of the p±timokkha

3. residence during the rainy season (vassa)
4. ceremony concluding the
vassa, called pav±rao±
5. rules for articles of dress and furniture
6. medicine and food
7. annual distribution of robes (kaμhina)
8. rules for sick
bhikkhus, sleeping and robe material
9. mode of executing proceedings of the Sangha
10. proceedings in cases of schism

(4) C31⁄4avagga-p±1⁄4i (or Cullavagga) (12 khandakas dealing with further rules and proce-
dures for institutional acts or functions, known as
saaghakamma:
1. rules for dealing with offences that come before the Sangha
(saagh±disesa)

2. procedures for putting a bhikkhu on probation
3. procedures for dealing with accumulation of offences by a
bhikkhu
4. rules for settling legal procedures in the Sangha
5. misc. rules for bathing, dress, etc.
6. dwellings, furniture, lodging, etc.
7. schisms
8. classes of
bhikkhus and duties of teachers & novices
9. exclusion from the
p±timokkha
10. the ordination and instruction of bhikkhunis
11. account of the 1st council at R±jagaha
12. account of the 2nd council at Ves±li

3. Pariv±ra-p±1⁄4i [a summary of the vinaya, arranged as a
catechism for instruction and examination]

(5) Pariv±ra-p±1⁄4i The fifth book of vinaya serves as a kind of manual enabling the reader
to make an analytical survey of the whole of Vinaya Piμaka.


Sutta Piṭaka -Digha Nikāya

DN 9 -
Poṭṭhapāda Sutta
{excerpt}
— The questions of Poṭṭhapāda —

Poṭṭhapāda asks various questions reagrding the nature of Saññā.

Note: plain texts

ஸஞ்யா
நு கொ பந்தெ பதமங் உப்பஜ்ஜதி, பச்சா ஞானங்? உதாஹு ஞானங் பதமங் உப்பஜ்ஜதி,
பச்சா ஸஞ்யா? உதாஹு ஸஞ்யா ச ஞானங்ச அபுபங் ஆசரிமங் உப்பஜ்ஜந்தி?’ தி.

Saññā nu kho bhante paṭhamaṃ uppajjati, pacchā ñāṇaṃ? Udāhu ñāṇaṃ
paṭhamaṃ uppajjati, pacchā saññā? Udāhu saññā ca ñāṇañca apubbaṃ
acarimaṃ uppajjantī?’ ti.


இப்பொழுது, பந்த்தே, எது முதலாவது எழும்புவது
புலனுணர்வா,ஞானங் அடுத்ததா? அல்லது ஞானங் முதலாவது மற்றும் புலனுணர்வு
அடுத்ததா? அல்லது ஒரே நேரத்தில் புலனுணர்வும் ஞானமும் எழும்புகிறதா?


Now, lord, does perception arise first, and knowledge after; or does
knowledge arise first, and perception after; or do perception &
knowledge arise simultaneously? 



ஸஞ்யா கொ பொத்தபாதப தமங் உப்பஜ்ஜதி பச்சா
ஞானங். ஸன்யுப்பாதா ச பன ஞானுப்பாதொ ஹோதி. ஸொ ஏவங் பஜானாதி: இதப்பச்சாயா
கிர மெ ஞானங் உதபாதிதி. இமினா கொ ஏதங் பொத்தபாத பரியாயென வேதிதப்பங், யதா
ஸஞ்யா பதமங் உப்பஜ்ஜதி பச்சா ஞானங், ஸன்யுப்பாதொ  ச பன ஞானுப்பாதொ
ஹோதி’தி.


Saññā kho poṭṭhapāda paṭhamaṃ uppajjati pacchā ñāṇaṃ. Saññuppādā ca pana
ñāṇuppādo hoti. So evaṃ pajānāti: idappaccayā kira me ñāṇaṃ udapādīti.
Iminā kho etaṃ poṭṭhapāda pariyāyena veditabbaṃ, yathā saññā paṭhamaṃ
uppajjati pacchā ñāṇaṃ, saññuppādo ca pana ñāṇuppādo hotī’ ti. 


பொத்தபாத, முதலாவது
புலனுணர்வும் பின்னால் ஞானம் எழும்புகிறது.மற்றும் புலனுணர்வு
எழும்புகிறபோது ஞானம் எழும்புகிறது. ஒரு பிரித்தறியும் நிலை சார்ந்துள்ள
என்னுடைய இந்த ஞானம் எழும்பியது. இவ்வழியான வரம்பின் காரண ஆய்வால் ஒருவர்
எப்படி முதலாவது புலனுணர்வு எழும்புகிறது மற்றும் ஞானம் அடுத்து என்று உணர
முடியும் மற்றும் எவ்வாறு புலனுணர்வு எழும்பியதால், ஞானம் எழும்பிமயது
என்றும்.



Potthapada, perception arises first, and
knowledge after. And the arising of knowledge comes from the arising of
perception. One discerns, ‘It’s in dependence on this that my knowledge
has arisen.’ Through this line of reasoning one can realize how
perception arises first, and knowledge after, and how the arising of
knowledge comes from the arising of perception.

Sutta Piṭaka-Digha Nikāya

DN 16 - (D ii 137)
Mahāparinibbāna Sutta
{excerpts}
— The last instructions —
[mahā-parinibbāna]

This
sutta gathers various instructions the Buddha gave for the sake of his
followers after his passing away, which makes it be a very important set
of instructions for us nowadays.

Note: infobubbles on all Pali words except in section with light green background color

Dhammādāsaṃ
nāma dhamma-pariyāyaṃ desessāmi, yena samannāgato ariyasāvako
ākaṅkhamāno attanāva attānaṃ byā-kareyya: ‘khīṇa-nirayo-mhi
khīṇa-tiracchāna-yoni khīṇa-pettivisayo khīṇ’āpāya-duggati-vinipāto,
sotāpanno-hamasmi avinipāta-dhammo niyato sambodhi-parāyaṇo’ ti. 

(The Mirror of the Dhamma)

I
will expound the discourse on the Dhamma which is called Dhammādāsa,
possessed of which the ariyasāvaka, if he so desires, can declare of
himself: ‘For me, there is no more niraya, no more tiracchāna-yoni, no
more pettivisaya, no more state of unhappiness, of misfortune, of
misery, I am a sotāpanna, by nature free from states of misery, certain
of being destined to sambodhi.
தமிழ்
(தம்மாவின் உருப்பளிங்கு)
நான்
Dhammādāsa (தம்மாவின் உருப்பளிங்கு) என  கருதப்படும் தம்மாவை
வியாக்கியானம் பண்ண பிரசங்கம் செய்ய விரும்புகிரேன்,ariyasāvaka (புனிதமான
சீடர்)ஆக ஆட்கொண்டு,ஒருவேளை அவர் தானே  விரும்பி உறுதியாக்கிக் கொண்டால்:
‘ஆக
எனக்கு, இன்னும் மேலும் niraya (நரகம்) இல்லை,இன்னும் மேலும்
tiracchāna-yoni ( மிருகம சாம்ராஜ்யம்) இல்லை,இன்னும் மேலும் pettivisaya
(ஆவிகள் சாம்ராஜ்யம்) இல்லை,இன்னும் மேலும்
பாக்கியவீனம்,துரதிருஷ்டம்,துக்கம், நிலை இல்லை, நான் sotāpanna (புனல்
பிரவேசி), இயற்கையாக துக்க நிலையில் இருந்து விடுவிக்கப்பட்டவன்,sambodhi
(முழுக்க தூக்கத்திலிருந்து விழிப்பு) ஆக சேர இருத்தல் உறுதி.

Katamo
ca so, Ānanda, dhammādāso dhamma-pariyāyo, yena samannāgato ariyasāvako
ākaṅkhamāno attanāva attānaṃ byā-kareyya: ‘khīṇa-nirayo-mhi
khīṇa-tiracchāna-yoni khīṇa-pettivisayo khīṇ’āpāya-duggati-vinipāto,
sotāpanno-hamasmi avinipāta-dhammo niyato sambodhi-parāyaṇo’ ti? 

And
what, Ānanda, is that discourse on the Dhamma which is called
Dhammādāsa, possessed of which the ariyasāvaka, if he so desires, can
declare of himself: ‘For me, there is no more niraya, no more
tiracchāna-yoni, no more pettivisaya, no more state of unhappiness, of
misfortune, of misery, I am a sotāpanna, by nature free from states of
misery, certain of being destined to sambodhi?
மற்றும் என்ன,Ānanda
(ஆனந்தா),தம்மா மீது ஆன அந்த பிரசங்கம் Dhammādāsa (தம்மாவின்
உருப்பளிங்கு) என  கருதப்படும் தம்மாவை வியாக்கியானம் பண்ண பிரசங்கம் செய்ய
விரும்புகிரேன்,ariyasāvaka (புனிதமான சீடர்)ஆக ஆட்கொண்டு,ஒருவேளை அவர்
தானே  விரும்பி உறுதியாக்கிக் கொண்டால்:
‘ஆக எனக்கு, இன்னும் மேலும்
niraya (நரகம்) இல்லை,இன்னும் மேலும் tiracchāna-yoni ( மிருகம
சாம்ராஜ்யம்) இல்லை,இன்னும் மேலும் pettivisaya (ஆவிகள் சாம்ராஜ்யம்)
இல்லை,இன்னும் மேலும் பாக்கியவீனம்,துரதிருஷ்டம்,துக்கம், நிலை இல்லை, நான்
sotāpanna (புனல் பிரவேசி), இயற்கையாக துக்க நிலையில் இருந்து
விடுவிக்கப்பட்டவன்,sambodhi (முழுக்க தூக்கத்திலிருந்து விழிப்பு) ஆக சேர
இருத்தல் உறுதி தானே?

Idh’ānanda, ariyasāvako Buddhe aveccappasāda samannāgato hoti:

Here, Ānanda, an ariyasāvaka is endowed with Buddhe aveccappasāda:
இங்கு,ஆனந்தா,புனிதமான சீடர் Buddhe aveccappasāda  (புத்தர் இடத்தில் தன்னம்பிக்கை)யாக குணிக்கப் படுகிரார்.

‘Itipi
so bhagavā arahaṃ sammāsambuddho vijjācaraṇasampanno sugato lokavidū
anuttaro purisadammasārathi satthā devamanussānaṃ buddho bhagavā’ ti.

Dhamme aveccappasāda samannāgato hoti:
He is endowed with Dhamme aveccappasāda:
 Dhamme aveccappasāda:(தம்மா இடத்தில் தன்னம்பிக்கை)யாக குணிக்கப் படுகிரார்.

‘Svākkhāto bhagavatā dhammo sandiṭṭhiko akāliko ehipassiko opaneyyiko paccattaṃ veditabbo viññūhī’ ti.

Saṅghe aveccappasāda samannāgato hoti:
He is endowed with Saṅghe aveccappasāda:
 Saṅghe aveccappasāda (சான்றோர் இடத்தில் தன்னம்பிக்கை)யாக குணிக்கப் படுகிரார்.

‘Suppaṭipanno
bhagavato sāvakasaṅgho, ujuppaṭipanno bhagavato sāvakasaṅgho,
ñāyappaṭipanno bhagavato sāvakasaṅgho, sāmīcippaṭipanno bhagavato
sāvakasaṅgho yadidaṃ cattāri purisayugāni aṭṭha purisapuggalā, esa
bhagavato sāvakasaṅgho āhuneyyo pāhuneyyo dakkhiṇeyyo añjalikaraṇīyo
anuttaraṃ puññakkhettaṃ lokassā’ ti.

Ariya-kantehi sīlehi samannāgato hoti
He is endowed with a sīla which is agreeable to the ariyas,
புனிதமானவர்கள் ஏற்றுக்கொள்ளத்தக்க சீலராக குணிக்கப் படுகிரார்.

akhaṇḍehi acchiddehi asabalehi akammāsehi bhujissehi viññūpasatthehi aparāmaṭṭhehi samādhisaṃvattanikehi.

Ayaṃ
kho so, Ānanda, dhammādāso dhamma-pariyāyo, yena samannāgato
ariyasāvako ākaṅkhamāno attanāva attānaṃ byā-kareyya: ‘khīṇa-nirayo-mhi
khīṇa-tiracchāna-yoni khīṇa-pettivisayo khīṇ’āpāya-duggati-vinipāto,
sotāpanno-hamasmi avinipāta-dhammo niyato sambodhi-parāyaṇo’ ti 

This,
Ānanda, is the discourse on the Dhamma which is called Dhammādāsa,
possessed of which the ariyasāvaka, if he so desires, can declare of
himself: ‘For me, there is no more niraya, no more tiracchāna-yoni, no
more pettivisaya, no more state of unhappiness, of misfortune, of
misery, I am a sotāpanna, by nature free from states of misery, certain
of being destined to sambodhi. 

இது, Ānanda (ஆனந்தா),தம்மா மீது ஆன
அந்த பிரசங்கம் Dhammādāsa (தம்மாவின் உருப்பளிங்கு) என  கருதப்படும்
தம்மாவை வியாக்கியானம் பண்ண பிரசங்கம் செய்ய விரும்புகிரேன்,ariyasāvaka
(புனிதமான சீடர்)ஆக ஆட்கொண்டு,ஒருவேளை அவர் தானே  விரும்பி உறுதியாக்கிக்
கொண்டால்:
’ஆக எனக்கு, இன்னும் மேலும் niraya (நரகம்) இல்லை,இன்னும் மேலும்
tiracchāna-yoni ( மிருகம சாம்ராஜ்யம்) இல்லை,இன்னும் மேலும் pettivisaya
(ஆவிகள் சாம்ராஜ்யம்) இல்லை,இன்னும் மேலும்
பாக்கியவீனம்,துரதிருஷ்டம்,துக்கம், நிலை இல்லை, நான் sotāpanna (புனல்
பிரவேசி), இயற்கையாக துக்க நிலையில் இருந்து விடுவிக்கப்பட்டவன்,sambodhi
(முழுக்க தூக்கத்திலிருந்து விழிப்பு) ஆக சேர இருத்தல் உறுதி.

… 

… 

Sato, bhikkhave, bhikkhu vihareyya sampajāno. Ayaṃ vo amhākaṃ anusāsanī. 

Sato should you remain, bhikkhus, and sampajānos. This is our intruction to you.

Sato(கவனமான)
நீர் இருக்க வேண்டும்,bhikkhus (பிக்குக்கள்),மேலும் sampajānos(மாறா
இயல்பு அநித்தியத்தை பகுத்தறிதல்).இது தான் உமக்கு
எங்களுடைய போதனை.

Katha’ñca, bhikkhave, bhikkhu sato hoti? Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu
And how, bhikkhus, is a bhikkhu sato? Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu
மற்றும் எப்படி,பிக்கு, பிக்குக்கள் sato (கவனமான) இருக்கிரார்? இங்கு,பிக்குக்கள், ஒரு பிக்கு

kāye
kāyānupassī viharati ātāpī sampajāno satimā, vineyya loke
abhijjhā-domanassaṃ; vedanāsu vedanānupassī viharati ātāpī sampajāno
satimā, vineyya loke abhijjhā-domanassaṃ; citte cittānupassī viharati
ātāpī sampajāno satimā, vineyya loke abhijjhā-domanassaṃ; dhammesu
dhammānupassī viharati ātāpī sampajāno satimā, vineyya loke
abhijjhā-domanassaṃ.

Evaṃ kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu sato hoti. Katha’ñca, bhikkhave, bhikkhu sampajāno hoti? Idha, bhikkhave,
Thus, bhikkhus, is a bhikkhu sato. And how, bhikkhus, is a bhikkhu sampajāno? Here, bhikkhus,

இப்படி,பிக்குக்கள்,பிக்கு
sato (கவனமான) இருக்கிரார்.மற்றும் எப்படி,பிக்குக்கள், பிக்கு
sampajānos(மாறா இயல்பு அநித்தியத்தை பகுத்தறிதல்)ஆகிரார்?
இங்கு,பிக்குக்கள்,

bhikkhu abhikkante paṭikkante sampajānakārī
hoti, ālokite vilokite sampajānakārī hoti, samiñjite pasārite
sampajānakārī hoti, saṅghāṭipattacīvaradhāraṇe sampajānakārī hoti, asite
pīte khāyite sāyite sampajānakārī hoti, uccārapassāvakamme
sampajānakārī hoti, gate ṭhite nisinne sutte jāgarite bhāsite tuṇhībhāve
sampajānakārī hoti.

Evaṃ kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu sampajāno hoti. Sato, bhikkhave, bhikkhu vihareyya sampajāno. Ayaṃ vo amhākaṃ anusāsanī ti. 

Thus, bhikkhus, is a bhikkhu sampajāno. Sato should you remain, bhikkhus, and sampajānos. This is our intruction to you.
இப்படி,பிக்குக்கள்,பிக்கு
sampajānos(மாறா இயல்பு அநித்தியத்தை பகுத்தறிதல்)ஆகிரார்,Sato(கவனமான)
நீர் இருக்க வேண்டும்,பிக்குக்கள்,மற்றும்sampajānos(மாறா இயல்பு
அநித்தியத்தை பகுத்தறிதல்),இது தான் உமக்கு
எங்களுடைய போதனை.

… 



Sabbaphāliphullā kho, Ānanda, yamakasālā akālapupphehi. Te tathāgatassa
sarīraṃ okiranti ajjhokiranti abhippakiranti tathāgatassa pūjāya.
Dibbānipi mandāravapupphāni antalikkhā papatanti, tāni tathāgatassa
sarīraṃ okiranti ajjhokiranti abhippakiranti tathāgatassa pūjāya.
Dibbānipi candanacuṇṇāni antalikkhā papatanti, tāni tathāgatassa sarīraṃ
okiranti ajjhokiranti abhippakiranti tathāgatassa pūjāya. Dibbānipi
tūriyāni antalikkhe vajjanti tathāgatassa pūjāya. Dibbānipi saṅgītāni
antalikkhe vattanti tathāgatassa pūjāya. 

– Ananda, the twin sala
trees are in full bloom, though it is not the season of flowering. And
the blossoms rain upon the body of the Tathagata and drop and scatter
and are strewn upon it in worship of the Tathagata. And celestial coral
flowers and heavenly sandalwood powder from the sky rain down upon the
body of the Tathagata, and drop and scatter and are strewn upon it in
worship of the Tathagata. And the sound of heavenly voices and heavenly
instruments makes music in the air out of reverence for the Tathagata.
-ஆனந்தா,பூவா
பருவகாலமாக இருந்த போதிலும், இரட்டை sala (சாலா) மரங்கள் முழு மலர்ச்சி
அடைந்து இருக்கிறது. மற்றும் Tathagata (குறைபாடற்றவரை) வழிபாடு செய்தல்
போல் Tathagata(குறைபாடற்றவர்) உடல் மேலே பூமழை பொழிந்து, துளி சிதற,
இரத்தினப்பிரபையாகியது. மற்றும் தேவலோக பவழமலர்கள் மற்றும் சுவர்க்கத்தைச்
சேர்ந்த சந்தன மரத் தூள் வானத்தில் இருந்து மழை கீழ் நோக்கி Tathagata
(குறைபாடற்றவர்) உடல் மேலே பொழிந்து, மற்றும் Tathagata (குறைபாடற்றவரை)
வழிபாடு செய்தல் போல் Tathagata(குறைபாடற்றவர்) உடல் மேலே பூமழை பொழிந்தது.
மற்றும் Tathagata(குறைபாடற்றவர்) போற்றுதலைக் காட்டுஞ் சமிக்கையால்
சுவர்க்கத்தைச் சேர்ந்த குரல் ஒலி மற்றும் இசைகருவிகள் காற்றுவெளியில்
வெளிப்படுத்தியது.

Na kho, Ānanda, ettāvatā Tathāgato sakkato vā
hoti garukato vā mānito vā pūjito vā apacito vā. Yo kho, Ānanda, bhikkhu
vā bhikkhunī vā upāsako vā upāsikā vā dhammānudhammappaṭipanno viharati
sāmīcippaṭipanno anudhammacārī, so Tathāgataṃ sakkaroti garuṃ karoti
māneti pūjeti apaciyati, paramāya pūjāya. Tasmātih’ānanda,
dhammānudhammappaṭipannā viharissāma sāmīcippaṭipannā
anudhammacārin’oti. Evañ’hi vo, Ānanda, sikkhitabba nti. 

It is not
by this, Ānanda, that the Tathāgata is respected, venerated, esteemed,
paid homage and honored. But, Ananda, any bhikkhu or bhikkhuni, layman
or laywoman, remaining dhamm’ānudhamma’p’paṭipanna, sāmīci’p’paṭipanna,
living in accordance with the Dhamma, that one respects, venerates,
esteems, pays homage, and honors the Tathāgata with the most excellent
homage. Therefore, Ānanda, you should train yourselves thus: ‘We will
remain dhamm’ānudhamma’p’paṭipanna, sāmīci’p’paṭipanna, living in
accordance with the Dhamma’.
இதனால் மட்டும் அல்ல, ஆனந்தா,Tathagata
(குறைபாடற்றவரை) உபசரித்தது, மரியாதை செலுத்தியது, நன்குமதிக்கப் பட்டது,
மனந்திறந்த புகழுரைத்தது, கெளரவம் செலுத்தியது. ஆனால், ஆனந்தா, எந்த ஒரு
பிக்குவோ அல்லது பிக்குனியோ, உபாசகன் அல்லது
உபாசகி,dhamm’ānudhamma’p’paṭipanna, sāmīci’p’paṭipanna, தம்மாவிற்கு
பொருந்துமாறு பயிற்சிக்கிராரோ அவர் Tathagata (குறைபாடற்றவரை) உபசரித்தது,
மரியாதை செலுத்தி, நன்குமதித்து, மனந்திறந்த புகழுரைத்தது, கெளரவம்
செலுத்தி. மிக உயர்ந்த அளவு நேர்த்திவாய்ந்த மனந்திறந்த புகழுரையாற்றுவர்.
இதுக்காக, ஆனந்தா, நீங்கள், நீங்களாகவே பயிற்சித்தல் இதுதான்: நாங்கள்
dhamm’ānudhamma’p’paṭipanna, sāmīci’p’paṭipanna, தம்மாவிற்கு
பொருந்துமாறு வாழ்க்கை முறையில் தொடர்ந்திருப்போம்.
… 

… 


‘Siyā kho pan’ānanda, tumhākaṃ evam’assa: ‘atīta-satthukaṃ pāvacanaṃ,
natthi no satthā’ ti. Na kho pan’etaṃ, Ānanda, evaṃ daṭṭhabbaṃ. Yo vo,
Ānanda, mayā Dhammo ca Vinayo ca desito paññatto, so vo mam’accayena
satthā. 

– ‘To some of you, Ānanda, it may occur thus: ‘The words of
the Teacher have ended, there is no longer a Teacher’. But this,
Ānanda, should not, be so considered. That, Ānanda, which I have taught
and made known to you as the Dhamma and the Vinaya, that will be your
Teacher after my passing away. 

உங்கள் சிலர்ருக்கு, ஆனந்தா,இவ்வாறு  நேரிடக் கூடும்:
கற்பிப்பவர்
வார்த்தைகள் தீர்ந்து விட்டது,  இனி கற்பிப்பவர் இல்லை. ஆனால் இது,
ஆனந்தா, அவ்வாறு ஆலோசனை பண்ணப்படாது. அது, ஆனந்தா,எவை நான் பாடம் படிப்பிது
மற்றும் உங்களை அறிந்திருக்க செய்துமுடித்த  Dhamma and Vinaya (தம்மாவும்
வினயாவும்) அது என்னுடைய இறப்புக்கு அப்பால் உங்களுடைய கற்பிப்பவராக
இருக்கும்.
… 


DN 22 - (D ii 290)
Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta
— Attendance on awareness —
[ mahā+satipaṭṭhāna ]

This sutta is widely considered as a the main reference for meditation practice.

Note: infobubbles on all Pali words

Pāḷi

Uddesa

I. Kāyānupassanā
   A. Ānāpāna Pabba
   B. Iriyāpatha Pabba
   C. Sampajāna Pabba
   D. Paṭikūlamanasikāra Pabba
   E. Dhātumanasikāra Pabba
   F. Navasivathika Pabba

II. Vedanānupassanā

English

Introduction

I. Observation of Kāya
   A. Section on ānāpāna
   B. Section on postures
   C. Section on sampajañña
   D. Section on repulsiveness
   E. Section on the Elements
   F. Section on the nine charnel grounds

II. Observation of Vedanā

Uddesa

Evaṃ me sutaṃ:
Introduction

Thus have I heard: 

Ekaṃ samayaṃ bhagavā kurūsu viharati kammāsadhammaṃ nāma kurūnaṃ nigamo. Tatra kho bhagavā bhikkhū āmantesi:
On
one occasion, the Bhagavā was staying among the Kurus at Kammāsadhamma,
a market town of the Kurus. There, he addressed the bhikkhus:
– Bhikkhavo ti.
– Bhaddante ti te bhikkhū bhagavato paccassosuṃ. Bhagavā etad-avoca: 

– Bhikkhus.
– Bhaddante answered the bhikkhus. The Bhagavā said: 


Ekāyano ayaṃ, bhikkhave, maggo sattānaṃ visuddhiyā, soka-paridevānaṃ
samatikkamāya, dukkha-domanassānaṃ atthaṅgamāya, ñāyassa adhigamāya,
nibbānassa sacchikiriyāya, yadidaṃ cattāro satipaṭṭhānā. 

– This,
bhikkhus, is the path that leads to nothing but the purification of
beings, the overcoming of sorrow and lamentation, the disappearance of
dukkha-domanassa, the attainment of the right way, the realization of
Nibbāna, that is to say the four satipaṭṭhānas.

Katame
cattāro? Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī viharati ātāpī
sampajāno satimā, vineyya loke abhijjhā-domanassaṃ. Vedanāsu
vedanānupassī viharati ātāpī sampajāno satimā, vineyya loke
abhijjhā-domanassaṃ. Citte cittānupassī viharati ātāpī sampajāno satimā,
vineyya loke abhijjhā-domanassaṃ. Dhammesu dhammānupassī viharati ātāpī
sampajāno satimā, vineyya loke abhijjhā-domanassaṃ.
Which four?
Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya, ātāpī
sampajāno, satimā, having given up abhijjhā-domanassa towards the world.
He dwells observing vedanā in vedanā, ātāpī sampajāno, satimā, having
given up abhijjhā-domanassa towards the world. He dwells observing citta
in citta, ātāpī sampajāno, satimā, having given up abhijjhā-domanassa
towards the world. He dwells observing dhamma·s in dhamma·s, ātāpī
sampajāno, satimā, having given up abhijjhā-domanassa towards the world.

I. Kāyānupassanā

A. Ānāpāna Pabba

Katha·ñ·ca,
bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī viharati? Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu
arañña-gato vā rukkha-mūla-gato vā suññ’āgāra-gato vā nisīdati pallaṅkaṃ
ābhujitvā ujuṃ kāyaṃ paṇidhāya parimukhaṃ satiṃ upaṭṭhapetvā. So
sato’va assasati, sato’va passasati. Dīghaṃ vā assasanto ‘dīghaṃ
assasāmī’ ti pajānāti; dīghaṃ vā passasanto ‘dīghaṃ passasāmī’ ti
pajānāti; rassaṃ vā assasanto ‘rassaṃ assasāmī’ ti pajānāti; rassaṃ vā
passasanto ‘rassaṃ passasāmī’ ti pajānāti; ’sabba-kāya-paṭisaṃvedī
assasissāmī’ ti sikkhati; ’sabba-kāya-paṭisaṃvedī passasissāmī’ ti
sikkhati; ‘passambhayaṃ kāya-saṅkhāraṃ assasissāmī’ ti sikkhati;
‘passambhayaṃ kāya-saṅkhāraṃ passasissāmī’ ti sikkhati. 


நான் இவ்வாறு கேட்டிருக்கேன்:

 ஒரு
குறிப்பிட்டதறுவாயில், ஒரு கடைத்தெருவு நகரமான Kammāsadhamma
(கம்மாசதம்மா) வில், Kurus (பாரத்துவாசர்) இடையில் Bhagavā  (பகவான்) தங்கி
இருந்தார்.

 அவ்விடம், பிக்குக்களுக்கு அவர் உரை நிகழ்த்தினார்:
- பிக்குக்களுக்களா

- பிக்குக்களுக்கு Bhaddante (பந்த்தே) பதில்  அளித்தார்.Bhagavā  (பகவா) சொற்றார்:

-
இது, பிக்குக்களுக்களா,ஒன்றுமில்லை இனங்களை தூய்மைப்படுத்தும் பாதையில்
நடத்திச் செல்லும், துயரம் மற்றும் புலம்பலை முறியடித்து, 
dukkha-domanassa(துக்கம்-துயரம்)மறைவு , Nibbāna(யாவுங் கடந்த நிலை
உணர்தல்) மெய்யாகக் காண்டல்,அதுதான் நான்கு பொருள்கள் கொண்ட
satipaṭṭhānas(விழிப்பு நிலை உளதாந்தன்மை) என கூறலாம்.

எந்த
நான்கு?இங்கு பிக்குக்களுக்களா,ஒரு பிக்கு kāye kāyānupassī (உடலை உடல்
கண்காணிப்புடன்) கவனித்து வசிக்கிரார் ātāpī sampajāno satimā,வேறு
வழியில்லாமல்   பிரபஞ்சம் நோக்கி எச்சரிக்கையுடன் இருக்க
ஏகாந்தமாயிருக்கிரார்.வேறு வழியில்லாமல்   பிரபஞ்சம் நோக்கி
எச்சரிக்கையுடன் இருக்க ஏகாந்தமாயிருக்க  Vedanāsu vedanānupassī
உறுதலுணர்ச்சி கண்காணிப்புடன் வசிக்கிரார்.வேறு வழியில்லாமல்   பிரபஞ்சம்
நோக்கி எச்சரிக்கையுடன் இருக்க ஏகாந்தமாயிருக Citte cittānupassī viharati
ātāpī sampajāno satimā, சித்த நலம் கருதி ண்காணிப்புடன் வசிக்கிரார்.
மனத்தால் இயக்கப்படுகிற அபூர்வமான வினயா(ஒழுக்கம்) காக்க வேறு
வழியில்லாமல்   பிரபஞ்சம் நோக்கி எச்சரிக்கையுடன் இருக்க ஏகாந்தமாயிருக்க
கண்காணிப்புடன் வசிக்கிரார்.

I. Kāyānupassanā

A. Section on ānāpāna

And
how, bhikkhus, does a bhikkhu dwell observing kāya in kāya? Here,
bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, having gone to the forest or having gone at the
root of a tree or having gone to an empty room, sits down folding the
legs crosswise, setting kāya upright, and setting sati parimukhaṃ. Being
thus sato he breathes in, being thus sato he breathes out. Breathing in
long he understands: ‘I am breathing in long’; breathing out long he
understands: ‘I am breathing out long’; breathing in short he
understands: ‘I am breathing in short’; breathing out short he
understands: ‘I am breathing out short’; he trains himself: ‘feeling the
whole kāya, I will breathe in’; he trains himself: ‘feeling the whole
kāya, I will breathe out’; he trains himself: ‘calming down the
kāya-saṅkhāras, I will breathe in’; he trains himself: ‘calming down the
kāya-saṅkhāras, I will breathe out’.
மற்றும்
எப்படி,பிக்குக்களுக்களே,kāya in kāya (உடலில் உடலை கவனித்து வசிக்கிரார்?
இங்கு பிக்குக்களுக்களா,ஒரு பிக்கு,காட்டுக்குச் சென்றோ அல்லது
மரத்தடிக்குச் சென்றோ அல்லது காலி அறைகுச் சென்றோ,காலை குறுக்காக
கீழ்நோக்கி மடித்துக்கொண்டு அமர்கிரார்,உடலை செங்குத்தாக
சரிசெய்துக்கொண்டு,மற்றும் sati parimukhaṃ. மூச்சு உள்ளே அல்லது வெளியே
சரிசெய்துக்கொள்கிரார்.  sato இவ்வாறு கவனமான மூச்சு உள்ளே அல்லது வெளியே
செலுத்துகிரார். மூச்சு நீண்டதாக உள்ளே செலுத்தும்போது: நான் நீண்டதாக
உள்ளே செலுத்துககின்றேன் என அறிகிரார்.மூச்சு நீண்டதாக வெளியே 
செலுத்தும்போது: நான் நீண்டதாக வெளியே செலுத்துககின்றேன் என
அறிகிரார்.மூச்சு குறைவாக உள்ளே செலுத்தும்போது: நான் குறைவாக உள்ளே
செலுத்துககின்றேன் என அறிகிரார்.மூச்சு குறைவாக வெளியே செலுத்தும்போது:நான்
குறைவாக வெளியே செலுத்துககின்றேன் என அறிகிரார்.அவர் தானே
பயிற்சித்துகொள்கிரார்: முழு  kāya உடலை/காயாவையும் கூருணர்ச்சியுடன்,நான்
மூச்சை உள்ளே செலுத்துககின்றேன்:அவர் தானே பயிற்சித்துகொள்கிரார்:முழு 
kāya உடலை/காயாவையும் கூருணர்ச்சியுடன்,நான் மூச்சை வெளியே
செலுத்துககின்றேன்:அவர் தானே பயிற்சித்துகொள்கிரார்:  kāya-saṅkhāras
உடல்/காயா இச்சாசத்தியை அமைதி உண்டாக்கொண்டு.நான் மூச்சை உள்ளே
செலுத்துககின்றேன்:அவர் தானே பயிற்சித்துகொள்கிரார்:,நான் மூச்சை வெளியே
செலுத்துககின்றேன்:அவர் தானே பயிற்சித்துகொள்கிரார்:
Seyyathāpi,
bhikkhave, dakkho bhamakāro vā bhamakār·antevāsī vā dīghaṃ vā añchanto
‘dīghaṃ añchāmī’ ti pajānāti; rassaṃ vā añchanto ‘rassaṃ añchāmī’ ti
pajānāti; evameva kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu dīghaṃ vā assasanto ‘dīghaṃ
assasāmī’ ti pajānāti; dīghaṃ vā passasanto ‘dīghaṃ passasāmī’ ti
pajānāti; rassaṃ vā assasanto ‘rassaṃ assasāmī’ ti pajānāti; rassaṃ vā
passasanto ‘rassaṃ passasāmī’ ti pajānāti; ’sabba-kāya-paṭisaṃvedī
assasissāmī’ ti sikkhati; ’sabba-kāya-paṭisaṃvedī passasissāmī’ ti
sikkhati; ‘passambhayaṃ kāya-saṅkhāraṃ assasissāmī’ ti sikkhati;
‘passambhayaṃ kāya-saṅkhāraṃ passasissāmī’ ti sikkhati. 


Just
as, bhikkhus, a skillful turner or a turner’s apprentice, making a long
turn, understands: ‘I am making a long turn’; making a short turn, he
understands: ‘I am making a short turn’; in the same way, bhikkhus, a
bhikkhu, breathing in long, understands: ‘I am breathing in long’;
breathing out long he understands: ‘I am breathing out long’; breathing
in short he understands: ‘I am breathing in short’; breathing out short
he understands: ‘I am breathing out short’; he trains himself: ‘feeling
the whole kāya, I will breathe in’; he trains himself: ‘feeling the
whole kāya, I will breathe out’; he trains himself: ‘calming down the
kāya-saṅkhāras, I will breathe in’; he trains himself: ‘calming down the
kāya-saṅkhāras, I will breathe out’.

சம்மதம்படி,பிக்குக்களுக்களே,திறமை
கடைசல்காரர் அல்லது கடைசல்காரின் தொழில் பழகுநர், ஒரு நீளமான சுழற்றுதல்
உருவாக்குதல் குறிப்பறிது: ‘நான் நீளமான சுழற்றுதல் உருவாக்குகிறேன்’;ஒரு
குறைவான சுழற்றுதல் உருவாக்குதல் குறிப்பறிது: ‘நான் குறைவான சுழற்றுதல்
உருவாக்குகிறேன்’;அவ்வழி,பிக்குக்களுக்களே,ஒரு பிக்கு,மூச்சு நீண்டதாக
உள்ளே செலுத்தும்போது: நான் நீண்டதாக உள்ளே செலுத்துககின்றேன் என
அறிகிரார்.மூச்சு நீண்டதாக வெளியே  செலுத்தும்போது: நான் நீண்டதாக வெளியே
செலுத்துககின்றேன் என அறிகிரார்.மூச்சு குறைவாக உள்ளே செலுத்தும்போது: நான்
குறைவாக உள்ளே செலுத்துககின்றேன் என அறிகிரார்.மூச்சு குறைவாக வெளியே
செலுத்தும்போது:நான் குறைவாக வெளியே செலுத்துககின்றேன் என அறிகிரார்.அவர்
தானே பயிற்சித்துகொள்கிரார்: முழு  kāya உடலை/காயாவையும்
கூருணர்ச்சியுடன்,நான் மூச்சை உள்ளே செலுத்துககின்றேன்:அவர் தானே
பயிற்சித்துகொள்கிரார்:முழு  kāya உடலை/காயாவையும் கூருணர்ச்சியுடன்,நான்
மூச்சை வெளியே செலுத்துககின்றேன்:அவர் தானே பயிற்சித்துகொள்கிரார்: 
kāya-saṅkhāras உடல்/காயா இச்சாசத்தியை அமைதி உண்டாக்கொண்டு.நான் மூச்சை
உள்ளே செலுத்துககின்றேன்:அவர் தானே பயிற்சித்துகொள்கிரார்:,நான் மூச்சை
வெளியே செலுத்துககின்றேன்:அவர் தானே பயிற்சித்துகொள்கிரார்:

Iti
ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī
viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati;
samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā
kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati;
‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti, yāvadeva
ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati, na ca kiñci
loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī
viharati. 




Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally,
or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells observing
kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya
of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing away of
phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away
of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is
present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he
dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus,
bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya. 

இவ்வாறு அவர்
kāya in kāya உடல்/காயத்தை காயதுக்குள் கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது
காயத்தை காயதுக்கு வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது காயத்தை
காயதுக்கு உள்ளே மற்றும் வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்;புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்க எழுச்சி கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், மற்றும் புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்கதை கடந்துசெல்லுவதை கண்காணித்து வாசம் செய்கிரார்; இல்லாவிடில்
எச்சரிக்கையாயிருக்கிற உணர் உடனிருக்கிறதை,சும்மா வெறும் ஓர்அளவு ஞானம்
மற்றும் ஓர்அளவு paṭissati என எண்ணி பற்றறு வாசம் செய்கிரார்.

B. Iriyāpatha Pabba

Puna
ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu gacchanto vā ‘gacchāmī’ ti pajānāti, ṭhito
vā ‘ṭhitomhī’ ti pajānāti, nisinno vā ‘nisinnomhī’ ti pajānāti, sayāno
vā ‘sayānomhī’ ti pajānāti. Yathā yathā vā pan·assa kāyo paṇihito hoti,
tathā tathā naṃ pajānāti. 

B. Section on postures

Furthermore,
bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, while walking, understands: ‘I am walking’, or
while standing he understands: ‘I am standing’, or while sitting he
understands: ‘I am sitting’, or while lying down he understands: ‘I am
lying down’. Or else, in whichever position his kāya is disposed, he
understands it accordingly. 

Iti ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī
viharati, bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā
kāye kāyānupassī viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati,
vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī
vā kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā
hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati,
na ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye
kāyānupassī viharati. 



Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya
internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells
observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing
the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing
away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and
passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!”
sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere
paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the
world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya. 

மேலும்,பிக்குக்களுக்களே,ஒரு
பிக்கு, நடந்து செல்லும் பொழுது, ‘நான் நடந்து செல்கிறேன்’,என அவர்
அறிந்துகொள்கிறார்.அல்லது நின்று கொண்டிருக்கிற பொழுது, ‘நான் நின்று
கொண்டிருக்கிகிறேன்’, என அவர் அறிந்துகொள்கிறார்:அல்லது உட்கார்ந்திருக்கிற
பொழுது, ‘நான் உட்கார்ந்திருக்கிறேன்’, என அவர் அறிந்துகொள்கிறார்: அல்லது
படுத்திருத்திருக்கிற பொழுது, ‘நான் படுத்திருத்திருக்கிறேன்’,என அவர்
அறிந்துகொள்கிறார்: தவிர அவர் kāya உடல்அமர்வுநிலை எதுவாக தீர்வு
செய்கிறாரோ அதன்படிபுரிந்து கொள்கிறார்.

இவ்வாறு அவர் kāya in kāya
உடல்/காயத்தை காயதுக்குள் கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது காயத்தை
காயதுக்கு வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது காயத்தை காயதுக்கு
உள்ளே மற்றும் வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்;புலன்களால் உணரத்தக்க
எழுச்சி கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், மற்றும் புலன்களால் உணரத்தக்கதை
கடந்துசெல்லுவதை கண்காணித்து வாசம் செய்கிரார்; இல்லாவிடில்
எச்சரிக்கையாயிருக்கிற உணர் உடனிருக்கிறதை,சும்மா வெறும் ஓர்அளவு ஞானம்
மற்றும் ஓர்அளவு paṭissati என எண்ணி பற்றறு வாசம் செய்கிரார்.
C. Sampajāna Pabba

Puna
ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu abhikkante paṭikkante sampajānakārī hoti,
ālokite vilokite sampajānakārī hoti, samiñjite pasārite sampajānakārī
hoti, saṅghāṭi-patta-cīvara-dhāraṇe sampajānakārī hoti, asite pīte
khāyite sāyite sampajānakārī hoti, uccāra-passāva-kamme sampajānakārī
hoti, gate ṭhite nisinne sutte jāgarite bhāsite tuṇhībhāve sampajānakārī
hoti. 


C. Section on sampajañña

Furthermore,
bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, while approaching and while departing, acts with
sampajañña, while looking ahead and while looking around, he acts with
sampajañña, while bending and while stretching, he acts with sampajañña,
while wearing the robes and the upper robe and while carrying the bowl,
he acts with sampajañña, while eating, while drinking, while chewing,
while tasting, he acts with sampajañña, while attending to the business
of defecating and urinating, he acts with sampajañña, while walking,
while standing, while sitting, while sleeping, while being awake, while
talking and while being silent, he acts with sampajañña. 

Iti
ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī
viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati;
samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā
kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati;
‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti, yāvadeva
ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati, na ca kiñci
loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī
viharati. 



Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally, or he
dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells observing kāya
in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of
phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena
in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of
phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is present
in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells
detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a
bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya. 


மேலும்,பிக்குக்களுக்களே,ஒரு
பிக்கு, அணுகும் பொழுது மற்றும் விட்டு நீங்கும் பொழுது, sampajañña
நிரந்தரமான தீர்க்கமான உணருந்திறனுடன்  நுணுகிக்கண்டு  செயல் படுகிரார்,
முன் நோக்கி கவனித்துப் பார்க்கும் பொழுது மற்றும் எல்லாப் பக்கங்களிலும்
கவனித்துப் பார்க்கும் பொழுது,sampajañña நிரந்தரமான தீர்க்கமான
உணருந்திறனுடன்  நுணுகிக்கண்டு  செயல் படுகிரார், வளைக்கிற பொழுது  மற்றும்
நெட்டிமுறியும் பொழுது,sampajañña நிரந்தரமான தீர்க்கமான உணருந்திறனுடன் 
நுணுகிக்கண்டு  செயல் படுகிரார், பதவிக்குரிய நீண்ட மேலங்கி அணிந்து கொள்
பொழுது மற்றும் தளர்த்தியான மேலங்கி  மற்றும் ஐயக்கடிஞை எடுத்துச் செல்லும்
பொழுது,sampajañña நிரந்தரமான தீர்க்கமான உணருந்திறனுடன்  நுணுகிக்கண்டு 
செயல் படுகிரார், உண்ணும் பொழுது, குடிக்கும் பொழுது, மெல்லும் பொழுது,
சுவைக்கும் பொழுது,sampajañña நிரந்தரமான தீர்க்கமான உணருந்திறனுடன் 
நுணுகிக்கண்டு  செயல் படுகிரார், வண்டலகற்றும்  மற்றும் சிறுநீர் கழிக்கும்
பணி கவனிக்கும் பொழுது,sampajañña நிரந்தரமான தீர்க்கமான உணருந்திறனுடன் 
நுணுகிக்கண்டு  செயல் படுகிரார், நடந்து செல்கிறே பொழுது நின்று
கொண்டிருக்கிற பொழுது,
உட்கார்ந்திருக்கிற பொழுது, படுத்திருத்திருக்கிற
பொழுது, விழிதிருக்கிற பொழுது, உரையாடுகிற பொழுது, பேசாமலிருக்கிற பொழுது,
sampajañña நிரந்தரமான தீர்க்கமான உணருந்திறனுடன்  நுணுகிக்கண்டு  செயல்
படுகிரார்.

இவ்வாறு அவர் kāya in kāya உடல்/காயத்தை காயதுக்குள்
கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது காயத்தை காயதுக்கு வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம்
செய்கிரார், அல்லது காயத்தை காயதுக்கு உள்ளே மற்றும் வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம்
செய்கிரார்;புலன்களால் உணரத்தக்க எழுச்சி கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்,
மற்றும் புலன்களால் உணரத்தக்கதை கடந்துசெல்லுவதை கண்காணித்து வாசம்
செய்கிரார்; இல்லாவிடில் எச்சரிக்கையாயிருக்கிற உணர் உடனிருக்கிறதை,சும்மா
வெறும் ஓர்அளவு ஞானம் மற்றும் ஓர்அளவு paṭissati என எண்ணி பற்றறு வாசம்
செய்கிரார்.
D. Paṭikūlamanasikāra Pabba

Puna ca·paraṃ,
bhikkhave, bhikkhu imam·eva kāyaṃ, uddhaṃ pādatalā adho kesa·matthakā,
taca·pariyantaṃ pūraṃ nānappakārassa asucino paccavekkhati: ‘Atthi
imasmiṃ kāye kesā lomā nakhā dantā taco maṃsaṃ nhāru aṭṭhi aṭṭhimiñjaṃ
vakkaṃ hadayaṃ yakanaṃ kilomakaṃ pihakaṃ papphāsaṃ antaṃ antaguṇaṃ
udariyaṃ karīsaṃ pittaṃ semhaṃ pubbo lohitaṃ sedo medo assu vasā kheḷo
siṅghāṇikā lasikā muttaṃ’ ti. 


D. Section on Repulsiveness

Furthermore,
bhikkhus, a bhikkhu considers this very body, from the soles of the
feet up and from the hair on the head down, which is delimited by its
skin and full of various kinds of impurities: “In this kāya, there are
the hairs of the head, hairs of the body, nails, teeth, skin, flesh,
tendons, bones, bone marrow, kidneys, heart, liver, pleura, spleen,
lungs, intestines, mesentery, stomach with its contents, feces, bile,
phlegm, pus, blood, sweat, fat, tears, grease, saliva, nasal mucus,
synovial fluid and urine.” 

Seyyathāpi, bhikkhave, ubhatomukhā
putoḷi pūrā nānāvihitassa dhaññassa, seyyathidaṃ sālīnaṃ vīhīnaṃ
muggānaṃ māsānaṃ tilānaṃ taṇḍulānaṃ. Tamenaṃ cakkhumā puriso muñcitvā
paccavekkheyya: ‘Ime sālī ime vīhī, ime muggā, ime māsā, ime tilā, ime
taṇḍulā’ ti; evameva kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu imam·eva kāyaṃ, uddhaṃ
pādatalā adho kesa·matthakā, taca·pariyantaṃ pūraṃ nānappakārassa
asucino paccavekkhati: ‘Atthi imasmiṃ kāye kesā lomā nakhā dantā taco
maṃsaṃ nhāru aṭṭhi aṭṭhimiñjaṃ vakkaṃ hadayaṃ yakanaṃ kilomakaṃ pihakaṃ
papphāsaṃ antaṃ antaguṇaṃ udariyaṃ karīsaṃ pittaṃ semhaṃ pubbo lohitaṃ
sedo medo assu vasā kheḷo siṅghāṇikā lasikā muttaṃ’ ti. 

Just as if,
bhikkhus, there was a bag having two openings and filled with various
kinds of grain, such as hill-paddy, paddy, mung beans, cow-peas, sesame
seeds and husked rice. A man with good eyesight, having unfastened it,
would consider [its contents]: “This is hill-paddy, this is paddy, those
are mung beans, those are cow-peas, those are sesame seeds and this is
husked rice;” in the same way, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu considers this very
body, from the soles of the feet up and from the hair on the head down,
which is delimited by its skin and full of various kinds of impurities:
“In this kāya, there are the hairs of the head, hairs of the body,
nails, teeth, skin, flesh, tendons, bones, bone marrow, kidneys, heart,
liver, pleura, spleen, lungs, intestines, mesentery, stomach with its
contents, feces, bile, phlegm, pus, blood, sweat, fat, tears, grease,
saliva, nasal mucus, synovial fluid and urine.”


Iti
ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī
viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati;
samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā
kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati;
‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti, yāvadeva
ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati, na ca kiñci
loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī
viharati. 



Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally, or he
dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells observing kāya
in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of
phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena
in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of
phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is present
in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells
detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a
bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya. 


மேலும்,
பிக்குக்களுக்களே, ஒரு பிக்கு, இதே உடம்பில்,உச்சைந்தலை முடியிலிருந்து
கீழ்நோக்கி உள்ளங்கால் வரை, மெல்லிய தோல் மற்றும் பல்வேறு வகைப்பட்ட
அசுத்தம் நிறைந்த, ‘இந்த kāya, உடம்பு தலை முடி, உடம்புமுடி, நகம், பற்கள்,
மெல்லியல் தோல், தசை, தசை நாண், எலும்பு, எலும்புச்சோறு, சிறுநீரகம்,
இதயம், கல்லீரல்,மார்புவரி, மண்ணீரல், சுவாசப்பை,குடல், குடல்தாங்கி,
இரைப்பை அதனுடைய உள்ளடங்கல், மலம், பித்தநீர், கபம், சீழ், இரத்தம்,
வியர்வை, கொழுப்பு, கண்ணீர், மசகிடு, உமிழ்நீர், மூக்குச்சளி, உயவுநீர்மஞ்
சார்ந்த நீர்த்தன்மையுள்ள மற்றும் சிறுநீர் அதன் வரம்பிடலில் உள்ளது என
அறீவார்.

ஒருவேளை பிக்குக்களுக்களே,அங்கே ஒரு பை இரண்டு வாயில்கள்
உடையதாயிருப்பின், பல்வேறு  வகைப்பட்ட தானியம், குன்று நெல் பயிர், நெல்
பயிர், பச்சைப்பருப்பு, மாட்டு பட்டாணி, எள்ளு விதை, தொலியல். ஒரு மனிதன்
நல்ல பார்வையாற்றல் உடையவராயிருத்தல் கட்டு அவிழ்க்கப் பட்டவுடன் ஆழ்ந்து
ஆராய விரும்பி ,”இது குன்று நெல் பயிர்,நெல் பயிர், பச்சைப்பருப்பு, மாட்டு
பட்டாணி, எள்ளு விதை, தொலியல்என அறீவார்.” அதே போல்,  பிக்குக்களுக்களே,
ஒரு பிக்கு, இதே உடம்பில்,உச்சைந்தலை முடியிலிருந்து கீழ்நோக்கி உள்ளங்கால்
வரை, மெல்லிய தோல் மற்றும் பல்வேறு வகைப்பட்ட அசுத்தம் நிறைந்த, ‘இந்த
kāya, உடம்பு தலை முடி, உடம்புமுடி, நகம், பற்கள், மெல்லியல் தோல், தசை,
தசை நாண், எலும்பு, எலும்புச்சோறு, சிறுநீரகம், இதயம், கல்லீரல்,மார்புவரி,
மண்ணீரல், சுவாசப்பை,குடல், குடல்தாங்கி, இரைப்பை அதனுடைய உள்ளடங்கல்,
மலம், பித்தநீர், கபம், சீழ், இரத்தம், வியர்வை, கொழுப்பு, கண்ணீர்,
மசகிடு, உமிழ்நீர், மூக்குச்சளி, உயவுநீர்மஞ் சார்ந்த நீர்த்தன்மையுள்ள
மற்றும் சிறுநீர் அதன் வரம்பிடலில் உள்ளது என அறீவார்.

இவ்வாறு அவர்
kāya in kāya உடல்/காயத்தை காயதுக்குள் கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது
காயத்தை காயதுக்கு வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது காயத்தை
காயதுக்கு உள்ளே மற்றும் வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்;புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்க எழுச்சி கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், மற்றும் புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்கதை கடந்துசெல்லுவதை கண்காணித்து வாசம் செய்கிரார்; இல்லாவிடில்
எச்சரிக்கையாயிருக்கிற உணர் உடனிருக்கிறதை,சும்மா வெறும் ஓர்அளவு ஞானம்
மற்றும் ஓர்அளவு paṭissati என எண்ணி பற்றறு வாசம் செய்கிரார்.

E. Dhātumanasikāra Pabba

Puna
ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu imam·eva kāyaṃ yathā·ṭhitaṃ
yathā·paṇihitaṃ dhātuso paccavekkhati: ‘Atthi imasmiṃ kāye pathavī·dhātu
āpo·dhātū tejo·dhātū vāyo·dhātū’ ti. 


E. Section on the Elements

Furthermore,
bhikkhus, a bhikkhu reflects on this very kāya, however it is placed,
however it is disposed: “In this kāya, there is the earth element, the
water element, the fire element and the air element.” 


Seyyathāpi,
bhikkhave, dakkho goghātako vā goghātak·antevāsī vā gāviṃ vadhitvā
catu·mahā·pathe bilaso vibhajitvā nisinno assa; evameva kho, bhikkhave,
bhikkhu imam·eva kāyaṃ yathā·ṭhitaṃ yathā·paṇihitaṃ dhātuso
paccavekkhati: ‘Atthi imasmiṃ kāye pathavī·dhātu āpo·dhātū tejo·dhātū
vāyo·dhātū’ ti. 

Just as, bhikkhus, a skillful butcher or a
butcher’s apprentice, having killed a cow, would sit at a crossroads
cutting it into pieces; in the same way, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu reflects on
this very kāya, however it is placed, however it is disposed: “In this
kāya, there is the earth element, the water element, the fire element
and the air element.”

 

Iti ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī
viharati, bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā
kāye kāyānupassī viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati,
vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī
vā kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā
hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati,
na ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye
kāyānupassī viharati. 



Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya
internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells
observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing
the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing
away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and
passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!”
sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere
paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the
world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya.

E. நாற்பெரும் பூதங்கள் மேலான பிரிவு
மேலும்,
பிக்குக்களுக்களே, ஒரு பிக்கு, எவ்வகையிலேனும் அதை வைத்திருந்த போதும்,
எவ்வகையிலேனும் அதை அப்புறப்படுத்த போதும், இந்த உடல்/காயம்  பிரதிபலிக்க 
இந்த :”உடல்/காயத்தில் ,நிலவுலகம் மெய்ம்மூலம், தண்ணீர் மெய்ம்மூலம்,
நெருப்பு மெய்ம்மூலம், காற்று மெய்ம்மூலம் இருக்கிறது.

சம்மதம்போலே,பிக்குக்களுக்களே, ஒரு பயிற்சி பெற்ற கசாப்புக்காரர் அல்லது ஒரு
கசாப்புக்காரரிடம் தொழில் பழகுநர்,ஒரு பசு கொல்லுஞ் செயல் உடையவராயிரருந்து,
ஒரு
குறுக்கு வீதி உட்கார்ந்து எப்படி வெட்டி எடுக்கப்பட்டதோ;  அதே போன்றே,
பிக்குக்களுக்களே, ஒரு பிக்கு, எவ்வகையிலேனும் அதை வைத்திருந்த போதும்,
எவ்வகையிலேனும் அதை அப்புறப்படுத்த போதும், இந்த உடல்/காயம்  பிரதிபலிக்க 
இந்த :”உடல்/காயத்தில் ,நிலவுலகம் மெய்ம்மூலம், தண்ணீர் மெய்ம்மூலம்,
நெருப்பு மெய்ம்மூலம், காற்று மெய்ம்மூலம் இருக்கிறது.

இவ்வாறு அவர்
kāya in kāya உடல்/காயத்தை காயதுக்குள் கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது
காயத்தை காயதுக்கு வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது காயத்தை
காயதுக்கு உள்ளே மற்றும் வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்;புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்க எழுச்சி கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், மற்றும் புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்கதை கடந்துசெல்லுவதை கண்காணித்து வாசம் செய்கிரார்; இல்லாவிடில்
எச்சரிக்கையாயிருக்கிற உணர் உடனிருக்கிறதை,சும்மா வெறும் ஓர்அளவு ஞானம்
மற்றும் ஓர்அளவு paṭissati என எண்ணி பற்றறு வாசம் செய்கிரார்.


F. Navasivathika Pabba

(1)
Puna
ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu seyyathāpi passeyya sarīraṃ sivathikāya
chaḍḍitaṃ ekāha·mataṃ vā dvīha·mataṃ vā tīha·mataṃ vā uddhumātakaṃ
vinīlakaṃ vipubbaka·jātaṃ, so imam·eva kāyaṃ upasaṃharati: ‘ayaṃ pi kho
kāyo evaṃ·dhammo evaṃ·bhāvī evaṃ·an·atīto’ ti. 

F. Section on the nine charnel grounds

(1)
Furthermore,
bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as if he was seeing a dead body, cast away in
a charnel ground, one day dead, or two days dead or three days dead,
swollen, bluish and festering, he considers this very kāya: “This kāya
also is of such a nature, it is going to become like this, and is not
free from such a condition.” 


Iti ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī
viharati, bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā
kāye kāyānupassī viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati,
vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī
vā kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā
hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati,
na ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye
kāyānupassī viharati. 



Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya
internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells
observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing
the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing
away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and
passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!”
sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere
paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the
world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya.

F. ஒன்பது இடுகாடு நிலத்தளங்கள் மேலான பிரிவு

மேலும், பிக்குக்களுக்களே, ஒரு பிக்கு, ஒருவேளை அவர் தொலைவான இடத்தில்  ஒரு பிரேதம் இடுகாடு நிலத்தளத்தில் எறியப்பட்டு
இருப்பதைப்
பார்த்துக் கொண்டிருஇந்தால், ஒரு நாள் இறந்த, அல்லது இரண்டு நாட்கள்
இறந்த, அல்லது மூன்று நாட்கள் இறந்த, வீங்கிய, சற்றே நீலமான மற்றும்
புரைத்துச் சீக்கொண்ட நிலையில், அவர் இந்த மெய்ம்மூலமான kāya  உடல்/காய
ஆழ்ந்து ஆராய: “இந்த kāya  உடல்/காய கூட அவ்வகைப்பட்ட ஒரு இயற்கை ஆற்றல்
உடையதாக இருக்கிறது, அதுவும் இப்படி  ஆகத்தொடங்கு போக இருக்கிறது, மற்றும்
அத்தகைய ஒரு  கட்டுப்பாட்டு வரம்புகளற்ற
நிலைமை இருந்து  வேறல்ல.

இவ்வாறு
அவர் kāya in kāya உடல்/காயத்தை காயதுக்குள் கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்,
அல்லது காயத்தை காயதுக்கு வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது காயத்தை
காயதுக்கு உள்ளே மற்றும் வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்;புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்க எழுச்சி கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், மற்றும் புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்கதை கடந்துசெல்லுவதை கண்காணித்து வாசம் செய்கிரார்; இல்லாவிடில்
எச்சரிக்கையாயிருக்கிற உணர் உடனிருக்கிறதை,சும்மா வெறும் ஓர்அளவு ஞானம்
மற்றும் ஓர்அளவு paṭissati என எண்ணி பற்றறு வாசம் செய்கிரார்.

(2)
Puna
ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu seyyathāpi passeyya sarīraṃ sivathikāya
chaḍḍitaṃ kākehi vā khajjamānaṃ kulalehi vā khajjamānaṃ gijjhehi vā
khajjamānaṃ kaṅkehi vā khajjamānaṃ sunakhehi vā khajjamānaṃ byagghehi vā
khajjamānaṃ dīpīhi vā khajjamānaṃ siṅgālehi vā khajjamānaṃ vividhehi vā
pāṇaka·jātehi khajjamānaṃ, so imam·eva kāyaṃ upasaṃharati: ‘ayaṃ pi kho
kāyo evaṃ·dhammo evaṃ·bhāvī evaṃ·an·atīto’ ti. 

(2)
Furthermore,
bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as if he was seeing a dead body, cast away in
a charnel ground, being eaten by crows, being eaten by hawks, being
eaten by vultures, being eaten by herons, being eaten by dogs, being
eaten by tigers, being eaten by panthers, being eaten by various kinds
of beings, he considers this very kāya: “This kāya also is of such a
nature, it is going to become like this, and is not free from such a
condition.”

Iti ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī
viharati, bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā
kāye kāyānupassī viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati,
vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī
vā kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā
hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati,
na ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye
kāyānupassī viharati. 



Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya
internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells
observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing
the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing
away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and
passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!”
sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere
paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the
world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya.
மேலும், பிக்குக்களுக்களே, ஒரு பிக்கு, ஒருவேளை அவர் தொலைவான இடத்தில்  ஒரு பிரேதம் இடுகாடு நிலத்தளத்தில் எறியப்பட்டு
இருப்பதைப்
பார்த்துக் கொண்டிருந்தால்,காகங்களால் தின்னப்பட்டு, பருந்துகளால்
தின்னப்பட்டு, பிணந்தின்னிக் கழுகுகளால் தின்னப்பட்டு, நாரைகளால்
தின்னப்பட்டு, நாய்களால் தின்னப்பட்டு, புலிகளால் தின்னப்பட்டு,
சிறுத்தைகளால் தின்னப்பட்டு, பல்வேறு வகைப்பட்ட அசரீரிவஸ்துக்களால்
தின்னப்பட்டு, அவர் இந்த மெய்ம்மூலமான kāya  உடல்/காய ஆழ்ந்து ஆராய: “இந்த
kāya  உடல்/காய கூட அவ்வகைப்பட்ட ஒரு இயற்கை ஆற்றல் உடையதாக இருக்கிறது,
அதுவும் இப்படி  ஆகத்தொடங்கு போக இருக்கிறது, மற்றும் அத்தகைய ஒரு 
கட்டுப்பாட்டு வரம்புகளற்ற
நிலைமை இருந்து  வேறல்ல.

இவ்வாறு
அவர் kāya in kāya உடல்/காயத்தை காயதுக்குள் கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்,
அல்லது காயத்தை காயதுக்கு வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது காயத்தை
காயதுக்கு உள்ளே மற்றும் வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்;புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்க எழுச்சி கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், மற்றும் புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்கதை கடந்துசெல்லுவதை கண்காணித்து வாசம் செய்கிரார்; இல்லாவிடில்
எச்சரிக்கையாயிருக்கிற உணர் உடனிருக்கிறதை,சும்மா வெறும் ஓர்அளவு ஞானம்
மற்றும் ஓர்அளவு paṭissati என எண்ணி பற்றறு வாசம் செய்கிரார்.

(3)
Puna
ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu seyyathāpi passeyya sarīraṃ sivathikāya
chaḍḍitaṃ aṭṭhika·saṅkhalikaṃ sa·maṃsa·lohitaṃ nhāru·sambandhaṃ, so
imam·eva kāyaṃ upasaṃharati: ‘ayaṃ pi kho kāyo evaṃ·dhammo evaṃ·bhāvī
evaṃ·an·atīto’ ti. 

(3)
Furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as
if he was seeing a dead body, cast away in a charnel ground, a
squeleton with flesh and blood, held together by tendons, he considers
this very kāya: “This kāya also is of such a nature, it is going to
become like this, and is not free from such a condition.”


Iti
ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī
viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati;
samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā
kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati;
‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti, yāvadeva
ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati, na ca kiñci
loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī
viharati. 



Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally, or he
dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells observing kāya
in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of
phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena
in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of
phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is present
in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells
detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a
bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya.

மேலும், பிக்குக்களுக்களே, ஒரு பிக்கு, ஒருவேளை அவர் தொலைவான இடத்தில்  ஒரு பிரேதம் இடுகாடு நிலத்தளத்தில் எறியப்பட்டு
இருப்பதைப்
பார்த்துக் கொண்டிருந்தால், ஒரு மனித  எலும்புக் கூடு தசை மற்றும்
இரத்தத்துடன்,நரம்புகளால்  ஒன்றாய் பிடிக்கப்பட்டு,அவர் இந்த மெய்ம்மூலமான
kāya  உடல்/காய ஆழ்ந்து ஆராய: “இந்த kāya  உடல்/காய கூட அவ்வகைப்பட்ட ஒரு
இயற்கை ஆற்றல் உடையதாக இருக்கிறது, அதுவும் இப்படி  ஆகத்தொடங்கு போக
இருக்கிறது, மற்றும் அத்தகைய ஒரு  கட்டுப்பாட்டு வரம்புகளற்ற
நிலைமை இருந்து  வேறல்ல.

இவ்வாறு
அவர் kāya in kāya உடல்/காயத்தை காயதுக்குள் கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்,
அல்லது காயத்தை காயதுக்கு வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது காயத்தை
காயதுக்கு உள்ளே மற்றும் வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்;புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்க எழுச்சி கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், மற்றும் புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்கதை கடந்துசெல்லுவதை கண்காணித்து வாசம் செய்கிரார்; இல்லாவிடில்
எச்சரிக்கையாயிருக்கிற உணர் உடனிருக்கிறதை,சும்மா வெறும் ஓர்அளவு ஞானம்
மற்றும் ஓர்அளவு paṭissati என எண்ணி பற்றறு வாசம் செய்கிரார்.

(4)
Puna
ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu seyyathāpi passeyya sarīraṃ sivathikāya
chaḍḍitaṃ aṭṭhika·saṅkhalikaṃ ni·maṃsa·lohita·makkhitaṃ
nhāru·sambandhaṃ, so imam·eva kāyaṃ upasaṃharati: ‘ayaṃ pi kho kāyo
evaṃ·dhammo evaṃ·bhāvī evaṃ·an·atīto’ ti. 

(4)
Furthermore,
bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as if he was seeing a dead body, cast away in a
charnel ground, a squeleton without flesh and smeared with blood, held
together by tendons, he considers this very kāya: “This kāya also is of
such a nature, it is going to become like this, and is not free from
such a condition.” 

Iti ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati,
bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā kāye
kāyānupassī viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati,
vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī
vā kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā
hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati,
na ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye
kāyānupassī viharati. 



Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya
internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells
observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing
the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing
away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and
passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!”
sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere
paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the
world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya.
மேலும், பிக்குக்களுக்களே, ஒரு பிக்கு, ஒருவேளை அவர் தொலைவான இடத்தில்  ஒரு பிரேதம் இடுகாடு நிலத்தளத்தில் எறியப்பட்டு
இருப்பதைப் பார்த்துக் கொண்டிருந்தால், ஒரு மனித  எலும்புக் கூடு தசைகளில்லாமல் மற்றும் இரத்தம் பூசப்பட்டு,
நரம்புகளால் 
ஒன்றாய் பிடிக்கப்பட்டு,அவர் இந்த மெய்ம்மூலமான kāya  உடல்/காய ஆழ்ந்து
ஆராய: “இந்த kāya  உடல்/காய கூட அவ்வகைப்பட்ட ஒரு இயற்கை ஆற்றல் உடையதாக
இருக்கிறது, அதுவும் இப்படி  ஆகத்தொடங்கு போக இருக்கிறது, மற்றும் அத்தகைய
ஒரு  கட்டுப்பாட்டு வரம்புகளற்ற
நிலைமை இருந்து  வேறல்ல.

இவ்வாறு
அவர் kāya in kāya உடல்/காயத்தை காயதுக்குள் கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்,
அல்லது காயத்தை காயதுக்கு வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது காயத்தை
காயதுக்கு உள்ளே மற்றும் வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்;புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்க எழுச்சி கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், மற்றும் புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்கதை கடந்துசெல்லுவதை கண்காணித்து வாசம் செய்கிரார்; இல்லாவிடில்
எச்சரிக்கையாயிருக்கிற உணர் உடனிருக்கிறதை,சும்மா வெறும் ஓர்அளவு ஞானம்
மற்றும் ஓர்அளவு paṭissati என எண்ணி பற்றறு வாசம் செய்கிரார்.

(5)
Puna
ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu seyyathāpi passeyya sarīraṃ sivathikāya
chaḍḍitaṃ aṭṭhika·saṅkhalikaṃ apagata·maṃsa·lohitaṃ nhāru·sambandhaṃ, so
imam·eva kāyaṃ upasaṃharati: ‘ayaṃ pi kho kāyo evaṃ·dhammo evaṃ·bhāvī
evaṃ·an·atīto’ ti. 

(5)
Furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as
if he was seeing a dead body, cast away in a charnel ground, a
squeleton without flesh nor blood, held together by tendons, he
considers this very kāya: “This kāya also is of such a nature, it is
going to become like this, and is not free from such a condition.” 

Iti
ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī
viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati;
samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā
kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati;
‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti, yāvadeva
ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati, na ca kiñci
loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī
viharati. 



Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally, or he
dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells observing kāya
in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of
phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena
in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of
phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is present
in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells
detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a
bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya. 

மேலும், பிக்குக்களுக்களே, ஒரு பிக்கு, ஒருவேளை அவர் தொலைவான இடத்தில்  ஒரு பிரேதம் இடுகாடு நிலத்தளத்தில் எறியப்பட்டு
இருப்பதைப் பார்த்துக் கொண்டிருந்தால், ஒரு மனித  எலும்புக் கூடு தசைகளில்லாமல் மற்றும் இரத்தம்  இல்லாமல்,
நரம்புகளால் 
ஒன்றாய் பிடிக்கப்பட்டு,அவர் இந்த மெய்ம்மூலமான kāya  உடல்/காய ஆழ்ந்து
ஆராய: “இந்த kāya  உடல்/காய கூட அவ்வகைப்பட்ட ஒரு இயற்கை ஆற்றல் உடையதாக
இருக்கிறது, அதுவும் இப்படி  ஆகத்தொடங்கு போக இருக்கிறது, மற்றும் அத்தகைய
ஒரு  கட்டுப்பாட்டு வரம்புகளற்ற
நிலைமை இருந்து  வேறல்ல.

இவ்வாறு
அவர் kāya in kāya உடல்/காயத்தை காயதுக்குள் கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்,
அல்லது காயத்தை காயதுக்கு வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது காயத்தை
காயதுக்கு உள்ளே மற்றும் வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்;புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்க எழுச்சி கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், மற்றும் புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்கதை கடந்துசெல்லுவதை கண்காணித்து வாசம் செய்கிரார்; இல்லாவிடில்
எச்சரிக்கையாயிருக்கிற உணர் உடனிருக்கிறதை,சும்மா வெறும் ஓர்அளவு ஞானம்
மற்றும் ஓர்அளவு paṭissati என எண்ணி பற்றறு வாசம் செய்கிரார்.


(6)
Puna
ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu seyyathāpi passeyya sarīraṃ sivathikāya
chaḍḍitaṃ aṭṭhikāni apagata·sambandhāni disā vidisā vikkhittāni, aññena
hatth·aṭṭhikaṃ aññena pād·aṭṭhikaṃ aññena gopphak·aṭṭhikaṃ aññena
jaṅgh·aṭṭhikaṃ aññena ūru·ṭṭhikaṃ aññena kaṭi·ṭṭhikaṃ aññena
phāsuk·aṭṭhikaṃ aññena piṭṭh·iṭṭhikaṃ aññena khandh·aṭṭhikaṃ aññena
gīv·aṭṭhikaṃ aññena hanuk·aṭṭhikaṃ aññena dant·aṭṭhikaṃ aññena
sīsakaṭāhaṃ, so imam·eva kāyaṃ upasaṃharati: ‘ayaṃ pi kho kāyo
evaṃ·dhammo evaṃ·bhāvī evaṃ·an·atīto’ ti. 

(6)
Furthermore,
bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as if he was seeing a dead body, cast away in a
charnel ground, disconnected bones scattered here and there, here a
hand bone, there a foot bone, here an ankle bone, there a shin bone,
here a thigh bone, there a hip bone, here a rib, there a back bone, here
a spine bone, there a neck bone, here a jaw bone, there a tooth bone,
or there the skull, he considers this very kāya: “This kāya also is of
such a nature, it is going to become like this, and is not free from
such a condition.” 

Iti ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati,
bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā kāye
kāyānupassī viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati,
vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī
vā kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā
hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati,
na ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye
kāyānupassī viharati. 



Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya
internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells
observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing
the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing
away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and
passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!”
sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere
paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the
world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya.

மேலும், பிக்குக்களுக்களே, ஒரு பிக்கு, ஒருவேளை அவர் தொலைவான இடத்தில்  ஒரு பிரேதம் இடுகாடு நிலத்தளத்தில் எறியப்பட்டு
இருப்பதைப்
பார்த்துக் கொண்டிருந்தால், கழற்றபட்ட எலும்புகள் அங்குமிங்குமா சிதறலான,
இங்கே ஒரு கை எலும்பு, அங்கே ஒரு கால் எலும்பு, இங்கே ஒரு கணுக்கால்
எலும்பு, அங்கே ஒரு முழந்தாள் எலும்பு, இங்கே ஒரு தொடை எலும்பு, அங்கே ஒரு
இடுப்பு எலும்பு, இங்கே ஒரு தொடை எலும்பு, அங்கே ஒரு விலா எலும்பு, இங்கே
ஒரு தொடை எலும்பு, அங்கே ஒரு முதுகு எலும்பு, இங்கே ஒரு தண்டெலும்பு, அங்கே
ஒரு கழுத்து எலும்பு, இங்கே ஒரு தாடை எலும்பு, அங்கே ஒரு பல் எலும்பு,
அல்லது அங்கே ஒரு மண்டை ஓடு என அவர் இந்த மெய்ம்மூலமான kāya  உடல்/காய
ஆழ்ந்து ஆராய: “இந்த kāya  உடல்/காய கூட அவ்வகைப்பட்ட ஒரு இயற்கை ஆற்றல்
உடையதாக இருக்கிறது, அதுவும் இப்படி  ஆகத்தொடங்கு போக இருக்கிறது, மற்றும்
அத்தகைய ஒரு  கட்டுப்பாட்டு வரம்புகளற்ற நிலைமை இருந்து  வேறல்ல.

இவ்வாறு
அவர் kāya in kāya உடல்/காயத்தை காயதுக்குள் கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்,
அல்லது காயத்தை காயதுக்கு வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது காயத்தை
காயதுக்கு உள்ளே மற்றும் வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்;புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்க எழுச்சி கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், மற்றும் புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்கதை கடந்துசெல்லுவதை கண்காணித்து வாசம் செய்கிரார்; இல்லாவிடில்
எச்சரிக்கையாயிருக்கிற உணர் உடனிருக்கிறதை,சும்மா வெறும் ஓர்அளவு ஞானம்
மற்றும் ஓர்அளவு paṭissati என எண்ணி பற்றறு வாசம் செய்கிரார்.



(7)
Puna
ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu seyyathāpi passeyya sarīraṃ sivathikāya
chaḍḍitaṃ aṭṭhikāni setāni saṅkha·vaṇṇa·paṭibhāgāni, so imam·eva kāyaṃ
upasaṃharati: ‘ayaṃ pi kho kāyo evaṃ·dhammo evaṃ·bhāvī evaṃ·an·atīto’
ti. 

(7)
Furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as if he was
seeing a dead body, cast away in a charnel ground, the bones whitened
like a seashell, he considers this very kāya: “This kāya also is of such
a nature, it is going to become like this, and is not free from such a
condition.” 

Iti ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, bahiddhā vā
kāye kāyānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī
viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kā

22 X 2012

10 07 2012 TUESDAY LESSON 663 FREE ONLINE  eNālāndā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY

TIPITAKA
TIPITAKA   AND   TWELVE   DIVISIONS
    Brief historical background
   Sutta Pitaka
   Vinaya Pitaka
   Abhidhamma Pitaka
     Twelve Divisions of Buddhist Canons
Nine Divisions of Buddhist Canons

  
TIPITAKA   AND   TWELVE   DIVISIONS  is the collection of the teachings
of the Buddha over 45 years. It consists of Sutta (the conventional
teaching), Vinaya (Disciplinary code) and Abhidhamma (commentaries).

The Tipitaka was compiled and arranged in its present form by the
disciples who had immediate contact with Shakyamuni Buddha. 
The Buddha
had passed away, but the sublime Dhamma which he unreservedly bequeathed
to humanity still exists in its pristine purity. 
Although the Buddha
had left no written records of his teachings, his distinguished
disciples preserved them by committing to memory and transmitting them
orally from generation to generation. 

     Brief historical background 


 
Immediately after the final passing away of the Buddha, 500
distinguished Arahats held a convention known as the First Buddhist
Council to rehearse the Doctrine taught by the Buddha. Venerable Ananda,
who was a faithful attendant of the Buddha and had the special
privilege of hearing all the discourses the Buddha ever uttered, recited
the Sutta, whilst the Venerable Upali recited the Vinaya, the rules of
conduct for the Sangha. 
One hundred years after the First Buddhist
Council, some disciples saw the need to change certain minor rules. The
orthodox Bhikkus said that nothing should be changed while the others
insisted on modifying some disciplinary rules (Vinaya). Finally, the
formation of different schools of Buddhism germinated after his council.
And in the Second Council, only matters pertaining to the Vinaya were
discussed and no controversy about the Dhamma was reported. 
In the 3rd
Century B.C. during the time of Emperor Asoka, the Third Council was
held to discuss the differences of opinion held by the Sangha community.
At this Council the differences were not confined to the Vinaya but
were also connected with the Dhamma. The Abhidhamma Pitaka was discussed
and included at this Council. The Council which was held in Sri Lanka
in 80 B.C. is known as the 4th Council under the patronage of the pious
King Vattagamini Abbaya. It was at this time in Sri Lanka that the
Tipitaka was first committed to writing in Pali language. 



The
Sutta Pitaka consists mainly of discourses delivered by the Buddha
himself on various occasions. There were also a few discourses delivered
by some of his distinguished disciples (e.g. Sariputta, Ananda,
Moggallana) included in it. It is like a book of prescriptions, as the
sermons embodied therein were expounded to suit the different occasions
and the temperaments of various persons. There may be seemingly
contradictory statements, but they should not be misconstrued as they
were opportunely uttered by the Buddha to suit a particular purpose.

This Pitaka is divided into five Nikayas or collections, viz.:- 

     Dlgha Nikaya (Collection of Long Discourses)
      Majjhima Nikaya (Collection of Middle-length Discourses)
    Samyuita Nikaya (Collection of Kindred Sayings)
    Anguttara Nikaya (Collection of Discourses arranged in accordance with number)
    Khuddaka Nikaya (Smaller Collection)
       The fifth is subdivided into fifteen books:- 

    
   Khuddaka Patha (Shorter Texts)
   Dhammapada (The Way of Truth)
     Udana (Heartfelt sayings or Paeons of Joy)
   Iti Vuttaka (’Thus said’ Discourses)
   Sutta Nipata (Collected Discourses)
   Vimana Vatthu (Stories of Celestial Mansions)
   Peta Vatthu (Stories of Petas)
      Theragatha (Psalms of the Brethren)
     Therigatha (Psalms of the Sisters)
    Jataka (Birth Stories)
    Niddesa (Expositions)
      Patisambhida (Analytical Knowledge)
        Apadana (Lives of Saints)
    Buddhavamsa (The History of Buddha)
     Cariya Pitaka (Modes of Conduct)

  
  Vinaya Pitaka 
The Vinaya Pitaka mainly deals with the rules and
regulations of the Order of monks (Bhikhus) and nuns (Bhikhunis). It
also gives an account of the life and ministry of the Buddha. Indirectly
it reveals some useful information about ancient history, Indian
customs, arts, sciences, etc. 
For nearly twenty years since his
enlightenment, the Buddha did not lay down rules for the control of the
Sangha. Later, as the occasion arose, the Buddha promulgated rules for
the future discipline of the Sangha. 
This Pitaka consists of the
following five books:- 


     Parajika Pali (Major Offences)
     Pacittiya Pali (Minor Offences)
    Mahavagga Pali (Greater Section)
  Cullavagga Pali (Smaller Section)
  Parivara Pali (Epitome of the Vinaya)

 
Abhidhamma Pitaka 
The Abhidhamma, is the most important and
interesting, as it contains the profound philosophy of the Buddha’s
teaching in contrast to the illuminating but simpler discourses in the
Sutta Pitaka. 
In the Sutta Pitaka one often finds references to
individual, being, etc., but in the Abhidhamma, instead of such
conventional terms, we meet with ultimate terms, such as aggregates,
mind, matter etc. 
In the Abhidhamma everything is analyzed and
explained in detail, and as such it is called analytical doctrine
(Vibhajja Vada). 
Four ultimate things (Paramattha) are enumerated in
the Abhidhamma. They are Citta (Consciousness), Cetasika (Mental
concomitants). Rupa (Matter) and Nibbana. 
The so-called being is
microscopically analyzed and its component parts are minutely described.
Finally the ultimate goal and the method to achieve it is explained
with all necessary details. 
The Abhidhamma Pitaka is composed of the
following works: 


   Dhamma-Sangani (Enumeration of Phenomena)
    Vibhanaga (The Book of the Treatises)
  Ikatha Vatthu (Point of Controversy)
  Puggala Pannatti (Description of Individuals)
   Dhatu Katha (Discussion with reference to Elements)
   Yamaka (The Book of Pairs)
    Patthana (The Book of Relations)

   
  Twelve Divisions of Buddhist Canons 
The content of Buddhist canons
is divided into twelve divisions, categorized by the types of forms of
literature (i.e., Sutta, Geyya and Gatha) and the context (i.e., all
other nine divisions). It is known as the Twelve Divisions. 


  
Sutta  - These are the short, medium, and long discourses expounded by
the Buddha on various occasions. The whole Vinaya Pitaka is also
included in this respect.

   Geyya  - i.e., the metrical pieces. These are discourses/proses mixed with Gathas or verses.

      
Gatha - i.e., verses, chants or poems. These include verses formed in
the Dharmapada, etc., and those isolated verses which are not classified
amongst the Sutta.

   Nidana - i.e., the causes and conditions of the Buddha’s teachings.

    Itivrttaka - i.e., the suttas in which the Buddhas tell of the deeds of their disciples and others in previous lives.

    Jataka - i.e., stories of the former lives of Buddhas. These are the 547 birth-stories.

  
Abbhuta-dhamma - i.e., miracles, etc. These are the few discourses that
deal with wonderful and inconceivable powers of the Buddhas.

  
Avadana - i.e., parables, metaphors. Illustrations are used to
facilitate the human beings to understand the profound meanings of the
Buddhist Dhamma.

   Upadesa - i.e., dogmatic treatises. The
discourse and discussions by questions and answers regarding the
Buddhist doctrines. It is a synonym for Abhidhamma Pitaka.

     
Udana - i.e., impromptu or unsolicited addresses. The Buddha speaks
voluntarily and not in reply to questions or appeals, e.g., the Amitabha
Sutta.

     Vaipulya - i.e., interpretation by elaboration or
deeper explanation of the doctrines. It is the broad school or wider
teachings, in contrast with the “narrow” school. The term covers the
whole of the specifically Mahayana suttas. The Suttas are also known as
the scriptures of measureless meaning, i.e., infinite and
universalistic.

    Veyyakarama  - i.e. prophecies, prediction by the Buddha of the future attainment of Buddhahood by his disciples.

  
Nine Divisions of Buddhist Canons 
The term is generally referred to
Hinayana. There are only nine divisions excluding Udana, Vaipulya and
Veyyakarana. 
However, there is also a Mahayana division of nine of the
Twelve Divisions, i.e., all except Nidana, Avadana and Upadesa.

11 07 2012 WEDNESDAY LESSON 664 FREE ONLINE  eNālāndā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY
TIPITAKA
TIPITAKA   AND   TWELVE   DIVISIONS
    Brief historical background
   Sutta Pitaka
   Vinaya Pitaka
   Abhidhamma Pitaka
     Twelve Divisions of Buddhist Canons
Nine Divisions of Buddhist Canons
Sutta Piṭaka
— The basket of discourses —
[ sutta: discourse ]
Dīgha Nikāya

DN 9 -
Poṭṭhapāda Sutta
{excerpt}
— The questions of Poṭṭhapāda —

Sutta Piṭaka
— The basket of discourses —
[ sutta: discourse ]

The
Sutta Piṭaka contains the essence of the Buddha’s teaching regarding
the Dhamma. It contains more than ten thousand suttas. It is divided in
five collections called Nikāyas.

Dīgha Nikāya
[dīgha:
long] The Dīgha Nikāya gathers 34 of the longest discourses given by the
Buddha. There are various hints that many of them are late additions to
the original corpus and of questionable authenticity.

Majjhima Nikāya
[majjhima:
medium] The Majjhima Nikāya gathers 152 discourses of the Buddha of
intermediate length, dealing with diverse matters.

Saṃyutta Nikāya
[samyutta:
group] The Saṃyutta Nikāya gathers the suttas according to their
subject in 56 sub-groups called saṃyuttas. It contains more than three
thousand discourses of variable length, but generally relatively short.

Aṅguttara Nikāya
[aṅg:
factor | uttara: additionnal] The Aṅguttara Nikāya is subdivized in
eleven sub-groups called nipātas, each of them gathering discourses
consisting of enumerations of one additional factor versus those of the
precedent nipāta. It contains thousands of suttas which are generally
short.

Khuddaka Nikāya
[khuddha: short, small] The Khuddhaka
Nikāya short texts and is considered as been composed of two stratas:
Dhammapada, Udāna, Itivuttaka, Sutta Nipāta, Theragāthā-Therīgāthā and
Jātaka form the ancient strata, while other books are late additions and
their authenticity is more questionable.

12 07 2012 THURSDAY LESSON 665 FREE ONLINE  eNālāndā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY
TIPITAKA
TIPITAKA   AND   TWELVE   DIVISIONS
    Brief historical background
   Sutta Pitaka
   Vinaya Pitaka
   Abhidhamma Pitaka
     Twelve Divisions of Buddhist Canons
Nine Divisions of Buddhist Canons
Sutta Piṭaka
— The basket of discourses —
[ sutta: discourse ]
Dīgha Nikāya
Mahāparinibbāna Sutta
Dhammapada
Verses 246,247 and 248 Panca Upasaka Vatthu-Verse 246. Wrong Deeds To
Avoid-Verse 247. Precepts The Lay Person Should Follow-Verse 248. These
Precepts Prevent Suffering

AWAKEN ONE WITH AWARENESS ONLINE GOOD NEWS LETTER
ALL ABOUT USA
Hawaii

 >> Sutta Piṭaka >> Digha Nikāya

DN 16 - (D ii 137)
Mahāparinibbāna Sutta
{excerpts}
— The last instructions —
[mahā-parinibbāna]

This
sutta gathers various instructions the Buddha gave for the sake of his
followers after his passing away, which makes it be a very important set
of instructions for us nowadays.

Note: infobubbles on all Pali words except in section with light green background color

Pāḷi

English


… 

(Dhammādāsa)

Dhammādāsaṃ
nāma dhamma-pariyāyaṃ desessāmi, yena samannāgato ariyasāvako
ākaṅkhamāno attanāva attānaṃ byā-kareyya: ‘khīṇa-nirayo-mhi
khīṇa-tiracchāna-yoni khīṇa-pettivisayo khīṇ’āpāya-duggati-vinipāto,
sotāpanno-hamasmi avinipāta-dhammo niyato sambodhi-parāyaṇo’ ti. 

(The Mirror of the Dhamma)

I
will expound the discourse on the Dhamma which is called Dhammādāsa,
possessed of which the ariyasāvaka, if he so desires, can declare of
himself: ‘For me, there is no more niraya, no more tiracchāna-yoni, no
more pettivisaya, no more state of unhappiness, of misfortune, of
misery, I am a sotāpanna, by nature free from states of misery, certain
of being destined to sambodhi.
தமிழ்
(தம்மாவின் உருப்பளிங்கு)
நான்
Dhammādāsa (தம்மாவின் உருப்பளிங்கு) என  கருதப்படும் தம்மாவை
வியாக்கியானம் பண்ண பிரசங்கம் செய்ய விரும்புகிரேன், ariyasāvaka (புனிதமான
சீடர்) ஆக  ஆட்கொண்டு, ஒருவேளை அவர் தானே  விரும்பி உறுதியாக்கிக்
கொண்டால்:
’ஆக எனக்கு, இன்னும் மேலும் niraya (நரகம்) இல்லை,இன்னும் மேலும்
tiracchāna-yoni ( மிருகம சாம்ராஜ்யம்) இல்லை,இன்னும் மேலும் pettivisaya
(ஆவிகள் சாம்ராஜ்யம்) இல்லை, இன்னும் மேலும் பாக்கியவீனம், துரதிருஷ்டம்,
துக்க நிலை இல்லை, நான் sotāpanna (புனல் பிரவேசி), இயற்கையாக துக்க
நிலையில் இருந்து விடுவிக்கப்பட்டவன், sambodhi (முழுக்க தூக்கத்திலிருந்து
விழிப்பு) ஆக சேர இருத்தல் உறுதி.

Katamo ca so, Ānanda, dhammādāso
dhamma-pariyāyo, yena samannāgato ariyasāvako ākaṅkhamāno attanāva
attānaṃ byā-kareyya: ‘khīṇa-nirayo-mhi khīṇa-tiracchāna-yoni
khīṇa-pettivisayo khīṇ’āpāya-duggati-vinipāto, sotāpanno-hamasmi
avinipāta-dhammo niyato sambodhi-parāyaṇo’ ti? 

And what, Ānanda, is
that discourse on the Dhamma which is called Dhammādāsa, possessed of
which the ariyasāvaka, if he so desires, can declare of himself: ‘For
me, there is no more niraya, no more tiracchāna-yoni, no more
pettivisaya, no more state of unhappiness, of misfortune, of misery, I
am a sotāpanna, by nature free from states of misery, certain of being
destined to sambodhi?
மற்றும் என்ன,Ānanda (ஆனந்தா),தம்மா மீது ஆன
அந்த பிரசங்கம் Dhammādāsa (தம்மாவின் உருப்பளிங்கு) என  கருதப்படும்
தம்மாவை வியாக்கியானம் பண்ண பிரசங்கம் செய்ய விரும்புகிரேன்,ariyasāvaka
(புனிதமான சீடர்)ஆக ஆட்கொண்டு,ஒருவேளை அவர் தானே  விரும்பி உறுதியாக்கிக்
கொண்டால்:
’ஆக எனக்கு, இன்னும் மேலும் niraya (நரகம்) இல்லை,இன்னும் மேலும்
tiracchāna-yoni ( மிருகம சாம்ராஜ்யம்) இல்லை,இன்னும் மேலும் pettivisaya
(ஆவிகள் சாம்ராஜ்யம்) இல்லை,இன்னும் மேலும்
பாக்கியவீனம்,துரதிருஷ்டம்,துக்கம், நிலை இல்லை, நான் sotāpanna (புனல்
பிரவேசி), இயற்கையாக துக்க நிலையில் இருந்து விடுவிக்கப்பட்டவன்,sambodhi
(முழுக்க தூக்கத்திலிருந்து விழிப்பு) ஆக சேர இருத்தல் உறுதி தானே?


Idh’ānanda, ariyasāvako Buddhe aveccappasāda samannāgato hoti:
Here, Ānanda, an ariyasāvaka is endowed with Buddhe aveccappasāda:
இங்கு,ஆனந்தா,புனிதமான சீடர் Buddhe aveccappasāda  (புத்தர் இடத்தில் தன்னம்பிக்கை)உடைய வராக குணிக்கப் படுகிரார்.
Here, Ānanda, an ariyasāvaka is endowed with Buddhe aveccappasāda:
இங்கு,ஆனந்தா,புனிதமான சீடர் Buddhe aveccappasāda  (புத்தர் இடத்தில் தன்னம்பிக்கை)உடைய வராக குணிக்கப் படுகிரார்.

14
07 2012 SATURDAY LESSON 667 FREE ONLINE  eNālāndā Research and Practice
UNIVERSITY
TIPITAKA
TIPITAKA   AND   TWELVE   DIVISIONS
    Brief
historical background
   Sutta Pitaka
   Vinaya Pitaka
   Abhidhamma
Pitaka
     Twelve Divisions of Buddhist Canons
Nine Divisions of
Buddhist Canons 
Sutta Piṭaka 
— The basket of discourses
—Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta (DN 22) {excerpt} - all infobubbles— Attendance
on awareness —

DN 22 - (D ii 290) 
Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta
— Attendance on awareness —
[ mahā+satipaṭṭhāna ]

This sutta is widely considered as a the main reference for meditation practice.

Note: infobubbles on all Pali words

Pāḷi

Uddesa

I. Kāyānupassanā
   A. Ānāpāna Pabba
   B. Iriyāpatha Pabba
   C. Sampajāna Pabba
   D. Paṭikūlamanasikāra Pabba
   E. Dhātumanasikāra Pabba
   F. Navasivathika Pabba

II. Vedanānupassanā

English

Introduction

I. Observation of Kāya
   A. Section on ānāpāna
   B. Section on postures
   C. Section on sampajañña
   D. Section on repulsiveness
   E. Section on the Elements
   F. Section on the nine charnel grounds

II. Observation of Vedanā

Uddesa

Evaṃ me sutaṃ:
Introduction

Thus have I heard: 

Ekaṃ samayaṃ bhagavā kurūsu viharati kammāsadhammaṃ nāma kurūnaṃ nigamo. Tatra kho bhagavā bhikkhū āmantesi:
On
one occasion, the Bhagavā was staying among the Kurus at Kammāsadhamma,
a market town of the Kurus. There, he addressed the bhikkhus:
– Bhikkhavo ti.
– Bhaddante ti te bhikkhū bhagavato paccassosuṃ. Bhagavā etad-avoca: 

– Bhikkhus.
– Bhaddante answered the bhikkhus. The Bhagavā said: 


Ekāyano ayaṃ, bhikkhave, maggo sattānaṃ visuddhiyā, soka-paridevānaṃ
samatikkamāya, dukkha-domanassānaṃ atthaṅgamāya, ñāyassa adhigamāya,
nibbānassa sacchikiriyāya, yadidaṃ cattāro satipaṭṭhānā. 

– This,
bhikkhus, is the path that leads to nothing but the purification of
beings, the overcoming of sorrow and lamentation, the disappearance of
dukkha-domanassa, the attainment of the right way, the realization of
Nibbāna, that is to say the four satipaṭṭhānas. 

Katame cattāro?
Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī viharati ātāpī sampajāno
satimā, vineyya loke abhijjhā-domanassaṃ. Vedanāsu vedanānupassī
viharati ātāpī sampajāno satimā, vineyya loke abhijjhā-domanassaṃ. Citte
cittānupassī viharati ātāpī sampajāno satimā, vineyya loke
abhijjhā-domanassaṃ. Dhammesu dhammānupassī viharati ātāpī sampajāno
satimā, vineyya loke abhijjhā-domanassaṃ.
Which four? Here,
bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya, ātāpī sampajāno,
satimā, having given up abhijjhā-domanassa towards the world. He dwells
observing vedanā in vedanā, ātāpī sampajāno, satimā, having given up
abhijjhā-domanassa towards the world. He dwells observing citta in
citta, ātāpī sampajāno, satimā, having given up abhijjhā-domanassa
towards the world. He dwells observing dhamma·s in dhamma·s, ātāpī
sampajāno, satimā, having given up abhijjhā-domanassa towards the world.

I. Kāyānupassanā

A. Ānāpāna Pabba

Katha·ñ·ca,
bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī viharati? Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu
arañña-gato vā rukkha-mūla-gato vā suññ’āgāra-gato vā nisīdati pallaṅkaṃ
ābhujitvā ujuṃ kāyaṃ paṇidhāya parimukhaṃ satiṃ upaṭṭhapetvā. So
sato’va assasati, sato’va passasati. Dīghaṃ vā assasanto ‘dīghaṃ
assasāmī’ ti pajānāti; dīghaṃ vā passasanto ‘dīghaṃ passasāmī’ ti
pajānāti; rassaṃ vā assasanto ‘rassaṃ assasāmī’ ti pajānāti; rassaṃ vā
passasanto ‘rassaṃ passasāmī’ ti pajānāti; ’sabba-kāya-paṭisaṃvedī
assasissāmī’ ti sikkhati; ’sabba-kāya-paṭisaṃvedī passasissāmī’ ti
sikkhati; ‘passambhayaṃ kāya-saṅkhāraṃ assasissāmī’ ti sikkhati;
‘passambhayaṃ kāya-saṅkhāraṃ passasissāmī’ ti sikkhati. 


I. Kāyānupassanā

A. Section on ānāpāna

And
how, bhikkhus, does a bhikkhu dwell observing kāya in kāya? Here,
bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, having gone to the forest or having gone at the
root of a tree or having gone to an empty room, sits down folding the
legs crosswise, setting kāya upright, and setting sati parimukhaṃ. Being
thus sato he breathes in, being thus sato he breathes out. Breathing in
long he understands: ‘I am breathing in long’; breathing out long he
understands: ‘I am breathing out long’; breathing in short he
understands: ‘I am breathing in short’; breathing out short he
understands: ‘I am breathing out short’; he trains himself: ‘feeling the
whole kāya, I will breathe in’; he trains himself: ‘feeling the whole
kāya, I will breathe out’; he trains himself: ‘calming down the
kāya-saṅkhāras, I will breathe in’; he trains himself: ‘calming down the
kāya-saṅkhāras, I will breathe out’. 

Seyyathāpi, bhikkhave, dakkho
bhamakāro vā bhamakār·antevāsī vā dīghaṃ vā añchanto ‘dīghaṃ añchāmī’
ti pajānāti; rassaṃ vā añchanto ‘rassaṃ añchāmī’ ti pajānāti; evameva
kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu dīghaṃ vā assasanto ‘dīghaṃ assasāmī’ ti
pajānāti; dīghaṃ vā passasanto ‘dīghaṃ passasāmī’ ti pajānāti; rassaṃ vā
assasanto ‘rassaṃ assasāmī’ ti pajānāti; rassaṃ vā passasanto ‘rassaṃ
passasāmī’ ti pajānāti; ’sabba-kāya-paṭisaṃvedī assasissāmī’ ti
sikkhati; ’sabba-kāya-paṭisaṃvedī passasissāmī’ ti sikkhati;
‘passambhayaṃ kāya-saṅkhāraṃ assasissāmī’ ti sikkhati; ‘passambhayaṃ
kāya-saṅkhāraṃ passasissāmī’ ti sikkhati. 

Just as, bhikkhus, a
skillful turner or a turner’s apprentice, making a long turn,
understands: ‘I am making a long turn’; making a short turn, he
understands: ‘I am making a short turn’; in the same way, bhikkhus, a
bhikkhu, breathing in long, understands: ‘I am breathing in long’;
breathing out long he understands: ‘I am breathing out long’; breathing
in short he understands: ‘I am breathing in short’; breathing out short
he understands: ‘I am breathing out short’; he trains himself: ‘feeling
the whole kāya, I will breathe in’; he trains himself: ‘feeling the
whole kāya, I will breathe out’; he trains himself: ‘calming down the
kāya-saṅkhāras, I will breathe in’; he trains himself: ‘calming down the
kāya-saṅkhāras, I will breathe out’. 

Iti ajjhattaṃ vā kāye
kāyānupassī viharati, bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati,
ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī
vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati,
samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā
pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya
paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati, na ca kiñci loke upādiyati.
Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī viharati. 



Thus
he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally, or he dwells observing kāya
in kāya externally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally and
externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he
dwells observing the passing away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells
observing the samudaya and passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else,
[realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is present in him, just to the extent
of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling
to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing
kāya in kāya. 



B. Iriyāpatha Pabba

Puna ca·paraṃ,
bhikkhave, bhikkhu gacchanto vā ‘gacchāmī’ ti pajānāti, ṭhito vā
‘ṭhitomhī’ ti pajānāti, nisinno vā ‘nisinnomhī’ ti pajānāti, sayāno vā
‘sayānomhī’ ti pajānāti. Yathā yathā vā pan·assa kāyo paṇihito hoti,
tathā tathā naṃ pajānāti. 

B. Section on postures

Furthermore,
bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, while walking, understands: ‘I am walking’, or
while standing he understands: ‘I am standing’, or while sitting he
understands: ‘I am sitting’, or while lying down he understands: ‘I am
lying down’. Or else, in whichever position his kāya is disposed, he
understands it accordingly. 

Iti ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī
viharati, bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā
kāye kāyānupassī viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati,
vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī
vā kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā
hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati,
na ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye
kāyānupassī viharati. 



Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya
internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells
observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing
the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing
away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and
passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!”
sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere
paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the
world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya. 

C. Sampajāna Pabba

Puna
ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu abhikkante paṭikkante sampajānakārī hoti,
ālokite vilokite sampajānakārī hoti, samiñjite pasārite sampajānakārī
hoti, saṅghāṭi-patta-cīvara-dhāraṇe sampajānakārī hoti, asite pīte
khāyite sāyite sampajānakārī hoti, uccāra-passāva-kamme sampajānakārī
hoti, gate ṭhite nisinne sutte jāgarite bhāsite tuṇhībhāve sampajānakārī
hoti. 

C. Section on sampajañña

Furthermore, bhikkhus, a
bhikkhu, while approaching and while departing, acts with sampajañña,
while looking ahead and while looking around, he acts with sampajañña,
while bending and while stretching, he acts with sampajañña, while
wearing the robes and the upper robe and while carrying the bowl, he
acts with sampajañña, while eating, while drinking, while chewing, while
tasting, he acts with sampajañña, while attending to the business of
defecating and urinating, he acts with sampajañña, while walking, while
standing, while sitting, while sleeping, while being awake, while
talking and while being silent, he acts with sampajañña. 

Iti
ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī
viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati;
samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā
kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati;
‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti, yāvadeva
ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati, na ca kiñci
loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī
viharati. 



Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally, or he
dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells observing kāya
in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of
phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena
in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of
phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is present
in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells
detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a
bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya. 

D. Paṭikūlamanasikāra Pabba

Puna
ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu imam·eva kāyaṃ, uddhaṃ pādatalā adho
kesa·matthakā, taca·pariyantaṃ pūraṃ nānappakārassa asucino
paccavekkhati: ‘Atthi imasmiṃ kāye kesā lomā nakhā dantā taco maṃsaṃ
nhāru aṭṭhi aṭṭhimiñjaṃ vakkaṃ hadayaṃ yakanaṃ kilomakaṃ pihakaṃ
papphāsaṃ antaṃ antaguṇaṃ udariyaṃ karīsaṃ pittaṃ semhaṃ pubbo lohitaṃ
sedo medo assu vasā kheḷo siṅghāṇikā lasikā muttaṃ’ ti. 

D. Section on Repulsiveness

Furthermore,
bhikkhus, a bhikkhu considers this very body, from the soles of the
feet up and from the hair on the head down, which is delimited by its
skin and full of various kinds of impurities: “In this kāya, there are
the hairs of the head, hairs of the body, nails, teeth, skin, flesh,
tendons, bones, bone marrow, kidneys, heart, liver, pleura, spleen,
lungs, intestines, mesentery, stomach with its contents, feces, bile,
phlegm, pus, blood, sweat, fat, tears, grease, saliva, nasal mucus,
synovial fluid and urine.” 

Seyyathāpi, bhikkhave, ubhatomukhā
putoḷi pūrā nānāvihitassa dhaññassa, seyyathidaṃ sālīnaṃ vīhīnaṃ
muggānaṃ māsānaṃ tilānaṃ taṇḍulānaṃ. Tamenaṃ cakkhumā puriso muñcitvā
paccavekkheyya: ‘Ime sālī ime vīhī, ime muggā, ime māsā, ime tilā, ime
taṇḍulā’ ti; evameva kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu imam·eva kāyaṃ, uddhaṃ
pādatalā adho kesa·matthakā, taca·pariyantaṃ pūraṃ nānappakārassa
asucino paccavekkhati: ‘Atthi imasmiṃ kāye kesā lomā nakhā dantā taco
maṃsaṃ nhāru aṭṭhi aṭṭhimiñjaṃ vakkaṃ hadayaṃ yakanaṃ kilomakaṃ pihakaṃ
papphāsaṃ antaṃ antaguṇaṃ udariyaṃ karīsaṃ pittaṃ semhaṃ pubbo lohitaṃ
sedo medo assu vasā kheḷo siṅghāṇikā lasikā muttaṃ’ ti. 

Just as if,
bhikkhus, there was a bag having two openings and filled with various
kinds of grain, such as hill-paddy, paddy, mung beans, cow-peas, sesame
seeds and husked rice. A man with good eyesight, having unfastened it,
would consider [its contents]: “This is hill-paddy, this is paddy, those
are mung beans, those are cow-peas, those are sesame seeds and this is
husked rice;” in the same way, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu considers this very
body, from the soles of the feet up and from the hair on the head down,
which is delimited by its skin and full of various kinds of impurities:
“In this kāya, there are the hairs of the head, hairs of the body,
nails, teeth, skin, flesh, tendons, bones, bone marrow, kidneys, heart,
liver, pleura, spleen, lungs, intestines, mesentery, stomach with its
contents, feces, bile, phlegm, pus, blood, sweat, fat, tears, grease,
saliva, nasal mucus, synovial fluid and urine.” 

Iti ajjhattaṃ vā
kāye kāyānupassī viharati, bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati,
ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī
vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati,
samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā
pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya
paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati, na ca kiñci loke upādiyati.
Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī viharati. 



Thus
he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally, or he dwells observing kāya
in kāya externally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally and
externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he
dwells observing the passing away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells
observing the samudaya and passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else,
[realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is present in him, just to the extent
of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling
to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing
kāya in kāya. 

E. Dhātumanasikāra Pabba

Puna ca·paraṃ,
bhikkhave, bhikkhu imam·eva kāyaṃ yathā·ṭhitaṃ yathā·paṇihitaṃ dhātuso
paccavekkhati: ‘Atthi imasmiṃ kāye pathavī·dhātu āpo·dhātū tejo·dhātū
vāyo·dhātū’ ti. 

E. Section on the Elements

Furthermore,
bhikkhus, a bhikkhu reflects on this very kāya, however it is placed,
however it is disposed: “In this kāya, there is the earth element, the
water element, the fire element and the air element.” 

Seyyathāpi,
bhikkhave, dakkho goghātako vā goghātak·antevāsī vā gāviṃ vadhitvā
catu·mahā·pathe bilaso vibhajitvā nisinno assa; evameva kho, bhikkhave,
bhikkhu imam·eva kāyaṃ yathā·ṭhitaṃ yathā·paṇihitaṃ dhātuso
paccavekkhati: ‘Atthi imasmiṃ kāye pathavī·dhātu āpo·dhātū tejo·dhātū
vāyo·dhātū’ ti. 

Just as, bhikkhus, a skillful butcher or a
butcher’s apprentice, having killed a cow, would sit at a crossroads
cutting it into pieces; in the same way, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu reflects on
this very kāya, however it is placed, however it is disposed: “In this
kāya, there is the earth element, the water element, the fire element
and the air element.” 

Iti ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati,
bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā kāye
kāyānupassī viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati,
vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī
vā kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā
hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati,
na ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye
kāyānupassī viharati. 



Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya
internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells
observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing
the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing
away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and
passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!”
sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere
paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the
world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya. 

F. Navasivathika Pabba

(1)
Puna
ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu seyyathāpi passeyya sarīraṃ sivathikāya
chaḍḍitaṃ ekāha·mataṃ vā dvīha·mataṃ vā tīha·mataṃ vā uddhumātakaṃ
vinīlakaṃ vipubbaka·jātaṃ, so imam·eva kāyaṃ upasaṃharati: ‘ayaṃ pi kho
kāyo evaṃ·dhammo evaṃ·bhāvī evaṃ·an·atīto’ ti. 

F. Section on the nine charnel grounds

(1)
Furthermore,
bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as if he was seeing a dead body, cast away in
a charnel ground, one day dead, or two days dead or three days dead,
swollen, bluish and festering, he considers this very kāya: “This kāya
also is of such a nature, it is going to become like this, and is not
free from such a condition.” 

Iti ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī
viharati, bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā
kāye kāyānupassī viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati,
vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī
vā kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā
hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati,
na ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye
kāyānupassī viharati. 



Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya
internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells
observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing
the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing
away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and
passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!”
sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere
paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the
world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya. 

(2)
Puna
ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu seyyathāpi passeyya sarīraṃ sivathikāya
chaḍḍitaṃ kākehi vā khajjamānaṃ kulalehi vā khajjamānaṃ gijjhehi vā
khajjamānaṃ kaṅkehi vā khajjamānaṃ sunakhehi vā khajjamānaṃ byagghehi vā
khajjamānaṃ dīpīhi vā khajjamānaṃ siṅgālehi vā khajjamānaṃ vividhehi vā
pāṇaka·jātehi khajjamānaṃ, so imam·eva kāyaṃ upasaṃharati: ‘ayaṃ pi kho
kāyo evaṃ·dhammo evaṃ·bhāvī evaṃ·an·atīto’ ti. 

(2)
Furthermore,
bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as if he was seeing a dead body, cast away in
a charnel ground, being eaten by crows, being eaten by hawks, being
eaten by vultures, being eaten by herons, being eaten by dogs, being
eaten by tigers, being eaten by panthers, being eaten by various kinds
of beings, he considers this very kāya: “This kāya also is of such a
nature, it is going to become like this, and is not free from such a
condition.” 

Iti ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, bahiddhā vā
kāye kāyānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī
viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati,
vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī
vā kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā
hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati,
na ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye
kāyānupassī viharati. 



Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya
internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells
observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing
the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing
away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and
passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!”
sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere
paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the
world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya. 

(3)
Puna
ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu seyyathāpi passeyya sarīraṃ sivathikāya
chaḍḍitaṃ aṭṭhika·saṅkhalikaṃ sa·maṃsa·lohitaṃ nhāru·sambandhaṃ, so
imam·eva kāyaṃ upasaṃharati: ‘ayaṃ pi kho kāyo evaṃ·dhammo evaṃ·bhāvī
evaṃ·an·atīto’ ti. 

(3)
Furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as
if he was seeing a dead body, cast away in a charnel ground, a
squeleton with flesh and blood, held together by tendons, he considers
this very kāya: “This kāya also is of such a nature, it is going to
become like this, and is not free from such a condition.” 

Iti
ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī
viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati;
samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā
kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati;
‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti, yāvadeva
ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati, na ca kiñci
loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī
viharati. 



Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally, or he
dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells observing kāya
in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of
phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena
in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of
phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is present
in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells
detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a
bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya. 

(4)
Puna ca·paraṃ,
bhikkhave, bhikkhu seyyathāpi passeyya sarīraṃ sivathikāya chaḍḍitaṃ
aṭṭhika·saṅkhalikaṃ ni·maṃsa·lohita·makkhitaṃ nhāru·sambandhaṃ, so
imam·eva kāyaṃ upasaṃharati: ‘ayaṃ pi kho kāyo evaṃ·dhammo evaṃ·bhāvī
evaṃ·an·atīto’ ti. 

(4)
Furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as
if he was seeing a dead body, cast away in a charnel ground, a
squeleton without flesh and smeared with blood, held together by
tendons, he considers this very kāya: “This kāya also is of such a
nature, it is going to become like this, and is not free from such a
condition.” 

Iti ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, bahiddhā vā
kāye kāyānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī
viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati,
vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī
vā kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā
hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati,
na ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye
kāyānupassī viharati. 



Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya
internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells
observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing
the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing
away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and
passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!”
sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere
paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the
world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya. 

(5)
Puna
ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu seyyathāpi passeyya sarīraṃ sivathikāya
chaḍḍitaṃ aṭṭhika·saṅkhalikaṃ apagata·maṃsa·lohitaṃ nhāru·sambandhaṃ, so
imam·eva kāyaṃ upasaṃharati: ‘ayaṃ pi kho kāyo evaṃ·dhammo evaṃ·bhāvī
evaṃ·an·atīto’ ti. 

(5)
Furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as
if he was seeing a dead body, cast away in a charnel ground, a
squeleton without flesh nor blood, held together by tendons, he
considers this very kāya: “This kāya also is of such a nature, it is
going to become like this, and is not free from such a condition.” 

Iti
ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī
viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati;
samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā
kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati;
‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti, yāvadeva
ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati, na ca kiñci
loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī
viharati. 



Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally, or he
dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells observing kāya
in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of
phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena
in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of
phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is present
in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells
detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a
bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya. 

(6)
Puna ca·paraṃ,
bhikkhave, bhikkhu seyyathāpi passeyya sarīraṃ sivathikāya chaḍḍitaṃ
aṭṭhikāni apagata·sambandhāni disā vidisā vikkhittāni, aññena
hatth·aṭṭhikaṃ aññena pād·aṭṭhikaṃ aññena gopphak·aṭṭhikaṃ aññena
jaṅgh·aṭṭhikaṃ aññena ūru·ṭṭhikaṃ aññena kaṭi·ṭṭhikaṃ aññena
phāsuk·aṭṭhikaṃ aññena piṭṭh·iṭṭhikaṃ aññena khandh·aṭṭhikaṃ aññena
gīv·aṭṭhikaṃ aññena hanuk·aṭṭhikaṃ aññena dant·aṭṭhikaṃ aññena
sīsakaṭāhaṃ, so imam·eva kāyaṃ upasaṃharati: ‘ayaṃ pi kho kāyo
evaṃ·dhammo evaṃ·bhāvī evaṃ·an·atīto’ ti. 

(6)
Furthermore,
bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as if he was seeing a dead body, cast away in a
charnel ground, disconnected bones scattered here and there, here a
hand bone, there a foot bone, here an ankle bone, there a shin bone,
here a thigh bone, there a hip bone, here a rib, there a back bone, here
a spine bone, there a neck bone, here a jaw bone, there a tooth bone,
or there the skull, he considers this very kāya: “This kāya also is of
such a nature, it is going to become like this, and is not free from
such a condition.” 

Iti ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati,
bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā kāye
kāyānupassī viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati,
vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī
vā kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā
hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati,
na ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye
kāyānupassī viharati. 



Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya
internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells
observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing
the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing
away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and
passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!”
sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere
paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the
world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya. 

(7)
Puna
ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu seyyathāpi passeyya sarīraṃ sivathikāya
chaḍḍitaṃ aṭṭhikāni setāni saṅkha·vaṇṇa·paṭibhāgāni, so imam·eva kāyaṃ
upasaṃharati: ‘ayaṃ pi kho kāyo evaṃ·dhammo evaṃ·bhāvī evaṃ·an·atīto’
ti. 

(7)
Furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as if he was
seeing a dead body, cast away in a charnel ground, the bones whitened
like a seashell, he considers this very kāya: “This kāya also is of such
a nature, it is going to become like this, and is not free from such a
condition.” 

Iti ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, bahiddhā vā
kāye kāyānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī
viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati,
vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī
vā kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā
hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati,
na ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye
kāyānupassī viharati. 



Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya
internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells
observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing
the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing
away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and
passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!”
sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere
paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the
world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya. 

(8)
Puna
ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu seyyathāpi passeyya sarīraṃ sivathikāya
chaḍḍitaṃ aṭṭhikāni puñja·kitāni terovassikāni, so imam·eva kāyaṃ
upasaṃharati: ‘ayaṃ pi kho kāyo evaṃ·dhammo evaṃ·bhāvī evaṃ·an·atīto’
ti. 

(8)
Furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as if he was
seeing a dead body, cast away in a charnel ground, heaped up bones over a
year old, he considers this very kāya: “This kāya also is of such a
nature, it is going to become like this, and is not free from such a
condition.” 

Iti ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, bahiddhā vā
kāye kāyānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī
viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati,
vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī
vā kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā
hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati,
na ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye
kāyānupassī viharati. 



Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya
internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells
observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing
the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing
away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and
passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!”
sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere
paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the
world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya. 

(9)
Puna
ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu seyyathāpi passeyya sarīraṃ sivathikāya
chaḍḍitaṃ aṭṭhikāni pūtīni cuṇṇaka·jātāni, so imam·eva kāyaṃ
upasaṃharati: ‘ayaṃ pi kho kāyo evaṃ·dhammo evaṃ·bhāvī evaṃ·an·atīto’
ti. 

(9)
Furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as if he was
seeing a dead body, cast away in a charnel ground, rotten bones reduced
to powder, he considers this very kāya: “This kāya also is of such a
nature, it is going to become like this, and is not free from such a
condition.” 

Iti ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, bahiddhā vā
kāye kāyānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī
viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati,
vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī
vā kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā
hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati,
na ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye
kāyānupassī viharati. 



Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya
internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells
observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing
the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing
away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and
passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!”
sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere
paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the
world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya. 


II. Vedanānupassanā

Kathaṃ ca pana, bhikkhave, bhikkhu vedanāsu vedanānupassī viharati? 


II. Observation of Vedanā

And how now, bhikkhus, does a bhikkhu dwell observing vedanā in vedanā? 

Idha,
bhikkhave, bhikkhu sukhaṃ vā vedanaṃ vedayamāno ‘sukhaṃ vedanaṃ
vedayāmī’ ti pajānāti; dukkhaṃ vā vedanaṃ vedayamāno ‘dukkhaṃ vedanaṃ
vedayāmī’ ti pajānāti; a·dukkham-a·sukhaṃ vā vedanaṃ vedayamāno
‘a·dukkham-a·sukhaṃ vedanaṃ vedayāmī’ ti pajānāti. Sāmisaṃ vā sukhaṃ
vedanaṃ vedayamāno ‘sāmisaṃ sukhaṃ vedanaṃ vedayāmī’ ti pajānāti;
nirāmisaṃ vā sukhaṃ vedanaṃ vedayamāno ‘nirāmisaṃ sukhaṃ vedanaṃ
vedayāmī’ ti pajānāti. Sāmisaṃ vā dukkhaṃ vedanaṃ vedayamāno ‘sāmisaṃ
dukkhaṃ vedanaṃ vedayāmī’ ti pajānāti; nirāmisaṃ vā dukkhaṃ vedanaṃ
vedayamāno ‘nirāmisaṃ dukkhaṃ vedanaṃ vedayāmī’ ti pajānāti. Sāmisaṃ vā
a·dukkham-a·sukhaṃ vedanaṃ vedayamāno ‘sāmisaṃ a·dukkham-a·sukhaṃ
vedanaṃ vedayāmī’ ti pajānāti; nirāmisaṃ vā a·dukkham-a·sukhaṃ vedanaṃ
vedayamāno ‘nirāmisaṃ a·dukkham-a·sukhaṃ vedanaṃ vedayāmī’ ti pajānāti. 

Here,
bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, experiencing a sukha vedanā, undersands: “I am
experiencing a sukha vedanā”; experiencing a dukkha vedanā, undersands:
“I am experiencing a dukkha vedanā”; experiencing an adukkham-asukhā
vedanā, undersands: “I am experiencing a adukkham-asukhā vedanā”;
experiencing a sukha vedanā sāmisa, undersands: “I am experiencing a
sukha vedanā sāmisa”; experiencing a sukha vedanā nirāmisa, undersands:
“I am experiencing a sukha vedanā nirāmisa”; experiencing a dukkha
vedanā sāmisa, undersands: “I am experiencing a dukkha vedanā sāmisa”;
experiencing a dukkha vedanā nirāmisa, undersands: “I am experiencing a
dukkha vedanā nirāmisa”; experiencing an adukkham-asukhā vedanā sāmisa,
undersands: “I am experiencing a adukkham-asukhā vedanā sāmisa”;
experiencing an adukkham-asukhā vedanā nirāmisa, undersands: “I am
experiencing a adukkham-asukhā vedanā nirāmisa”. 

Iti ajjhattaṃ vā
vedanāsu vedanānupassī viharati, bahiddhā vā vedanāsu vedanānupassī
viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā vedanāsu vedanānupassī viharati;
samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā vedanāsu viharati, vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā
vedanāsu viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā vedanāsu viharati;
‘atthi vedanā’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti, yāvadeva
ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati, na ca kiñci
loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu vedanāsu vedanānupassī
viharati. 


15 07 2012 SUNDAY LESSON 668 FREE ONLINE  eNālāndā Research
and Practice UNIVERSITY
TIPITAKA
TIPITAKA   AND   TWELVE   DIVISIONS
    Brief historical background
   Sutta Pitaka
   Vinaya Pitaka
   Abhidhamma Pitaka
     Twelve Divisions of Buddhist Canons
Nine Divisions of Buddhist Canons
Sutta Piṭaka
— The basket of discourses —Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta (DN 22) {excerpt} - all infobubbles— Attendance on awareness —
Dhammapada Verse 252-Mendakasetthi Vatthu-Easy To See Are The Faults Of Others
ALL ABOUT USA
Kentucky

Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta
— Attendance on awareness —
[ mahā+satipaṭṭhāna ]

This sutta is widely considered as a the main reference for meditation practice.

Note: infobubbles on all Pali words

Pāḷi

Uddesa

I. Kāyānupassanā
   A. Ānāpāna Pabba
   B. Iriyāpatha Pabba
   C. Sampajāna Pabba
   D. Paṭikūlamanasikāra Pabba
   E. Dhātumanasikāra Pabba
   F. Navasivathika Pabba

II. Vedanānupassanā

English

Introduction

I. Observation of Kāya
   A. Section on ānāpāna
   B. Section on postures
   C. Section on sampajañña
   D. Section on repulsiveness
   E. Section on the Elements
   F. Section on the nine charnel grounds

II. Observation of Vedanā

Uddesa

Evaṃ me sutaṃ:
Introduction
Katame
cattāro? Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī viharati ātāpī
sampajāno satimā, vineyya loke abhijjhā-domanassaṃ. Vedanāsu
vedanānupassī viharati ātāpī sampajāno satimā, vineyya loke
abhijjhā-domanassaṃ. Citte cittānupassī viharati ātāpī sampajāno satimā,
vineyya loke abhijjhā-domanassaṃ. Dhammesu dhammānupassī viharati ātāpī
sampajāno satimā, vineyya loke abhijjhā-domanassaṃ.
Which four?
Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya, ātāpī
sampajāno, satimā, having given up abhijjhā-domanassa towards the world.
He dwells observing vedanā in vedanā, ātāpī sampajāno, satimā, having
given up abhijjhā-domanassa towards the world. He dwells observing citta
in citta, ātāpī sampajāno, satimā, having given up abhijjhā-domanassa
towards the world. He dwells observing dhamma·s in dhamma·s, ātāpī
sampajāno, satimā, having given up abhijjhā-domanassa towards the world.

எந்த நான்கு?இங்கு பிக்குக்களுக்களா,ஒரு பிக்கு kāye kāyānupassī
(உடலை உடல் கண்காணிப்புடன்) கவனித்து வசிக்கிரார் ātāpī sampajāno
satimā,வேறு வழியில்லாமல்   பிரபஞ்சம் நோக்கி எச்சரிக்கையுடன் இருக்க
ஏகாந்தமாயிருக்கிரார்.வேறு வழியில்லாமல்   பிரபஞ்சம் நோக்கி
எச்சரிக்கையுடன் இருக்க ஏகாந்தமாயிருக்க  Vedanāsu vedanānupassī
உறுதலுணர்ச்சி கண்காணிப்புடன் வசிக்கிரார்.வேறு வழியில்லாமல்   பிரபஞ்சம்
நோக்கி எச்சரிக்கையுடன் இருக்க ஏகாந்தமாயிருக Citte cittānupassī viharati
ātāpī sampajāno satimā, சித்த நலம் கருதி ண்காணிப்புடன் வசிக்கிரார்.
மனத்தால் இயக்கப்படுகிற அபூர்வமான வினயா(ஒழுக்கம்) காக்க வேறு
வழியில்லாமல்   பிரபஞ்சம் நோக்கி எச்சரிக்கையுடன் இருக்க ஏகாந்தமாயிருக்க
கண்காணிப்புடன் வசிக்கிரார்.

Thus he dwells observing vedanā
in vedanā internally, or he dwells observing vedanā in vedanā
externally, or he dwells observing vedanā in vedanā internally and
externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of phenomena in vedanā, or
he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena in vedanā, or he
dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of phenomena in vedanā;
or else, [realizing:] “this is vedanā!” sati is present in him, just to
the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does
not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells
observing vedanā in vedanā.
16 07 2012 MONDAY LESSON 669 FREE ONLINE  eNālāndā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY
T ipitaka network … his life, his acts, his words                 sabbe satta bhavantu sukhi-tatta
TIPITAKA
TIPITAKA   AND   TWELVE   DIVISIONS
    Brief historical background
   Sutta Pitaka
   Vinaya Pitaka
   Abhidhamma Pitaka
     Twelve Divisions of Buddhist Canons
Nine Divisions of Buddhist Canons
Sutta Piṭaka
— The basket of discourses —Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta (DN 22) {excerpt} - all infobubbles— Attendance on awareness —Kāyānupassanā
Dhammapada Verse 253-Ujjhanasannitthera Vatthu-Seeing Others’ Faults
ALL ABOUT USA
Louisiana
    •    New Orleans Zen Temple

Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta
— Attendance on awareness —
[ mahā+satipaṭṭhāna ]

This sutta is widely considered as a the main reference for meditation practice.

Note: infobubbles on all Pali words

And
how, bhikkhus, does a bhikkhu dwell observing kāya in kāya? Here,
bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, having gone to the forest or having gone at the
root of a tree or having gone to an empty room, sits down folding the
legs crosswise, setting kāya upright, and setting sati parimukhaṃ.
Pāḷi

Uddesa

I. Kāyānupassanā
   A. Ānāpāna Pabba
   B. Iriyāpatha Pabba
   C. Sampajāna Pabba
   D. Paṭikūlamanasikāra Pabba
   E. Dhātumanasikāra Pabba
   F. Navasivathika Pabba

II. Vedanānupassanā

English

Introduction

I. Observation of Kāya
   A. Section on ānāpāna
   B. Section on postures
   C. Section on sampajañña
   D. Section on repulsiveness
   E. Section on the Elements
   F. Section on the nine charnel grounds

II. Observation of Vedanā
I. Kāyānupassanā

A. Ānāpāna Pabba

Pāḷi
Katha·ñ·ca,
bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī viharati? Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu
arañña-gato vā rukkha-mūla-gato vā suññ’āgāra-gato vā nisīdati pallaṅkaṃ
ābhujitvā ujuṃ kāyaṃ paṇidhāya parimukhaṃ satiṃ upaṭṭhapetvā. So
sato’va assasati, sato’va passasati. Dīghaṃ vā assasanto ‘dīghaṃ
assasāmī’ ti pajānāti; dīghaṃ vā passasanto ‘dīghaṃ passasāmī’ ti
pajānāti; rassaṃ vā assasanto ‘rassaṃ assasāmī’ ti pajānāti; rassaṃ vā
passasanto ‘rassaṃ passasāmī’ ti pajānāti; ’sabba-kāya-paṭisaṃvedī
assasissāmī’ ti sikkhati; ’sabba-kāya-paṭisaṃvedī passasissāmī’ ti
sikkhati; ‘passambhayaṃ kāya-saṅkhāraṃ assasissāmī’ ti sikkhati;
‘passambhayaṃ kāya-saṅkhāraṃ passasissāmī’ ti sikkhati. 


English

I. Kāyānupassanā

A. Section on ānāpāna
Being
thus sato he breathes in, being thus sato he breathes out. Breathing in
long he understands: ‘I am breathing in long’; breathing out long he
understands: ‘I am breathing out long’; breathing in short he
understands: ‘I am breathing in short’; breathing out short he
understands: ‘I am breathing out short’; he trains himself: ‘feeling the
whole kāya, I will breathe in’; he trains himself: ‘feeling the whole
kāya, I will breathe out’; he trains himself: ‘calming down the
kāya-saṅkhāras, I will breathe in’; he trains himself: ‘calming down the
kāya-saṅkhāras, I will breathe out’.

தமிழ்

மற்றும்
எப்படி,பிக்குக்களுக்களா,kāya in kāya (உடலில் உடலை கவனித்து வசிக்கிரார்?
இங்கு பிக்குக்களுக்களா,ஒரு பிக்கு,காட்டுக்குச் சென்றோ அல்லது
மரத்தடிக்குச் சென்றோ அல்லது காலி அறைகுச் சென்றோ,காலை குறுக்காக
கீழ்நோக்கி மடித்துக்கொண்டு அமர்கிரார்,உடலை செங்குத்தாக
சரிசெய்துக்கொண்டு,மற்றும் sati parimukhaṃ. மூச்சு உள்ளே அல்லது வெளியே
சரிசெய்துக்கொள்கிரார்.  sato இவ்வாறு கவனமான மூச்சு உள்ளே அல்லது வெளியே
செலுத்துகிரார். மூச்சு நீண்டதாக உள்ளே செலுத்தும்போது: நான் நீண்டதாக
உள்ளே செலுத்துககின்றேன் என அறிகிரார்.மூச்சு நீண்டதாக வெளியே 
செலுத்தும்போது: நான் நீண்டதாக வெளியே செலுத்துககின்றேன் என
அறிகிரார்.மூச்சு குறைவாக உள்ளே செலுத்தும்போது: நான் குறைவாக உள்ளே
செலுத்துககின்றேன் என அறிகிரார்.மூச்சு குறைவாக வெளியே செலுத்தும்போது:நான்
குறைவாக வெளியே செலுத்துககின்றேன் என அறிகிரார்.அவர் தானே
பயிற்சித்துகொள்கிரார்: முழு  kāya உடலை/காயாவையும் கூருணர்ச்சியுடன்,நான்
மூச்சை உள்ளே செலுத்துககின்றேன்:அவர் தானே பயிற்சித்துகொள்கிரார்:முழு 
kāya உடலை/காயாவையும் கூருணர்ச்சியுடன்,நான் மூச்சை வெளியே
செலுத்துககின்றேன்:அவர் தானே பயிற்சித்துகொள்கிரார்:  kāya-saṅkhāras
உடல்/காயா இச்சாசத்தியை அமைதி உண்டாக்கொண்டு.நான் மூச்சை உள்ளே
செலுத்துககின்றேன்:அவர் தானே பயிற்சித்துகொள்கிரார்:,நான் மூச்சை வெளியே
செலுத்துககின்றேன்:அவர் தானே பயிற்சித்துகொள்கிரார்:

17 07 2012 MONDAY LESSON 670 FREE ONLINE  eNālāndā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY
T ipitaka network … his life, his acts, his words                 sabbe satta bhavantu sukhi-tatta
TIPITAKA
TIPITAKA   AND   TWELVE   DIVISIONS
    Brief historical background
   Sutta Pitaka
   Vinaya Pitaka
   Abhidhamma Pitaka
     Twelve Divisions of Buddhist Canons
Nine Divisions of Buddhist Canons
Sutta Piṭaka
— The basket of discourses —Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta (DN 22) {excerpt} - all infobubbles— Attendance on awareness —Kāyānupassanā
Dhammapada
Verse 254-and 255 Subhaddaparibbajaka Vatthu-Verse 254. Nothing Is
Eternal Other Than Nibbana-Verse 255. The Buddha Has No Anxiety
ALL ABOUT AWAKEN ONES WITH AWARENESS USA
Maryland
    •    Kunzang Palyul Choling

 >> Sutta Piṭaka >> Digha Nikāya

DN 22 - (D ii 290)
Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta
— Attendance on awareness —
[ mahā+satipaṭṭhāna ]

This sutta is widely considered as a the main reference for meditation practice.

Note: infobubbles on all Pali words

Pāḷi

Uddesa

I. Kāyānupassanā
   A. Ānāpāna Pabba
   B. Iriyāpatha Pabba
   C. Sampajāna Pabba
   D. Paṭikūlamanasikāra Pabba
   E. Dhātumanasikāra Pabba
   F. Navasivathika Pabba

II. Vedanānupassanā

I. Kāyānupassanā

A. Ānāpāna Pabba

English

Introduction

I. Observation of Kāya
   A. Section on ānāpāna
   B. Section on postures
   C. Section on sampajañña
   D. Section on repulsiveness
   E. Section on the Elements
   F. Section on the nine charnel grounds

II. Observation of Vedanā

Pāḷi
Seyyathāpi,
bhikkhave, dakkho bhamakāro vā bhamakār·antevāsī vā dīghaṃ vā añchanto
‘dīghaṃ añchāmī’ ti pajānāti; rassaṃ vā añchanto ‘rassaṃ añchāmī’ ti
pajānāti; evameva kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu dīghaṃ vā assasanto ‘dīghaṃ
assasāmī’ ti pajānāti; dīghaṃ vā passasanto ‘dīghaṃ passasāmī’ ti
pajānāti; rassaṃ vā assasanto ‘rassaṃ assasāmī’ ti pajānāti; rassaṃ vā
passasanto ‘rassaṃ passasāmī’ ti pajānāti; ’sabba-kāya-paṭisaṃvedī
assasissāmī’ ti sikkhati; ’sabba-kāya-paṭisaṃvedī passasissāmī’ ti
sikkhati; ‘passambhayaṃ kāya-saṅkhāraṃ assasissāmī’ ti sikkhati;
‘passambhayaṃ kāya-saṅkhāraṃ passasissāmī’ ti sikkhati.

I. Kāyānupassanā 

A. Section on ānāpāna
English

Just
as, bhikkhus, a skillful turner or a turner’s apprentice, making a long
turn, understands: ‘I am making a long turn’; making a short turn, he
understands: ‘I am making a short turn’; in the same way, bhikkhus, a
bhikkhu, breathing in long, understands: ‘I am breathing in long’;
breathing out long he understands: ‘I am breathing out long’; breathing
in short he understands: ‘I am breathing in short’; breathing out short
he understands: ‘I am breathing out short’; he trains himself: ‘feeling
the whole kāya, I will breathe in’; he trains himself: ‘feeling the
whole kāya, I will breathe out’; he trains himself: ‘calming down the
kāya-saṅkhāras, I will breathe in’; he trains himself: ‘calming down the
kāya-saṅkhāras, I will breathe out’.

தமிழ்

சம்மதம்படி,பிக்குக்களுக்களே,திறமை
கடைசல்காரர் அல்லது கடைசல்காரின் தொழில் பழகுநர், ஒரு நீளமான சுழற்றுதல்
உருவாக்குதல் குறிப்பறிது: ‘நான் நீளமான சுழற்றுதல் உருவாக்குகிறேன்’;ஒரு
குறைவான சுழற்றுதல் உருவாக்குதல் குறிப்பறிது: ‘நான் குறைவான சுழற்றுதல்
உருவாக்குகிறேன்’;அவ்வழி,பிக்குக்களுக்களே,ஒரு பிக்கு,மூச்சு நீண்டதாக
உள்ளே செலுத்தும்போது: நான் நீண்டதாக உள்ளே செலுத்துககின்றேன் என
அறிகிரார்.மூச்சு நீண்டதாக வெளியே  செலுத்தும்போது: நான் நீண்டதாக வெளியே
செலுத்துககின்றேன் என அறிகிரார்.மூச்சு குறைவாக உள்ளே செலுத்தும்போது: நான்
குறைவாக உள்ளே செலுத்துககின்றேன் என அறிகிரார்.மூச்சு குறைவாக வெளியே
செலுத்தும்போது:நான் குறைவாக வெளியே செலுத்துககின்றேன் என அறிகிரார்.அவர்
தானே பயிற்சித்துகொள்கிரார்: முழு  kāya உடலை/காயாவையும்
கூருணர்ச்சியுடன்,நான் மூச்சை உள்ளே செலுத்துககின்றேன்:அவர் தானே
பயிற்சித்துகொள்கிரார்:முழு  kāya உடலை/காயாவையும் கூருணர்ச்சியுடன்,நான்
மூச்சை வெளியே செலுத்துககின்றேன்:அவர் தானே பயிற்சித்துகொள்கிரார்: 
kāya-saṅkhāras உடல்/காயா இச்சாசத்தியை அமைதி உண்டாக்கொண்டு.நான் மூச்சை
உள்ளே செலுத்துககின்றேன்:அவர் தானே பயிற்சித்துகொள்கிரார்:,நான் மூச்சை
வெளியே செலுத்துககின்றேன்:அவர் தானே பயிற்சித்துகொள்கிரார்:

Please watch:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oLel1sMDpEM&list=LPWCeFjm-hYPo&index=1&feature=plcp
for
Buddhist Meditation - Lama Ole Nydahl

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-49FV0Bs6mw&list=LPWCeFjm-hYPo&index=2&feature=plcp
for
Buddhas in Gardens - HD - Calming Nature Buddha Meditation
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E2a5RZjzC8A&list=LPWCeFjm-hYPo&index=3&feature=plcp

Buddhism, Meditation Nature & Water - Sublime,Inspiring Buddha Quotes HD Secret Jungle Temple
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ym9SEiP55O4&feature=autoplay&list=LPWCeFjm-hYPo&playnext=1
Jhana Grove Buddhist Meditation Centre
18 07 2012 WEDNESDAY LESSON 671 FREE ONLINE  eNālāndā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY
Tipitaka network … his life, his acts, his words                 sabbe satta bhavantu sukhi-tatta
TIPITAKA
TIPITAKA   AND   TWELVE   DIVISIONS
    Brief historical background
   Sutta Pitaka
   Vinaya Pitaka
   Abhidhamma Pitaka
     Twelve Divisions of Buddhist Canons
Nine Divisions of Buddhist Canons
Sutta Piṭaka
— The basket of discourses —Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta (DN 22) {excerpt} - all infobubbles— Attendance on awareness —Kāyānupassanā
மற்றும்
எப்படி,பிக்குக்களுக்களே,kāya in kāya (உடலில் உடலை கவனித்து வசிக்கிரார்?
இங்கு பிக்குக்களுக்களா,ஒரு பிக்கு,காட்டுக்குச் சென்றோ அல்லது
மரத்தடிக்குச் சென்றோ அல்லது காலி அறைகுச் சென்றோ,காலை குறுக்காக
கீழ்நோக்கி மடித்துக்கொண்டு அமர்கிரார்,உடலை செங்குத்தாக
சரிசெய்துக்கொண்டு,மற்றும் sati parimukhaṃ. மூச்சு உள்ளே அல்லது வெளியே
சரிசெய்துக்கொள்கிரார்.  sato இவ்வாறு கவனமான மூச்சு உள்ளே அல்லது வெளியே
செலுத்துகிரார். மூச்சு நீண்டதாக உள்ளே செலுத்தும்போது: நான் நீண்டதாக
உள்ளே செலுத்துககின்றேன் என அறிகிரார்.மூச்சு நீண்டதாக வெளியே 
செலுத்தும்போது: நான் நீண்டதாக வெளியே செலுத்துககின்றேன் என
அறிகிரார்.மூச்சு குறைவாக உள்ளே செலுத்தும்போது: நான் குறைவாக உள்ளே
செலுத்துககின்றேன் என அறிகிரார்.மூச்சு குறைவாக வெளியே செலுத்தும்போது:நான்
குறைவாக வெளியே செலுத்துககின்றேன் என அறிகிரார்.அவர் தானே
பயிற்சித்துகொள்கிரார்: முழு  kāya உடலை/காயாவையும் கூருணர்ச்சியுடன்,நான்
மூச்சை உள்ளே செலுத்துககின்றேன்:அவர் தானே பயிற்சித்துகொள்கிரார்:முழு 
kāya உடலை/காயாவையும் கூருணர்ச்சியுடன்,நான் மூச்சை வெளியே
செலுத்துககின்றேன்:அவர் தானே பயிற்சித்துகொள்கிரார்:  kāya-saṅkhāras
உடல்/காயா இச்சாசத்தியை அமைதி உண்டாக்கொண்டு.நான் மூச்சை உள்ளே
செலுத்துககின்றேன்:அவர் தானே பயிற்சித்துகொள்கிரார்:,நான் மூச்சை வெளியே
செலுத்துககின்றேன்:அவர் தானே பயிற்சித்துகொள்கிரார்:
19 07 2012 THURSSDAY LESSON 672 FREE ONLINE  eNālāndā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY
Tipitaka network … his life, his acts, his words                 sabbe satta bhavantu sukhi-tatta
TIPITAKA
TIPITAKA   AND   TWELVE   DIVISIONS
    Brief historical background
   Sutta Pitaka
   Vinaya Pitaka
   Abhidhamma Pitaka
     Twelve Divisions of Buddhist Canons
Nine Divisions of Buddhist Canons
Sutta Piṭaka
— The basket of discourses —Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta (DN 22) {excerpt} - all infobubbles— Attendance on awareness —Kāyānupassanā
>> Sutta Piṭaka >> Digha Nikāya

DN 22 - (D ii 290)
Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta
— Attendance on awareness —
[ mahā+satipaṭṭhāna ]

This sutta is widely considered as a the main reference for meditation practice.

Note: infobubbles on all Pali words

Pāḷi

Uddesa

I. Kāyānupassanā
   A. Ānāpāna Pabba
   B. Iriyāpatha Pabba
   C. Sampajāna Pabba
   D. Paṭikūlamanasikāra Pabba
   E. Dhātumanasikāra Pabba
   F. Navasivathika Pabba

II. Vedanānupassanā

English

Introduction

I. Observation of Kāya
   A. Section on ānāpāna
   B. Section on postures
   C. Section on sampajañña
   D. Section on repulsiveness
   E. Section on the Elements
   F. Section on the nine charnel grounds

II. Observation of Vedanā

B. Iriyāpatha Pabba

Puna
ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu gacchanto vā ‘gacchāmī’ ti pajānāti, ṭhito
vā ‘ṭhitomhī’ ti pajānāti, nisinno vā ‘nisinnomhī’ ti pajānāti, sayāno
vā ‘sayānomhī’ ti pajānāti. Yathā yathā vā pan·assa kāyo paṇihito hoti,
tathā tathā naṃ pajānāti. 

B. Section on postures

Furthermore,
bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, while walking, understands: ‘I am walking’, or
while standing he understands: ‘I am standing’, or while sitting he
understands: ‘I am sitting’, or while lying down he understands: ‘I am
lying down’. Or else, in whichever position his kāya is disposed, he
understands it accordingly. 

Iti ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī
viharati, bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā
kāye kāyānupassī viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati,
vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī
vā kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā
hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati,
na ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye
kāyānupassī viharati. 



Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya
internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells
observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing
the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing
away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and
passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!”
sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere
paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the
world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya.
தமிழ்
மேலும்,பிக்குக்களுக்களே,ஒரு பிக்கு, நடந்து செல்லும் பொழுது, ‘நான் நடந்து செல்கிறேன்’,
என
அவர் அறிந்துகொள்கிறார்.அல்லது நின்று கொண்டிருக்கிற பொழுது, ‘நான் நின்று
கொண்டிருக்கிகிறேன்’, என அவர் அறிந்துகொள்கிறார்:அல்லது
உட்கார்ந்திருக்கிற பொழுது, ‘நான் உட்கார்ந்திருக்கிறேன்’, என அவர்
அறிந்துகொள்கிறார்: அல்லது படுத்திருத்திருக்கிற பொழுது, ‘நான்
படுத்திருத்திருக்கிறேன்’,என அவர் அறிந்துகொள்கிறார்: தவிர அவர் kāya
உடல்அமர்வுநிலை எதுவாக தீர்வு செய்கிறாரோ
அதன்படிபுரிந்து கொள்கிறார்.

இவ்வாறு
அவர் kāya in kāya உடல்/காயத்தை காயதுக்குள் கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்,
அல்லது காயத்தை காயதுக்கு வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது காயத்தை
காயதுக்கு உள்ளே மற்றும் வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்;புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்க எழுச்சி கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், மற்றும் புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்கதை கடந்துசெல்லுவதை கண்காணித்து வாசம் செய்கிரார்; இல்லாவிடில்
எச்சரிக்கையாயிருக்கிற உணர் உடனிருக்கிறதை,சும்மா வெறும் ஓர்அளவு ஞானம்
மற்றும் ஓர்அளவு paṭissati என எண்ணி பற்றறு வாசம் செய்கிரார்

21 07 2012 SATURDAY LESSON 674 FREE ONLINE  eNālāndā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY
Tipitaka network … his life, his acts, his words                 sabbe satta bhavantu sukhi-tatta
TIPITAKA
TIPITAKA   AND   TWELVE   DIVISIONS
    Brief historical background
   Sutta Pitaka
   Vinaya Pitaka
   Abhidhamma Pitaka
     Twelve Divisions of Buddhist Canons
Nine Divisions of Buddhist Canons
Sutta Piṭaka
— The basket of discourses —Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta (DN 22) {excerpt} - all infobubbles— Attendance on awareness —Kāyānupassanā
Sutta Piṭaka >> Digha Nikāya

DN 22 - (D ii 290)
Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta
— Attendance on awareness —
[ mahā+satipaṭṭhāna ]

This sutta is widely considered as a the main reference for meditation practice.

Note: infobubbles on all Pali words

Pāḷi

Uddesa

I. Kāyānupassanā
   A. Ānāpāna Pabba
   B. Iriyāpatha Pabba
   C. Sampajāna Pabba
   D. Paṭikūlamanasikāra Pabba
   E. Dhātumanasikāra Pabba
   F. Navasivathika Pabba

II. Vedanānupassanā

III. Cittānupassanā

IV. Dhammānupassanā
   A. Nīvaraṇa Pabba

English

Introduction

I. Observation of Kāya
   A. Section on ānāpāna
   B. Section on postures
   C. Section on sampajañña
   D. Section on repulsiveness
   E. Section on the Elements
   F. Section on the nine charnel grounds

II. Observation of Vedanā

III. Observation of Citta

IV. Observation of Dhammas
   A. Section on the nīvaraṇas

C. Sampajāna Pabba

Puna
ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu abhikkante paṭikkante sampajānakārī hoti,
ālokite vilokite sampajānakārī hoti, samiñjite pasārite sampajānakārī
hoti, saṅghāṭi-patta-cīvara-dhāraṇe sampajānakārī hoti, asite pīte
khāyite sāyite sampajānakārī hoti, uccāra-passāva-kamme sampajānakārī
hoti, gate ṭhite nisinne sutte jāgarite bhāsite tuṇhībhāve sampajānakārī
hoti. 

C. Section on sampajañña

Furthermore, bhikkhus, a
bhikkhu, while approaching and while departing, acts with sampajañña,
while looking ahead and while looking around, he acts with sampajañña,
while bending and while stretching, he acts with sampajañña, while
wearing the robes and the upper robe and while carrying the bowl, he
acts with sampajañña, while eating, while drinking, while chewing, while
tasting, he acts with sampajañña, while attending to the business of
defecating and urinating, he acts with sampajañña, while walking, while
standing, while sitting, while sleeping, while being awake, while
talking and while being silent, he acts with sampajañña. 

Iti
ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī
viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati;
samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā
kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati;
‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti, yāvadeva
ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya, a·nissito ca viharati, na ca kiñci loke
upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī viharati.




Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally, or he dwells
observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya
internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of phenomena
in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena in kāya,
or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of phenomena in
kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is present in him, just
to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and
does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu
dwells observing kāya in kāya.
தமிழ்

மேலும்,பிக்குக்களுக்களே,ஒரு
பிக்கு, அணுகும் பொழுது மற்றும் விட்டு நீங்கும் பொழுது, sampajañña
நிரந்தரமான தீர்க்கமான உணருந்திறனுடன்  நுணுகிக்கண்டு  செயல் படுகிரார்,
முன் நோக்கி கவனித்துப் பார்க்கும் பொழுது மற்றும் எல்லாப் பக்கங்களிலும்
கவனித்துப் பார்க்கும் பொழுது,sampajañña நிரந்தரமான தீர்க்கமான
உணருந்திறனுடன்  நுணுகிக்கண்டு  செயல் படுகிரார், வளைக்கிற பொழுது  மற்றும்
நெட்டிமுறியும் பொழுது,sampajañña நிரந்தரமான தீர்க்கமான உணருந்திறனுடன் 
நுணுகிக்கண்டு  செயல் படுகிரார், பதவிக்குரிய நீண்ட மேலங்கி அணிந்து கொள்
பொழுது மற்றும் தளர்த்தியான மேலங்கி  மற்றும் ஐயக்கடிஞை எடுத்துச் செல்லும்
பொழுது,sampajañña நிரந்தரமான தீர்க்கமான உணருந்திறனுடன்  நுணுகிக்கண்டு 
செயல் படுகிரார், உண்ணும் பொழுது, குடிக்கும் பொழுது, மெல்லும் பொழுது,
சுவைக்கும் பொழுது,sampajañña நிரந்தரமான தீர்க்கமான உணருந்திறனுடன் 
நுணுகிக்கண்டு  செயல் படுகிரார், வண்டலகற்றும்  மற்றும் சிறுநீர் கழிக்கும்
பணி கவனிக்கும் பொழுது,sampajañña நிரந்தரமான தீர்க்கமான உணருந்திறனுடன் 
நுணுகிக்கண்டு  செயல் படுகிரார், நடந்து செல்கிறே பொழுது நின்று
கொண்டிருக்கிற பொழுது,
உட்கார்ந்திருக்கிற பொழுது, படுத்திருத்திருக்கிற
பொழுது, விழிதிருக்கிற பொழுது, உரையாடுகிற பொழுது, பேசாமலிருக்கிற பொழுது,
sampajañña நிரந்தரமான தீர்க்கமான உணருந்திறனுடன்  நுணுகிக்கண்டு  செயல்
படுகிரார்.

இவ்வாறு அவர் kāya in kāya உடல்/காயத்தை காயதுக்குள்
கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது காயத்தை காயதுக்கு வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம்
செய்கிரார், அல்லது காயத்தை காயதுக்கு உள்ளே மற்றும் வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம்
செய்கிரார்;புலன்களால் உணரத்தக்க எழுச்சி கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்,
மற்றும் புலன்களால் உணரத்தக்கதை கடந்துசெல்லுவதை கண்காணித்து வாசம்
செய்கிரார்; இல்லாவிடில் எச்சரிக்கையாயிருக்கிற உணர் உடனிருக்கிறதை,சும்மா
வெறும் ஓர்அளவு ஞானம் மற்றும் ஓர்அளவு paṭissati என எண்ணி பற்றறு வாசம்
செய்கிரார்.
24 07 2012 TUESDAY LESSON 677 FREE ONLINE  eNālāndā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY
Tipitaka network … his life, his acts, his words                 sabbe satta bhavantu sukhi-tatta
TIPITAKA
TIPITAKA   AND   TWELVE   DIVISIONS
    Brief historical background
   Sutta Pitaka
   Vinaya Pitaka
   Abhidhamma Pitaka
     Twelve Divisions of Buddhist Canons
Nine Divisions of Buddhist Canons
Sutta Piṭaka
— The basket of discourses —Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta (DN 22) {excerpt} - all infobubbles— Attendance on awareness —Kāyānupassanā
D. Paṭikūlamanasikāra Pabba     D. Section on Repulsiveness
Sutta Piṭaka >> Digha Nikāya

DN 22 - (D ii 290)
Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta
— Attendance on awareness —
[ mahā+satipaṭṭhāna ]

This sutta is widely considered as a the main reference for meditation practice.

Note: infobubbles on all Pali words

Pāḷi

Uddesa

I. Kāyānupassanā
   A. Ānāpāna Pabba
   B. Iriyāpatha Pabba
   C. Sampajāna Pabba
   D. Paṭikūlamanasikāra Pabba
   E. Dhātumanasikāra Pabba
   F. Navasivathika Pabba

II. Vedanānupassanā

III. Cittānupassanā

IV. Dhammānupassanā
   A. Nīvaraṇa Pabba
   B. Khandha Pabba
   C. Āyatana Pabba
   D. Bojjhaṅga Pabba

English

Introduction

I. Observation of Kāya
   A. Section on ānāpāna
   B. Section on postures
   C. Section on sampajañña
   D. Section on repulsiveness
   E. Section on the Elements
   F. Section on the nine charnel grounds

II. Observation of Vedanā

III. Observation of Citta

IV. Observation of Dhammas
   A. Section on the Nīvaraṇas
   B. Section on the Khandhas
   C. Section on the Sense Spheres
   D. Section on the Bojjhaṅgas

D. Paṭikūlamanasikāra Pabba

Puna
ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu imam·eva kāyaṃ, uddhaṃ pādatalā adho
kesa·matthakā, taca·pariyantaṃ pūraṃ nānappakārassa asucino
paccavekkhati: ‘Atthi imasmiṃ kāye kesā lomā nakhā dantā taco maṃsaṃ
nhāru aṭṭhi aṭṭhimiñjaṃ vakkaṃ hadayaṃ yakanaṃ kilomakaṃ pihakaṃ
papphāsaṃ antaṃ antaguṇaṃ udariyaṃ karīsaṃ pittaṃ semhaṃ pubbo lohitaṃ
sedo medo assu vasā kheḷo siṅghāṇikā lasikā muttaṃ’ ti. 

D. Section on Repulsiveness

Furthermore,
bhikkhus, a bhikkhu considers this very body, from the soles of the
feet up and from the hair on the head down, which is delimited by its
skin and full of various kinds of impurities: “In this kāya, there are
the hairs of the head, hairs of the body, nails, teeth, skin, flesh,
tendons, bones, bone marrow, kidneys, heart, liver, pleura, spleen,
lungs, intestines, mesentery, stomach with its contents, feces, bile,
phlegm, pus, blood, sweat, fat, tears, grease, saliva, nasal mucus,
synovial fluid and urine.” 

Seyyathāpi, bhikkhave, ubhatomukhā
putoḷi pūrā nānāvihitassa dhaññassa, seyyathidaṃ sālīnaṃ vīhīnaṃ
muggānaṃ māsānaṃ tilānaṃ taṇḍulānaṃ. Tamenaṃ cakkhumā puriso muñcitvā
paccavekkheyya: ‘Ime sālī ime vīhī, ime muggā, ime māsā, ime tilā, ime
taṇḍulā’ ti; evameva kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu imam·eva kāyaṃ, uddhaṃ
pādatalā adho kesa·matthakā, taca·pariyantaṃ pūraṃ nānappakārassa
asucino paccavekkhati: ‘Atthi imasmiṃ kāye kesā lomā nakhā dantā taco
maṃsaṃ nhāru aṭṭhi aṭṭhimiñjaṃ vakkaṃ hadayaṃ yakanaṃ kilomakaṃ pihakaṃ
papphāsaṃ antaṃ antaguṇaṃ udariyaṃ karīsaṃ pittaṃ semhaṃ pubbo lohitaṃ
sedo medo assu vasā kheḷo siṅghāṇikā lasikā muttaṃ’ ti. 

Just as if,
bhikkhus, there was a bag having two openings and filled with various
kinds of grain, such as hill-paddy, paddy, mung beans, cow-peas, sesame
seeds and husked rice. A man with good eyesight, having unfastened it,
would consider [its contents]: “This is hill-paddy, this is paddy, those
are mung beans, those are cow-peas, those are sesame seeds and this is
husked rice;” in the same way, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu considers this very
body, from the soles of the feet up and from the hair on the head down,
which is delimited by its skin and full of various kinds of impurities:
“In this kāya, there are the hairs of the head, hairs of the body,
nails, teeth, skin, flesh, tendons, bones, bone marrow, kidneys, heart,
liver, pleura, spleen, lungs, intestines, mesentery, stomach with its
contents, feces, bile, phlegm, pus, blood, sweat, fat, tears, grease,
saliva, nasal mucus, synovial fluid and urine.” 

Iti ajjhattaṃ vā
kāye kāyānupassī viharati, bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati,
ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī
vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati,
samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā
pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya
paṭissati·mattāya, a·nissito ca viharati, na ca kiñci loke upādiyati.
Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī viharati. 



Thus
he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally, or he dwells observing kāya
in kāya externally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally and
externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he
dwells observing the passing away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells
observing the samudaya and passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else,
[realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is present in him, just to the extent
of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling
to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing
kāya in kāya.

தமிழ்

மேலும், பிக்குக்களுக்களே, ஒரு
பிக்கு, இதே உடம்பில்,உச்சைந்தலை முடியிலிருந்து கீழ்நோக்கி உள்ளங்கால்
வரை, மெல்லிய தோல் மற்றும் பல்வேறு வகைப்பட்ட அசுத்தம் நிறைந்த, ‘இந்த
kāya, உடம்பு தலை முடி, உடம்புமுடி, நகம், பற்கள், மெல்லியல் தோல், தசை,
தசை நாண், எலும்பு, எலும்புச்சோறு, சிறுநீரகம், இதயம், கல்லீரல்,மார்புவரி,
மண்ணீரல், சுவாசப்பை,குடல், குடல்தாங்கி, இரைப்பை அதனுடைய உள்ளடங்கல்,
மலம், பித்தநீர், கபம், சீழ், இரத்தம், வியர்வை, கொழுப்பு, கண்ணீர்,
மசகிடு, உமிழ்நீர், மூக்குச்சளி, உயவுநீர்மஞ் சார்ந்த நீர்த்தன்மையுள்ள
மற்றும் சிறுநீர் அதன் வரம்பிடலில் உள்ளது என அறீவார்.

ஒருவேளை
பிக்குக்களுக்களே,அங்கே ஒரு பை இரண்டு வாயில்கள் உடையதாயிருப்பின்,
பல்வேறு  வகைப்பட்ட தானியம், குன்று நெல் பயிர், நெல் பயிர்,
பச்சைப்பருப்பு, மாட்டு பட்டாணி, எள்ளு விதை, தொலியல். ஒரு மனிதன் நல்ல
பார்வையாற்றல் உடையவராயிருத்தல் கட்டு அவிழ்க்கப் பட்டவுடன் ஆழ்ந்து ஆராய
விரும்பி ,”இது குன்று நெல் பயிர்,நெல் பயிர், பச்சைப்பருப்பு, மாட்டு
பட்டாணி, எள்ளு விதை, தொலியல்என அறீவார்.” அதே போல்,  பிக்குக்களுக்களே,
ஒரு பிக்கு, இதே உடம்பில்,உச்சைந்தலை முடியிலிருந்து கீழ்நோக்கி உள்ளங்கால்
வரை, மெல்லிய தோல் மற்றும் பல்வேறு வகைப்பட்ட அசுத்தம் நிறைந்த, ‘இந்த
kāya, உடம்பு தலை முடி, உடம்புமுடி, நகம், பற்கள், மெல்லியல் தோல், தசை,
தசை நாண், எலும்பு, எலும்புச்சோறு, சிறுநீரகம், இதயம், கல்லீரல்,மார்புவரி,
மண்ணீரல், சுவாசப்பை,குடல், குடல்தாங்கி, இரைப்பை அதனுடைய உள்ளடங்கல்,
மலம், பித்தநீர், கபம், சீழ், இரத்தம், வியர்வை, கொழுப்பு, கண்ணீர்,
மசகிடு, உமிழ்நீர், மூக்குச்சளி, உயவுநீர்மஞ் சார்ந்த நீர்த்தன்மையுள்ள
மற்றும் சிறுநீர் அதன் வரம்பிடலில் உள்ளது என அறீவார்.

இவ்வாறு அவர்
kāya in kāya உடல்/காயத்தை காயதுக்குள் கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது
காயத்தை காயதுக்கு வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது காயத்தை
காயதுக்கு உள்ளே மற்றும் வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்;புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்க எழுச்சி கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், மற்றும் புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்கதை கடந்துசெல்லுவதை கண்காணித்து வாசம் செய்கிரார்; இல்லாவிடில்
எச்சரிக்கையாயிருக்கிற உணர் உடனிருக்கிறதை,சும்மா வெறும் ஓர்அளவு ஞானம்
மற்றும் ஓர்அளவு paṭissati என எண்ணி பற்றறு வாசம் செய்கிரார்.

25 07 2012 WEDNESDAY LESSON 678 FREE ONLINE  eNālāndā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY
Tipitaka network … his life, his acts, his words                 sabbe satta bhavantu sukhi-tatta
TIPITAKA
TIPITAKA   AND   TWELVE   DIVISIONS
    Brief historical background
   Sutta Pitaka
   Vinaya Pitaka
   Abhidhamma Pitaka
     Twelve Divisions of Buddhist Canons
Nine Divisions of Buddhist Canons
Sutta Piṭaka
— The basket of discourses —Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta (DN 22) {excerpt} - all infobubbles— Attendance on awareness —Kāyānupassanā

E. Dhātumanasikāra Pabba-E. Section on the Elements-E. நாற்பெரும் பூதங்கள் மேலான பிரிவு
>> Sutta Piṭaka >> Digha Nikāya

DN 22 - (D ii 290)
Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta
— Attendance on awareness —
[ mahā+satipaṭṭhāna ]

This sutta is widely considered as a the main reference for meditation practice.

Note: infobubbles on all Pali words

Pāḷi

Uddesa

I. Kāyānupassanā
   A. Ānāpāna Pabba
   B. Iriyāpatha Pabba
   C. Sampajāna Pabba
   D. Paṭikūlamanasikāra Pabba
   E. Dhātumanasikāra Pabba
   F. Navasivathika Pabba

II. Vedanānupassanā

III. Cittānupassanā

IV. Dhammānupassanā
   A. Nīvaraṇa Pabba
   B. Khandha Pabba
   C. Āyatana Pabba
   D. Bojjhaṅga Pabba

English

Introduction

I. Observation of Kāya
   A. Section on ānāpāna
   B. Section on postures
   C. Section on sampajañña
   D. Section on repulsiveness
   E. Section on the Elements
   F. Section on the nine charnel grounds

II. Observation of Vedanā

III. Observation of Citta

IV. Observation of Dhammas
   A. Section on the Nīvaraṇas
   B. Section on the Khandhas
   C. Section on the Sense Spheres
   D. Section on the Bojjhaṅgas

E. Dhātumanasikāra Pabba

Puna
ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu imam·eva kāyaṃ yathā·ṭhitaṃ
yathā·paṇihitaṃ dhātuso paccavekkhati: ‘Atthi imasmiṃ kāye pathavī·dhātu
āpo·dhātū tejo·dhātū vāyo·dhātū’ ti. 

E. Section on the Elements

Furthermore,
bhikkhus, a bhikkhu reflects on this very kāya, however it is placed,
however it is disposed: “In this kāya, there is the earth element, the
water element, the fire element and the air element.” 

Seyyathāpi,
bhikkhave, dakkho goghātako vā goghātak·antevāsī vā gāviṃ vadhitvā
catu·mahā·pathe bilaso vibhajitvā nisinno assa; evameva kho, bhikkhave,
bhikkhu imam·eva kāyaṃ yathā·ṭhitaṃ yathā·paṇihitaṃ dhātuso
paccavekkhati: ‘Atthi imasmiṃ kāye pathavī·dhātu āpo·dhātū tejo·dhātū
vāyo·dhātū’ ti. 

Just as, bhikkhus, a skillful butcher or a
butcher’s apprentice, having killed a cow, would sit at a crossroads
cutting it into pieces; in the same way, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu reflects on
this very kāya, however it is placed, however it is disposed: “In this
kāya, there is the earth element, the water element, the fire element
and the air element.” 

Iti ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati,
bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā kāye
kāyānupassī viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati,
vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī
vā kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā
hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya, a·nissito ca viharati, na
ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye
kāyānupassī viharati. 



Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya
internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells
observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing
the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing
away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and
passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!”
sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere
paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the
world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya.

தமிழ்

E. நாற்பெரும் பூதங்கள் மேலான பிரிவு

மேலும்,
பிக்குக்களுக்களே, ஒரு பிக்கு, எவ்வகையிலேனும் அதை வைத்திருந்த போதும்,
எவ்வகையிலேனும் அதை அப்புறப்படுத்த போதும், இந்த உடல்/காயம்  பிரதிபலிக்க 
இந்த :”உடல்/காயத்தில் ,நிலவுலகம் மெய்ம்மூலம், தண்ணீர் மெய்ம்மூலம்,
நெருப்பு மெய்ம்மூலம், காற்று மெய்ம்மூலம் இருக்கிறது.

சம்மதம்போலே,பிக்குக்களுக்களே, ஒரு பயிற்சி பெற்ற கசாப்புக்காரர் அல்லது ஒரு
கசாப்புக்காரரிடம் தொழில் பழகுநர்,ஒரு பசு கொல்லுஞ் செயல் உடையவராயிரருந்து,
ஒரு
குறுக்கு வீதி உட்கார்ந்து எப்படி வெட்டி எடுக்கப்பட்டதோ;  அதே போன்றே,
பிக்குக்களுக்களே, ஒரு பிக்கு, எவ்வகையிலேனும் அதை வைத்திருந்த போதும்,
எவ்வகையிலேனும் அதை அப்புறப்படுத்த போதும், இந்த உடல்/காயம்  பிரதிபலிக்க 
இந்த :”உடல்/காயத்தில் ,நிலவுலகம் மெய்ம்மூலம், தண்ணீர் மெய்ம்மூலம்,
நெருப்பு மெய்ம்மூலம், காற்று மெய்ம்மூலம் இருக்கிறது.

இவ்வாறு அவர்
kāya in kāya உடல்/காயத்தை காயதுக்குள் கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது
காயத்தை காயதுக்கு வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது காயத்தை
காயதுக்கு உள்ளே மற்றும் வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்;புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்க எழுச்சி கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், மற்றும் புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்கதை கடந்துசெல்லுவதை கண்காணித்து வாசம் செய்கிரார்; இல்லாவிடில்
எச்சரிக்கையாயிருக்கிற உணர் உடனிருக்கிறதை,சும்மா வெறும் ஓர்அளவு
27 07 2012 FRIDAY LESSON 680 FREE ONLINE  eNālāndā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY
Tipitaka network … his life, his acts, his words                 sabbe satta bhavantu sukhi-tatta
TIPITAKA
TIPITAKA   AND   TWELVE   DIVISIONS
    Brief historical background
   Sutta Pitaka
   Vinaya Pitaka
   Abhidhamma Pitaka
     Twelve Divisions of Buddhist Canons
Nine Divisions of Buddhist Canons
Sutta Piṭaka
— The basket of discourses —Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta (DN 22) {excerpt} - all infobubbles— Attendance on awareness —Kāyānupassanā
F. Navasivathika Pabba    F. Section on the nine charnel grounds  F. ஒன்பது இடுகாடு நிலத்தளங்கள் மேலான பிரிவு
Sutta Piṭaka >> Digha Nikāya

DN 22 - (D ii 290)
Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta
— Attendance on awareness —
[ mahā+satipaṭṭhāna ]

This sutta is widely considered as a the main reference for meditation practice.

Note: infobubbles on all Pali words

Pāḷi

Uddesa

I. Kāyānupassanā
   A. Ānāpāna Pabba
   B. Iriyāpatha Pabba
   C. Sampajāna Pabba
   D. Paṭikūlamanasikāra Pabba
   E. Dhātumanasikāra Pabba
   F. Navasivathika Pabba

II. Vedanānupassanā

III. Cittānupassanā

IV. Dhammānupassanā
   A. Nīvaraṇa Pabba
   B. Khandha Pabba
   C. Āyatana Pabba
   D. Bojjhaṅga Pabba

English

Introduction

I. Observation of Kāya
   A. Section on ānāpāna
   B. Section on postures
   C. Section on sampajañña
   D. Section on repulsiveness
   E. Section on the Elements
   F. Section on the nine charnel grounds

II. Observation of Vedanā

III. Observation of Citta

IV. Observation of Dhammas
   A. Section on the Nīvaraṇas
   B. Section on the Khandhas
   C. Section on the Sense Spheres
   D. Section on the Bojjhaṅgas

F. Navasivathika Pabba

(1)
Puna
ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu seyyathāpi passeyya sarīraṃ sivathikāya
chaḍḍitaṃ ekāha·mataṃ vā dvīha·mataṃ vā tīha·mataṃ vā uddhumātakaṃ
vinīlakaṃ vipubbaka·jātaṃ, so imam·eva kāyaṃ upasaṃharati: ‘ayaṃ pi kho
kāyo evaṃ·dhammo evaṃ·bhāvī evaṃ·an·atīto’ ti. 

F. Section on the nine charnel grounds

(1)
Furthermore,
bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as if he was seeing a dead body, cast away in
a charnel ground, one day dead, or two days dead or three days dead,
swollen, bluish and festering, he considers this very kāya: “This kāya
also is of such a nature, it is going to become like this, and is not
free from such a condition.” 

Iti ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī
viharati, bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā
kāye kāyānupassī viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati,
vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī
vā kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā
hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya, a·nissito ca viharati, na
ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye
kāyānupassī viharati. 



Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya
internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells
observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing
the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing
away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and
passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!”
sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere
paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the
world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya.

தமிழ்
F. ஒன்பது இடுகாடு நிலத்தளங்கள் மேலான பிரிவு

மேலும்,
பிக்குக்களுக்களே, ஒரு பிக்கு, ஒருவேளை அவர் தொலைவான இடத்தில்  ஒரு
பிரேதம் இடுகாடு நிலத்தளத்தில் எறியப்பட்டு இருப்பதைப் பார்த்துக்
கொண்டிருஇந்தால், ஒரு நாள் இறந்த, அல்லது இரண்டு நாட்கள் இறந்த, அல்லது
மூன்று நாட்கள் இறந்த, வீங்கிய, சற்றே நீலமான மற்றும் புரைத்துச் சீக்கொண்ட
நிலையில், அவர் இந்த மெய்ம்மூலமான kāya  உடல்/காய ஆழ்ந்து ஆராய: “இந்த
kāya  உடல்/காய கூட அவ்வகைப்பட்ட ஒரு இயற்கை ஆற்றல் உடையதாக இருக்கிறது,
அதுவும் இப்படி  ஆகத்தொடங்கு போக இருக்கிறது, மற்றும் அத்தகைய ஒரு 
கட்டுப்பாட்டு வரம்புகளற்ற நிலைமை இருந்து  வேறல்ல.

இவ்வாறு அவர்
kāya in kāya உடல்/காயத்தை காயதுக்குள் கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது
காயத்தை காயதுக்கு வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது காயத்தை
காயதுக்கு உள்ளே மற்றும் வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்;புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்க எழுச்சி கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், மற்றும் புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்கதை கடந்துசெல்லுவதை கண்காணித்து வாசம் செய்கிரார்; இல்லாவிடில்
எச்சரிக்கையாயிருக்கிற உணர் உடனிருக்கிறதை,சும்மா வெறும் ஓர்அளவு ஞானம்
மற்றும் ஓர்அளவு paṭissati என எண்ணி பற்றறு வாசம் செய்கிரார்.

(2)
Puna
ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu seyyathāpi passeyya sarīraṃ sivathikāya
chaḍḍitaṃ kākehi vā khajjamānaṃ kulalehi vā khajjamānaṃ gijjhehi vā
khajjamānaṃ kaṅkehi vā khajjamānaṃ sunakhehi vā khajjamānaṃ byagghehi vā
khajjamānaṃ dīpīhi vā khajjamānaṃ siṅgālehi vā khajjamānaṃ vividhehi vā
pāṇaka·jātehi khajjamānaṃ, so imam·eva kāyaṃ upasaṃharati: ‘ayaṃ pi kho
kāyo evaṃ·dhammo evaṃ·bhāvī evaṃ·an·atīto’ ti. 

(2)
Furthermore,
bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as if he was seeing a dead body, cast away in
a charnel ground, being eaten by crows, being eaten by hawks, being
eaten by vultures, being eaten by herons, being eaten by dogs, being
eaten by tigers, being eaten by panthers, being eaten by various kinds
of beings, he considers this very kāya: “This kāya also is of such a
nature, it is going to become like this, and is not free from such a
condition.” 

Iti ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, bahiddhā vā
kāye kāyānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī
viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati,
vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī
vā kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā
hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya, a·nissito ca viharati, na
ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye
kāyānupassī viharati. 



Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya
internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells
observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing
the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing
away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and
passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!”
sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere
paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the
world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya.
மேலும்,
பிக்குக்களுக்களே, ஒரு பிக்கு, ஒருவேளை அவர் தொலைவான இடத்தில்  ஒரு
பிரேதம் இடுகாடு நிலத்தளத்தில் எறியப்பட்டு இருப்பதைப் பார்த்துக்
கொண்டிருந்தால்,காகங்களால் தின்னப்பட்டு, பருந்துகளால் தின்னப்பட்டு,
பிணந்தின்னிக் கழுகுகளால் தின்னப்பட்டு, நாரைகளால் தின்னப்பட்டு, நாய்களால்
தின்னப்பட்டு, புலிகளால் தின்னப்பட்டு, சிறுத்தைகளால் தின்னப்பட்டு,
பல்வேறு வகைப்பட்ட அசரீரிவஸ்துக்களால் தின்னப்பட்டு, அவர் இந்த
மெய்ம்மூலமான kāya  உடல்/காய ஆழ்ந்து ஆராய: “இந்த kāya  உடல்/காய கூட
அவ்வகைப்பட்ட ஒரு இயற்கை ஆற்றல் உடையதாக இருக்கிறது, அதுவும் இப்படி 
ஆகத்தொடங்கு போக இருக்கிறது, மற்றும் அத்தகைய ஒரு  கட்டுப்பாட்டு
வரம்புகளற்ற
நிலைமை இருந்து  வேறல்ல.

இவ்வாறு அவர் kāya in kāya
உடல்/காயத்தை காயதுக்குள் கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது காயத்தை
காயதுக்கு வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது காயத்தை காயதுக்கு
உள்ளே மற்றும் வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்;புலன்களால் உணரத்தக்க
எழுச்சி கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், மற்றும் புலன்களால் உணரத்தக்கதை
கடந்துசெல்லுவதை கண்காணித்து வாசம் செய்கிரார்; இல்லாவிடில்
எச்சரிக்கையாயிருக்கிற உணர் உடனிருக்கிறதை,சும்மா வெறும் ஓர்அளவு ஞானம்
மற்றும் ஓர்அளவு paṭissati என எண்ணி பற்றறு வாசம் செய்கிரார்.

(3)
Puna
ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu seyyathāpi passeyya sarīraṃ sivathikāya
chaḍḍitaṃ aṭṭhika·saṅkhalikaṃ sa·maṃsa·lohitaṃ nhāru·sambandhaṃ, so
imam·eva kāyaṃ upasaṃharati: ‘ayaṃ pi kho kāyo evaṃ·dhammo evaṃ·bhāvī
evaṃ·an·atīto’ ti. 

(3)
Furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as
if he was seeing a dead body, cast away in a charnel ground, a
squeleton with flesh and blood, held together by tendons, he considers
this very kāya: “This kāya also is of such a nature, it is going to
become like this, and is not free from such a condition.” 

Iti
ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī
viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati;
samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā
kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati;
‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti, yāvadeva
ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya, a·nissito ca viharati, na ca kiñci loke
upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī viharati.




Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally, or he dwells
observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya
internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of phenomena
in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena in kāya,
or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of phenomena in
kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is present in him, just
to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and
does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu
dwells observing kāya in kāya.
மேலும், பிக்குக்களுக்களே, ஒரு பிக்கு,
ஒருவேளை அவர் தொலைவான இடத்தில்  ஒரு பிரேதம் இடுகாடு நிலத்தளத்தில்
எறியப்பட்டு இருப்பதைப் பார்த்துக் கொண்டிருந்தால், ஒரு மனித  எலும்புக்
கூடு தசை மற்றும் இரத்தத்துடன்,நரம்புகளால்  ஒன்றாய் பிடிக்கப்பட்டு,அவர்
இந்த மெய்ம்மூலமான kāya  உடல்/காய ஆழ்ந்து ஆராய: “இந்த kāya  உடல்/காய கூட
அவ்வகைப்பட்ட ஒரு இயற்கை ஆற்றல் உடையதாக இருக்கிறது, அதுவும் இப்படி 
ஆகத்தொடங்கு போக இருக்கிறது, மற்றும் அத்தகைய ஒரு  கட்டுப்பாட்டு
வரம்புகளற்ற
நிலைமை இருந்து  வேறல்ல.

இவ்வாறு அவர் kāya in kāya
உடல்/காயத்தை காயதுக்குள் கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது காயத்தை
காயதுக்கு வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது காயத்தை காயதுக்கு
உள்ளே மற்றும் வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்;புலன்களால் உணரத்தக்க
எழுச்சி கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், மற்றும் புலன்களால் உணரத்தக்கதை
கடந்துசெல்லுவதை கண்காணித்து வாசம் செய்கிரார்; இல்லாவிடில்
எச்சரிக்கையாயிருக்கிற உணர் உடனிருக்கிறதை,சும்மா வெறும் ஓர்அளவு ஞானம்
மற்றும் ஓர்அளவு paṭissati என எண்ணி பற்றறு வாசம் செய்கிரார்.

28 07 2012 SATURDAY LESSON 681 FREE ONLINE  eNālāndā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY
Tipitaka network … his life, his acts, his words                 sabbe satta bhavantu sukhi-tatta
TIPITAKA
TIPITAKA   AND   TWELVE   DIVISIONS
    Brief historical background
   Sutta Pitaka
   Vinaya Pitaka
   Abhidhamma Pitaka
     Twelve Divisions of Buddhist Canons
Nine Divisions of Buddhist Canons
Sutta Piṭaka
— The basket of discourses —Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta (DN 22) {excerpt} - all infobubbles— Attendance on awareness —Kāyānupassanā
F. Navasivathika Pabba    F. Section on the nine charnel grounds  F. ஒன்பது இடுகாடு நிலத்தளங்கள் மேலான பிரிவு

Sutta Piṭaka >> Digha Nikāya

DN 22 - (D ii 290)
Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta
— Attendance on awareness —
[ mahā+satipaṭṭhāna ]

This sutta is widely considered as a the main reference for meditation practice.

Note: infobubbles on all Pali words

Pāḷi

Uddesa

I. Kāyānupassanā
   A. Ānāpāna Pabba
   B. Iriyāpatha Pabba
   C. Sampajāna Pabba
   D. Paṭikūlamanasikāra Pabba
   E. Dhātumanasikāra Pabba
   F. Navasivathika Pabba

II. Vedanānupassanā

III. Cittānupassanā

IV. Dhammānupassanā
   A. Nīvaraṇa Pabba
   B. Khandha Pabba
   C. Āyatana Pabba
   D. Bojjhaṅga Pabba

English

Introduction

I. Observation of Kāya
   A. Section on ānāpāna
   B. Section on postures
   C. Section on sampajañña
   D. Section on repulsiveness
   E. Section on the Elements
   F. Section on the nine charnel grounds

II. Observation of Vedanā

III. Observation of Citta

IV. Observation of Dhammas
   A. Section on the Nīvaraṇas
   B. Section on the Khandhas
   C. Section on the Sense Spheres
   D. Section on the Bojjhaṅgas

Thus
he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally, or he dwells observing
kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally
and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of phenomena in kāya,
or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena in kāya, or he
dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of phenomena in kāya; or
else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is present in him, just to the
extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not
cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells
observing kāya in kāya. 

(4)
Puna ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu
seyyathāpi passeyya sarīraṃ sivathikāya chaḍḍitaṃ aṭṭhika·saṅkhalikaṃ
ni·maṃsa·lohita·makkhitaṃ nhāru·sambandhaṃ, so imam·eva kāyaṃ
upasaṃharati: ‘ayaṃ pi kho kāyo evaṃ·dhammo evaṃ·bhāvī evaṃ·an·atīto’
ti. 

(4)
Furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as if he was
seeing a dead body, cast away in a charnel ground, a squeleton without
flesh and smeared with blood, held together by tendons, he considers
this very kāya: “This kāya also is of such a nature, it is going to
become like this, and is not free from such a condition.” 

Iti
ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī
viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati;
samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā
kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati;
‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti, yāvadeva
ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya, a·nissito ca viharati, na ca kiñci loke
upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī viharati.




Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally, or he dwells
observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya
internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of phenomena
in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena in kāya,
or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of phenomena in
kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is present in him, just
to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and
does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu
dwells observing kāya in kāya.

தமிழ்

F. ஒன்பது இடுகாடு நிலத்தளங்கள் மேலான பிரிவு

மேலும்,
பிக்குக்களுக்களே, ஒரு பிக்கு, ஒருவேளை அவர் தொலைவான இடத்தில்  ஒரு
பிரேதம் இடுகாடு நிலத்தளத்தில் எறியப்பட்டு இருப்பதைப் பார்த்துக்
கொண்டிருந்தால், ஒரு மனித  எலும்புக் கூடு தசைகளில்லாமல் மற்றும் இரத்தம்
பூசப்பட்டு,நரம்புகளால்  ஒன்றாய் பிடிக்கப்பட்டு,அவர் இந்த மெய்ம்மூலமான
kāya  உடல்/காய ஆழ்ந்து ஆராய: “இந்த kāya  உடல்/காய கூட அவ்வகைப்பட்ட ஒரு
இயற்கை ஆற்றல் உடையதாக இருக்கிறது, அதுவும் இப்படி  ஆகத்தொடங்கு போக
இருக்கிறது, மற்றும் அத்தகைய ஒரு  கட்டுப்பாட்டு வரம்புகளற்ற  நிலைமை
இருந்து  வேறல்ல.

இவ்வாறு அவர் kāya in kāya உடல்/காயத்தை
காயதுக்குள் கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது காயத்தை காயதுக்கு வெளியே
கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது காயத்தை காயதுக்கு உள்ளே மற்றும் வெளியே
கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்;புலன்களால் உணரத்தக்க எழுச்சி கண்காணி வாசம்
செய்கிரார், மற்றும் புலன்களால் உணரத்தக்கதை கடந்துசெல்லுவதை கண்காணித்து
வாசம் செய்கிரார்; இல்லாவிடில் எச்சரிக்கையாயிருக்கிற உணர்
உடனிருக்கிறதை,சும்மா வெறும் ஓர்அளவு ஞானம் மற்றும் ஓர்அளவு paṭissati என
எண்ணி பற்றறு வாசம் செய்கிரார்.

(5)
Puna ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave,
bhikkhu seyyathāpi passeyya sarīraṃ sivathikāya chaḍḍitaṃ
aṭṭhika·saṅkhalikaṃ apagata·maṃsa·lohitaṃ nhāru·sambandhaṃ, so imam·eva
kāyaṃ upasaṃharati: ‘ayaṃ pi kho kāyo evaṃ·dhammo evaṃ·bhāvī
evaṃ·an·atīto’ ti. 

(5)
Furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as
if he was seeing a dead body, cast away in a charnel ground, a
squeleton without flesh nor blood, held together by tendons, he
considers this very kāya: “This kāya also is of such a nature, it is
going to become like this, and is not free from such a condition.” 

Iti
ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī
viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati;
samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā
kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati;
‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti, yāvadeva
ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya, a·nissito ca viharati, na ca kiñci loke
upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī viharati.




Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally, or he dwells
observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya
internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of phenomena
in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena in kāya,
or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of phenomena in
kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is present in him, just
to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and
does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu
dwells observing kāya in kāya.

மேலும், பிக்குக்களுக்களே, ஒரு
பிக்கு, ஒருவேளை அவர் தொலைவான இடத்தில்  ஒரு பிரேதம் இடுகாடு நிலத்தளத்தில்
எறியப்பட்டு இருப்பதைப் பார்த்துக் கொண்டிருந்தால், ஒரு மனித  எலும்புக்
கூடு தசைகளில்லாமல் மற்றும் இரத்தம்  இல்லாமல்,நரம்புகளால்  ஒன்றாய்
பிடிக்கப்பட்டு,அவர் இந்த மெய்ம்மூலமான kāya  உடல்/காய ஆழ்ந்து ஆராய: “இந்த
kāya  உடல்/காய கூட அவ்வகைப்பட்ட ஒரு இயற்கை ஆற்றல் உடையதாக இருக்கிறது,
அதுவும் இப்படி ஆகத்தொடங்கு போக இருக்கிறது, மற்றும் அத்தகைய ஒரு 
கட்டுப்பாட்டு வரம்புகளற்ற நிலைமை இருந்து  வேறல்ல.

இவ்வாறு
அவர் kāya in kāya உடல்/காயத்தை காயதுக்குள் கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்,
அல்லது காயத்தை காயதுக்கு வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது காயத்தை
காயதுக்கு உள்ளே மற்றும் வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்;புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்க எழுச்சி கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், மற்றும் புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்கதை கடந்துசெல்லுவதை கண்காணித்து வாசம் செய்கிரார்; இல்லாவிடில்
எச்சரிக்கையாயிருக்கிற உணர் உடனிருக்கிறதை,சும்மா வெறும் ஓர்அளவு ஞானம்
மற்றும் ஓர்அளவு paṭissati என எண்ணி பற்றறு வாசம் செய்கிரார்.

30 07 2012 MONDAY LESSON 683 FREE ONLINE  eNālāndā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY
Tipitaka network … his life, his acts, his words                 sabbe satta bhavantu sukhi-tatta
TIPITAKA
TIPITAKA   AND   TWELVE   DIVISIONS
    Brief historical background
   Sutta Pitaka
   Vinaya Pitaka
   Abhidhamma Pitaka
     Twelve Divisions of Buddhist Canons
Nine Divisions of Buddhist Canons
Sutta Piṭaka
— The basket of discourses —Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta (DN 22) {excerpt} - all infobubbles— Attendance on awareness —Kāyānupassanā
F. Navasivathika Pabba    F. Section on the nine charnel grounds  F. II. Vedanānupassanā
II. Observation of Vedanā ஒன்பது இடுகாடு நிலத்தளங்கள் மேலான பிரிவு - II. வேதனையை கூர்ந்த கவனித்தல்
Sutta Piṭaka >> Digha Nikāya

DN 22 - (D ii 290)
Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta
— Attendance on awareness —
[ mahā+satipaṭṭhāna ]

This sutta is widely considered as a the main reference for meditation practice.

Note: infobubbles on all Pali words

Pāḷi

Uddesa

I. Kāyānupassanā
   A. Ānāpāna Pabba
   B. Iriyāpatha Pabba
   C. Sampajāna Pabba
   D. Paṭikūlamanasikāra Pabba
   E. Dhātumanasikāra Pabba
   F. Navasivathika Pabba

II. Vedanānupassanā

III. Cittānupassanā

IV. Dhammānupassanā
   A. Nīvaraṇa Pabba
   B. Khandha Pabba
   C. Āyatana Pabba
   D. Bojjhaṅga Pabba

English

Introduction

I. Observation of Kāya
   A. Section on ānāpāna
   B. Section on postures
   C. Section on sampajañña
   D. Section on repulsiveness
   E. Section on the Elements
   F. Section on the nine charnel grounds

II. Observation of Vedanā

III. Observation of Citta

IV. Observation of Dhammas
   A. Section on the Nīvaraṇas
   B. Section on the Khandhas
   C. Section on the Sense Spheres
   D. Section on the Bojjhaṅgas

(6)
Puna
ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu seyyathāpi passeyya sarīraṃ sivathikāya
chaḍḍitaṃ aṭṭhikāni apagata·sambandhāni disā vidisā vikkhittāni, aññena
hatth·aṭṭhikaṃ aññena pād·aṭṭhikaṃ aññena gopphak·aṭṭhikaṃ aññena
jaṅgh·aṭṭhikaṃ aññena ūru·ṭṭhikaṃ aññena kaṭi·ṭṭhikaṃ aññena
phāsuk·aṭṭhikaṃ aññena piṭṭh·iṭṭhikaṃ aññena khandh·aṭṭhikaṃ aññena
gīv·aṭṭhikaṃ aññena hanuk·aṭṭhikaṃ aññena dant·aṭṭhikaṃ aññena
sīsakaṭāhaṃ, so imam·eva kāyaṃ upasaṃharati: ‘ayaṃ pi kho kāyo
evaṃ·dhammo evaṃ·bhāvī evaṃ·an·atīto’ ti. 

(6)
Furthermore,
bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as if he was seeing a dead body, cast away in a
charnel ground, disconnected bones scattered here and there, here a
hand bone, there a foot bone, here an ankle bone, there a shin bone,
here a thigh bone, there a hip bone, here a rib, there a back bone, here
a spine bone, there a neck bone, here a jaw bone, there a tooth bone,
or there the skull, he considers this very kāya: “This kāya also is of
such a nature, it is going to become like this, and is not free from
such a condition.” 

Iti ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati,
bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā kāye
kāyānupassī viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati,
vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī
vā kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā
hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya, a·nissito ca viharati, na
ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye
kāyānupassī viharati. 



Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya
internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells
observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing
the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing
away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and
passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!”
sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere
paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the
world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya.

தமிழ்

மேலும்,
பிக்குக்களுக்களே, ஒரு பிக்கு, ஒருவேளை அவர் தொலைவான இடத்தில்  ஒரு
பிரேதம் இடுகாடு நிலத்தளத்தில் எறியப்பட்டு இருப்பதைப் பார்த்துக்
கொண்டிருந்தால், கழற்றபட்ட எலும்புகள் அங்குமிங்குமா சிதறலான, இங்கே ஒரு கை
எலும்பு, அங்கே ஒரு கால் எலும்பு, இங்கே ஒரு கணுக்கால் எலும்பு, அங்கே ஒரு
முழந்தாள் எலும்பு, இங்கே ஒரு தொடை எலும்பு, அங்கே ஒரு இடுப்பு எலும்பு,
இங்கே ஒரு தொடை எலும்பு, அங்கே ஒரு விலா எலும்பு, இங்கே ஒரு தொடை எலும்பு,
அங்கே ஒரு முதுகு எலும்பு, இங்கே ஒரு தண்டெலும்பு, அங்கே ஒரு கழுத்து
எலும்பு, இங்கே ஒரு தாடை எலும்பு, அங்கே ஒரு பல் எலும்பு, அல்லது அங்கே ஒரு
மண்டை ஓடு என அவர் இந்த மெய்ம்மூலமான kāya  உடல்/காய ஆழ்ந்து ஆராய: “இந்த
kāya  உடல்/காய கூட அவ்வகைப்பட்ட ஒரு இயற்கை ஆற்றல் உடையதாக இருக்கிறது,
அதுவும் இப்படி  ஆகத்தொடங்கு போக இருக்கிறது, மற்றும் அத்தகைய ஒரு 
கட்டுப்பாட்டு வரம்புகளற்ற நிலைமை இருந்து  வேறல்ல.

இவ்வாறு அவர்
kāya in kāya உடல்/காயத்தை காயதுக்குள் கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது
காயத்தை காயதுக்கு வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது காயத்தை
காயதுக்கு உள்ளே மற்றும் வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்;புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்க எழுச்சி கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், மற்றும் புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்கதை கடந்துசெல்லுவதை கண்காணித்து வாசம் செய்கிரார்; இல்லாவிடில்
எச்சரிக்கையாயிருக்கிற உணர் உடனிருக்கிறதை,சும்மா வெறும் ஓர்அளவு ஞானம்
மற்றும் ஓர்அளவு paṭissati என எண்ணி பற்றறு வாசம் செய்கிரார்.


(7)
Puna
ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu seyyathāpi passeyya sarīraṃ sivathikāya
chaḍḍitaṃ aṭṭhikāni setāni saṅkha·vaṇṇa·paṭibhāgāni, so imam·eva kāyaṃ
upasaṃharati: ‘ayaṃ pi kho kāyo evaṃ·dhammo evaṃ·bhāvī evaṃ·an·atīto’
ti. 

(7)
Furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as if he was
seeing a dead body, cast away in a charnel ground, the bones whitened
like a seashell, he considers this very kāya: “This kāya also is of such
a nature, it is going to become like this, and is not free from such a
condition.” 

Iti ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, bahiddhā vā
kāye kāyānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī
viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati,
vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī
vā kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā
hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya, a·nissito ca viharati, na
ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye
kāyānupassī viharati. 



Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya
internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells
observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing
the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing
away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and
passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!”
sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere
paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the
world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya.

மேலும்,
பிக்குக்களுக்களே, ஒரு பிக்கு, ஒருவேளை அவர் தொலைவான இடத்தில்  ஒரு
பிரேதம் இடுகாடு நிலத்தளத்தில் எறியப்பட்டு இருப்பதைப் பார்த்துக்
கொண்டிருந்தால்,எலும்புகள் கடல்நுரை போல் வெண்மையாக இருந்தால், அவர் இந்த
மெய்ம்மூலமான kāya  உடல்/காய ஆழ்ந்து ஆராய: “இந்த kāya  உடல்/காய கூட
அவ்வகைப்பட்ட ஒரு இயற்கை ஆற்றல் உடையதாக இருக்கிறது, அதுவும் இப்படி 
ஆகத்தொடங்கு போக இருக்கிறது, மற்றும் அத்தகைய ஒரு  கட்டுப்பாட்டு
வரம்புகளற்ற நிலைமை இருந்து  வேறல்ல.

இவ்வாறு அவர் kāya in kāya
உடல்/காயத்தை காயதுக்குள் கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது காயத்தை
காயதுக்கு வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது காயத்தை காயதுக்கு
உள்ளே மற்றும் வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்;புலன்களால் உணரத்தக்க
எழுச்சி கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், மற்றும் புலன்களால் உணரத்தக்கதை
கடந்துசெல்லுவதை கண்காணித்து வாசம் செய்கிரார்; இல்லாவிடில்
எச்சரிக்கையாயிருக்கிற உணர் உடனிருக்கிறதை,சும்மா வெறும் ஓர்அளவு ஞானம்
மற்றும் ஓர்அளவு paṭissati என எண்ணி பற்றறு வாசம் செய்கிரார்.


(8)
Puna
ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu seyyathāpi passeyya sarīraṃ sivathikāya
chaḍḍitaṃ aṭṭhikāni puñja·kitāni terovassikāni, so imam·eva kāyaṃ
upasaṃharati: ‘ayaṃ pi kho kāyo evaṃ·dhammo evaṃ·bhāvī evaṃ·an·atīto’
ti. 

(8)
Furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as if he was
seeing a dead body, cast away in a charnel ground, heaped up bones over a
year old, he considers this very kāya: “This kāya also is of such a
nature, it is going to become like this, and is not free from such a
condition.” 

Iti ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, bahiddhā vā
kāye kāyānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī
viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati,
vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī
vā kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā
hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya, a·nissito ca viharati, na
ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye
kāyānupassī viharati. 



Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya
internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells
observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing
the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing
away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and
passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!”
sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere
paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the
world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya.

மேலும்,
பிக்குக்களுக்களே, ஒரு பிக்கு, ஒருவேளை அவர் தொலைவான இடத்தில்  ஒரு
பிரேதம் இடுகாடு நிலத்தளத்தில் எறியப்பட்டு இருப்பதைப் பார்த்துக்
கொண்டிருந்தால்,எலும்புகள் ஒரு ஆண்டுக்கு மேலே பழையதாகி குவியல் போல் 
இருந்தால், அவர் இந்த மெய்ம்மூலமான kāya  உடல்/காய ஆழ்ந்து ஆராய: “இந்த
kāya  உடல்/காய கூட அவ்வகைப்பட்ட ஒரு இயற்கை ஆற்றல் உடையதாக இருக்கிறது,
அதுவும் இப்படி  ஆகத்தொடங்கு போக இருக்கிறது, மற்றும் அத்தகைய ஒரு 
கட்டுப்பாட்டு வரம்புகளற்ற நிலைமை இருந்து  வேறல்ல.

இவ்வாறு அவர்
kāya in kāya உடல்/காயத்தை காயதுக்குள் கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது
காயத்தை காயதுக்கு வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது காயத்தை
காயதுக்கு உள்ளே மற்றும் வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்;புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்க எழுச்சி கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், மற்றும் புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்கதை கடந்துசெல்லுவதை கண்காணித்து வாசம் செய்கிரார்; இல்லாவிடில்
எச்சரிக்கையாயிருக்கிற உணர் உடனிருக்கிறதை,சும்மா வெறும் ஓர்அளவு ஞானம்
மற்றும் ஓர்அளவு paṭissati என எண்ணி பற்றறு வாசம் செய்கிரார்.


(9)
Puna
ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu seyyathāpi passeyya sarīraṃ sivathikāya
chaḍḍitaṃ aṭṭhikāni pūtīni cuṇṇaka·jātāni, so imam·eva kāyaṃ
upasaṃharati: ‘ayaṃ pi kho kāyo evaṃ·dhammo evaṃ·bhāvī evaṃ·an·atīto’
ti. 

(9)
Furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as if he was
seeing a dead body, cast away in a charnel ground, rotten bones reduced
to powder, he considers this very kāya: “This kāya also is of such a
nature, it is going to become like this, and is not free from such a
condition.” 

Iti ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, bahiddhā vā
kāye kāyānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī
viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati,
vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī
vā kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā
hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya, a·nissito ca viharati, na
ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye
kāyānupassī viharati. 



Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya
internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells
observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing
the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing
away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and
passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!”
sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere
paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the
world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya.

மேலும்,
பிக்குக்களுக்களே, ஒரு பிக்கு, ஒருவேளை அவர் தொலைவான இடத்தில்  ஒரு
பிரேதம் இடுகாடு நிலத்தளத்தில் எறியப்பட்டு இருப்பதைப் பார்த்துக்
கொண்டிருந்தால்,சீரழிந்த எலும்புகள் பொடியாகி  இருந்தால், அவர் இந்த
மெய்ம்மூலமான kāya  உடல்/காய ஆழ்ந்து ஆராய: “இந்த kāya  உடல்/காய கூட
அவ்வகைப்பட்ட ஒரு இயற்கை ஆற்றல் உடையதாக இருக்கிறது, அதுவும் இப்படி 
ஆகத்தொடங்கு போக இருக்கிறது, மற்றும் அத்தகைய ஒரு  கட்டுப்பாட்டு
வரம்புகளற்ற நிலைமை இருந்து  வேறல்ல.

இவ்வாறு அவர் kāya in kāya
உடல்/காயத்தை காயதுக்குள் கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது காயத்தை
காயதுக்கு வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது காயத்தை காயதுக்கு
உள்ளே மற்றும் வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்;புலன்களால் உணரத்தக்க
எழுச்சி கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், மற்றும் புலன்களால் உணரத்தக்கதை
கடந்துசெல்லுவதை கண்காணித்து வாசம் செய்கிரார்; இல்லாவிடில்
எச்சரிக்கையாயிருக்கிற உணர் உடனிருக்கிறதை,சும்மா வெறும் ஓர்அளவு ஞானம்
மற்றும் ஓர்அளவு paṭissati என எண்ணி பற்றறு வாசம் செய்கிரார்.

________________________________________________________________________________________
II. Vedanānupassanā

Kathaṃ ca pana, bhikkhave, bhikkhu vedanāsu vedanānupassī viharati? 


II. Observation of Vedanā

And furthermore, bhikkhus, how does a bhikkhu dwell observing vedanā in vedanā? 

Idha,
bhikkhave, bhikkhu sukhaṃ vā vedanaṃ vedayamāno ‘sukhaṃ vedanaṃ
vedayāmī’ ti pajānāti; dukkhaṃ vā vedanaṃ vedayamāno ‘dukkhaṃ vedanaṃ
vedayāmī’ ti pajānāti; a·dukkham-a·sukhaṃ vā vedanaṃ vedayamāno
‘a·dukkham-a·sukhaṃ vedanaṃ vedayāmī’ ti pajānāti. Sāmisaṃ vā sukhaṃ
vedanaṃ vedayamāno ‘sāmisaṃ sukhaṃ vedanaṃ vedayāmī’ ti pajānāti;
nirāmisaṃ vā sukhaṃ vedanaṃ vedayamāno ‘nirāmisaṃ sukhaṃ vedanaṃ
vedayāmī’ ti pajānāti. Sāmisaṃ vā dukkhaṃ vedanaṃ vedayamāno ‘sāmisaṃ
dukkhaṃ vedanaṃ vedayāmī’ ti pajānāti; nirāmisaṃ vā dukkhaṃ vedanaṃ
vedayamāno ‘nirāmisaṃ dukkhaṃ vedanaṃ vedayāmī’ ti pajānāti. Sāmisaṃ vā
a·dukkham-a·sukhaṃ vedanaṃ vedayamāno ‘sāmisaṃ a·dukkham-a·sukhaṃ
vedanaṃ vedayāmī’ ti pajānāti; nirāmisaṃ vā a·dukkham-a·sukhaṃ vedanaṃ
vedayamāno ‘nirāmisaṃ a·dukkham-a·sukhaṃ vedanaṃ vedayāmī’ ti pajānāti. 

Here,
bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, experiencing a sukha vedanā, undersands: “I am
experiencing a sukha vedanā”; experiencing a dukkha vedanā, undersands:
“I am experiencing a dukkha vedanā”; experiencing an adukkham-asukhā
vedanā, undersands: “I am experiencing a adukkham-asukhā vedanā”;
experiencing a sukha vedanā sāmisa, undersands: “I am experiencing a
sukha vedanā sāmisa”; experiencing a sukha vedanā nirāmisa, undersands:
“I am experiencing a sukha vedanā nirāmisa”; experiencing a dukkha
vedanā sāmisa, undersands: “I am experiencing a dukkha vedanā sāmisa”;
experiencing a dukkha vedanā nirāmisa, undersands: “I am experiencing a
dukkha vedanā nirāmisa”; experiencing an adukkham-asukhā vedanā sāmisa,
undersands: “I am experiencing a adukkham-asukhā vedanā sāmisa”;
experiencing an adukkham-asukhā vedanā nirāmisa, undersands: “I am
experiencing a adukkham-asukhā vedanā nirāmisa”. 

Iti ajjhattaṃ vā
vedanāsu vedanānupassī viharati, bahiddhā vā vedanāsu vedanānupassī
viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā vedanāsu vedanānupassī viharati;
samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā vedanāsu viharati, vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā
vedanāsu viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā vedanāsu viharati;
‘atthi vedanā’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti, yāvadeva
ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya, a·nissito ca viharati, na ca kiñci loke
upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu vedanāsu vedanānupassī
viharati. 



Thus he dwells observing vedanā in vedanā internally,
or he dwells observing vedanā in vedanā externally, or he dwells
observing vedanā in vedanā internally and externally; he dwells
observing the samudaya of phenomena in vedanā, or he dwells observing
the passing away of phenomena in vedanā, or he dwells observing the
samudaya and passing away of phenomena in vedanā; or else, [realizing:]
“this is vedanā!” sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere
ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to
anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing vedanā
in vedanā.

II. வேதனையை கூர்ந்த கவனித்தல்

மற்றும் இப்போது எவ்வாறு பிக்குக்களுக்களே, ஒரு பிக்கு, vedanā in vedanā  வேதனையை வேதனையில் கூர்ந்த கவனித்து வாசம் செய்கிரார்?

இங்கு,
பிக்குக்களுக்களே, ஒரு பிக்கு, ஒரு sukha vedanā சுக வேதனையை
அனுபவிக்கும்போது, நான் ஒரு சுக வேதனையை அனுபவிக்றேன் என
புரிந்துகொள்கிரார்: ஒரு dukkha vedanā துக்க வேதனையை அனுபவிக்கும்போது,
நான் ஒரு துக்க வேதனையை அனுபவிக்றேன் என புரிந்துகொள்கிரார்: ஒரு 
adukkham-asukhā vedanā  அதுக்க-அசுக (துக்க-சுகமற்ற) வேதனையை
அனுபவிக்கும்போது, நான் ஒரு adukkham-asukhā vedanā  அதுக்க-அசுக
(துக்க-சுகமற்ற) வேதனையை அனுபவிக்றேன் என புரிந்துகொள்கிரார்:ஒரு sukhā
vedanā  sāmisa சுக வேதனையை உணவை மனப்பற்றுடன் அனுபவிக்கும்போது, நான் ஒரு
sukhā vedanā  sāmisa சுக வேதனையை உணவை மனப்பற்றுடன் அனுபவிக்றேன் என
புரிந்துகொள்கிரார்:ஒரு sukhā vedanā  nirāmisa சுக வேதனையை உணவை
மனப்பற்றறுடன் அனுபவிக்கும்போது, நான் ஒரு sukhā vedanā nirāmisa சுக
வேதனையை உணவை மனப்பற்றறுடன் அனுபவிக்றேன் என புரிந்துகொள்கிரார்:ஒரு dukkha
vedanā  sāmisa துக்க வேதனையை உணவை மனப்பற்றுடன் அனுபவிக்கும்போது, நான்
ஒரு dukkha vedanā  sāmisa துக்க வேதனையை உணவை மனப்பற்றுடன் அனுபவிக்றேன்
என புரிந்துகொள்கிரார்:ஒரு dukkha vedanā  nirāmisa துக்க வேதனையை உணவை
மனப்பற்றறுடன் அனுபவிக்கும்போது, நான் ஒரு dukkha vedanā nirāmisa துக்க
வேதனையை உணவை மனப்பற்றறுடன் அனுபவிக்றேன் என புரிந்துகொள்கிரார்:ஒரு
adukkham-asukhā  vedanā  sāmisa அதுக்க-அசுக (துக்க-சுகமற்ற) வேதனையை உணவை
மனப்பற்றுடன் அனுபவிக்கும்போது, நான் ஒரு adukkham-asukhā  vedanā  sāmisa
அதுக்க-அசுக (துக்க-சுகமற்ற)  வேதனையை உணவை மனப்பற்றுடன் அனுபவிக்றேன் என
புரிந்துகொள்கிரார்:ஒரு adukkham-asukhā  vedanā  nirāmisa அதுக்க-அசுக
(துக்க-சுகமற்ற)  வேதனையை உணவை மனப்பற்றறுடன் அனுபவிக்கும்போது, நான் ஒரு
adukkham-asukhā  vedanā nirāmisa அதுக்க-அசுக (துக்க-சுகமற்ற)  வேதனையை
உணவை மனப்பற்றறுடன் அனுபவிக்றேன் என புரிந்துகொள்கிரார்:

இவ்வாறு
அவர்  vedanā in vedanā  வேதனையை வேதனையில் கூர்ந்த கவனித்து  வாசம்
செய்கிரார், அல்லது வேதனையை வேதனைக்கு வெளியே கூர்ந்த கவனித்து  வாசம்
செய்கிரார், அல்லது வேதனையை வேதனைக்கு உள்ளே மற்றும் வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம்
செய்கிரார்;புலன்களால் உணரத்தக்க எழுச்சி கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்,
மற்றும் புலன்களால் உணரத்தக்கதை கடந்துசெல்லுவதை கண்காணித்து வாசம்
செய்கிரார்; இல்லாவிடில் எச்சரிக்கையாயிருக்கிற உணர் உடனிருக்கிறதை,சும்மா
வெறும் ஓர்அளவு ஞானம் மற்றும் ஓர்அளவு paṭissati என எண்ணி பற்றறு வாசம்
செய்கிரார்.
31 07 2012 TUESDAY LESSON 684 FREE ONLINE  eNālāndā Research and Practice UNIVERSITY
up a levelTipitaka network … his life, his acts, his words
               
sabbe satta bhavantu sukhi-tatta
TIPITAKA
TIPITAKA   AND   TWELVE   DIVISIONS
    Brief historical background
   Sutta Pitaka
   Vinaya Pitaka
   Abhidhamma Pitaka
     Twelve Divisions of Buddhist Canons
Nine Divisions of Buddhist Canons
Sutta Piṭaka

— The basket of discourses —Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta (DN 22) {excerpt} - all infobubbles— Attendance on awareness —Kāyānupassanā
F. Navasivathika Pabba    F. Section on the nine charnel grounds  F. II. Vedanānupassanā
II. Observation of Vedanā  - III. Citta மனம் அதனுடைய அகநிலையை கூர்ந்து கவனித்தல்

>> Sutta Piṭaka >> Digha Nikāya

DN 22 - (D ii 290)

Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta


— Attendance on awareness —
[ mahā+satipaṭṭhāna ]



This sutta is widely considered as a the main reference for meditation practice.





Note: infobubbles on all Pali words




Pāḷi



Uddesa

I. Kāyānupassanā

   A. Ānāpāna Pabba
   B. Iriyāpatha Pabba
   C. Sampajāna Pabba
   D. Paṭikūlamanasikāra Pabba
   E. Dhātumanasikāra Pabba
   F. Navasivathika Pabba

II. Vedanānupassanā

III. Cittānupassanā

IV. Dhammānupassanā

   A. Nīvaraṇa Pabba
   B. Khandha Pabba
   C. Āyatana Pabba
   D. Bojjhaṅga Pabba




English



Introduction

I. Observation of Kāya

   A. Section on ānāpāna
   B. Section on postures
   C. Section on sampajañña
   D. Section on repulsiveness
   E. Section on the Elements
   F. Section on the nine charnel grounds

II. Observation of Vedanā

III. Observation of Citta

IV. Observation of Dhammas


   A. Section on the Nīvaraṇas
   B. Section on the Khandhas
   C. Section on the Sense Spheres
   D. Section on the Bojjhaṅgas



III. Cittānupassanā


Kathaṃ ca pana, bhikkhave, bhikkhu citte cittānupassī viharati?



III. Observation of Citta



And furthermore, bhikkhus, how does a bhikkhu dwell observing citta in citta?


Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu sa·rāgaṃ cittaṃsa·rāgaṃ cittaṃti pajānāti, vīta·rāgaṃ cittaṃvīta·rāgaṃ cittaṃti pajānāti, sa·dosaṃ cittaṃsa·dosaṃ cittaṃti pajānāti, vīta·dosaṃ cittaṃvīta·dosaṃ cittaṃti pajānāti, sa·mohaṃ cittaṃsa·mohaṃ cittaṃti pajānāti, vīta·mohaṃ cittaṃvīta·mohaṃ cittaṃti pajānāti, saṅkhittaṃ cittaṃsaṅkhittaṃ cittaṃti pajānāti, vikkhittaṃ cittaṃvikkhittaṃ cittaṃti pajānāti, mahaggataṃ cittaṃmahaggataṃ cittaṃti pajānāti, a·mahaggataṃ cittaṃa·mahaggataṃ cittaṃti pajānāti, sa·uttaraṃ cittaṃsa·uttaraṃ cittaṃti pajānāti, an·uttaraṃ cittaṃan·uttaraṃ cittaṃti pajānāti, samāhitaṃ cittaṃsamāhitaṃ cittaṃti pajānāti, a·samāhitaṃ cittaṃa·samāhitaṃ cittaṃti pajānāti, vimuttaṃ cittaṃvimuttaṃ cittaṃti pajānāti, a·vimuttaṃ cittaṃa·vimuttaṃ cittaṃti pajānāti.



Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu understands citta with rāga as “citta with rāga“, or he understands citta without rāga as “citta without rāga“, or he understands citta with dosa as “citta with dosa“, or he understands citta without dosa as “citta without dosa“, or he understands citta with moha as “citta with moha“, or he understands citta without moha as “citta without moha“, or he understands a collected citta as “a collected citta“, or he understands a scattered citta as “a scattered citta“, or he understands an expanded citta as “an expanded citta“, or he understands an unexpanded citta as “an unexpanded citta“, or he understands a surpassable citta as “a surpassable citta“, or he understands an unsurpassable citta as “an unsurpassable citta“, or he understands a concentrated citta as “a concentrated citta“, or he understands an unconcentrated citta as “an unconcentrated citta“, or he understands a liberated citta as “a liberated citta“, or he understands an unliberated citta as “an unliberated citta“.


Iti ajjhattaṃ citte cittānupassī viharati, bahiddhā citte cittānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā citte cittānupassī viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī cittasmiṃ viharati, vaya-dhamm·ānupassī cittasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī cittasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi cittaṃti pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya, a·nissito ca viharati, na ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu citte cittānupassī viharati.



Thus he dwells observing citta in citta internally, or he dwells observing citta in citta externally, or he dwells observing citta in citta internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of phenomena in citta, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena in citta, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of phenomena in citta; or else, [realizing:] “this is citta!” sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing citta in citta.




தமிழ்


III. Citta மனம் அதனுடைய அகநிலையை கூர்ந்து கவனித்தல்

மற்றும்
இப்போது எவ்வாறு பிக்குக்களுக்களே, ஒரு பிக்கு, Citta மனம் அதனுடைய
அகநிலையை in Citta மனம் அதனுடைய அகநிலையில் கூர்ந்து  கவனித்து வாசம்
செய்கிரார்?

மற்றும் இப்போது எவ்வாறு பிக்குக்களுக்களே, ஒரு பிக்கு,
Citta மனம் அதனுடைய அகநிலை rāga  ஆர்வ வேட்கையை ” Citta மனம் அதனுடைய
அகநிலை rāga ஆர்வ வேட்கையாக” என புரிந்துகொள்கிரார்,அல்லது Citta மனம்
அதனுடைய அகநிலை rāga ஆர்வ வேட்கையற்றதை, “Citta மனம் அதனுடைய அகநிலை rāga
ஆர்வ வேட்கையற்றது” என புரிந்துகொள்கிரார்,அல்லது

Citta மனம்
அதனுடைய அகநிலை “dosa வெறுப்பு ஆர்வ வேட்கையை Citta மனம் அதனுடைய அகநிலை 
dosa வெறுப்பு ஆர்வ வேட்கையாக” என புரிந்துகொள்கிரார்,”Citta மனம் அதனுடைய
அகநிலை dosa வெறுப்பு ஆர்வ வேட்கையற்றதை, Citta மனம் அதனுடைய அகநிலை dosa
வெறுப்பு ஆர்வ வேட்கையற்றது” என புரிந்துகொள்கிரார், அல்லது Citta மனம்
அதனுடைய அகநிலை moha  மருட்சி  ஆர்வ வேட்கையை “Citta மனம் அதனுடைய அகநிலை 
moha மருட்சி ஆர்வ வேட்கை” என புரிந்துகொள்கிரார்,”Citta மனம் அதனுடைய
அகநிலை moha மருட்சி ஆர்வ வேட்கையற்றதை, Citta மனம் அதனுடைய அகநிலை moha
மருட்சி ஆர்வ வேட்கையற்றது” என புரிந்துகொள்கிரார், அல்லது ஒரு சேர்த்த
Citta மனம் அதனுடைய அகநிலை  “ஒரு சேர்த்த Citta மனம் அதனுடைய அகநிலை” என
புரிந்துகொள்கிரார்,  ஒரு சிதறலான
Citta மனம் அதனுடைய அகநிலை  “ஒரு
சிதறலான Citta மனம் அதனுடைய அகநிலை” என புரிந்துகொள்கிரார்,அல்லது ஒரு
விரிவாக்கம் செய்த Citta மனம் அதனுடைய அகநிலை  “ஒரு விரிவாக்கம் செய்த
Citta மனம் அதனுடைய அகநிலை” என புரிந்துகொள்கிரார்,  ஒரு விரிவாக்கம்
செய்யாத Citta மனம் அதனுடைய அகநிலை  “ஒரு விரிவாக்கம் செய்யாத Citta மனம்
அதனுடைய அகநிலை” என புரிந்துகொள்கிரார்,அல்லது ஒரு மிக மேற்பட்ட Citta மனம்
அதனுடைய அகநிலை  “ஒரு மிக மேற்பட்ட Citta மனம் அதனுடைய அகநிலை” என
புரிந்துகொள்கிரார்,  ஒரு  மிக மேற்படாத Citta மனம் அதனுடைய அகநிலை  “ஒரு
மிக மேற்படாத Citta மனம் அதனுடைய அகநிலை” என புரிந்துகொள்கிரார்,அல்லது ஒரு
திண்மையான Citta மனம் அதனுடைய அகநிலை  “ஒரு திண்மையான Citta மனம் அதனுடைய
அகநிலை” என புரிந்துகொள்கிரார்,  ஒரு திண்மையற்ற Citta மனம் அதனுடைய
அகநிலை  “ஒரு திண்மையற்ற  Citta மனம் அதனுடைய அகநிலை” என
புரிந்துகொள்கிரார்,அல்லது ஒரு விடுதலை செய்த Citta மனம் அதனுடைய அகநிலை 
“ஒரு விடுதலை செய்த Citta மனம் அதனுடைய அகநிலை” என புரிந்துகொள்கிரார், 
ஒரு விடுதலை செய்யாத Citta மனம் அதனுடைய அகநிலை  “ஒரு விடுதலை செய்யாத 
Citta மனம் அதனுடைய அகநிலை” என புரிந்துகொள்கிரார்.

இவ்வாறு
அவர்  Citta மனம் அதனுடைய அகநிலையை in Citta மனம் அதனுடைய அகநிலையில்
கூர்ந்து  கவனித்து  வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது அதனுடைய அகநிலையை in Citta
மனம் அதனுடைய அகநிலையில் வெளியே கூர்ந்த கவனித்து  வாசம்
செய்கிரார்;samudaya of phenomena புலன்களால் உணரத்தக்க தோற்றம் அதனுடைய
அகநிலையில் கூர்ந்து  கவனித்து  வாசம் செய்கிரார், புலன்களால் உணரத்தக்க
கழிதல் அதனுடைய அகநிலையில் கூர்ந்து  கவனித்து  வாசம் செய்கிரார், samudaya
and passing away of phenomena புலன்களால் உணரத்தக்க தோற்றம் மற்றும்
கழிதல் அதனுடைய அகநிலையில் கூர்ந்து  கவனித்து  வாசம் செய்கிரார்,
இல்லாவிடில் “இது  citta  அகநிலை” என உணர்ந்து,  sati விழிப்பு நிலை
அவருக்குள் வந்திருக்கிறது, சும்மா வெறும் ñāṇa  ஓர்அளவு ஞானம் மற்றும்
ஓர்அளவு paṭissati என எண்ணி பற்றறு வாசம் செய்கிரார். மற்றும் உலகத்தில்
சிறிதளவாவது பற்றிக்கொள்ளாது,அவ்வாறாக பிக்குக்களுக்களே, ஒரு பிக்கு, Citta
மனம் அதனுடைய அகநிலையை in Citta மனம் அதனுடைய அகநிலையில் கூர்ந்து 
கவனித்து வாசம் செய்கிரார்.


Sutta Piṭaka-Digha Nikāya

சிறந்த  வீடுபேற்றுநிலை குறிக்கோள் எய்தல் சவுகதநூலின் ஒரு பாகம் - எல்லாம் உணர்வுநிலையின் அடி எல்லை

DN 16 - (D ii 137)
Mahāparinibbāna Sutta
{excerpts}
— The last instructions —
[mahā-parinibbāna]

இந்த
சவுகதநூலின் ஒரு பாகம், புத்தரால், அவருடைய முடிவுறுதல் அப்புறம், அவருடைய
பின்பற்றுபவர்களின் நிமித்தம் கொடுக்கப்பட்ட பற்பல விதிமுறைகள்
கொய்சகமாக்கப்பட்டது. அவை, நமக்கு  தற்காலத்தில் மிக முக்கிய இணைகோப்பு
விதிமுறைகளை உண்டாக்குகிறது.

This
sutta gathers various instructions the Buddha gave for the sake of his
followers after his passing away, which makes it be a very important set
of instructions for us nowadays.

Note: infobubbles on all Pali words except in section with light green background color

தம்மாதாஸங் நாம தம்மா பரியாயங் தெசஸ்ஸஸ்ஸாமி, யென ஸம்மங்காதொ
ஆரியஸாவகொ ஆகன்கமாகொ அத்தனாவ அத்தானங் ப்யா-கரெய்ய:
‘கின்ன-நிரயொ-மி-கின்ன-திர்ச்சான-யொனி கின்ன-பெத்திவிஸயொ கின்’அபாய
துக்கதி-வினிபாதொ, ஸோதாபன்னொ-ஹமஸ்மி அவினிபாதொ-தம்மொ நியதொ
ஸம்போதி-பராயனொ’தி?

தமிழ்

(தம்மாவின் உருப்பளிங்கு)

நான்
Dhammādāsa (தம்மாவின் உருப்பளிங்கு) என  கருதப்படும் தம்மாவை
வியாக்கியானம் பண்ண பிரசங்கம் செய்ய விரும்புகிரேன்,ariyasāvaka (புனிதமான
சீடர்)ஆக ஆட்கொண்டு,ஒருவேளை அவர் தானே  விரும்பி உறுதியாக்கிக் கொண்டால்:
‘ஆக
எனக்கு, இன்னும் மேலும் niraya (நரகம்) இல்லை,இன்னும் மேலும்
tiracchāna-yoni ( மிருகம சாம்ராஜ்யம்) இல்லை,இன்னும் மேலும் pettivisaya
(ஆவிகள் சாம்ராஜ்யம்) இல்லை,இன்னும் மேலும்
பாக்கியவீனம்,துரதிருஷ்டம்,துக்கம், நிலை இல்லை, நான் sotāpanna (புனல்
பிரவேசி), இயற்கையாக துக்க நிலையில் இருந்து விடுவிக்கப்பட்டவன்,sambodhi
(முழுக்க தூக்கத்திலிருந்து விழிப்பு) ஆக சேர இருத்தல் உறுதி.

Dhammādāsaṃ
nāma dhamma-pariyāyaṃ desessāmi, yena samannāgato ariyasāvako
ākaṅkhamāno attanāva attānaṃ byā-kareyya: ‘khīṇa-nirayo-mhi
khīṇa-tiracchāna-yoni khīṇa-pettivisayo khīṇ’āpāya-duggati-vinipāto,
sotāpanno-hamasmi avinipāta-dhammo niyato sambodhi-parāyaṇo’ ti?

(The Mirror of the Dhamma)

I
will expound the discourse on the Dhamma which is called Dhammādāsa,
possessed of which the ariyasāvaka, if he so desires, can declare of
himself: ‘For me, there is no more niraya, no more tiracchāna-yoni, no
more pettivisaya, no more state of unhappiness, of misfortune, of
misery, I am a sotāpanna, by nature free from states of misery, certain
of being destined to sambodhi.

Katamo
ca so, Ānanda, dhammādāso dhamma-pariyāyo, yena samannāgato ariyasāvako
ākaṅkhamāno attanāva attānaṃ byā-kareyya: ‘khīṇa-nirayo-mhi
khīṇa-tiracchāna-yoni khīṇa-pettivisayo khīṇ’āpāya-duggati-vinipāto,
sotāpanno-hamasmi avinipāta-dhammo niyato sambodhi-parāyaṇo’ ti? 

And
what, Ānanda, is that discourse on the Dhamma which is called
Dhammādāsa, possessed of which the ariyasāvaka, if he so desires, can
declare of himself: ‘For me, there is no more niraya, no more
tiracchāna-yoni, no more pettivisaya, no more state of unhappiness, of
misfortune, of misery, I am a sotāpanna, by nature free from states of
misery, certain of being destined to sambodhi?
மற்றும் என்ன,Ānanda
(ஆனந்தா),தம்மா மீது ஆன அந்த பிரசங்கம் Dhammādāsa (தம்மாவின்
உருப்பளிங்கு) என  கருதப்படும் தம்மாவை வியாக்கியானம் பண்ண பிரசங்கம் செய்ய
விரும்புகிரேன்,ariyasāvaka (புனிதமான சீடர்)ஆக ஆட்கொண்டு,ஒருவேளை அவர்
தானே  விரும்பி உறுதியாக்கிக் கொண்டால்:
‘ஆக எனக்கு, இன்னும் மேலும்
niraya (நரகம்) இல்லை,இன்னும் மேலும் tiracchāna-yoni ( மிருகம
சாம்ராஜ்யம்) இல்லை,இன்னும் மேலும் pettivisaya (ஆவிகள் சாம்ராஜ்யம்)
இல்லை,இன்னும் மேலும் பாக்கியவீனம்,துரதிருஷ்டம்,துக்கம், நிலை இல்லை, நான்
sotāpanna (புனல் பிரவேசி), இயற்கையாக துக்க நிலையில் இருந்து
விடுவிக்கப்பட்டவன்,sambodhi (முழுக்க தூக்கத்திலிருந்து விழிப்பு) ஆக சேர
இருத்தல் உறுதி தானே?

Idh’ānanda, ariyasāvako Buddhe aveccappasāda samannāgato hoti:

Here, Ānanda, an ariyasāvaka is endowed with Buddhe aveccappasāda:
இங்கு,ஆனந்தா,புனிதமான சீடர் Buddhe aveccappasāda  (புத்தர் இடத்தில் தன்னம்பிக்கை)யாக குணிக்கப் படுகிரார்.

‘Itipi
so bhagavā arahaṃ sammāsambuddho vijjācaraṇasampanno sugato lokavidū
anuttaro purisadammasārathi satthā devamanussānaṃ buddho bhagavā’ ti.

Dhamme aveccappasāda samannāgato hoti:
He is endowed with Dhamme aveccappasāda:
 Dhamme aveccappasāda:(தம்மா இடத்தில் தன்னம்பிக்கை)யாக குணிக்கப் படுகிரார்.

‘Svākkhāto bhagavatā dhammo sandiṭṭhiko akāliko ehipassiko opaneyyiko paccattaṃ veditabbo viññūhī’ ti.

Saṅghe aveccappasāda samannāgato hoti:
He is endowed with Saṅghe aveccappasāda:
 Saṅghe aveccappasāda (சான்றோர் இடத்தில் தன்னம்பிக்கை)யாக குணிக்கப் படுகிரார்.

‘Suppaṭipanno
bhagavato sāvakasaṅgho, ujuppaṭipanno bhagavato sāvakasaṅgho,
ñāyappaṭipanno bhagavato sāvakasaṅgho, sāmīcippaṭipanno bhagavato
sāvakasaṅgho yadidaṃ cattāri purisayugāni aṭṭha purisapuggalā, esa
bhagavato sāvakasaṅgho āhuneyyo pāhuneyyo dakkhiṇeyyo añjalikaraṇīyo
anuttaraṃ puññakkhettaṃ lokassā’ ti.

Ariya-kantehi sīlehi samannāgato hoti
He is endowed with a sīla which is agreeable to the ariyas,
புனிதமானவர்கள் ஏற்றுக்கொள்ளத்தக்க சீலராக குணிக்கப் படுகிரார்.

akhaṇḍehi acchiddehi asabalehi akammāsehi bhujissehi viññūpasatthehi aparāmaṭṭhehi samādhisaṃvattanikehi.

Ayaṃ
kho so, Ānanda, dhammādāso dhamma-pariyāyo, yena samannāgato
ariyasāvako ākaṅkhamāno attanāva attānaṃ byā-kareyya: ‘khīṇa-nirayo-mhi
khīṇa-tiracchāna-yoni khīṇa-pettivisayo khīṇ’āpāya-duggati-vinipāto,
sotāpanno-hamasmi avinipāta-dhammo niyato sambodhi-parāyaṇo’ ti 

This,
Ānanda, is the discourse on the Dhamma which is called Dhammādāsa,
possessed of which the ariyasāvaka, if he so desires, can declare of
himself: ‘For me, there is no more niraya, no more tiracchāna-yoni, no
more pettivisaya, no more state of unhappiness, of misfortune, of
misery, I am a sotāpanna, by nature free from states of misery, certain
of being destined to sambodhi. 

இது, Ānanda (ஆனந்தா),தம்மா மீது ஆன
அந்த பிரசங்கம் Dhammādāsa (தம்மாவின் உருப்பளிங்கு) என  கருதப்படும்
தம்மாவை வியாக்கியானம் பண்ண பிரசங்கம் செய்ய விரும்புகிரேன்,ariyasāvaka
(புனிதமான சீடர்)ஆக ஆட்கொண்டு,ஒருவேளை அவர் தானே  விரும்பி உறுதியாக்கிக்
கொண்டால்:
’ஆக எனக்கு, இன்னும் மேலும் niraya (நரகம்) இல்லை,இன்னும் மேலும்
tiracchāna-yoni ( மிருகம சாம்ராஜ்யம்) இல்லை,இன்னும் மேலும் pettivisaya
(ஆவிகள் சாம்ராஜ்யம்) இல்லை,இன்னும் மேலும்
பாக்கியவீனம்,துரதிருஷ்டம்,துக்கம், நிலை இல்லை, நான் sotāpanna (புனல்
பிரவேசி), இயற்கையாக துக்க நிலையில் இருந்து விடுவிக்கப்பட்டவன்,sambodhi
(முழுக்க தூக்கத்திலிருந்து விழிப்பு) ஆக சேர இருத்தல் உறுதி.

… 

… 

Sato, bhikkhave, bhikkhu vihareyya sampajāno. Ayaṃ vo amhākaṃ anusāsanī. 

Sato should you remain, bhikkhus, and sampajānos. This is our intruction to you.

Sato(கவனமான)
நீர் இருக்க வேண்டும்,bhikkhus (பிக்குக்கள்),மேலும் sampajānos(மாறா
இயல்பு அநித்தியத்தை பகுத்தறிதல்).இது தான் உமக்கு
எங்களுடைய போதனை.

Katha’ñca, bhikkhave, bhikkhu sato hoti? Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu
And how, bhikkhus, is a bhikkhu sato? Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu
மற்றும் எப்படி,பிக்கு, பிக்குக்கள் sato (கவனமான) இருக்கிரார்? இங்கு,பிக்குக்கள், ஒரு பிக்கு

kāye
kāyānupassī viharati ātāpī sampajāno satimā, vineyya loke
abhijjhā-domanassaṃ; vedanāsu vedanānupassī viharati ātāpī sampajāno
satimā, vineyya loke abhijjhā-domanassaṃ; citte cittānupassī viharati
ātāpī sampajāno satimā, vineyya loke abhijjhā-domanassaṃ; dhammesu
dhammānupassī viharati ātāpī sampajāno satimā, vineyya loke
abhijjhā-domanassaṃ.

Evaṃ kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu sato hoti. Katha’ñca, bhikkhave, bhikkhu sampajāno hoti? Idha, bhikkhave,
Thus, bhikkhus, is a bhikkhu sato. And how, bhikkhus, is a bhikkhu sampajāno? Here, bhikkhus,

இப்படி,பிக்குக்கள்,பிக்கு
sato (கவனமான) இருக்கிரார்.மற்றும் எப்படி,பிக்குக்கள், பிக்கு
sampajānos(மாறா இயல்பு அநித்தியத்தை பகுத்தறிதல்)ஆகிரார்?
இங்கு,பிக்குக்கள்,

bhikkhu abhikkante paṭikkante sampajānakārī
hoti, ālokite vilokite sampajānakārī hoti, samiñjite pasārite
sampajānakārī hoti, saṅghāṭipattacīvaradhāraṇe sampajānakārī hoti, asite
pīte khāyite sāyite sampajānakārī hoti, uccārapassāvakamme
sampajānakārī hoti, gate ṭhite nisinne sutte jāgarite bhāsite tuṇhībhāve
sampajānakārī hoti.

Evaṃ kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu sampajāno hoti. Sato, bhikkhave, bhikkhu vihareyya sampajāno. Ayaṃ vo amhākaṃ anusāsanī ti. 

Thus, bhikkhus, is a bhikkhu sampajāno. Sato should you remain, bhikkhus, and sampajānos. This is our intruction to you.
இப்படி,பிக்குக்கள்,பிக்கு
sampajānos(மாறா இயல்பு அநித்தியத்தை பகுத்தறிதல்)ஆகிரார்,Sato(கவனமான)
நீர் இருக்க வேண்டும்,பிக்குக்கள்,மற்றும்sampajānos(மாறா இயல்பு
அநித்தியத்தை பகுத்தறிதல்),இது தான் உமக்கு
எங்களுடைய போதனை.

… 



Sabbaphāliphullā kho, Ānanda, yamakasālā akālapupphehi. Te tathāgatassa
sarīraṃ okiranti ajjhokiranti abhippakiranti tathāgatassa pūjāya.
Dibbānipi mandāravapupphāni antalikkhā papatanti, tāni tathāgatassa
sarīraṃ okiranti ajjhokiranti abhippakiranti tathāgatassa pūjāya.
Dibbānipi candanacuṇṇāni antalikkhā papatanti, tāni tathāgatassa sarīraṃ
okiranti ajjhokiranti abhippakiranti tathāgatassa pūjāya. Dibbānipi
tūriyāni antalikkhe vajjanti tathāgatassa pūjāya. Dibbānipi saṅgītāni
antalikkhe vattanti tathāgatassa pūjāya. 

– Ananda, the twin sala
trees are in full bloom, though it is not the season of flowering. And
the blossoms rain upon the body of the Tathagata and drop and scatter
and are strewn upon it in worship of the Tathagata. And celestial coral
flowers and heavenly sandalwood powder from the sky rain down upon the
body of the Tathagata, and drop and scatter and are strewn upon it in
worship of the Tathagata. And the sound of heavenly voices and heavenly
instruments makes music in the air out of reverence for the Tathagata.
-ஆனந்தா,பூவா
பருவகாலமாக இருந்த போதிலும், இரட்டை sala (சாலா) மரங்கள் முழு மலர்ச்சி
அடைந்து இருக்கிறது. மற்றும் Tathagata (குறைபாடற்றவரை) வழிபாடு செய்தல்
போல் Tathagata(குறைபாடற்றவர்) உடல் மேலே பூமழை பொழிந்து, துளி சிதற,
இரத்தினப்பிரபையாகியது. மற்றும் தேவலோக பவழமலர்கள் மற்றும் சுவர்க்கத்தைச்
சேர்ந்த சந்தன மரத் தூள் வானத்தில் இருந்து மழை கீழ் நோக்கி Tathagata
(குறைபாடற்றவர்) உடல் மேலே பொழிந்து, மற்றும் Tathagata (குறைபாடற்றவரை)
வழிபாடு செய்தல் போல் Tathagata(குறைபாடற்றவர்) உடல் மேலே பூமழை பொழிந்தது.
மற்றும் Tathagata(குறைபாடற்றவர்) போற்றுதலைக் காட்டுஞ் சமிக்கையால்
சுவர்க்கத்தைச் சேர்ந்த குரல் ஒலி மற்றும் இசைகருவிகள் காற்றுவெளியில்
வெளிப்படுத்தியது.

Na kho, Ānanda, ettāvatā Tathāgato sakkato vā
hoti garukato vā mānito vā pūjito vā apacito vā. Yo kho, Ānanda, bhikkhu
vā bhikkhunī vā upāsako vā upāsikā vā dhammānudhammappaṭipanno viharati
sāmīcippaṭipanno anudhammacārī, so Tathāgataṃ sakkaroti garuṃ karoti
māneti pūjeti apaciyati, paramāya pūjāya. Tasmātih’ānanda,
dhammānudhammappaṭipannā viharissāma sāmīcippaṭipannā
anudhammacārin’oti. Evañ’hi vo, Ānanda, sikkhitabba nti. 

It is not
by this, Ānanda, that the Tathāgata is respected, venerated, esteemed,
paid homage and honored. But, Ananda, any bhikkhu or bhikkhuni, layman
or laywoman, remaining dhamm’ānudhamma’p’paṭipanna, sāmīci’p’paṭipanna,
living in accordance with the Dhamma, that one respects, venerates,
esteems, pays homage, and honors the Tathāgata with the most excellent
homage. Therefore, Ānanda, you should train yourselves thus: ‘We will
remain dhamm’ānudhamma’p’paṭipanna, sāmīci’p’paṭipanna, living in
accordance with the Dhamma’.
இதனால் மட்டும் அல்ல, ஆனந்தா,Tathagata
(குறைபாடற்றவரை) உபசரித்தது, மரியாதை செலுத்தியது, நன்குமதிக்கப் பட்டது,
மனந்திறந்த புகழுரைத்தது, கெளரவம் செலுத்தியது. ஆனால், ஆனந்தா, எந்த ஒரு
பிக்குவோ அல்லது பிக்குனியோ, உபாசகன் அல்லது
உபாசகி,dhamm’ānudhamma’p’paṭipanna, sāmīci’p’paṭipanna, தம்மாவிற்கு
பொருந்துமாறு பயிற்சிக்கிராரோ அவர் Tathagata (குறைபாடற்றவரை) உபசரித்தது,
மரியாதை செலுத்தி, நன்குமதித்து, மனந்திறந்த புகழுரைத்தது, கெளரவம்
செலுத்தி. மிக உயர்ந்த அளவு நேர்த்திவாய்ந்த மனந்திறந்த புகழுரையாற்றுவர்.
இதுக்காக, ஆனந்தா, நீங்கள், நீங்களாகவே பயிற்சித்தல் இதுதான்: நாங்கள்
dhamm’ānudhamma’p’paṭipanna, sāmīci’p’paṭipanna, தம்மாவிற்கு
பொருந்துமாறு வாழ்க்கை முறையில் தொடர்ந்திருப்போம்.
… 

… 


‘Siyā kho pan’ānanda, tumhākaṃ evam’assa: ‘atīta-satthukaṃ pāvacanaṃ,
natthi no satthā’ ti. Na kho pan’etaṃ, Ānanda, evaṃ daṭṭhabbaṃ. Yo vo,
Ānanda, mayā Dhammo ca Vinayo ca desito paññatto, so vo mam’accayena
satthā. 

– ‘To some of you, Ānanda, it may occur thus: ‘The words of
the Teacher have ended, there is no longer a Teacher’. But this,
Ānanda, should not, be so considered. That, Ānanda, which I have taught
and made known to you as the Dhamma and the Vinaya, that will be your
Teacher after my passing away. 

உங்கள் சிலர்ருக்கு, ஆனந்தா,இவ்வாறு  நேரிடக் கூடும்:
கற்பிப்பவர்
வார்த்தைகள் தீர்ந்து விட்டது,  இனி கற்பிப்பவர் இல்லை. ஆனால் இது,
ஆனந்தா, அவ்வாறு ஆலோசனை பண்ணப்படாது. அது, ஆனந்தா,எவை நான் பாடம் படிப்பிது
மற்றும் உங்களை அறிந்திருக்க செய்துமுடித்த  Dhamma and Vinaya (தம்மாவும்
வினயாவும்) அது என்னுடைய இறப்புக்கு அப்பால் உங்களுடைய கற்பிப்பவராக
இருக்கும்.
… 


DN 22 - (D ii 290)
Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta
— Attendance on awareness —
[ mahā+satipaṭṭhāna ]

This sutta is widely considered as a the main reference for meditation practice.

Note: infobubbles on all Pali words

Pāḷi

Uddesa

I. Kāyānupassanā
   A. Ānāpāna Pabba
   B. Iriyāpatha Pabba
   C. Sampajāna Pabba
   D. Paṭikūlamanasikāra Pabba
   E. Dhātumanasikāra Pabba
   F. Navasivathika Pabba

II. Vedanānupassanā

English

Introduction

I. Observation of Kāya
   A. Section on ānāpāna
   B. Section on postures
   C. Section on sampajañña
   D. Section on repulsiveness
   E. Section on the Elements
   F. Section on the nine charnel grounds

II. Observation of Vedanā

Uddesa

Evaṃ me sutaṃ:
Introduction

Thus have I heard: 

Ekaṃ samayaṃ bhagavā kurūsu viharati kammāsadhammaṃ nāma kurūnaṃ nigamo. Tatra kho bhagavā bhikkhū āmantesi:
On
one occasion, the Bhagavā was staying among the Kurus at Kammāsadhamma,
a market town of the Kurus. There, he addressed the bhikkhus:
– Bhikkhavo ti.
– Bhaddante ti te bhikkhū bhagavato paccassosuṃ. Bhagavā etad-avoca: 

– Bhikkhus.
– Bhaddante answered the bhikkhus. The Bhagavā said: 


Ekāyano ayaṃ, bhikkhave, maggo sattānaṃ visuddhiyā, soka-paridevānaṃ
samatikkamāya, dukkha-domanassānaṃ atthaṅgamāya, ñāyassa adhigamāya,
nibbānassa sacchikiriyāya, yadidaṃ cattāro satipaṭṭhānā. 

– This,
bhikkhus, is the path that leads to nothing but the purification of
beings, the overcoming of sorrow and lamentation, the disappearance of
dukkha-domanassa, the attainment of the right way, the realization of
Nibbāna, that is to say the four satipaṭṭhānas.

Katame
cattāro? Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī viharati ātāpī
sampajāno satimā, vineyya loke abhijjhā-domanassaṃ. Vedanāsu
vedanānupassī viharati ātāpī sampajāno satimā, vineyya loke
abhijjhā-domanassaṃ. Citte cittānupassī viharati ātāpī sampajāno satimā,
vineyya loke abhijjhā-domanassaṃ. Dhammesu dhammānupassī viharati ātāpī
sampajāno satimā, vineyya loke abhijjhā-domanassaṃ.
Which four?
Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya, ātāpī
sampajāno, satimā, having given up abhijjhā-domanassa towards the world.
He dwells observing vedanā in vedanā, ātāpī sampajāno, satimā, having
given up abhijjhā-domanassa towards the world. He dwells observing citta
in citta, ātāpī sampajāno, satimā, having given up abhijjhā-domanassa
towards the world. He dwells observing dhamma·s in dhamma·s, ātāpī
sampajāno, satimā, having given up abhijjhā-domanassa towards the world.

I. Kāyānupassanā

A. Ānāpāna Pabba

Katha·ñ·ca,
bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī viharati? Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu
arañña-gato vā rukkha-mūla-gato vā suññ’āgāra-gato vā nisīdati pallaṅkaṃ
ābhujitvā ujuṃ kāyaṃ paṇidhāya parimukhaṃ satiṃ upaṭṭhapetvā. So
sato’va assasati, sato’va passasati. Dīghaṃ vā assasanto ‘dīghaṃ
assasāmī’ ti pajānāti; dīghaṃ vā passasanto ‘dīghaṃ passasāmī’ ti
pajānāti; rassaṃ vā assasanto ‘rassaṃ assasāmī’ ti pajānāti; rassaṃ vā
passasanto ‘rassaṃ passasāmī’ ti pajānāti; ’sabba-kāya-paṭisaṃvedī
assasissāmī’ ti sikkhati; ’sabba-kāya-paṭisaṃvedī passasissāmī’ ti
sikkhati; ‘passambhayaṃ kāya-saṅkhāraṃ assasissāmī’ ti sikkhati;
‘passambhayaṃ kāya-saṅkhāraṃ passasissāmī’ ti sikkhati. 


நான் இவ்வாறு கேட்டிருக்கேன்:

 ஒரு
குறிப்பிட்டதறுவாயில், ஒரு கடைத்தெருவு நகரமான Kammāsadhamma
(கம்மாசதம்மா) வில், Kurus (பாரத்துவாசர்) இடையில் Bhagavā  (பகவான்) தங்கி
இருந்தார்.

 அவ்விடம், பிக்குக்களுக்கு அவர் உரை நிகழ்த்தினார்:
- பிக்குக்களுக்களா

- பிக்குக்களுக்கு Bhaddante (பந்த்தே) பதில்  அளித்தார்.Bhagavā  (பகவா) சொற்றார்:

-
இது, பிக்குக்களுக்களா,ஒன்றுமில்லை இனங்களை தூய்மைப்படுத்தும் பாதையில்
நடத்திச் செல்லும், துயரம் மற்றும் புலம்பலை முறியடித்து, 
dukkha-domanassa(துக்கம்-துயரம்)மறைவு , Nibbāna(யாவுங் கடந்த நிலை
உணர்தல்) மெய்யாகக் காண்டல்,அதுதான் நான்கு பொருள்கள் கொண்ட
satipaṭṭhānas(விழிப்பு நிலை உளதாந்தன்மை) என கூறலாம்.

எந்த
நான்கு?இங்கு பிக்குக்களுக்களா,ஒரு பிக்கு kāye kāyānupassī (உடலை உடல்
கண்காணிப்புடன்) கவனித்து வசிக்கிரார் ātāpī sampajāno satimā,வேறு
வழியில்லாமல்   பிரபஞ்சம் நோக்கி எச்சரிக்கையுடன் இருக்க
ஏகாந்தமாயிருக்கிரார்.வேறு வழியில்லாமல்   பிரபஞ்சம் நோக்கி
எச்சரிக்கையுடன் இருக்க ஏகாந்தமாயிருக்க  Vedanāsu vedanānupassī
உறுதலுணர்ச்சி கண்காணிப்புடன் வசிக்கிரார்.வேறு வழியில்லாமல்   பிரபஞ்சம்
நோக்கி எச்சரிக்கையுடன் இருக்க ஏகாந்தமாயிருக Citte cittānupassī viharati
ātāpī sampajāno satimā, சித்த நலம் கருதி ண்காணிப்புடன் வசிக்கிரார்.
மனத்தால் இயக்கப்படுகிற அபூர்வமான வினயா(ஒழுக்கம்) காக்க வேறு
வழியில்லாமல்   பிரபஞ்சம் நோக்கி எச்சரிக்கையுடன் இருக்க ஏகாந்தமாயிருக்க
கண்காணிப்புடன் வசிக்கிரார்.

I. Kāyānupassanā

A. Section on ānāpāna

And
how, bhikkhus, does a bhikkhu dwell observing kāya in kāya? Here,
bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, having gone to the forest or having gone at the
root of a tree or having gone to an empty room, sits down folding the
legs crosswise, setting kāya upright, and setting sati parimukhaṃ. Being
thus sato he breathes in, being thus sato he breathes out. Breathing in
long he understands: ‘I am breathing in long’; breathing out long he
understands: ‘I am breathing out long’; breathing in short he
understands: ‘I am breathing in short’; breathing out short he
understands: ‘I am breathing out short’; he trains himself: ‘feeling the
whole kāya, I will breathe in’; he trains himself: ‘feeling the whole
kāya, I will breathe out’; he trains himself: ‘calming down the
kāya-saṅkhāras, I will breathe in’; he trains himself: ‘calming down the
kāya-saṅkhāras, I will breathe out’.
மற்றும்
எப்படி,பிக்குக்களுக்களே,kāya in kāya (உடலில் உடலை கவனித்து வசிக்கிரார்?
இங்கு பிக்குக்களுக்களா,ஒரு பிக்கு,காட்டுக்குச் சென்றோ அல்லது
மரத்தடிக்குச் சென்றோ அல்லது காலி அறைகுச் சென்றோ,காலை குறுக்காக
கீழ்நோக்கி மடித்துக்கொண்டு அமர்கிரார்,உடலை செங்குத்தாக
சரிசெய்துக்கொண்டு,மற்றும் sati parimukhaṃ. மூச்சு உள்ளே அல்லது வெளியே
சரிசெய்துக்கொள்கிரார்.  sato இவ்வாறு கவனமான மூச்சு உள்ளே அல்லது வெளியே
செலுத்துகிரார். மூச்சு நீண்டதாக உள்ளே செலுத்தும்போது: நான் நீண்டதாக
உள்ளே செலுத்துககின்றேன் என அறிகிரார்.மூச்சு நீண்டதாக வெளியே 
செலுத்தும்போது: நான் நீண்டதாக வெளியே செலுத்துககின்றேன் என
அறிகிரார்.மூச்சு குறைவாக உள்ளே செலுத்தும்போது: நான் குறைவாக உள்ளே
செலுத்துககின்றேன் என அறிகிரார்.மூச்சு குறைவாக வெளியே செலுத்தும்போது:நான்
குறைவாக வெளியே செலுத்துககின்றேன் என அறிகிரார்.அவர் தானே
பயிற்சித்துகொள்கிரார்: முழு  kāya உடலை/காயாவையும் கூருணர்ச்சியுடன்,நான்
மூச்சை உள்ளே செலுத்துககின்றேன்:அவர் தானே பயிற்சித்துகொள்கிரார்:முழு 
kāya உடலை/காயாவையும் கூருணர்ச்சியுடன்,நான் மூச்சை வெளியே
செலுத்துககின்றேன்:அவர் தானே பயிற்சித்துகொள்கிரார்:  kāya-saṅkhāras
உடல்/காயா இச்சாசத்தியை அமைதி உண்டாக்கொண்டு.நான் மூச்சை உள்ளே
செலுத்துககின்றேன்:அவர் தானே பயிற்சித்துகொள்கிரார்:,நான் மூச்சை வெளியே
செலுத்துககின்றேன்:அவர் தானே பயிற்சித்துகொள்கிரார்:
Seyyathāpi,
bhikkhave, dakkho bhamakāro vā bhamakār·antevāsī vā dīghaṃ vā añchanto
‘dīghaṃ añchāmī’ ti pajānāti; rassaṃ vā añchanto ‘rassaṃ añchāmī’ ti
pajānāti; evameva kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu dīghaṃ vā assasanto ‘dīghaṃ
assasāmī’ ti pajānāti; dīghaṃ vā passasanto ‘dīghaṃ passasāmī’ ti
pajānāti; rassaṃ vā assasanto ‘rassaṃ assasāmī’ ti pajānāti; rassaṃ vā
passasanto ‘rassaṃ passasāmī’ ti pajānāti; ’sabba-kāya-paṭisaṃvedī
assasissāmī’ ti sikkhati; ’sabba-kāya-paṭisaṃvedī passasissāmī’ ti
sikkhati; ‘passambhayaṃ kāya-saṅkhāraṃ assasissāmī’ ti sikkhati;
‘passambhayaṃ kāya-saṅkhāraṃ passasissāmī’ ti sikkhati. 


Just
as, bhikkhus, a skillful turner or a turner’s apprentice, making a long
turn, understands: ‘I am making a long turn’; making a short turn, he
understands: ‘I am making a short turn’; in the same way, bhikkhus, a
bhikkhu, breathing in long, understands: ‘I am breathing in long’;
breathing out long he understands: ‘I am breathing out long’; breathing
in short he understands: ‘I am breathing in short’; breathing out short
he understands: ‘I am breathing out short’; he trains himself: ‘feeling
the whole kāya, I will breathe in’; he trains himself: ‘feeling the
whole kāya, I will breathe out’; he trains himself: ‘calming down the
kāya-saṅkhāras, I will breathe in’; he trains himself: ‘calming down the
kāya-saṅkhāras, I will breathe out’.

சம்மதம்படி,பிக்குக்களுக்களே,திறமை
கடைசல்காரர் அல்லது கடைசல்காரின் தொழில் பழகுநர், ஒரு நீளமான சுழற்றுதல்
உருவாக்குதல் குறிப்பறிது: ‘நான் நீளமான சுழற்றுதல் உருவாக்குகிறேன்’;ஒரு
குறைவான சுழற்றுதல் உருவாக்குதல் குறிப்பறிது: ‘நான் குறைவான சுழற்றுதல்
உருவாக்குகிறேன்’;அவ்வழி,பிக்குக்களுக்களே,ஒரு பிக்கு,மூச்சு நீண்டதாக
உள்ளே செலுத்தும்போது: நான் நீண்டதாக உள்ளே செலுத்துககின்றேன் என
அறிகிரார்.மூச்சு நீண்டதாக வெளியே  செலுத்தும்போது: நான் நீண்டதாக வெளியே
செலுத்துககின்றேன் என அறிகிரார்.மூச்சு குறைவாக உள்ளே செலுத்தும்போது: நான்
குறைவாக உள்ளே செலுத்துககின்றேன் என அறிகிரார்.மூச்சு குறைவாக வெளியே
செலுத்தும்போது:நான் குறைவாக வெளியே செலுத்துககின்றேன் என அறிகிரார்.அவர்
தானே பயிற்சித்துகொள்கிரார்: முழு  kāya உடலை/காயாவையும்
கூருணர்ச்சியுடன்,நான் மூச்சை உள்ளே செலுத்துககின்றேன்:அவர் தானே
பயிற்சித்துகொள்கிரார்:முழு  kāya உடலை/காயாவையும் கூருணர்ச்சியுடன்,நான்
மூச்சை வெளியே செலுத்துககின்றேன்:அவர் தானே பயிற்சித்துகொள்கிரார்: 
kāya-saṅkhāras உடல்/காயா இச்சாசத்தியை அமைதி உண்டாக்கொண்டு.நான் மூச்சை
உள்ளே செலுத்துககின்றேன்:அவர் தானே பயிற்சித்துகொள்கிரார்:,நான் மூச்சை
வெளியே செலுத்துககின்றேன்:அவர் தானே பயிற்சித்துகொள்கிரார்:

Iti
ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī
viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati;
samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā
kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati;
‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti, yāvadeva
ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati, na ca kiñci
loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī
viharati. 




Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally,
or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells observing
kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya
of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing away of
phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away
of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is
present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he
dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus,
bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya. 

இவ்வாறு அவர்
kāya in kāya உடல்/காயத்தை காயதுக்குள் கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது
காயத்தை காயதுக்கு வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது காயத்தை
காயதுக்கு உள்ளே மற்றும் வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்;புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்க எழுச்சி கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், மற்றும் புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்கதை கடந்துசெல்லுவதை கண்காணித்து வாசம் செய்கிரார்; இல்லாவிடில்
எச்சரிக்கையாயிருக்கிற உணர் உடனிருக்கிறதை,சும்மா வெறும் ஓர்அளவு ஞானம்
மற்றும் ஓர்அளவு paṭissati என எண்ணி பற்றறு வாசம் செய்கிரார்.

B. Iriyāpatha Pabba

Puna
ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu gacchanto vā ‘gacchāmī’ ti pajānāti, ṭhito
vā ‘ṭhitomhī’ ti pajānāti, nisinno vā ‘nisinnomhī’ ti pajānāti, sayāno
vā ‘sayānomhī’ ti pajānāti. Yathā yathā vā pan·assa kāyo paṇihito hoti,
tathā tathā naṃ pajānāti. 

B. Section on postures

Furthermore,
bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, while walking, understands: ‘I am walking’, or
while standing he understands: ‘I am standing’, or while sitting he
understands: ‘I am sitting’, or while lying down he understands: ‘I am
lying down’. Or else, in whichever position his kāya is disposed, he
understands it accordingly. 

Iti ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī
viharati, bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā
kāye kāyānupassī viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati,
vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī
vā kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā
hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati,
na ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye
kāyānupassī viharati. 



Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya
internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells
observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing
the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing
away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and
passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!”
sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere
paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the
world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya. 

மேலும்,பிக்குக்களுக்களே,ஒரு
பிக்கு, நடந்து செல்லும் பொழுது, ‘நான் நடந்து செல்கிறேன்’,என அவர்
அறிந்துகொள்கிறார்.அல்லது நின்று கொண்டிருக்கிற பொழுது, ‘நான் நின்று
கொண்டிருக்கிகிறேன்’, என அவர் அறிந்துகொள்கிறார்:அல்லது உட்கார்ந்திருக்கிற
பொழுது, ‘நான் உட்கார்ந்திருக்கிறேன்’, என அவர் அறிந்துகொள்கிறார்: அல்லது
படுத்திருத்திருக்கிற பொழுது, ‘நான் படுத்திருத்திருக்கிறேன்’,என அவர்
அறிந்துகொள்கிறார்: தவிர அவர் kāya உடல்அமர்வுநிலை எதுவாக தீர்வு
செய்கிறாரோ அதன்படிபுரிந்து கொள்கிறார்.

இவ்வாறு அவர் kāya in kāya
உடல்/காயத்தை காயதுக்குள் கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது காயத்தை
காயதுக்கு வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது காயத்தை காயதுக்கு
உள்ளே மற்றும் வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்;புலன்களால் உணரத்தக்க
எழுச்சி கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், மற்றும் புலன்களால் உணரத்தக்கதை
கடந்துசெல்லுவதை கண்காணித்து வாசம் செய்கிரார்; இல்லாவிடில்
எச்சரிக்கையாயிருக்கிற உணர் உடனிருக்கிறதை,சும்மா வெறும் ஓர்அளவு ஞானம்
மற்றும் ஓர்அளவு paṭissati என எண்ணி பற்றறு வாசம் செய்கிரார்.
C. Sampajāna Pabba

Puna
ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu abhikkante paṭikkante sampajānakārī hoti,
ālokite vilokite sampajānakārī hoti, samiñjite pasārite sampajānakārī
hoti, saṅghāṭi-patta-cīvara-dhāraṇe sampajānakārī hoti, asite pīte
khāyite sāyite sampajānakārī hoti, uccāra-passāva-kamme sampajānakārī
hoti, gate ṭhite nisinne sutte jāgarite bhāsite tuṇhībhāve sampajānakārī
hoti. 


C. Section on sampajañña

Furthermore,
bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, while approaching and while departing, acts with
sampajañña, while looking ahead and while looking around, he acts with
sampajañña, while bending and while stretching, he acts with sampajañña,
while wearing the robes and the upper robe and while carrying the bowl,
he acts with sampajañña, while eating, while drinking, while chewing,
while tasting, he acts with sampajañña, while attending to the business
of defecating and urinating, he acts with sampajañña, while walking,
while standing, while sitting, while sleeping, while being awake, while
talking and while being silent, he acts with sampajañña. 

Iti
ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī
viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati;
samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā
kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati;
‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti, yāvadeva
ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati, na ca kiñci
loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī
viharati. 



Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally, or he
dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells observing kāya
in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of
phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena
in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of
phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is present
in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells
detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a
bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya. 


மேலும்,பிக்குக்களுக்களே,ஒரு
பிக்கு, அணுகும் பொழுது மற்றும் விட்டு நீங்கும் பொழுது, sampajañña
நிரந்தரமான தீர்க்கமான உணருந்திறனுடன்  நுணுகிக்கண்டு  செயல் படுகிரார்,
முன் நோக்கி கவனித்துப் பார்க்கும் பொழுது மற்றும் எல்லாப் பக்கங்களிலும்
கவனித்துப் பார்க்கும் பொழுது,sampajañña நிரந்தரமான தீர்க்கமான
உணருந்திறனுடன்  நுணுகிக்கண்டு  செயல் படுகிரார், வளைக்கிற பொழுது  மற்றும்
நெட்டிமுறியும் பொழுது,sampajañña நிரந்தரமான தீர்க்கமான உணருந்திறனுடன் 
நுணுகிக்கண்டு  செயல் படுகிரார், பதவிக்குரிய நீண்ட மேலங்கி அணிந்து கொள்
பொழுது மற்றும் தளர்த்தியான மேலங்கி  மற்றும் ஐயக்கடிஞை எடுத்துச் செல்லும்
பொழுது,sampajañña நிரந்தரமான தீர்க்கமான உணருந்திறனுடன்  நுணுகிக்கண்டு 
செயல் படுகிரார், உண்ணும் பொழுது, குடிக்கும் பொழுது, மெல்லும் பொழுது,
சுவைக்கும் பொழுது,sampajañña நிரந்தரமான தீர்க்கமான உணருந்திறனுடன் 
நுணுகிக்கண்டு  செயல் படுகிரார், வண்டலகற்றும்  மற்றும் சிறுநீர் கழிக்கும்
பணி கவனிக்கும் பொழுது,sampajañña நிரந்தரமான தீர்க்கமான உணருந்திறனுடன் 
நுணுகிக்கண்டு  செயல் படுகிரார், நடந்து செல்கிறே பொழுது நின்று
கொண்டிருக்கிற பொழுது,
உட்கார்ந்திருக்கிற பொழுது, படுத்திருத்திருக்கிற
பொழுது, விழிதிருக்கிற பொழுது, உரையாடுகிற பொழுது, பேசாமலிருக்கிற பொழுது,
sampajañña நிரந்தரமான தீர்க்கமான உணருந்திறனுடன்  நுணுகிக்கண்டு  செயல்
படுகிரார்.

இவ்வாறு அவர் kāya in kāya உடல்/காயத்தை காயதுக்குள்
கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது காயத்தை காயதுக்கு வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம்
செய்கிரார், அல்லது காயத்தை காயதுக்கு உள்ளே மற்றும் வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம்
செய்கிரார்;புலன்களால் உணரத்தக்க எழுச்சி கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்,
மற்றும் புலன்களால் உணரத்தக்கதை கடந்துசெல்லுவதை கண்காணித்து வாசம்
செய்கிரார்; இல்லாவிடில் எச்சரிக்கையாயிருக்கிற உணர் உடனிருக்கிறதை,சும்மா
வெறும் ஓர்அளவு ஞானம் மற்றும் ஓர்அளவு paṭissati என எண்ணி பற்றறு வாசம்
செய்கிரார்.
D. Paṭikūlamanasikāra Pabba

Puna ca·paraṃ,
bhikkhave, bhikkhu imam·eva kāyaṃ, uddhaṃ pādatalā adho kesa·matthakā,
taca·pariyantaṃ pūraṃ nānappakārassa asucino paccavekkhati: ‘Atthi
imasmiṃ kāye kesā lomā nakhā dantā taco maṃsaṃ nhāru aṭṭhi aṭṭhimiñjaṃ
vakkaṃ hadayaṃ yakanaṃ kilomakaṃ pihakaṃ papphāsaṃ antaṃ antaguṇaṃ
udariyaṃ karīsaṃ pittaṃ semhaṃ pubbo lohitaṃ sedo medo assu vasā kheḷo
siṅghāṇikā lasikā muttaṃ’ ti. 


D. Section on Repulsiveness

Furthermore,
bhikkhus, a bhikkhu considers this very body, from the soles of the
feet up and from the hair on the head down, which is delimited by its
skin and full of various kinds of impurities: “In this kāya, there are
the hairs of the head, hairs of the body, nails, teeth, skin, flesh,
tendons, bones, bone marrow, kidneys, heart, liver, pleura, spleen,
lungs, intestines, mesentery, stomach with its contents, feces, bile,
phlegm, pus, blood, sweat, fat, tears, grease, saliva, nasal mucus,
synovial fluid and urine.” 

Seyyathāpi, bhikkhave, ubhatomukhā
putoḷi pūrā nānāvihitassa dhaññassa, seyyathidaṃ sālīnaṃ vīhīnaṃ
muggānaṃ māsānaṃ tilānaṃ taṇḍulānaṃ. Tamenaṃ cakkhumā puriso muñcitvā
paccavekkheyya: ‘Ime sālī ime vīhī, ime muggā, ime māsā, ime tilā, ime
taṇḍulā’ ti; evameva kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu imam·eva kāyaṃ, uddhaṃ
pādatalā adho kesa·matthakā, taca·pariyantaṃ pūraṃ nānappakārassa
asucino paccavekkhati: ‘Atthi imasmiṃ kāye kesā lomā nakhā dantā taco
maṃsaṃ nhāru aṭṭhi aṭṭhimiñjaṃ vakkaṃ hadayaṃ yakanaṃ kilomakaṃ pihakaṃ
papphāsaṃ antaṃ antaguṇaṃ udariyaṃ karīsaṃ pittaṃ semhaṃ pubbo lohitaṃ
sedo medo assu vasā kheḷo siṅghāṇikā lasikā muttaṃ’ ti. 

Just as if,
bhikkhus, there was a bag having two openings and filled with various
kinds of grain, such as hill-paddy, paddy, mung beans, cow-peas, sesame
seeds and husked rice. A man with good eyesight, having unfastened it,
would consider [its contents]: “This is hill-paddy, this is paddy, those
are mung beans, those are cow-peas, those are sesame seeds and this is
husked rice;” in the same way, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu considers this very
body, from the soles of the feet up and from the hair on the head down,
which is delimited by its skin and full of various kinds of impurities:
“In this kāya, there are the hairs of the head, hairs of the body,
nails, teeth, skin, flesh, tendons, bones, bone marrow, kidneys, heart,
liver, pleura, spleen, lungs, intestines, mesentery, stomach with its
contents, feces, bile, phlegm, pus, blood, sweat, fat, tears, grease,
saliva, nasal mucus, synovial fluid and urine.”


Iti
ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī
viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati;
samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā
kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati;
‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti, yāvadeva
ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati, na ca kiñci
loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī
viharati. 



Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally, or he
dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells observing kāya
in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of
phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena
in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of
phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is present
in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells
detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a
bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya. 


மேலும்,
பிக்குக்களுக்களே, ஒரு பிக்கு, இதே உடம்பில்,உச்சைந்தலை முடியிலிருந்து
கீழ்நோக்கி உள்ளங்கால் வரை, மெல்லிய தோல் மற்றும் பல்வேறு வகைப்பட்ட
அசுத்தம் நிறைந்த, ‘இந்த kāya, உடம்பு தலை முடி, உடம்புமுடி, நகம், பற்கள்,
மெல்லியல் தோல், தசை, தசை நாண், எலும்பு, எலும்புச்சோறு, சிறுநீரகம்,
இதயம், கல்லீரல்,மார்புவரி, மண்ணீரல், சுவாசப்பை,குடல், குடல்தாங்கி,
இரைப்பை அதனுடைய உள்ளடங்கல், மலம், பித்தநீர், கபம், சீழ், இரத்தம்,
வியர்வை, கொழுப்பு, கண்ணீர், மசகிடு, உமிழ்நீர், மூக்குச்சளி, உயவுநீர்மஞ்
சார்ந்த நீர்த்தன்மையுள்ள மற்றும் சிறுநீர் அதன் வரம்பிடலில் உள்ளது என
அறீவார்.

ஒருவேளை பிக்குக்களுக்களே,அங்கே ஒரு பை இரண்டு வாயில்கள்
உடையதாயிருப்பின், பல்வேறு  வகைப்பட்ட தானியம், குன்று நெல் பயிர், நெல்
பயிர், பச்சைப்பருப்பு, மாட்டு பட்டாணி, எள்ளு விதை, தொலியல். ஒரு மனிதன்
நல்ல பார்வையாற்றல் உடையவராயிருத்தல் கட்டு அவிழ்க்கப் பட்டவுடன் ஆழ்ந்து
ஆராய விரும்பி ,”இது குன்று நெல் பயிர்,நெல் பயிர், பச்சைப்பருப்பு, மாட்டு
பட்டாணி, எள்ளு விதை, தொலியல்என அறீவார்.” அதே போல்,  பிக்குக்களுக்களே,
ஒரு பிக்கு, இதே உடம்பில்,உச்சைந்தலை முடியிலிருந்து கீழ்நோக்கி உள்ளங்கால்
வரை, மெல்லிய தோல் மற்றும் பல்வேறு வகைப்பட்ட அசுத்தம் நிறைந்த, ‘இந்த
kāya, உடம்பு தலை முடி, உடம்புமுடி, நகம், பற்கள், மெல்லியல் தோல், தசை,
தசை நாண், எலும்பு, எலும்புச்சோறு, சிறுநீரகம், இதயம், கல்லீரல்,மார்புவரி,
மண்ணீரல், சுவாசப்பை,குடல், குடல்தாங்கி, இரைப்பை அதனுடைய உள்ளடங்கல்,
மலம், பித்தநீர், கபம், சீழ், இரத்தம், வியர்வை, கொழுப்பு, கண்ணீர்,
மசகிடு, உமிழ்நீர், மூக்குச்சளி, உயவுநீர்மஞ் சார்ந்த நீர்த்தன்மையுள்ள
மற்றும் சிறுநீர் அதன் வரம்பிடலில் உள்ளது என அறீவார்.

இவ்வாறு அவர்
kāya in kāya உடல்/காயத்தை காயதுக்குள் கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது
காயத்தை காயதுக்கு வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது காயத்தை
காயதுக்கு உள்ளே மற்றும் வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்;புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்க எழுச்சி கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், மற்றும் புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்கதை கடந்துசெல்லுவதை கண்காணித்து வாசம் செய்கிரார்; இல்லாவிடில்
எச்சரிக்கையாயிருக்கிற உணர் உடனிருக்கிறதை,சும்மா வெறும் ஓர்அளவு ஞானம்
மற்றும் ஓர்அளவு paṭissati என எண்ணி பற்றறு வாசம் செய்கிரார்.

E. Dhātumanasikāra Pabba

Puna
ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu imam·eva kāyaṃ yathā·ṭhitaṃ
yathā·paṇihitaṃ dhātuso paccavekkhati: ‘Atthi imasmiṃ kāye pathavī·dhātu
āpo·dhātū tejo·dhātū vāyo·dhātū’ ti. 


E. Section on the Elements

Furthermore,
bhikkhus, a bhikkhu reflects on this very kāya, however it is placed,
however it is disposed: “In this kāya, there is the earth element, the
water element, the fire element and the air element.” 


Seyyathāpi,
bhikkhave, dakkho goghātako vā goghātak·antevāsī vā gāviṃ vadhitvā
catu·mahā·pathe bilaso vibhajitvā nisinno assa; evameva kho, bhikkhave,
bhikkhu imam·eva kāyaṃ yathā·ṭhitaṃ yathā·paṇihitaṃ dhātuso
paccavekkhati: ‘Atthi imasmiṃ kāye pathavī·dhātu āpo·dhātū tejo·dhātū
vāyo·dhātū’ ti. 

Just as, bhikkhus, a skillful butcher or a
butcher’s apprentice, having killed a cow, would sit at a crossroads
cutting it into pieces; in the same way, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu reflects on
this very kāya, however it is placed, however it is disposed: “In this
kāya, there is the earth element, the water element, the fire element
and the air element.”

 

Iti ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī
viharati, bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā
kāye kāyānupassī viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati,
vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī
vā kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā
hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati,
na ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye
kāyānupassī viharati. 



Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya
internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells
observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing
the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing
away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and
passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!”
sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere
paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the
world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya.

E. நாற்பெரும் பூதங்கள் மேலான பிரிவு
மேலும்,
பிக்குக்களுக்களே, ஒரு பிக்கு, எவ்வகையிலேனும் அதை வைத்திருந்த போதும்,
எவ்வகையிலேனும் அதை அப்புறப்படுத்த போதும், இந்த உடல்/காயம்  பிரதிபலிக்க 
இந்த :”உடல்/காயத்தில் ,நிலவுலகம் மெய்ம்மூலம், தண்ணீர் மெய்ம்மூலம்,
நெருப்பு மெய்ம்மூலம், காற்று மெய்ம்மூலம் இருக்கிறது.

சம்மதம்போலே,பிக்குக்களுக்களே, ஒரு பயிற்சி பெற்ற கசாப்புக்காரர் அல்லது ஒரு
கசாப்புக்காரரிடம் தொழில் பழகுநர்,ஒரு பசு கொல்லுஞ் செயல் உடையவராயிரருந்து,
ஒரு
குறுக்கு வீதி உட்கார்ந்து எப்படி வெட்டி எடுக்கப்பட்டதோ;  அதே போன்றே,
பிக்குக்களுக்களே, ஒரு பிக்கு, எவ்வகையிலேனும் அதை வைத்திருந்த போதும்,
எவ்வகையிலேனும் அதை அப்புறப்படுத்த போதும், இந்த உடல்/காயம்  பிரதிபலிக்க 
இந்த :”உடல்/காயத்தில் ,நிலவுலகம் மெய்ம்மூலம், தண்ணீர் மெய்ம்மூலம்,
நெருப்பு மெய்ம்மூலம், காற்று மெய்ம்மூலம் இருக்கிறது.

இவ்வாறு அவர்
kāya in kāya உடல்/காயத்தை காயதுக்குள் கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது
காயத்தை காயதுக்கு வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது காயத்தை
காயதுக்கு உள்ளே மற்றும் வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்;புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்க எழுச்சி கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், மற்றும் புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்கதை கடந்துசெல்லுவதை கண்காணித்து வாசம் செய்கிரார்; இல்லாவிடில்
எச்சரிக்கையாயிருக்கிற உணர் உடனிருக்கிறதை,சும்மா வெறும் ஓர்அளவு ஞானம்
மற்றும் ஓர்அளவு paṭissati என எண்ணி பற்றறு வாசம் செய்கிரார்.


F. Navasivathika Pabba

(1)
Puna
ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu seyyathāpi passeyya sarīraṃ sivathikāya
chaḍḍitaṃ ekāha·mataṃ vā dvīha·mataṃ vā tīha·mataṃ vā uddhumātakaṃ
vinīlakaṃ vipubbaka·jātaṃ, so imam·eva kāyaṃ upasaṃharati: ‘ayaṃ pi kho
kāyo evaṃ·dhammo evaṃ·bhāvī evaṃ·an·atīto’ ti. 

F. Section on the nine charnel grounds

(1)
Furthermore,
bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as if he was seeing a dead body, cast away in
a charnel ground, one day dead, or two days dead or three days dead,
swollen, bluish and festering, he considers this very kāya: “This kāya
also is of such a nature, it is going to become like this, and is not
free from such a condition.” 


Iti ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī
viharati, bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā
kāye kāyānupassī viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati,
vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī
vā kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā
hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati,
na ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye
kāyānupassī viharati. 



Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya
internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells
observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing
the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing
away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and
passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!”
sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere
paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the
world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya.

F. ஒன்பது இடுகாடு நிலத்தளங்கள் மேலான பிரிவு

மேலும், பிக்குக்களுக்களே, ஒரு பிக்கு, ஒருவேளை அவர் தொலைவான இடத்தில்  ஒரு பிரேதம் இடுகாடு நிலத்தளத்தில் எறியப்பட்டு
இருப்பதைப்
பார்த்துக் கொண்டிருஇந்தால், ஒரு நாள் இறந்த, அல்லது இரண்டு நாட்கள்
இறந்த, அல்லது மூன்று நாட்கள் இறந்த, வீங்கிய, சற்றே நீலமான மற்றும்
புரைத்துச் சீக்கொண்ட நிலையில், அவர் இந்த மெய்ம்மூலமான kāya  உடல்/காய
ஆழ்ந்து ஆராய: “இந்த kāya  உடல்/காய கூட அவ்வகைப்பட்ட ஒரு இயற்கை ஆற்றல்
உடையதாக இருக்கிறது, அதுவும் இப்படி  ஆகத்தொடங்கு போக இருக்கிறது, மற்றும்
அத்தகைய ஒரு  கட்டுப்பாட்டு வரம்புகளற்ற
நிலைமை இருந்து  வேறல்ல.

இவ்வாறு
அவர் kāya in kāya உடல்/காயத்தை காயதுக்குள் கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்,
அல்லது காயத்தை காயதுக்கு வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது காயத்தை
காயதுக்கு உள்ளே மற்றும் வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்;புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்க எழுச்சி கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், மற்றும் புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்கதை கடந்துசெல்லுவதை கண்காணித்து வாசம் செய்கிரார்; இல்லாவிடில்
எச்சரிக்கையாயிருக்கிற உணர் உடனிருக்கிறதை,சும்மா வெறும் ஓர்அளவு ஞானம்
மற்றும் ஓர்அளவு paṭissati என எண்ணி பற்றறு வாசம் செய்கிரார்.

(2)
Puna
ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu seyyathāpi passeyya sarīraṃ sivathikāya
chaḍḍitaṃ kākehi vā khajjamānaṃ kulalehi vā khajjamānaṃ gijjhehi vā
khajjamānaṃ kaṅkehi vā khajjamānaṃ sunakhehi vā khajjamānaṃ byagghehi vā
khajjamānaṃ dīpīhi vā khajjamānaṃ siṅgālehi vā khajjamānaṃ vividhehi vā
pāṇaka·jātehi khajjamānaṃ, so imam·eva kāyaṃ upasaṃharati: ‘ayaṃ pi kho
kāyo evaṃ·dhammo evaṃ·bhāvī evaṃ·an·atīto’ ti. 

(2)
Furthermore,
bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as if he was seeing a dead body, cast away in
a charnel ground, being eaten by crows, being eaten by hawks, being
eaten by vultures, being eaten by herons, being eaten by dogs, being
eaten by tigers, being eaten by panthers, being eaten by various kinds
of beings, he considers this very kāya: “This kāya also is of such a
nature, it is going to become like this, and is not free from such a
condition.”

Iti ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī
viharati, bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā
kāye kāyānupassī viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati,
vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī
vā kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā
hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati,
na ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye
kāyānupassī viharati. 



Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya
internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells
observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing
the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing
away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and
passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!”
sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere
paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the
world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya.
மேலும், பிக்குக்களுக்களே, ஒரு பிக்கு, ஒருவேளை அவர் தொலைவான இடத்தில்  ஒரு பிரேதம் இடுகாடு நிலத்தளத்தில் எறியப்பட்டு
இருப்பதைப்
பார்த்துக் கொண்டிருந்தால்,காகங்களால் தின்னப்பட்டு, பருந்துகளால்
தின்னப்பட்டு, பிணந்தின்னிக் கழுகுகளால் தின்னப்பட்டு, நாரைகளால்
தின்னப்பட்டு, நாய்களால் தின்னப்பட்டு, புலிகளால் தின்னப்பட்டு,
சிறுத்தைகளால் தின்னப்பட்டு, பல்வேறு வகைப்பட்ட அசரீரிவஸ்துக்களால்
தின்னப்பட்டு, அவர் இந்த மெய்ம்மூலமான kāya  உடல்/காய ஆழ்ந்து ஆராய: “இந்த
kāya  உடல்/காய கூட அவ்வகைப்பட்ட ஒரு இயற்கை ஆற்றல் உடையதாக இருக்கிறது,
அதுவும் இப்படி  ஆகத்தொடங்கு போக இருக்கிறது, மற்றும் அத்தகைய ஒரு 
கட்டுப்பாட்டு வரம்புகளற்ற
நிலைமை இருந்து  வேறல்ல.

இவ்வாறு
அவர் kāya in kāya உடல்/காயத்தை காயதுக்குள் கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்,
அல்லது காயத்தை காயதுக்கு வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது காயத்தை
காயதுக்கு உள்ளே மற்றும் வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்;புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்க எழுச்சி கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், மற்றும் புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்கதை கடந்துசெல்லுவதை கண்காணித்து வாசம் செய்கிரார்; இல்லாவிடில்
எச்சரிக்கையாயிருக்கிற உணர் உடனிருக்கிறதை,சும்மா வெறும் ஓர்அளவு ஞானம்
மற்றும் ஓர்அளவு paṭissati என எண்ணி பற்றறு வாசம் செய்கிரார்.

(3)
Puna
ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu seyyathāpi passeyya sarīraṃ sivathikāya
chaḍḍitaṃ aṭṭhika·saṅkhalikaṃ sa·maṃsa·lohitaṃ nhāru·sambandhaṃ, so
imam·eva kāyaṃ upasaṃharati: ‘ayaṃ pi kho kāyo evaṃ·dhammo evaṃ·bhāvī
evaṃ·an·atīto’ ti. 

(3)
Furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as
if he was seeing a dead body, cast away in a charnel ground, a
squeleton with flesh and blood, held together by tendons, he considers
this very kāya: “This kāya also is of such a nature, it is going to
become like this, and is not free from such a condition.”


Iti
ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī
viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati;
samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā
kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati;
‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti, yāvadeva
ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati, na ca kiñci
loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī
viharati. 



Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally, or he
dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells observing kāya
in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of
phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena
in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of
phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is present
in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells
detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a
bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya.

மேலும், பிக்குக்களுக்களே, ஒரு பிக்கு, ஒருவேளை அவர் தொலைவான இடத்தில்  ஒரு பிரேதம் இடுகாடு நிலத்தளத்தில் எறியப்பட்டு
இருப்பதைப்
பார்த்துக் கொண்டிருந்தால், ஒரு மனித  எலும்புக் கூடு தசை மற்றும்
இரத்தத்துடன்,நரம்புகளால்  ஒன்றாய் பிடிக்கப்பட்டு,அவர் இந்த மெய்ம்மூலமான
kāya  உடல்/காய ஆழ்ந்து ஆராய: “இந்த kāya  உடல்/காய கூட அவ்வகைப்பட்ட ஒரு
இயற்கை ஆற்றல் உடையதாக இருக்கிறது, அதுவும் இப்படி  ஆகத்தொடங்கு போக
இருக்கிறது, மற்றும் அத்தகைய ஒரு  கட்டுப்பாட்டு வரம்புகளற்ற
நிலைமை இருந்து  வேறல்ல.

இவ்வாறு
அவர் kāya in kāya உடல்/காயத்தை காயதுக்குள் கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்,
அல்லது காயத்தை காயதுக்கு வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது காயத்தை
காயதுக்கு உள்ளே மற்றும் வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்;புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்க எழுச்சி கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், மற்றும் புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்கதை கடந்துசெல்லுவதை கண்காணித்து வாசம் செய்கிரார்; இல்லாவிடில்
எச்சரிக்கையாயிருக்கிற உணர் உடனிருக்கிறதை,சும்மா வெறும் ஓர்அளவு ஞானம்
மற்றும் ஓர்அளவு paṭissati என எண்ணி பற்றறு வாசம் செய்கிரார்.

(4)
Puna
ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu seyyathāpi passeyya sarīraṃ sivathikāya
chaḍḍitaṃ aṭṭhika·saṅkhalikaṃ ni·maṃsa·lohita·makkhitaṃ
nhāru·sambandhaṃ, so imam·eva kāyaṃ upasaṃharati: ‘ayaṃ pi kho kāyo
evaṃ·dhammo evaṃ·bhāvī evaṃ·an·atīto’ ti. 

(4)
Furthermore,
bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as if he was seeing a dead body, cast away in a
charnel ground, a squeleton without flesh and smeared with blood, held
together by tendons, he considers this very kāya: “This kāya also is of
such a nature, it is going to become like this, and is not free from
such a condition.” 

Iti ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati,
bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā kāye
kāyānupassī viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati,
vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī
vā kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā
hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati,
na ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye
kāyānupassī viharati. 



Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya
internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells
observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing
the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing
away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and
passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!”
sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere
paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the
world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya.
மேலும், பிக்குக்களுக்களே, ஒரு பிக்கு, ஒருவேளை அவர் தொலைவான இடத்தில்  ஒரு பிரேதம் இடுகாடு நிலத்தளத்தில் எறியப்பட்டு
இருப்பதைப் பார்த்துக் கொண்டிருந்தால், ஒரு மனித  எலும்புக் கூடு தசைகளில்லாமல் மற்றும் இரத்தம் பூசப்பட்டு,
நரம்புகளால் 
ஒன்றாய் பிடிக்கப்பட்டு,அவர் இந்த மெய்ம்மூலமான kāya  உடல்/காய ஆழ்ந்து
ஆராய: “இந்த kāya  உடல்/காய கூட அவ்வகைப்பட்ட ஒரு இயற்கை ஆற்றல் உடையதாக
இருக்கிறது, அதுவும் இப்படி  ஆகத்தொடங்கு போக இருக்கிறது, மற்றும் அத்தகைய
ஒரு  கட்டுப்பாட்டு வரம்புகளற்ற
நிலைமை இருந்து  வேறல்ல.

இவ்வாறு
அவர் kāya in kāya உடல்/காயத்தை காயதுக்குள் கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்,
அல்லது காயத்தை காயதுக்கு வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது காயத்தை
காயதுக்கு உள்ளே மற்றும் வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்;புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்க எழுச்சி கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், மற்றும் புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்கதை கடந்துசெல்லுவதை கண்காணித்து வாசம் செய்கிரார்; இல்லாவிடில்
எச்சரிக்கையாயிருக்கிற உணர் உடனிருக்கிறதை,சும்மா வெறும் ஓர்அளவு ஞானம்
மற்றும் ஓர்அளவு paṭissati என எண்ணி பற்றறு வாசம் செய்கிரார்.

(5)
Puna
ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu seyyathāpi passeyya sarīraṃ sivathikāya
chaḍḍitaṃ aṭṭhika·saṅkhalikaṃ apagata·maṃsa·lohitaṃ nhāru·sambandhaṃ, so
imam·eva kāyaṃ upasaṃharati: ‘ayaṃ pi kho kāyo evaṃ·dhammo evaṃ·bhāvī
evaṃ·an·atīto’ ti. 

(5)
Furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as
if he was seeing a dead body, cast away in a charnel ground, a
squeleton without flesh nor blood, held together by tendons, he
considers this very kāya: “This kāya also is of such a nature, it is
going to become like this, and is not free from such a condition.” 

Iti
ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī
viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati;
samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā
kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati;
‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti, yāvadeva
ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati, na ca kiñci
loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī
viharati. 



Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya internally, or he
dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells observing kāya
in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing the samudaya of
phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing away of phenomena
in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and passing away of
phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!” sati is present
in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere paṭissati, he dwells
detached, and does not cling to anything in the world. Thus, bhikkhus, a
bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya. 

மேலும், பிக்குக்களுக்களே, ஒரு பிக்கு, ஒருவேளை அவர் தொலைவான இடத்தில்  ஒரு பிரேதம் இடுகாடு நிலத்தளத்தில் எறியப்பட்டு
இருப்பதைப் பார்த்துக் கொண்டிருந்தால், ஒரு மனித  எலும்புக் கூடு தசைகளில்லாமல் மற்றும் இரத்தம்  இல்லாமல்,
நரம்புகளால் 
ஒன்றாய் பிடிக்கப்பட்டு,அவர் இந்த மெய்ம்மூலமான kāya  உடல்/காய ஆழ்ந்து
ஆராய: “இந்த kāya  உடல்/காய கூட அவ்வகைப்பட்ட ஒரு இயற்கை ஆற்றல் உடையதாக
இருக்கிறது, அதுவும் இப்படி  ஆகத்தொடங்கு போக இருக்கிறது, மற்றும் அத்தகைய
ஒரு  கட்டுப்பாட்டு வரம்புகளற்ற
நிலைமை இருந்து  வேறல்ல.

இவ்வாறு
அவர் kāya in kāya உடல்/காயத்தை காயதுக்குள் கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்,
அல்லது காயத்தை காயதுக்கு வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது காயத்தை
காயதுக்கு உள்ளே மற்றும் வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்;புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்க எழுச்சி கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், மற்றும் புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்கதை கடந்துசெல்லுவதை கண்காணித்து வாசம் செய்கிரார்; இல்லாவிடில்
எச்சரிக்கையாயிருக்கிற உணர் உடனிருக்கிறதை,சும்மா வெறும் ஓர்அளவு ஞானம்
மற்றும் ஓர்அளவு paṭissati என எண்ணி பற்றறு வாசம் செய்கிரார்.


(6)
Puna
ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu seyyathāpi passeyya sarīraṃ sivathikāya
chaḍḍitaṃ aṭṭhikāni apagata·sambandhāni disā vidisā vikkhittāni, aññena
hatth·aṭṭhikaṃ aññena pād·aṭṭhikaṃ aññena gopphak·aṭṭhikaṃ aññena
jaṅgh·aṭṭhikaṃ aññena ūru·ṭṭhikaṃ aññena kaṭi·ṭṭhikaṃ aññena
phāsuk·aṭṭhikaṃ aññena piṭṭh·iṭṭhikaṃ aññena khandh·aṭṭhikaṃ aññena
gīv·aṭṭhikaṃ aññena hanuk·aṭṭhikaṃ aññena dant·aṭṭhikaṃ aññena
sīsakaṭāhaṃ, so imam·eva kāyaṃ upasaṃharati: ‘ayaṃ pi kho kāyo
evaṃ·dhammo evaṃ·bhāvī evaṃ·an·atīto’ ti. 

(6)
Furthermore,
bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as if he was seeing a dead body, cast away in a
charnel ground, disconnected bones scattered here and there, here a
hand bone, there a foot bone, here an ankle bone, there a shin bone,
here a thigh bone, there a hip bone, here a rib, there a back bone, here
a spine bone, there a neck bone, here a jaw bone, there a tooth bone,
or there the skull, he considers this very kāya: “This kāya also is of
such a nature, it is going to become like this, and is not free from
such a condition.” 

Iti ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati,
bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā kāye
kāyānupassī viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati,
vaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kāyasmiṃ viharati, samudaya-vaya-dhamm·ānupassī
vā kāyasmiṃ viharati; ‘atthi kāyo’ ti vā pan·assa sati paccupaṭṭhitā
hoti, yāvadeva ñāṇa·mattāya paṭissati·mattāya,{1} a·nissito ca viharati,
na ca kiñci loke upādiyati. Evam·pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye
kāyānupassī viharati. 



Thus he dwells observing kāya in kāya
internally, or he dwells observing kāya in kāya externally, or he dwells
observing kāya in kāya internally and externally; he dwells observing
the samudaya of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the passing
away of phenomena in kāya, or he dwells observing the samudaya and
passing away of phenomena in kāya; or else, [realizing:] “this is kāya!”
sati is present in him, just to the extent of mere ñāṇa and mere
paṭissati, he dwells detached, and does not cling to anything in the
world. Thus, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells observing kāya in kāya.

மேலும், பிக்குக்களுக்களே, ஒரு பிக்கு, ஒருவேளை அவர் தொலைவான இடத்தில்  ஒரு பிரேதம் இடுகாடு நிலத்தளத்தில் எறியப்பட்டு
இருப்பதைப்
பார்த்துக் கொண்டிருந்தால், கழற்றபட்ட எலும்புகள் அங்குமிங்குமா சிதறலான,
இங்கே ஒரு கை எலும்பு, அங்கே ஒரு கால் எலும்பு, இங்கே ஒரு கணுக்கால்
எலும்பு, அங்கே ஒரு முழந்தாள் எலும்பு, இங்கே ஒரு தொடை எலும்பு, அங்கே ஒரு
இடுப்பு எலும்பு, இங்கே ஒரு தொடை எலும்பு, அங்கே ஒரு விலா எலும்பு, இங்கே
ஒரு தொடை எலும்பு, அங்கே ஒரு முதுகு எலும்பு, இங்கே ஒரு தண்டெலும்பு, அங்கே
ஒரு கழுத்து எலும்பு, இங்கே ஒரு தாடை எலும்பு, அங்கே ஒரு பல் எலும்பு,
அல்லது அங்கே ஒரு மண்டை ஓடு என அவர் இந்த மெய்ம்மூலமான kāya  உடல்/காய
ஆழ்ந்து ஆராய: “இந்த kāya  உடல்/காய கூட அவ்வகைப்பட்ட ஒரு இயற்கை ஆற்றல்
உடையதாக இருக்கிறது, அதுவும் இப்படி  ஆகத்தொடங்கு போக இருக்கிறது, மற்றும்
அத்தகைய ஒரு  கட்டுப்பாட்டு வரம்புகளற்ற நிலைமை இருந்து  வேறல்ல.

இவ்வாறு
அவர் kāya in kāya உடல்/காயத்தை காயதுக்குள் கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்,
அல்லது காயத்தை காயதுக்கு வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், அல்லது காயத்தை
காயதுக்கு உள்ளே மற்றும் வெளியே கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார்;புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்க எழுச்சி கண்காணி வாசம் செய்கிரார், மற்றும் புலன்களால்
உணரத்தக்கதை கடந்துசெல்லுவதை கண்காணித்து வாசம் செய்கிரார்; இல்லாவிடில்
எச்சரிக்கையாயிருக்கிற உணர் உடனிருக்கிறதை,சும்மா வெறும் ஓர்அளவு ஞானம்
மற்றும் ஓர்அளவு paṭissati என எண்ணி பற்றறு வாசம் செய்கிரார்.



(7)
Puna
ca·paraṃ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu seyyathāpi passeyya sarīraṃ sivathikāya
chaḍḍitaṃ aṭṭhikāni setāni saṅkha·vaṇṇa·paṭibhāgāni, so imam·eva kāyaṃ
upasaṃharati: ‘ayaṃ pi kho kāyo evaṃ·dhammo evaṃ·bhāvī evaṃ·an·atīto’
ti. 

(7)
Furthermore, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu, just as if he was
seeing a dead body, cast away in a charnel ground, the bones whitened
like a seashell, he considers this very kāya: “This kāya also is of such
a nature, it is going to become like this, and is not free from such a
condition.” 

Iti ajjhattaṃ vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati, bahiddhā vā
kāye kāyānupassī viharati, ajjhatta-bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī
viharati; samudaya-dhamm·ānupassī vā kā


comments (0)